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THIEF RIVER (FALLS 



Tide:' ' v ' '! ' ' 

(Thief River Falls) TRIBUNE 



21:89 



22:41 



Inclusive 
Dat js: 



Jan ■ 6 . 



1922 



Dec 27'' 



1922 



Originals held by: MHS Jj. Other 



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21 — 10-1982 



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Oct 1, 1982 



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No: 89 



s ^fay To ^ddress 
Farm Schools 

Meeting Here Next Friday and 

at Goodridge Saturday to 

Be Interesting 



J* 



Halvorson to 



Present to Farm- 



ers Reso.ution Fixing 



Price 



of Wheat 



the fanner will 
Parm Managem 



Ex-Senator Gronna 
§peaks|For Farmer 



Asserts That it is- Time Bi£ 

Business; Gave Thought 

to Agriculture 



Many topics >f special interest to 






'Twice-a-Week Tribune 
Is First With the News 



TfrlEF RIVER FALLS; MINNESOTA^ FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 19jf2 



;! $2 A YEAR IN ADVANCE 



Says North Dakota will Adopt 

Reasonable System of 

. Credit Relief • 



be discussed at the 

__ „ — .ait schools, held in 

Thief River Fal.s on Friday Jan. 13 
and' Goodridge Jan. 14. Wm. L; Cav- 
crt Farm Management demonstrator 
for the University of Minnesota will 
talk on -the busness side of fanning, 
emphasizing the keeping of records, 
milk testing associations, more eco- 
" ; and factors entering 
I placing farm produce 



» PENNINGTON WILL HELP * 

* Heart-rending stories of famine * 

* and misery in Russia have come * 
» to The Tribune from heads of the * 
» relief associations, and so acute ..* 

* and terrible arei'conditions in that * 

* plague stricken' land that Gov..* 

* Preus has issued a special appeal * 
» for aid. This county has never. * 

* faHed to respond in any good * 

* cause— it will not fail now. , * 



SHANAHAN'S GROCERY 



I 



nomical feeding 
into the ;cost of 
on the market. 

J. H. Hay deputy commissioner of 
agriculture will address the farmers 
at both ; Thief Eiver and Goodridge 
Mr. Hay has >een very active the 
past months' ii assisting dairy; -sec 
tions organize co-operative cream 
eries and -testing associations. Hisj 
talk will, be of great interest 'to, 
everyone in Peinington county ] 

Mr. G. Halvjrson of Thief River 
Falls hVs a resolution regarding the 
fixing of prices on farm produce 
which he wishjes "to explain to the 
farmers of the iounty. Mr. Halvorsen 
• believes 'that the present low market 
on wheat, corn and -cotton can be 
remedied by a guaranteed price on 
! this produce wiich will have a tend- 
ency to stabilize the prices of other 
products marketed by the American 
farmer. 



Peterson Again 
Board Chairman 



Much Routine Business by 
County Commissioners at 
January Meeting '; 



as well as the small farmers. Wlat 
is needed is a system of relief trat 
will give relief, to . the smalffarjn 
er-of forty or. eighty acres as well 
the big farmer. 

"North Dakota today is in as gejod 
a financial condition as 'any state, 
not excepting Minn esota i and l y,c "l lld 
like to have the truth known; as 
there has beien so .much advejrse 
criticism. 



County "Printing Awarded to 
Times— Tribune Also to 



Print 



Proceedings 



New Establishment to Open 
1 Wednesday 

F. M. Shanahan informs the Tri- 
bune that h e will open his new groc- 
ery at 105 East 3d. street, in the form- 
er quarters of the Laird Specialty 
Shop, on Wednesday of next week 
The place has been entirely remodel- 
led and new fixtures installed. The 
fixtures, which are imitation birch, 
were manufactured in this city by the 
Northern Woodwork Co., are of artis- 
tic design and may be said to be a 
credit to the manufacturers. New 
counters, refrigerator, show, cases, 
etc., are in place and the interior of 
the store presents a neat and showy 
appearance. - 

The opening announcement will ap- 
pear in Tuesday's issue of the: Tri- 
bune, when Mr; Shanahan promises to 
have something of interest, to say to 



Ex-Senator Gronna, than whom tie 
farmers had no better friend in- tlie 
senate of the United States, spoke at 
the recent session of the joint con- 
gressional committee on rural credits, 
as follows: | . 

"You' business men and merchan ;s 
say'you' a/e opposed to Socialism aid 
government ownership. Unless the 
business interests are willing to dell 
with the basic industry of the ni- 
tiori, the farmers,"* one scarcely can 
blame them for grasping at any 
stray? to betterV conditions," A. J. 
Gronna. of Lakota, North Dakota 
former United tates senator, \ said 
directing his words to the bankers aid 
business men;' He termed preseit 
conditions a world crisis, not a pan c. 

Senator Gronna spoke just > fo £ ' ^V^cTSe" city and c'ountry. 
the close of the two-day session >f e *"= v " I 

tKe joint Congressional committee on 
short time rural credits. . , 

"I believe that it is better for in- 
dividuals to co-operate and furnish 
proper relief for farmers than to ha.ve 
a state or a government autocra(y. 

I do not favor the South Dakota lajid , 

loan system,'^ Senator Gronna said. Dates Mentioned oet ^\part by 
"I believe that there should be aliin- 
it to the loans for the big farmers 



* BANK MEETINGS HELD 
Chas. Vorachek, of the Citizen's 
State bank, attended a meeting of the 
board, of directors of the Citizens 
State bank at Grygla Wednesday. No 
changes are recorded ini the .list of 
directors. He reports the 1 roads in ex- 
cellent) shape, making the drive to 
Grygliin less than an hour. Mr. 
Vorachek reports that no changes 
were made in the board ; membership, 
of the Citizens State at Hazel, at tl. 
directors meeting held last evening. 

MONEY READY FORJ INDIANS 

Red^ake Residents Will ^Receive 1 $100 
on January ' 25th . 

■! The act of congress dated Nov. 19, 
1921, provides for a one hundred dol- 
lar payment to Chippewa Indians of 
Minnesota. In compliance with this 
act and the instructions of the com- 
missioner of Indian affairs; t wilt dis- 
tribute checks to Indians under my 
jurisdiction on the following dates: 
Cloquet, January 3rd and 4th; Brook- 
scon, January 5th; Sawyer, January 
6th; Superior, January 7th; Nett Lake 
January 9th and 10th; Grand Marais, 
January. 12th; Grand Portage, Janu- 
ary 13th; Tower, January 16th; Red 
Lake, January 20th to' 25th; Cross 
Lake, January 26th and 27th. All 
adult Indians should be present. Geo. 
W. Cross, : superintendent. 



Accident Befalls 
David Evenson 



Left Arm Shattered by. Ac- 
cidental Discharge of 38 . 
Calibre 'Revolver 



:Dr.MiWto Speak 
vto Parent-Teachers 



'"The Child's Health" to be 

Topic at Next Meeting 

January 10th 



Bullet Removed by . Doctors 

After .Being Located by 

X-Ray Examination 



program of Music and! Sing- 
ing. Lunch Will Be Serv- 
ed. Everybody Invited 



January 23, 24, 25 
Next Market Day 



Merchants of 
River Falls 



Thief 



Credit Book for 1922 Now 
Process of Revision by 
Committee 



WX McKerrow, of 
FaVm Agency, Dead 

f : 

Wei Known Co-operative 
Manager Succumbs From 
Stomach Trouble . 



David Evenson, 16 year old son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Evenson, met 
with a painful accident Wednesday 
evening while enjoying a ski tour 
south. of the city.- "He was proceeding 
through the timber near the Sanitar- 
ium, when, spying a rabbit, he took 
a shot at the fleeing animal with a 
38 calibre revolver which 'he carried 
in his pocket. The second attempt fail- 
ed, and in breaking the weapon to as- 
certain the cause of trouble, the cart- 
ridge mysteriously exploded, the bul- 
let entering his left forearm .near the 
elbow. He walked as far as the Model 
laundry, when a driver picked him up 
and conveyed him to the' offices-of the 
Thief River Clinic. 

He was placed, on the operating 
table and' doctors Froelich and Fisher 
removed the bullet after' locating it 
by an X-ray examination near the el- 
bow joint. It was a painful ordeal 
which very luckily, according to the 
statement of the doctors, will leave 
no permanent bad results. Evenson 
is a senior in the high school. 

BOWLERS IN TOURNAMENT 



Popular Young Man Addres- 
sed Farmers of This Sec- 
tion^on Many Occasions 



' The Merchant's. association held a 
nuci.nu. : . business meeting ' Wednesday lafter- 

"I believe 1 that with the exepehencS. noon to cons ider several mattfers of 

.. . i ^ «. x. '-'•i' "f import a n t business, among-which w^s 

the continuance of the monthly Mar- 
ket ! Days. In accordance with |a res- 
olution passed at the December meet- 
ing, January 23, 24 and 25; weri fixed 
as the next Market Days. ' The merj 



The hoard of : county commission 
ers adjourned Wednesday to a later 
date this month to' be fixed by Coun- 
ty Auditor Anderson, after electing 
O. J. Peterson, chairman, and J. S. 
Roy, of St.' Hilaire, vice-chairman." 
The county pf'nting was awarded the 
Times : on ■ its hid of full maximum 

" rates, supplements of the statement 
and. tax listjto be furnished the 
Spectator atjSt. Hilaire, and the Ban- 
ner at Goodridge. All official coun-i 

' ty publications -will be published in the 

' Tribune as heretofore. The publica- 
tion of i the financial statement of the 
county [is expected to' take place next 
week. | ■ ' '■. | 

Several school petitions were con- 
sidered by the board and notice to 

■ freeholders w 11 be issued next week 
by Auditor Anderson in accordance 
with the acticn of, the board. Good 
ridge citizens appeared before the 
board in tax ibatement proceeding 



the state has had, through lack of 
credit, North Dakota will adopt 
more helpful and better system of 
farm relief sthan any state— and 
have no right to. speak for the 'pres 

ent North Dakota administration. I ag the next raarKet uay*. *»y •"-; 
believe that: the fetate will work out chants are busy this week with the: 
a system like the farm loan boAds' annna i inventories, but' preparations 
to'provide real relief for farmers. I -^ ^ un der.way next 'week for the 
want to say right here that I <¥ s ;.;bi g bargain days to come. '; j 
agree with E. G. Quamme, president The '^vision of the 1922 credit book 
of the Federal Land bank of 3t - ' caEQe' up for consideration and final 
Paul. J i action upon the "hew book jwill take 

I place within ten days, it wasj announc-- 
ed. Every householder's napie in the 



BASKET BALL THIS EVENINC- 



BIG 



SALE EVENT 



Z^ ^~ • ■ ; ™ -n„«Lo citv will appear in the new book and 
,.Game Ser.es onwards ca^wmpp the credit 

the Aud.tor.um ^ding f each individual is no small 

job— hence it is important that each 
merchant.do his part as quickly as 
possible. \ 



First of. Two 

at tfce 

When theJ"jumpoff" comes this eye 
ning at 8:30 o'clock in. the first C(Jn 
test of a two-game series between the 
well-known I Excelsior team and the 
Thief RiverFalls aggregation of star 
basketballers, local enthusiasts,' in (id 
dition td seeing our own champions in 
action, will have the privilege^ of vieV 
ing the 
grown famous 
ket ball 
brothers 



up quit* 
the east 
Hutton, 



ill nave me F 11 **"^*- rue woman a ciuu wiij. iivi. 

work of athletes that hi.ve |firs( . mee tj ng f the New . pfear 
mous at the "business of bis- Commer? i a i c l u b rooms, Mondj. 
' in the persons of the Loucien „ _* « .,.,.. i. mvL di\ 



"Quick Action Sale" Will Pro^e Ont- 
| let for Oen Mercantile 

What is tl ought will prove ti>be 
one of the Llggest Sale events ever 
offered by any Thief River Falls mer- 
cantile 1 establ shment will open Moin- 
day morning vhen the Oen Mercantile 
company, Thief- River Falls, oldest 
concern - doini a general department 
store business inaugurate their "Quijck 
Action 1 Sale," an event that it is be- 
lieved! will g) on record as the big- 
gest bargain ' giving event ever ljut 
on by! this w »lHmown concern. 

G. A. Darnell, of the sales serv ce 
department if Lindeke, Warner & 
Sons, iSt. Pail,, the largest wholesale 
dry goods distributors -of the Norl- 



and Leo Hutton, a brother of 

Se'fampus' "Red" Hutton, who built 

a! reputation for himself in 

a couple of seasons ago. Leo 

nunon, however, is in fair way 

duplicate the work of his older broth Uch , Hlstory 0I ule 1>11I ,„ esol 
er and right now is known as a fo*m- era y on of Womanls^club, Mrs. 
idable player and one whose to' 1 " 8 shaw; departments of work of 
and expert- work is extremely dicfi- _, ■ cl _^ — 4.;„„ n f Wnnnm'<! nl 
cult to overcome. . ,„• 

So far tliis season, Coach Connc Us 



t, u 4..,. .j . man's clubs, Mrs. E. M. Stanton; club 

team stands undefeated, and it 18 i everlt5| | leader, Mrs. John Cronkhite. 

thought that the two games scheduled , ■ ■ - .. 

for tonight and tomorrow wilUbe — -s — ==:^= 



j*- 



X^- 



west," is in Thief River Falls and 
in charge' of the sale. ' Dr. Darnell 
has years of experience back of him 
in sales conducting in various sections 
of the country. ' He has charge of ex- 
tensive adve rtising activities, where- 
'by ii^is plained to thoroughly cover 
thissection and a radius of about 50 
miles: He ii assisted by Haakon 01 
son, who formerly lived in this, city 
when j he wa:j connected with the Oen 
company. 



The employees of the First and 
People's State- bank were guests of 
Mr. and Mrs, H. S. Dahlen, 123 Mark 
ley Ave., N. at a five o'clock dinner 
party Mond ly evening. The hours 
following th£ dinner were spent soci- 
ally. 



f 



:?.,l 



about] the toughest of the season ind, 
the leant in general is prepared for | 
any form' of attack that may -he I. rot 
out by the Excelsior .five. That the, 
boys playing here tonight know has ket I 
ball is conceded and that they Jare 
out for scalps is another known fact. 
The game tonight is slated to c >m 
mence atj 8:16 o'clock at the Audi;or 
ium and ! the regular prices of admis 
sion will be charged, There .has heen 
ureat demand for tickets and it is he- 
Seved that one of the-tajgest crowds 
of the season will be outfto witness 
the .contest. 

KEAL JOB FOR DENTIST 

Chisholm jMerchant Swiped By Car 
! Crank^^- 

Hibbingi Minn., Jan. 4— Oscar Poh 
jonen %f Ohisholm is in the Rood hos 
pital hereiminus the whole of his up- 
per row of front teeth. Mr. Pohjpnen 
was cranking his' car preparatory to 
returning home after a visit when the 
crank balked and hit him in the 
mouth; ; . , 

Mr.iPohjonen bears his misfortune 
in good spirit. "I may he a patient of 
the dentists for the balance of my 
life." he says, "but I am. not goujg. to 
be discouraged." 



'■>' I 



WOMAN'S CLUB MEETiNG 



AT 



COMMERCIAL CLUB MCNDAY 

The Woman's club will holi their 
" iar at the 

, „ ldj.y Jan- 

Th'e following 

irogram 

W. W. 

by the 



W. A. ; McKerrow, manager of the 
Miri.,-t5ota Central Co-operative Com- 
mission.,, association, -long' a leader 
•in co-operative marketing activities 
among Minnesota farmers, died yes- 
terday at St. Joseph's hospital, St. 
Paul. ' He had been there only two 
days, suffering from an acute attack 
hf stomach trouble. He was -38 years 
old and! unmarried, a native .of Pe- 
waukee, :Wis.,- where live his parents, 
Mr. and 'Mrs. George McKerrow, and 
his brother, David.. 

Mr. McKerrow was I a graduate of 
the Uniyersity of Wisconsin and had 
been director of livestock extension 
work for th e . University of Minnesota 
nine years, going to the central selling 
agency on a leave of absence. Under 
his management it had done a ?5,- 
000 000 business in five months. He 
also' was secretary of the Minnesota 
Dairy council, the Minnesota Central 
Shippers association, and of the Min- 
nesota Livestock Breeders' associa- 
tion. ■ ' 

Mr. McKerrow was well known to 
men prominent in the co-operative 
field in the vicinity of Thief River 
Falls," having addressed farmer's 
gatherings in this city on "several oc- 
casions. ' 

WESTERN UNION EXTENDS HRS. 

Local Office to Keep Open Until 
i • Midnight 

u. - -_ iThe Western Union office in the 

Daniel Evelyn hotel building put a new 

onaw; uey<"""="-a «* "«•» ». Gener- j schedule into effect on January ,1st to 

al Federation of Woman's club and ; accommodate the public. In the fu- 

of the Minnesota Federation of Wo- ture the office will , be open from 8:15 

_.._.. , , ' , t 12:00 p. m., instead of clos- 



uary 9 at 3 o'clock. 



interesting: and instructive _ 
will be rendered: Solo, Mrs. 
Prichard, Jr^; Federation song. . 
club; .History of .General Federatipn 
- • - — — "■ Froeh- 
a Fed- 



of Woman's club, Mrs. H. W. 
lich; History of the Minnesol 



Pinmen to Compete for Ten Prizes 
Offered by Business Men 
What is thought will develop into 
one of the biggest bowling tourna- 
ments ever held in. Thief River Falls 
by enthusiasts of the ten-pin game, 
is scheduled for January 12, 13 and 
14, when bowlers of the city compete 
for ten prizes offered by local, busi- 
ness men. . 

The contests are to be hehTat- the 
Citizens Bowling alleys and all the 
meets will he two-men events. A play- 
er may enter as often as he desires 
providing he does not enter with the 
same man twice. No player can re- 
ceive more than two prizes, one cash 
and one other. 

Entree fee will be 75 cents per man, 
one-half of which will go to cash 
prizes, to be divided as follows: 30 per 
cent for first, 25 per cent for second, 
20 per cent for third, 15 per cent for 
fourth, 10 per cent for fifth. 

The other prizes will be as follows: 
The first winning team to take their 
choice' of prizes and other winners 
take choices according to standing: 

One strip of Christmas bacon do- 
nated bv Louis DeCremer. 

One-half cord of any kind of wood 
desired,. donated by City Dray & Fue^ 
Company. | " 

One pair of auto driving gloves, do- 
nated by E. O. lilogenson, clothier. 

One amber bakelite cigarette hold- 
er, donated by Lambert Drug store. 
One pair of ladies' silk hose, do- 
nated by.Sapero & Company. 

One 3-lh. can "of the best coffee, 
donated by Simonson Grocery com- 
pany. . ' , 

:Two No. 1 hair cuts, donated by 
Bacon & Crown, barbers. 

One carton cigarettes, 200, any 
brand. • 

One pound box of Garrott's candy, 
booby prize. 

There. are 21 teams entered to date. 
Entrees close Wednesday, January 11, 
at 9 o'clock p. m. Entrees to be made 
with secretary of the Bowling League. 



The next meeting of the Parent- 
Teachers association, will be held 
Tuesday evening, January 10, in the 
high school auditorium. . The program 
will start promptly at j eight o'clock. 
At the - close a light lunch will be 
served. : 

,'. More attention is and ought to be 
giyen today by schools throughout the 
country to the physical development 
and the health of" the child than has 1 
been common practise heretofore. .One 
of the very first requisites for a" use- 
ful and successful life is good health. 
It is fitting, therefore! that this ques- | 
tdon be given attention. by the par- 
ents and teachers of Thief River Falls. 
Consequently the (general theme of 
this program willj . be The Child's 
Health.. Master, Henry Arneson, ac- 
companied by hisi sister Eileen, will 
play a violin solo Kvhile a male quar- 
tette consisting of Doctor Nesse, Doc- 
tor Vistaunet, Mr. Simley, and Mr. 
Bennes, will appear, in one number. 
Superintendent Siinley will present 
some facts and figures in regard to 
the city schools which ought to prove 
of interest to every patron. Doctor 
Milan has kindly | consented to speak 
on "The Child's Health." Our school 
nurse, Miss Ruth Johnson, and our 



physical directors Mr. Stenhoff and 
Miss Baumann, will- speak briefly of 
the work done in| their departments. 

Better M^jket In 
Farm Loans Seen 



Former North 1 Dakota Govern- 
or Predicts Better Tone 
In Money Market/i 



With Liberty - Loans at Par 

Investors Will Look for 

Farm Security 



ing at six o'clock as heretofore. \ 



Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Axel Ander 
January 3, a girl. 



MAIL DELIVERED ONLY TO THE FELLOW NEXT DOOR 




L. B. Hanna, I former governor of 
North Dakota and. capitalist, declared 
in an interview thatj there is plenty . 
of money in the Uriited States, but 
that for some time H has 'been diffi- 
cult to obtain money for farm loans 
and rates have been high and are still 
high. • 

"I believe that with/ an easier money 
market and the j lowering in rates of 
interest on good 'securities that money 
before long .will begin to come to the 
northwest, for farm loans," said Mr. 
Hanna. 

'Money, like everything, else, na- 
turally seeks to secure as good a re- 
turn as possible and when high grade 
bonds and like securities are earning 
low rates of interest money will again 
flow into farm loans and then the 
competition for them will bring down 
the rates of interest. • 

•There has been a marked apprecia- 
tion recently in prices for United 
States government bonds, the Victory ■ 
bonds going to par and over and the 
other issues ruining close to par. 
These bonds- draw a low rate of inter- 
est as we have looked at interest rates 
for the last two or three years. Com- 
mercial paper of the higher class is 
floating today at a low rate of m- 

teresVand a fe T months ag0: 
rates on it were high. 

"All this shows that there is money 
for safe investment and. that people 
a-relwilVma-tp 5'n' 1 «?* &*'* ri ?» ey ' v ™?~ 
■ndtidi^ey.'betoa.'thaf the secunties 
yrhich. they, axe. buying -are • sale- and-. 
sounld.'''-'. 



HOME REMEDY FORCES 

AMPUTATION OF LEG 



Brookings, S..D-— As a resuffi of at- 
tempting to ren ove a bunion on his . 
fdot-by home remedies, Sebastian. 
iSehmitz'of'Est|line,,wafe obliged to 
have his right leg amputated at the 
knee. Infection set in following 
Schmitz's effort Ito remove the bunion 
yfhich later developed into gangrene. 
A part of his fcjot was first removed 
in! the hopes of saving his limb, but 
the disease was too far advanced and. 
... was found necessary to amputate 
his leg at "'the knee. 



Miss Maybelle Ostby returned Tues- 
day evening to Minneapolis |to resume 
her studies at I MacPhall school of 
Music and Darmitic Art., . after en- 
Joying a ten day vacation with her- 
parents, Mr.ani Mrs. O. D. Ostby. 







, \ 



KV 



Page/N 



o. 



The Tribune 

SEMI- WEEKLY. 



ESTABLISHED 1801. 



J. S. ARNES.ON 
S. Y. AHN^SON 



Published every Tuesday and Friday at 
Thlcjf Elver Fall,, Minn. 



Entered a I second class matter at the 



post office 
under the A 



iit Thief Elver Falls, Minn. 
:.t of March 3, 1879. 



SUBSCRIPTION J2.99 PER YEAR. 



Editor 
- Associate Editor 



=? 



PENROSED! 

.'The Thief Kiver Falls Tribune, 
edited by Jim Arnesdn, one of the ' 
biggest :ogs in the republican 
political machine, is out for Kel- 
logg foi . senator. This shows 
where -the old guard stands.— 
Fairmont Sentinel. 
Its a cruel world. Just as we im 
agined we were making headway as 
a reforme:-, along comes the Sentinel 
. and boots us into the Penrose column. 
Well, no natter, since we are in the 
"Boss" class, we have a job for Frank 
Day. If h°. will look around a little 
he 'will .-find himself in bed with un- 
desirable |:ompany, his old arch en- 
emy,- which he has kicked out of the 
house on several occasions, none other 
than— booze. If Mr. Day will furnish 
proof tha 1 ; this influence is not vic- 
iously op[ osing the 'junior senator 
from Min le'sota— then the Tribune 
■ will support th& canuidates of the 
democratic party in the coming cam- 
paign. _ 



PACKING HOUSE LABOR 
At trie present moment there 
are thousands of stockyards 
workers on strik*e as a protest 
-against a further reduction in 
.' wages. , The strikers claim, and 
rightly | so, that the cost of ^ liv- 
ing has not decreased sufficiently 
to warnnt wages being reduced. 
It cannot be denied . that the 
living conditions of the stockyards 
workers and their families are 

■ anythin; but • desirable. Back of 
the yards are dwelling places that 
Ogden Armour would not place 
his autc mobile in, much less shelt- 
er his norses. How long would 

' his daujgter, Mrs. J.. J. Mitchell, 
work in the stockyards 'for $15 
per weik standing in water all 
day. If it is not good enough for- 
her the: i why should other women 
and thear daughters be compelled 
to subn it to such intolerable con- 

, ditio'ns! 

The plea of the packers that 
they must reduce wages to bring 
business back to normal is 'bunk.' 
Let us examine the facts; 

The assets of Armour & Co. 
in 1920 were $500,000,000 and 
surplus $70,000,000. The gross 
sales vere about $1,000,000,000. 

■ The griss sales in 1919 were $1,- 
038,000 000. This'company is con- 
trolled by the Armour family. In* 

1910 thiy voted themsel-es a 400 
■per cent stock' dividend, raising 
the. capital from i^0,00l)',000 to 
$100,00 D,000. The company was 
. recap'it uizod. in AOiiO when a 50 
cent stock dividend was (le- 



per 
clarecl. 
Thej 
?15 pe;' 



according to official .state- 



ments, 



er $200,000jj00. Yet he has the 



gall tc 



day 

country 
oi ailov 
trol the 
try. 



Turn 
l'u.m y 
;u;ine t 
perou 

.Vviry. kl 

'■ til! 

by. am 
, stream, 
every 



■vcek, 
ith 



window 
with 
haunt e 
'vou lis 
•fled, s 
ipet .p; 



THE; WISE MR QUAMME 
"Too [much credit rather thai] a 
lack of it is responsible-, for the 
financial ills of northwestern 
farmers, according to E. G. 
Quamnie, president of the federal 
land bank of St. Paul, who testi- 
fied before the joint congressional 
commission on rural ■ credits at 
the hearing being concluded to day 
at the '■ state capitol. Mr. Quini- 
me spoke late yesterday and op- 
posed creating any new maciin- 
ery for extending credit. to farm- 
ers, who in many cases are^ lay- 
ing more interest now than i.hey 
can meet, he said. 

Federal land banks, Mr. Qvjam- 
me said, have loaned about ?! 60,- 
000,000 on farms, or one-eighth 
• the total amount loaned since the ■ 
system became effective. "It is 
a question," he said, "of how far - 
we want to go with the govern- 
ment in business. The War E-__ 
nance i corporation ds only ar in- 
flation to care for the situation 
which;. the Federal Reserve bank 
could inot meet., If this c -edit 
machinery is put on a permanent 
basis', ithe government faces '. luge 
losses. I believe the farmers. can 
be financed by private capit.il in 
the future." 

Senator Magnus Johnson said. I 
that .farmers have b'orrowe 1 to ' 
the limit and asked whether new 
machinery -to allow further loans 
is not imperatiyfe. "Farmers may 
need money," said Mr. Quarime, 
"but if they get it, you should not 
call it. credit, but charity." 
Have things come to such 1 pass, 
that an official of a governmen ; insti- 
tution can see no future financial re- 
lief for the farming industry except 
charity t 

Those are harsh words, Mr. 
me. . 

Such remarks do not squarje well 
with President Harding's ac ion 
calling a meeting at Washingtm this 
month' to make a survey of the situa- 
tion. • . ! 

The president must intend to. put 
the resources of the government be 
hind the relief measures adopt 2d. 
And why not? 

Unless the farming indus ry re- 
covers from its present stite of 
paralysis, ' which is general- in all 
parts of the country, ihe;e can never 
be business reviva' in any lint. 

Getting. agricultuie b„ck on its' feet 
isn't altogether a matter of tusiness 
either; it may prove ^o be just self- 
preservation. 

A recent survey shows .that a half 
million acres of farm land lied idle in 
the ! winter -wheat section. 

No one knows how many acres will 
be i&cropped. in the. spring wheat 
arev-but the amount will be £ s great 
if not greater' than in the: southern 
section.' 

' Under such circumstances a famine 
might easily occur in this cou ltry 
■ If such a calamity .should come, 
very little interest will attacl to' the 



there is again evident the now com"- j we begin to see the importance of 
mon tendertcy to bring about moral Ithis bill 1 just signed by .President 
reform by statute rather than byj a ! Harding.— ^Albert Lea .Times-Enter- 
quickening of the moral sense through ' prise. 

precept and example. The report de-l + -t; 1 

votes hundreds of words to depicting | The death of Senator 'Penrose re- 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUTE 



' . ..: -. f ■■; 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1922 



the terrible ruin wrought by jazz, and ^moves from the columns of the Fair- 
is satisfied with a pafagraph suggest- jmont Sentinel a prolific source of 
iiig that parents, churches! and schools editorial ianter. As the boogey man 



learn of the evil and act against jit. 
Nat a line, in the report before us em- 
phasizes the need of parents teaching 
their children the advantages, of mor- 
ality and high character in them- 
selves. In the final accounting the re- 
sponsibility does lie with the parents. 
If they teach their children good moiS 
als and clean living, and provide them 
with clean interests and .recreations, 
the jazz dance hall will not lure them 
to ruin and eventually will die of in- 
anition. 

But the-- Vigilance association over- 
looks this point inyjts eagerness ;for 
reform by force.- It-is^easier'and more 
spectacular to attack something_ 
against which ■ a prohibitory law may- 
be asked than to attack lazy, indif-' 
ferent, and incapable parents in their 
homes. , 

Perhaps the association is right. 
Perhaps eventually, with the aidj of 
Dr. Crafts and other associates) it 
will be able to remove' all evil and, all 
temptation from the 1 world by law. 
Then no- one can go to ruin, whether 
child or adult. There will be no deed 
even for parents, except to produce 
children. Parental instruction and 
home life can be eliminated except for 
the entertainment thjey afford, ; be- 
cause no rmoral principles will be nec- 
essary in a world in which no wrong 
can be done. 

• In the meantime it is our guess that 
parents can do more to keep their 
children decent than all the laws ever 
conceived by man and reformer. 

-^— ■ — ♦ ! 

SAVE BABIES AND MOTHERS 
President Harding has signed Ithe 
federal "Maternity, Bill" whfchj be- 
comes effective in Minnesota and five 
other states at orfce, owing to; the 
fact that the legislature of these ; six 



of the republican party, the Penn- 
sylvania senator has been meat and 
drink to- the democratic paragraphers 
—and Frank Day kept his name 
standing in every font of type in the 
Sentinel office. 



interested in the various breeds will 
be here for the show, and the combin- 
ation breed sales to. be held will be 
an attraction of considera'ble inter- 
est. ' Breeders who want to list ani- 
mals, in the sale are especially re- 
quested to notify the secretary . at 
once, of their consignments. 

The interest reported by the direct- 
ors at the meeting fully Indicates that 
at the winter show there will be one 
of the best annual livestock shows 
that has ever been staged in thee as- 
sociation. 



What a. howl has gone up in certain 
quarters over the Farm bloc in con- 
gress. Let the galled jades wince. 
If the bloc functions as well as we 
hope it does, the farmer's may take 
heart and get into politics,' local, state 
and national on a basis of helping 
themselves as' other blocs have, been 
doing for years and years. 



got 



STEENER 



By S. R. Rogers.; - lhas been. this 

J., A. Russell is-hauling gravel these ■ iRuth Solem 
days with one team. , I'Newf olden 

.Tver Wesby had his teaip shod at 
the Rogers blacksmith shop the past 
week. ■ 

Irvin Russell did business in Thief 
River Falls the first of the week. 
' There . are about 25 or SO teams 
hauling gravel from the Ole Berg pit 
at present, the hauling being good on 



Mr. Best and , Criss Berg' 
couple "of wolves last weelc. 

Nat and Arthur Muzzy are among 
the gravel haulers these days. 

Paul Koglin has been- driving a 
team on the gravel hadl for the Slacks 
while they are in. quarantine for small- 

P ox - ,'■' . ' * j i. 

A ; g'eneral good itime is reported by. 

the young people .of this part of the 
neighborhood, a party given by Brus- 
sels last Saturday, evening. A dandy ■ 
supper was served, k 

The snow that, fell Friday is get- 
ting pretty well heaped up. The hard ' 
Iwind that, night did the finishing 
4 \ touches, but sleighing is the best it 
"' winter. 

who is teaching near " 
home, for the holiday 
vacation. 

Amy Whitman who is teaching near 

Warren this year, came home last 

her parents, until after 



r- 



General. March says that a stand 
ing army of 200,000 -men is absolute _ 

ly necessary to the nation.. Natur- sleighs. It is .estimated the job will 
ally enough. A painter always- wants be finished in about _a week or ten 



to paint .your house, a tailor- 'will- tell 
you that you are in need of a suit 
and a florist likes 'you to "say it with 
flowers." . 

: ♦" : . . 

Army officers at Camp Travis, have 
placed the ban on freak haircuts and 
have put novelty patterns' for scalp 
adornments on the shelf, aspecially 
the "chill bowl" and. the "layback' 
variety. Now, altogether, boys. 

' : • 

Secretary 'JWeeks probably never 
made a dollar in his life that, entailed 
hard work, and he should be the last 
to raise his voice 'against the farm 
bloc in congress. ' 

-♦- 

BREEDERS PREPARE FOR SHpW 



days with the present weather and 
number of teams.. 

Rene Werner was a business caller 
in the county seat last week. \ 

Mable Rogers, who is teaching neai( 
Dayton, N. p., is home spending the 
holiday vacation. • ■• 

The Halquist boys from near Rose- 
wood are stopping in the Harvey Copp 
building while hauling gravel. .' 



.Livestock Producers Recommend Hav- 
ing Sales, Despite Low "Prices 

O. ; M. Kiser, secretary of the Red 
River Valley - Livestock : association, 
. , c """? :?£* reports that Northwestern Minnesota 
states had previously accepted : the hreeders are putting forth special ef- 
forts to make the February livestock 



THEO QUALE 

Lawyer 

Practice in all Courts and a 

fore D. S. Land Office 

McGinn Building 

THIEF BITOJt FALLS, JOK5(. 



do not know what $11 to 
week means, Ogdon Arm- 



Is estimated to be worth • 



such men asxQuamme. , The hike gov 
nment lossis he speaks of vill then 

assuredly take place— and . we will 

gladly part with the money. 
Kr. Quamme's "charity" will take 

an entirely different form., 
The toilers of the country fare gei 

ting -pretty sick of some of t le town 

talk they hear, 



terms of the bill in anticipation of 
its. passage. The states .are Dela- 
ware, New Hampshire, New Mexico,' 
Pennsylvania, •* South Dakota, and 
Minnesota. 

The passage .of this bill means 
much to the mothers of the, state' and 
nation. It has been backed by the 
League of Women Voters, the Child 
Welfare Association, Federated, Wom- 
ens Clubs and other women's organ- 
izations all over {he country for it is 
designed to safeguard mothers j and 



show at Crookston better than ever. 
A spirit of optimism prevails among 
them, as does the feeling that this 
is the time to encourage the desire for 
better livestock in the Red River Val- 
ley. .The directors, at their business 
session held ' Thursday, voiced the 
growing importance o'f the show to the 
livestock men of the northwest. Here 
they said, is gathered the best from 
this part of the state and. North Da- 
kota, and resulting from it are first, a 



expectant mothers through eduction- ; des - e for . better livestock , an d sec- 
al methods. iond, an opportunity at the sales to 

have the desire fulfilled. , 
It is expected "that extremely 

high averages will prevail at the sales 



CITY DRAY & FUEL COMPANY 
L. MANTHER, Manager. 

FUEL OF ALL KINDS . 

Phone 176. ' Thief River Fails; Minn. 



TH.IEF 



week to visit ! 
New Year. 

S. R. Rogers took a load of porfc 
to Thief River Falls last week, he 
says pork is way clown.. 



RIVER CLINIC 



DR. O. F. MELLBY 

Eye, Ear, Nbseland Throat ■• 
' j • - ' 

DR. H..W. FROEHLICH 
Surgery and Obstetrics 

DR. L. F. FISHER , 

Internal. Medicine and X-Ray 

j OFFICE 
CITIZENS BANK BUILDING 



Under the law the federal govern- 
ment will give to states the same 
amount as the state appropriates.. In 
other words, Uncle Sam- will match 
dollar for dollar. .-, 

' For the time being, only $10,000 
will be available -in Minnesota for 
carrying on the work, owing to tha 



"facts"' and "figures" submitted. by jfact that, the 1921 legislature failed 



reduce the -wages of men 
ho a i - e barely able to exist on 
what they are getting. The same 
could lie said of Swift's, as Swift 
is crecited with being worth over 
$150,000,000. 

The cc-ntents of the above communi- 
cation w 
-.Dispatch 

mellli 

bune, ai 

Word ar 

slave dv 

ers are 

fortune! 



VOTES FOR MEN 
It would be strange, wouldjl't.it, 
men had to struggle" to. get fnto the 
home, as women did to get out of it! 
Perhaps, after a long period W pion- 
eers an enlightened and - det ermined 
man will feel- a call to leadership. He 
will form clubs where men ,:an ( talk 
over their wrongs and tell t neir ex-- 
liich appeared in the St. Paul i periences trying to gain a focthold^n 
dovetails exactly with state- j the (home. One can picture u w, afte, 
rfrade repeatedly by ' the - Tri- \ a while, members of these cluts would 
1 this paper endorses every! decide to have a big campaign 
I syllable. Of ail the hellish- there would be speakers at the- street 
vers in this country the pack- ; corners and mass meetings, 
the most heartless. Their iday| when a great ynany mbn we.e 
were wrung from blood and ! a|ake to their wrongs, 
misery and human suffering and some! be a great parade.- 

'the Lord onlv knows when-t'msj jolne can see them, marchmj? /thous- 
oing to get dammed tiled! amis strong, wearing white .suits ana 
ing five big forturns* to con-! sashes of blue or yellow, -wlnl 
meat industry of this coun-jstW- along the curb, shoutfng 

. icduragii'-K words and cheering them 



there would 



' along. 



THE RUSSIAN THRONGS 



for a moment, 
nil" play or your 
ia£, through -ytuir 

vhueirfir" 



1 kinds of legends. 
Americans, ! Us Decide How We 
work, im-, "Japanese Men Cook, 
erican Men ? 



They, will have banner's, with 



ptri-et, pros- 



Shall 

Why 

"We Demand 



ft, .wWr'^-Vakllin the Home 
•,...* ••i»iir *. :.i:ii tan. r.omnoseu 



There will be 



u\ 6utci,eV-si«res"i;i!ed.^ilS-too, composed rf men already 



■.VoftMiw to e-it vo« beard! making occupations, 

coming again,' aa^h=W^g*^:ffi»" « h ^™ B m m ™ 
two or three thousand of thtap.h««"»hold tasks like mak n 
jelly, 1 or putting laundry to 



our. Imagine them pouring - 

week after Peeling potatoes.- 



past you', day after day, 



-New Republic, 



all tin 
monotony 



■drying footfalls, 



hours of the day, I 
broken only by the j 
vigorous or feeble,! 



THE JAZZ ROAD TO RUIN 
The Illinois Vigilance association, 



or the lihort light steps of children. If ; through its superintendent, Ithe 
all the, Russians .who are dying- from ' philip Yarrow, has" issued i prelim 
■humrer or disease that follows hung- , j na ry report on immorality in Chica 
er, this day and tomorrow and every -g 0j j n ^vnich it attributes the downfall 
day u'ifi.l spring, could file past yourj of j^ooo girls to the evil influence of 
your street would be filled • j nzz -j music ■ and improper 



like procession, and your soul 
1. by it. How many hours could 
:en to those uncountable muf- 
auffling footfalls, hinting at 
added with miserable rag! 



bare altogether, before you gave a 



good nany of your least necessary i^ave no doubt that jazz music in un- 



dollars 



toward helping to make themj^gtrjcted environment tends to stim 
rcsTfriquent?— The New Republic. .-[ u ] a tg improper dancing anl thereby 

" — : • - . . , quickens the steps of its de »otees to- \ 

Senator Kellogg is brie of the lead- ward downfall. To that extent.it is; 
'vi. TrJmbers-of the farm bloc in the evil and may properly be discouraged. 



senate. 



which it encourages, says th 
Tribpne. The association p 
crusade through the 
against such music and dai cing. 

There is something in whit the as- 
sociation says, but not. every :h;ng. We 



to make the necessary state- appro- 
priation. Undoubtedly the women of . 
our state will see to it that the. next 
session of the legislature .appropri- 
ates the much needed amount, 

We note in the Congressional Rec- 
ord, that during the debates in Con- 
gress over this bill, .statistics furnish- 
ed by Dr. Philip Van \ngen c-f the Co- 
lumbia university, showed that the 
maternal mortality ; in the - United 
States is the greatest of any country 
in the world. In 1918 ialone, we lost 
23,000 mothers in childbirth. Most 
of these deaths were preventable, 
says Dr. Van Ingen. Italy, Norway, 
Sweden, Prussia, Japan, Finland and 
Hungary have less than one-half the 
mortality of our- country. England, 
France, Australia, New Zealand, Ire- 
land have a little more than half as 
large while Scotland, Switzerland and 
Spain show about, eighty per cent of 
the mortality loss taking place in the 
United States.. • 

When we realize that the ., proper 
care and education could have saved 
the greater per cent of these mothers 



this winter, but this is not in the least 
cheapening flie importance of better 
livestock.' It is, rather, getting the 
industry on the basis where more 
can afford to becoml interested and 
more will be interested, in securing 
high class animals. This' is what 
should be done, and breeders are to 
be commended for their' sincere deter- 
mination, "by all means to have the 
sales." 

During the two-day sale, February 
8 and 9, no special effort \yill be made 
to have straight breed sales. In fact, 
with a two-day sale, it would be al : 
most impossible to expect that, any 
one day could be used for selling ani- 
mals in any particular breed. Men 



dte. Let 

Work," 

not, Am- 

a Place 

lections, 

n hbm'e- 

hous;keepers, 

oats will 

n simple 

r grape 

soak or 




v* 1 

„u ,-r -rUtM for CHI.fcHB9.T8aS 
SUMOKD I1KAND PILT.S|in BK» •■" 1 /A\ 
Gold' metallic boxes, aealed with BlueV^y- 
.Eibbon.; lAta no orncR. Bay cf r=»J \/ ' 
DrtiBKlii nod Bsk for Cni,.CUtS.T£B9 <f 
SffioSD nillMI rlJ.t.S, for twenty-Si*! 
years rccardi-d aa Befl-Safcst, Alwaya Reliable 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 
•S3£ .EVERYWHERE SgSBJ 




At The First National 



v 



i a new interest period began 
January 1st. B ut — there is 
a ten day leeway; if you op- 
en your savings account be- 
fore January lOthj your 

• money will draw interest 
from January 1st. 

Don't put it off tojo' long; 
come in now and start the 
new year right by opening 
your account in this strong 
national bank. . 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA 
DOUBLE your «avings---it CAN be done. 



Get a ^^g^SqWYoiu 

•25C. BOX. : "^-J8-a>rvjq.;5is 

LAMBERT'S DRUG STORE 




dancing; 

, > Chicago 

irposes li 

Morals court 



DR.SP0FF0RD 

Optometrist 

Will be at a 

HOTEL EVELYN. 

Thief River Fslls,Tues., 

January 10 ;h; 1922 



But ih the report of the sssociatien 



CARL B. LARSON 




LICENSED, EMBALM ER 
':'■ AND UNDERTAKER. 



Lersoa Furniture -Company. 



Phone 61 



Night Call 'I48 



CAH YOO NAKI TH£M 7 

|©IAR5PD0TOYT0H ©eUSSKWESSKESffi 

4® BusaBASH Bif.vain©.jflmflEHasAiinr 
|©siffi4wrraARlt. ©eEffiB0THftMsa« 

1® MACLQflHGBSLEfiD ^) IABY E0HrfiO? 
I© EST BUT SO PES ®Hffi£PETIAW 



/ 



FOR SALE! 



?\ 



^ Possesion Qan be 
given immediately 

Inquire Tribune 



(j 



'Cian 'You. Solve . This ! Puzzle? 

Here is 2 puzzle that everybody should try. The other night at the "Movies" the operator 
wanted to try anew "stunt," so he rearraoged r the naWe'5 of some of the famous actors and 
actresses and threw them on the screen like'yon see in'the picture.; Everybody had "j oad *" 
of fan-fiiruriDg out the correct names. See if you can do it yourself. ! No. I is Dorothy Dalton. 
If vou can solve them all you can win 51,090 or a Hupmobile. 

Though you probably know the names of all the popular actors and actresses we U name. 
a few of them just to refresh your" memory: - i *■" 

Mtfr MMm «iBt«r. Oeuol.. Falrbunlc^ Mary PiekfanJ, Ju«nlu sUnten. BiwUr KwUn, William 8. Hat% 
Cfar* Kimball Yo«no. Tom Mi«, Mahal Nwmand, Thomaa Mai a han. DouqIu UaaLun. Bryaflt Wailjbiim, 
CBrathy Oalion, Hawtd Uoy4 Pia^ White, JacUa Caegan, Clorla 8wan»n. . \ ' 

-.110 Points Will Win First Prize 



For «aeh •«««• vow can wranjia corractly ya^ will 
rceaiva 6va peinta or fifty poinla If you sotva than aiL 
You oan «arh 33 mora pointa by qualifyino vou* atv 
iwar. That ia, by p'rovino that you hava ahown a copy 
ef Tht St Paul Daily Nawa to fhra paepla. Tha final 
25 ptfliua will ba awarfad'by tha Judsea. who will b* 
thna mall-knawn St. Paul bualnaaa man. . 



Tha btat carract antwar Will bo awardad FIrit PHia 
and tha aacond baatxorract anawar Sacend Pria, *r.i 
«o forth. Jn eaaa of a Ua bath wirniara will ba aw^rJ- 
ad full amount al thajpriia. Sani) IivVour'aiW'tr 
TODAY am) a aampla of tha MP«r will ba «M yiu 
al one* to halp you qualify. 



IT COSTS YOU NOTHING TO TRY 

«r.-,^ wT luv. Blvw .way . snat ma.ylwMdMfwl «hli*fl> •»* m M. fc. th. n«t wlnni* If you mikI !- 

ffjSflC^lSfou «M w«T S.^- CJiy -t-^- "<-■■»• p-i— "-"ua r» ™^. no». 

R. C. WILLS, 94 E. Fburth St ST. PAUL, MINN. 





1' V 



/ 



„v- 



s 



s 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1922 



Bill! to 

IllsN 



(Congressman 



fcureFarrfi 

ow Drafted 

— ■">'. 

Anderson Say's 



Land 



sist 



Banks Will As- 
Farmers 



Putting Store and Farm on 



Equal' 



3asis Object of 
egislatipn . 



Legislation 
mi'i's' 'credit 



congressional 
cultural inquu'} 
ing an addre 



same benef i ; 
receive from 
tern. It will 
loan act by .,> 



bush ess 



no,t suffering as much from 
depression as some -other lines. "B 
ness failures in .the United. T' 
have amounted to $060,000,000," 
onel Wilkinson said. "We aren't 
so hard, and besides we have grejiter 
recuperating power, than business 

THE DEVIL'S DANCE 



aiming to solve the far- 
iroblem 



form has been worked out by 



Bertha Woman Asks Light ; pn Hijtch- 
J inson. Affair 

The alleged appearance of a devil 
with cloven hoofs, horns, fire and all 
the regulation accessories at Lake 
Marion dance pavilion near .Hutchin- 
son has been the'cause of much in- 
itiation. In addition to the ori 
account, the devil is receiving bac _ 
ve the far- &om othel . sources . Mrs . C . A. -Bart- 
permaneiit. Iett of Be]tha wag curious &s to 4 vhat 



T 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Pag4 Three 



Stites 



hit 



jn worked out by tnc,j the tnith of the affair was _ an n she 
joint committee on agn- wrote to A L; R i chaWson of Hfitch- 
ry, it developed follow- ,.„„.,;,i; n i. it. 



.,., .. __. jloped 

;s by Congressman Syd- 



inson regarding it. 
Mr. Richardson's letter is pullish- 



f^ ney -Andersor, chairman of the com- fid jn fte k att j e Lake Eevlew as fo i. 
,„;tt„» hpfnri thn Minnesota Farm ■ -. 



mittee, befoi^ ...^ - 
Bureau federation. Before leaving for 
Washington, JMr. Anderson told mem- 
bers of -the federation that_a bill had 
been prepare! by his committee and 
will be introduced in both houses of 
congress in : a few: days, along with 
a special- report from the committee 
on the subjejrt of' rural credits.' 
' The propos 



lows: ... . , 

- "Hutchinson, Minn., Nov. 16, ' (.921. 
"Mrs. C. L. Bartlett,! 

"Bertha; Minn. 
"Dear Madam: , 

"Your inquiry -about the Hutfchin- 

son 'Devil'' came t!o hand and I wi ling- 

,ly tell all I know about it. Of course 

■\— -"" ,„j„«„r,imuch that we hear about it is net de- 

;ed act, Mr Anderson ^ ^ wha( . . g fect js . lbout 

n civo the farmer the,. 1 , „ . 

here, 



saniraWiogive^the farmer the;-"^^- 



that businessmen nowi 



''Lake Marion ninepmiles from 
the federal reserve sys- 1 ^^ ^ a paviu has 

amend the fedeal &im. ^ ^ by the hotd for lanc . 

■ uun «... -, establishing a fami cred-. &r somfi time back 

its department in every federal land, fe - been ^ ^ a d£ 

bank. ThrcVh this department the . , mi]es around ^ 







iensen s January 




bank will di's count notes, the proceeds 
of which have been used for strictly 
agricultural purposes, and which are 
based on. assets such as igrain, live- 
stock or other products not to be mar- 

■ keted' immediately. - ; 

. Such loans now" may b e made by 
banks, but kre difficult to negotiate 
and must bf carried by the banks as «^«s 
a rule. Under the. proposed act the 
banks could rediscount them. Similar 
loans now j re being handled through 
the War Finance corporation as an 
emergency proposition, under the Kel- 
logg amend nent to that law. 

"What wt purpose," said Mr. An 
derson,."is [to- put into every federal 



aerson,. i= ™ v. - ," ,+„,„„! -thev say, horns, hoofs ana tan. ine 

land bank a farm credits < epartnient they sa y , Unstr A ments 

which will provide for making loans ^%^ d ,^ hands of the Slayers 
precisely adjusted to- agricultural de- flew from the han 



governmen 
ment purch 



I layers 
- ., „ - ■ , arid were splintered. Xurid ■ .lights 

mands. . , L-WioH tlic nlace and the devil janced 

at farm ;houses. Twenty-six cars were 



be not less 
. than three 
Anderson, 
provide mo 
debentures ....... 4 . 

ed by the farmers' obligations. 

In his address the other day, Mi 
Anderson urged farmers to "ganize 
thoroughly 



at .lam. r i.uua^. v - 

left standing by the pavilio i until 



rged farmers ."> meaiiuc .«- — = - f r "„ „_,.„ 

.so as to control the mar- daylight came and 1 the party 



thoroughly -so as to control tne mai- "«"£"• ~" - ~~ . u j b teepinfr ' 
keting of tU producta. He opposed and k pt thei^ r cou rag ^ £ y . 



price 'fixing or govern- 



stabilizing 
he said 



lases of farm :porducts for 
s the market. "Farmers," 
'have as much right to take 



close together and .got the cari • away. 



ize prices 
a practica 
out for 



"Many and varied stones are told 
about the details, but the aiov.e is 
generally told by all. If it was a hoax : 



oul iui i'e S uii."..o -o-- - 

duction according to the demand for 
farm products, eliminating market 
wrecking surpluses, farmers undoubt- 
edly would have ,the right to adopt it. 
"Better farm organization and more 
agricultural co-operation would do 
much to pjrevent such disastrous cqn- 
• ditions as face the farmers now. 

- Agricultural loans through the War 
Finance corporation were explained at 
the session by M. O. Grangaard of 
Rogers, N. D.,' secretary of the agn- 

' cultural lAan -committee for this dis- 
trict Mr Grangaard, himself both a 
farmer and a banker, answered a run- 
ning fire of- questions, many of which 
showed a feeling that the system is 
not benef ting farmers as much- as it 
'was inter (led. 

"Loans by the War- Finance corpor- 
ation," Mr. Grangaard explained, 
"help indirectly, but none the less 
definitely, every -person who borrows 
from' the bank. Perhaps the- very 
farmer wno complains that he can get 
no more money despite the govern- 
ment credit should be thanking the 
War Finance corporation that he is 
not required to liquidate on an old 
" note, or that he is able to renew a 
note. -With deposits falling, many 
banks are obliged to sustain the loans 
outstand ng with funds from the War 
Finance ;orporation. 

; "I she uld. hesitate to condemn a 
bank for making a loan,, nofv, .par- 
ticularly a loan to pay a debt to _a 
merchant or someone who has made 

- a profit J on the farmer. A bank should 
not be ekpectid to' assume ;an obliga- 
tion which a merchant,, with an equal 

" interest in the community, should car- 
ry until fall.. 

"But I do condemn a bank that, on 
feeling the pinch, calls in the notes 
: of the farmers without seeking the 
aid of the War Finance corporation 
to 'relies the situation. Such a bank 
declines a remedy that is at hand, and 



his family dare remain there. 

"If it -was the real devil, he .has 
hurt his 6wn business, for iaricing 
among :that class has ceased. It Has 
been a 1 real sensation, and I suppose 
has been widely advertise 1. The 
hardest people to convince that it was 
a hoax! are those who were there. 
"Yours very sincerely, 
' " A. L. Eicha rdson." 



back 
ss of 

uauwo jiu*v — '-■ — •• 

people for many miles around who at- 
tend Sunday affairs have attended: It 
has been : said, that these dances are 
rough and that some of the dancrs of; 
both sexes got drunk;. that tire i'ooms 
of the hotel are all engaged, i i .ad 
vance, and that the cottages arejbrok- 
en into and the rooms occupied py the 
velers. ; . , 

"On Sunday night, October 3D, last 
a dance was in progress there ind it 
is generally agreed that there .were, 
100 dancers on the floor, white the 
devil came and in their midst. Some 
claim that he came up through the 
floor, others that he came dowi from 
the roof.: He .was the regular jfellow, 
-they say, horns, hoofs and tail. The 



rallied 



LIKED THE SOLDIERS 

Girl Admits She's "Nut"' on Service 
Men. 

Helen Ferguson Drexler if Wau- 
kegan.illl., daughter of a Irooklyn, 
N Y family, who admits ihe is a 
"nut on soldiers and sailers, but 
don't like- marines," is in 2 cell at 
the county jail .trying, to recall the 
names, of eleven of her 15 Vusbands., 
Equipped with one baby and a 
penchant for hero husbands, Mrs; 
Drexler, the government alltees, has 
collected as high as ?400 a- jnonth in 
soldier's allotment checks from the 
government for -the past thrse years 
The b'aby was listed, as the child of 
each successive husband and drew an 
allotment too. . . . 

In 1917, she says, she married Wil- 
fred Taylor, a soldier, and'|they had 
a son, now, 3 years old. 

Next, she married Paul Mohler, a 
soldier, then Thomas Meehan, a sail- 
or at I Great Lakes, and ne::t Albert 
Drexler a soldier at Camp Grant. Al- 
though she has 'retained Drexler's 
name,' there have been at leest eleven 
husbands since him, she Estimates. 
She never . obtained a divorce- from, 
any of them, she says. 



REDUCTION IN ACREAGE 

; OF CORN' IS FAVORED 

Reduction of America's orn acre- 
age was favored by a gat lering of 
- dedine U a ,"teT e ri™eriro'bHging.' members of the American Farm Bur- 
h!mTo t imma u« "tock or disuse jeau federation at Chicago , list week 
him to sell 'n" 1 """ market Difficulty in disposing of the old 

° f Mr langaardsaid itll S 25?293 000 1 crop.'the taw price and pos ibility of 
alriadfhTb"en S distributed' under | further- glutting the market were.said 
?v I *l .Minnesota and the two Da- .by. the conferees to make' a curtailed 
t h o?af fdTat e b°y JuTy 1 when the ' production, next year anladyisable 
corpora ion wil, cease extendmg cred- move , 

i-at^xs; ^'saidT w °s%k ^ 

Formation of a farmers finance cor- today," said J. W CwerdUe, secre 
poratioA for Minnesota to handle cred- tary^of the association. - '^ 

H« in rrluch the same way as the Syd-i "The question that cor fronts all 
Ky AnieSon plaTis under some dis- farniers is whether they cin dispose 
cussion Colonel P. A. Wilkinson of of the old crop, much less wjirry about 
Lake Elmo declared that fatmers^are- growing any more. 




■'...-•.' ■ .' ' . / . . ! ' 

This gre^t bargain event will positively end on Saturday night, January 14. 
It has been the most successful end-of-season sale in our history and proves that 
people are both able and willing to buy clothing when unusual price? inducements 
are made. 



MUST 



' The price at which they go is a minor consideration. We will soon be Igoing 
to market to make our regular spring purchases. When these arrive we.niiist have 
room for them. These • reductions,, are genuine and cover everything in the 
store. .; .' 



►uits 



"Kuppenheimer," "Hirsh-Wickwire" ajid 
"Kirshbaum" Suits, the world's finest made 
suits. ' Nothing better 1 made. A large range to 
choose from. Your unrestricted chpice of $55, 
$60 and $65 Suits, while they last, at only 



\ 



$37.50 



All other Suits at 
$17.50, 19.50, 22.50, 27,50, 29150 and 32.50. 



.Your unrestricted choice ;of any "Kuppenf 
heimer", or "Patrick" Overcoat, as well as all 
. other makes of Overcoats marked to sell reg- 
ularly at'$55/$60 and $65, While they last, ojnly 



! HATS 

All Hats Must Go Now! 

512.00 Hats, now ."....$7:95 

$ 9:00 Hats, now $6.50 

% 8:00' Hats, now.^..:. $5.95 

$ 7.00 Hats, now....'...'.....$4.65 

$ 6.00 Hats, now $3.95 

$ 5.00 Hats, now...- $2.95 

$ 4.00 Hats, now.. $2.65 

:$ 3.00 Hats; how,. 1 . $2.25 



/ 



$37.50 



CAPS 

$2.00 Caps,- now..!. 
?2.50 Caps, now ..|.. 



..$1.35 
..$1.75 



»s : 

$3.00 Cap's, now- $1.95 

$3!50 Caps, now- $2.45 

$4.00 Caps, now S2.75 

$4.50 Caps, now $2.95 

$1.50 Caps, now - 95c 

$1.00 Caps, now : 65c 

Scotch Caps' ...:'. 95c 

MEN'S SOCKS 

25c Socks ,.,..-' 19 c 

35c Socks 27c 

50c Socks .-. - -....35c 

$1.00 Socks; ...'....-....:' 73c 

$1.50 Socks ...1 - $1.15. 



Heavy Weight 
GLOVES AND MITTENS 
at Less Than Cost 



-i 



/ Air other Overcoats at 
$17.50, 19.50, 22.50, 27.50, 29.50 and 32J50i 



SWEATERS 

$6.00 Sweaters- $4.75 

$6.50 Sweaters $4.95 

- 58.00 Sweaters ..;....- $5.95 

j, $9.00 Sweaters .....56.95 

I- All others' equally reduced 



.in price. 



"Patrick" ;Mackinaws 

The regular $22.50 kind, at, 
only 

$12.95 



1,000 pairs of men's and boys'. fine Shoes 
to go in the greatest 'of all Clearance Sales., . 
$5,. $6 and $7 men's Dress Shoes, while, the 
; last only, per pair 



$3.65 



Your choice of men's fine Dress Shoes 
worth $7.50, $8.50 and $9.00; while, they 
last, per pair \ 



CLEARING OUR SHELVES OF 



- Take this tip — no better time presents itself 
than right now after the holidays to replenish 
your stock of shirts. Though the Christmas 
trade took many, we. still have plenty to offer' 
you at these reduced prices, YouV choice of 
any $2.50 or $3.00 Shirt, each 



$1.65 



$5.65 



Ybur choice of any $10, $1 1. or' $12 Shoes, 
,at only, per pair i - j 



$7.65 



Your choice of $3.50, $4.00 of ,$4.50 men's 
Dress Shirts at i 

$2.65 

All other Shirts greatly reduced. 



Ladies' Lamb Lined Fur Col- 
lar Fine Coats 

"Stevenson" high grade all 

fine lamb lined Coats. ; 
$80.00 Coats-.,— $49.50 



$75.00 Coats^_ —^$49.50 

$65 and $63.50 Coats_$42.50 
These are made full lamb lin- 
ed arid have oppossum. coon- 
skin or nutria collars. 



OVERSHOES 
"Ball Band" and U. S. Rubber 

One-buckle Overshoes _$1.95 
Two-buckle Overshoes _$2.25 
Four-buckle Overshoes _$2.95 



Quality Goods at 
Greatly Reduced 
■ ./, Prices • 



'THfEF WVER FALLS 

MINNESOTA. . 

GJ^tf comes from Nogenseni HarusilegoaK' 



Store Open Evenings 

We Are 'Here to 

Please You. 



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ALL CASH 
SALES 


Men's Oregon' All-wool/ 
Mackinaws 

$8.75 


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;V 



Page Six 




$250,000 Rate Cut , 
Means More Roads 



State R 
C 



Iroad and Warehouse 
nissioner Orders ■ 
Reduced Rates 



Bill of Department 
e Much Lov^er Than 
in Previous Years 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



_£. 



FRIDAY, JANUARY. 6, 19! 2 



NOT PLU&-UG£IES 



Minnesota will have about $250,000 
less freig it to pay on sand and gravel 
and othei materials for its 1922 work 
on trunk highway improvements un- 
der a freight rate reduction order 
made thi.- week by the state railroad 



and ware 
saving w 
highway 



house commission. The big 
11 be used to extend needed 
betterments. 



[The rai.e reduction order made pub- 

. ' 1 ^ ■ _.- T T»_ „* 



lie by C 



ed the fi 
more, h 
contracts 



mimissioner Ivan Bowen of 
the railriad body, Charles M. Bab- 
cbek. state highway commissioner, es- 
timated t :ie freight saving and "declar- 
' " "' jure conservative. Further: 

added, highway department 

__ are so worded that every 

dollar saved will revert to the state — 
not the contractors. 

>The lower freight rates will mean 
that Minnesota will have" an addition- 
al quarti'V million dollars for use tins, 
year to spread and speed benefits 
from go id roads amendment No. 1 
-4that sum will go into public roads 
aiid not to the railroads as would have 
been the case otherwise," said the 

executive. 

;sioner Babcock several 



highway 
;Commi 



weeks aeo demanded lower rail rates 
oii road building materials. A few 
railroad jfficials offered to make cuts 
on indiv dual projects but the ccm 
missionei insisted upon a general, fiat 
decrease. He carried the matter be 
fore the railroad and warehouse com 
mission with the favorable result 




This prize ring cham lion is a family man,. as shown in the above 



Ho is Johnny 
.•s ago won -the 



!u(f, who is flyweight champion, and who 
>=mtam weight also, from Pete Herman, 



"JAZZ" ON THE WAr E 



Dancinp 



Masters Favor Conservative 
Steps 



"Jazz" is slowly but; sure 
into the discard, according, to 
ment issued by the Fenton 
Dayto'n, O., Director of Danc< 
of the American National association. 
Masters of Dancing. 

"The 'F° x ' Trot ' »s tne d 



y gomg- 
a state-' 
Bott, of 
Reform 



nee that 



receives the most abuse by the! danc- 



er," said the statement, "and 



| IN THE WRONG PLACE' 
!A well known admiral — a stickler 
for uniform— stopped opposite a very 
... . scilor whose medal ribbon was 
an inch n so too low down. Fixing 
tile man with his eyes, the admiral 
'Did you get that medal for 

. a , my man?" 

i On the man replying, "No, sir," the 
admiral rasped out. "Then why the 
you wear it on your stom- 




I 



[ Fox Trot' music as written J.nd play 
ed in 'Jazz' fashion, that ci.uses the 
dancer ■ to abuse this popul; r dance. 
There is nothing wrong with the 'Fox 
Trot" or the steps in the 'Fdx Trot', 
but it is a conceded fact a nong all 
teachers of dancing that thi Orient 
ah suggestiveness and >brokei 
the Fox Trot Jazz music, 
with the lack of. sufficient supervision 
is responsible for the downward trend 
of the dance. 

The American National 
tion of Masters of Dancirj 
two years ago, to work . fo: cleaner 
dancing. ' Hundreds of Welf ire asso 
ciations,. thousands of college deans,' 
police women everywhere aid finally 
the public dance hall propri 
listed in .the woTk with u: 
feel and' hope that the ere: 
wave of this disgusting 



been reached an 1. reports! 



First and Peoples State 

Thief River Falls, Minn. I 
at close of business on December 31st, 19! 
RESOURCES 



/Loans and Discounts ......: 

• Overdrafts .....' — ■ 

Bonds and securities other than those of U. 3 

Banking house, furniture and fixtures 

Other real estate ~» - — 

Checks and Drafts in Transit.' .' 

Due from other banks ;. ■■—■■. 5' 

Cash on hand — f 

Currency .'. ....54,913.00 

Gold , i |- L040 00 

Silver ■ !- 4,117.55 

Other : j . 547.65' 

Total Cash Assets ■ r- 

Checks arid Cash Items '. .'- 

Insurance Account i : •• 



Total 



LIABILITIES. 



Capital stock : — — — ,•• — 

Surplus fund — — 

Undivided Profits, Net 

Reserved for Depreciation on Bonds 

Notes rediscounted and bills; payable (including' i 

for money borrowed..... .-... ,— 

Dennsits 'Subject to Check...:.: 

Certified Checks , - .•■■• 

Cashier's Checks ■ : 

Due to Banks , i....' ~. 



13. Total Immediate Liabilities.;. 



Less Liquor Used, 
Say the Churches 



A Decrease of 85 Per Cent 

Shown In Recent Probe 

qf M. E. Church 



Best Results Sjiown In Small 
Tbwijs^alia Rural Com- 
munities Report Says 



it is the 



time in 
together 



Associa- 
g j began 



tors are 

We all 

,t of the 



missions of crime of serious anture 
on other charges. 

"Even better results have been ob- 
tained in rural anil small town dis- 
tricts. 

"It is frequently stated l>y alcohol 
propagandists that there is in the Un- 
ited States enormous illicit distilla- 
tion, that nearly every family makes 
alcohol. Obviously, this is. simply an 
expression of opinion. In America, 
only a few families of German ex- 
traction know how to make palatable 
beer. .Whiskey, illicitly produced, is 
so nearly non-palatable that 
habitual alcoholics 



TO ATTEND RETAIL SHOE 

DEALERS' CONVENTION 



A. M. Langseth, of the .Langseth 
Shoe store,- will leave tomorrow for 
Chicago, where he expects to attend 
the National Retail Shoe- Dea^grs' con- 
vention which: is scheduled to*open in 
the windy city, on Monday. 

Mr. Langseth each year attends 
the retailers convention and finds the 
sessions of great; benefit both from a 
buying and selling* standpoint. Move 



4? 



show 'clean dancing' crusades being 
started everywhere. I 

"All exaggerated movements, es- 
pecially of the upper parts of the 
body, ai*e in very bad taste in social 
dancing, and are never found with 
true refinement and culture." 

Nine don'ts are given in the state- 
ment. They are: 

."Don't permit vulgar jazz music to 
be played. . 

"Don't permit .young men to hold 
their partners tightly. 

'Don't permit, partners ■ to dance 
with cheeks close or touching. 

"Don't permit 'neck holds.' 

"So-called 'shimmy' or. 'toddle' 
dancing should not be tolerated. 

"Don't permit dancers to take eith- 
er exceptionally ,long or short steps. 

"Don't dance 'i.from the waist up; 
dance from the waist down. 

"Don't permit suggestive move- 
ments. ■ 

"Don't permit dancers to copy the 
extremes that . are now ' used on the 
modern stage." 



Prohibition is excellently enforced 
in nine tenths of the area ol-the coun- 
try and in the remainderls sufficient- 
ly well enforced tri^ be a jvery great 
improvement' ojrer 'the license system. 

This is the result of an investiga- 
tion covering several months, through 
official channels and direct inquiry as 
recently announced by the Dr. Deets 
Pickett, Research secretary of the 
board of prohibition, temperance "and 
public morals of the Methodist Episco 
pal church. The organization of the 
church was used as one of the agencies 
of information. 

The investigation showed that 
there ; has been an enormous de- 
crease in the consumption of liquor, 
decrease not less than; eighty-five 
and possibly more than j ninety per 
cent," according to Dr. Pickett. "This 
has resulted in a very large decrease 
in the number of arrests for dvunken- 
ness and in a' very considerable in- 
crease in the' purchasing power of the 
poor and of the skilled and unskilled 
laborers," says the report. "In San 
Francisco, prohibition decreased ar- 
rests for drunkenness !in its first year 
from 17,354 to 1,814. In Los Angeles 
from 15,830 to 2,589.' In Boston, if 
was from 52,682". to 16,487: In Balti- 
more, .in the last wet October, there 
were 1,165 arrests for drunkenness 
and in the first dry October, 119. We 
have similar reports' from the heads 
of police of Washington, St. Paul, Lin- 
coln, Galveston, St. Louis and other 



than 7,000 reservations have been 
only! made by various shoe men of. the; 
can consume it. | United States and almost all '"shoe 
Private distillation and brewing, while Manufacturers of the country^ rep- 
it worries the prohibition officers by I resented there by their biands of foot- 
necessitation many arrests, is an in- wear. The railroads have granted ref 
significant factor. duced rates to all those who attend. 

Prohibition is a >elative success. The sessions 1 this year will be held 
now, and is ,on the road to complete! in the big Chicago Coliseum. Last 

i year's convention was held at Milwau 
!kcc and was largely attended. 



BONUS CHECK RETURNED 



Michigan Math Returns 
nesota 



$225 to Min> 



I RATTLESNAKE FEAST IS 

NEWEST COLLEGE >PORT 



If Diogenes were alive today he 
could put away his lantern and rest. 
For an honest man has been found, 
i His name is Roy H. Gould, 708 Neff 
street, Detroit,. Mich., who was draft- 
ed into the -army^at St. Cloud and 
served^fjftecm months. 

Receiving his discharge from the 
army he filed appilcation for a state 



The man from New England, just 
arrived in a western city, went into a 
small office and asked if he could wire! cities, 
direct from there and how long it "There has also been a decrease in 
would take.' 'more serious crimes in many cities. 

The 'girl assistant cut him short The wjet propagandists have spoken 
with: "I am not here to answer silly much of a crime wave in New York, 
questions." She looked foolish, how- I have it on th e ' authority! of the Com- 
ever, when sh e found herself com-- missioner of Police of thei city of. New 



vrigglingjpelled to wire the following: 



York,' that in 1918, there were 11,611 



Girls here ugly and burglaries, and in 1920 only 6,830. He 




A score of students-arid instructors 
at West Virginia university were 
treated to a rattlesnake feast, while 
Dr.. A. M. Reese, head of the depart- 
ment of zoology, incidentally attempt- 
ed to prove that a great deal of meat 
goes to waste every year owing to 
common scruples. 

The rattler from the West Virginia 



army ne meu application ior a state - 1 -" 1 - *«"*"" r \" K " i - jv •"&"■"* v 

bonus in Minnesota/Some questions! hills was presented to the university ; . £>. ■ 



as) to his residence delayed the pay 
ment and in the meantime a Michi- 
gan bonus law was passed. . Gould 
filed claim there and it was allowed. 



several weeks ago.- When it declined 
to eat, Dr. Reese killed it and pre- 
pared it ; much in the same way that 
other meats are prepared. Those who 



Later his Minnesota bonus claim was. partook of the meat said it was not 
allowed. • unlike the breast of a; chicken, and 

Gould attempted'to return the bon-jhad the same cofor. 
to the Michigan bonus board. 



which refused to accept it, declar 
ing that he was entitled to' payment 
under Michigan regulations. 

Tuesday Mr. Gould, who \s a school 
teacher, sent his- personal check .for 



Minnesota will accept the return of 
the bonus payment, 



Shall I accept him-?" 

The editor : dipped his pen in the 
ink. This was the last straw. 

"If you've lost three husbands," he 
wrote, "I should say you are much 
too careless to be trusted with a 
fourth." — Toronto Mail. ' 



THE .LAWYER FIRST / 

A railway' employe was in the wit- 
ness box", and was being cross-ex- 
amined by a very self : important 
young lawyer 'about a case which had 



$225 to Ray • P. Chase, state auditor resulted in a damage suit as the con 

sequence of an accident on the rail- 
road. 

"You say that you saw this man 
fall from the train?" said, the lawyer. 

"I saw him fall, ; y§§»" Replied the 
railway man.- . 

"Yet it t was night time," insisted 
the lawyer. "And : you were at one 



The editor in charge of the personal 
inquiry column, .opened his seven- 
tieth with a groan. 

"I have lost three husbands,'.' the 
lady reader had written, confidentially 
"and now have the offer- of a fourth.iend of the train and the man was at 



the other. Do you expect an intelli- 
gent jury to believe such a yarn? 
How far can, you see at night?" 

"About a million miles, I think," 
replied the railway man. "I can see 
the moon. How far is that?" 
. The lawyer . retired. 



3ank 



- 3,066.21 



..5428,603.33 
'697.24 
.. 19,937.50 
.. 60,000.00 
.. 36,500.10 
1,359.80 



First and Peoples State Bank 



AT THIEF RIVER FALLS, | MINNESOTA j 
. at Close of Business December 31, 1921 



53,684.41. 53,684.41 

4,726.35 

...:...... 168.09 



..$595,676.82 



..$ 76,000.00 

., 15,000.00 

.. 11,862.59 

99.02 



certificates 



$217, 



,586.52 
83.85 
4,306.62 
3,705.60 



(None) 



The Bank Owes 



To' its depositors _-. 

On borrowed money. (None)' 
On Rediscounts. (None) 



_$492il5.21 



$492,815.21 



The Bank Holds 



...52 



25,682.59 



\e 



Savings Deposits 1. r... 

Time Certificates \ i 

Total Deposit's .'. ■ • ; 

Reserve for Depreciation on : Building.. 



42,525.34 
224,607.28 



' $492,815.21 492,815.21 
" ^ - 900.00 



Total 



..?595,676.82 

..$ 53,684.41 
.... 40,438.56 



Amount of Reserve on Hand.: 

Amount of Reserve Required,: by Law ,-. ...... 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF PENNINGTON, ss. 

We, H. S. Dahlen, Vice; President, and K. M. Sheldon, Cashier of the 
above named bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true to the 
best of our knowledge and belief. ^ . g DAmEN> ^ ft^ 

K. M. SHELDOS, Cashier. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this' 6th day °JJ$f™-™£, 



(For the purpose of meeting the above obligations.) 

CASH --— — — . $ 53,684.41 

(Consists of .actual cash in our vaults and money due on 
demand deposited with other banks.) ' - * 

CHECKS ON OTHER. BANKS— L ■ r _>" 6,254.24 

(Payable on presentation.) 

BONDS i- — — - — -< — -' -. 19,937.50 

($20,000 par value.) 

LOANS TO INDIVIDUALS, COUNTIES, TOWNS, 
SCHOOL DISTRICTS, BANKS AND OTHER COR- ; 
PORATIONS — * ,429,300.57 

BANKING HOUSE AND OTHER REAL ESTATEL___ 86,500.1 



(SEAL) 



G. HOW 

Notary Public, Penningtoh 
' .(My commission expires A 

Correct. Attest (Two Directors] 
i • CARL B 



F.. J/ STEBBINS. 



,»+^H~ H + um |HtHM I j **■ 



$595,676.82 
492.815.21 

.$102,861,61 



URD SMITH, 
i. County, Minn, 
igust 17th, 1928.) 



LARSON. 



T&-IIS LEAVES A SURPLUS OF__ ___ __L 

(This surplus is the property of ithe stockholders, which operates as a 
Guarantee Fund to secure depositors against loss, arid added to this the 
stockholders are additionally liable for $75,000.00, which gives our 
depositors the strongest protection possible.) 



( 1 I ! I t I I i I H I H M t t H f H H H H , * H t + f 't H H I H " * * * * * * * " * * ' U ltl ttUl l ttl l M I 



Largest Capita! of Any Bank in Pennington County 



A 



FRIDAY,: JANUARY 6, 1922 



/ 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Page Seven 



Billion Dollars 
- Now Available 



1 •, 



Minnesota To Get More Than 
Any Other State From ■ 
Finance, Corporation 



Amendment to, Morris Bill 
i Known as Kellogg Substi- 
. tutes Relief Measure 



ot 



s: 



The amendment to the. War Fi 
nance Corporation Act passed at the 
last session of congress enables farm- 
ing communities to obtain, through 
their local banls, sufficient credit to 
enable the farn ers to tide over their 
financiall disaster, by affording them 
an extension of credit that will give 
them from one 
sion of time to 
edness. j 

This amendment is known 
Kellogg [Substitute 



I AT THE CHURCHES | 

«. — 4 — 7—— »l 



Trinity Lutheran Church — Confirm-; 

ation class at i the parsonage Saturday 
10:00 a. m. } Divine ■ service in, Nor-! 
wegton 11:00: a. m. Song choir. In 
English 7:45 1 p. m. Sunday school 
meets for: first time in New Year 
9:45. Full attendance desired. Choir 
practice every Thursday evening. Sun] 
day school teachers meet at the parj 
sonage Monday, Jan. 9th, at 8:00> ml 
— T. E. Sweger, pastor. ! 



"Nuisance" and 
''Luxury" Taxes 



Zion Lutheran Church-pServices in 

Norwegian, 11:00 a. m. Services in 
English, ; 7:45 p. m. Sunday school, 
9:45 a. m. Prayer meeting at. Hans 
Peterson Wednesday evening, 7:45 
p. m. Zion Ladies' Aid will give a 
special meeting Thursday 12th, 2 p 
m. Rev: J. Mortensen from Fosstori 
will speak. The contents will go to 
the Augsburg Seminary. . Zion young 
peoples meeting in the evening and 
Rev. J. Mortensen will speak. A spe- 

to three years' exten- «" invita ?°" is &$*° aU frfendS ' 
liquidate their indebt^ -George Lars on, pasto r. ^ ; 

\ Swedish Evangelical Mission church 



as the 
for the Norris 
bill-. It I was d:awn by Senator Kel- 
logg after consultation with J. R. 
Howard,' presicent of the American 
Farm Bureau, and was approved by 
him, and he ani other officers of the 



Farm Bureau 
It gg in . securi: 
bll. 

The War 



VJ 



i The rates oi 
under present, 
and the I terms' 
six months. 



assisted Senator Kel 
g the passage of the 

nance Corporation is 
fully organized to carry out the 
e.law, and the federal 



provisions of tl . 

^officials |are anxious- to get the money- 
ti the farmer: . " 
[quickest! way possible. All unneces- 
sary red tape has been eliminated and 
the method of making the loan to 
the individual' farmer is simple and 
easilv understo )d. 



Beginning January 1st Such 
- Taxes No Longer Apply 
Says Collector 



PLAN TO REVOKE PASSES .> 



Abolishment of Free Transportation 
is Considered Economy Measure 

Abolishment of virtually all free 
transportation to railroad employes 
and their dependents is being' planned 
as an economy measure by Northwest 
lines, it has been repprted in St. Paul. 

Such. a policy, permitting the issu- 
ance of passes to employes on com- 
pany business only except in excep- 
tional cases, would save the railroads 
thousands of dollars monthly and 
would mean a saving of many . mil- 
lions annually, railroad men said. . 

Passenger .revenue has declined 

greatly during the past year and 

_, j. ,. . , . . . , many trains are being operated at a 

The | following statement is issued j 



Sporting Goods Also Exempt 

in Future According 

to Circular ' 



The competition of motor bus com- 



— Next Sunday Sunday school at : lp 
a. m. Young peoples meeting Friday 
at 8:00 p. m. -. 



takes, among ; them the 
nuisance" and "luxury" taxes, 



SflT«nty-fiTe Dollars Attorney's f»M, as 
stipulated In aDd by said Uertffaae li ease 
of foreclosure, and the disbursements al- 
lowed bylaw: subject to redemption at 
ax-r time within one -year from the day ol 
sale, as prorided by law. i 

Dated November 30U, A. D.. 1931.- 
HOBTHWBSTEHN NATIONAL LIPal 1K- 

J0BA5CB COMPANY, Assignee and 
Present Owner ef Mortgage. 
J. M. BISHOP, Attorney, 

Thief River Falle, Minnesota. 
I D-2-0-10-23-SO— J-2 



St. Hilaire Church— At East Side 
school house ^at 11:00 a. m. and at St. 
Hilaire at 7:30 p. m. 



by the- Collector of Internal Revenue 

L. M. WiUcuts, district of Minnesota.: ies ^ the increase ^ rivateIy 

In response to numerous^ inquiries, owned automobiles is credited with 

taxpayers are advised that certain , havin fflade the mo ^ serious inroads 

so-called . . , 

.in passenger business. " 

,-,_.. T , no o a v e | Travel by employes and their de 

repealed, effective January 1,1922, by j dents ^ g ^ extensive out 

the reveriue act- of 1921. !))f the , terminals, railroad men 

Patrons of soda-water fountains, said both haul and short haul 

ice cream parlors and "similar places d including suburban traffic 

of business no longer are required to, If th . i ■■ u ^ ad d mem . 
pay the tax of 1 cent for each 10 ^ o{ Ij families ^ bg re . 

cents or fraction ■ thereof on the, ^ tQ r , fc ^^ ■ 

amount expended for sodas, sundaes,." Eastem ^ recent , ^ ^ &is 
or similar articles of food or dnnks J measure and have reported 

The small boy. may rejoice in the fact | v fc succi ; ssful 
that .an ice cream, cone doesn't cost | - . ^ 

an extra penny- The tax imposed by: recently el ^i nated 

the revenue act of 1921 is on bever- 



St. John's! Lutheran Church— No 

services and no Sunday school next 
Sunday. The Ladies' Aid meets Wed- 
nesday afternoon in the church ..base 

___ ._ = . ment. As this is the annual -meeting 

by the° shortest and I the election \ of officers for the nej.v 
year, all members are earnestly re- 
quested to attend. | 

Presbyterian Church — Services Sup 
day: Sunday school at 9:45., Ser- 
vices at 11:00 a. m. Mr. E. O.i Green 
will read sen-ices. Junior Endeavor 
at 3:00 p. m. Christian Endeavor at 
7:00 p. m. Men's Bible class. at 7:30 



interest required are 
conditions reasonable; 
if the loan running for 
;h the privilege of re 



Northwestern 
dependents 



viewing I the lokn from one to three p. m . There, will be a meeting of 
vears; are also satisfactory. the .members of the congregation im- 

"' One billion dollars is available for j mediately following the morning ser- 
these "loans, and there is no . reason . vie e. j 

why this money should not be placed 
-in our|farmin; communities within 
the next three months, if prompt ad- 
vantage 1 is taken of the opportunity 
now afforded. 



Scandinavian Evangelical Church- 
Services Sunday the 8th, at 11:00 
a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Sunday school 
10:00 ai m. The yearly business meet- 
Every interested person who has ex- ; n g win be held on Monday, the 9th, 
amined'jthe conditions of this loan, ad- |. at 7 : 30.p. m. Wednesday 7:30 p. m., 
mits the value Lnd benefit of it at this j our ordinary Bible teaching meeting, 
time, and every one interested- in the j y u are cordially welcome. — Bot Wy- 
prosperity of the farmers should do borg, pastor, 
all in tlieir power to assist farmers in ' 



evenue ac. ^ ^, « uu «.=.- , from the subu rban pass 

ages and the .constituent parts therof are .... 

.and » paid by the manufacturer. ^ J 

The tax on the transportation of ,. ° * 

freight and passengers is repealed, ef- IS IT ANY WONDER? 

fective 'January i, .1922, also the tax.] a. ma n was one' day visiting a lun- 
paid by the purchaser on amounts at ; c asylum, an d while walking in the 
paid for men's and women's wearing gr0U nds he met a patient to whom he 
apparel (shoes, hats, caps, neckwear, sa j Q . ; 

shirts, hose, etc.) in excess of a "Wen, how did you get here?"- 
specified price.. . The man replied: 

Taxes, imposed under section 904] «w e ll, sir, you see, I married a 
(which under the revenue act of 1918, wjdovv with a grown-up daughter, and 
included the taxes on wearing ap- then my f a ther married my wife's 
parel) are now, confined to a 5 per (j aU ghter,and that made my wife the 
cent tax on the following articles: mo ther-in-law of her father-in-law, 
carpets, on the amount in excess of and m} , f at her became my stepson. 
54.50 a square yard; rugs, on the Then my s t e pmother, the daughter of 
the amounts in excess of ?6 a square my wifc> had a . son> and that. boy, of 
yard; trunks on the amount in excess courS g i was m y brother, because he 
of $35 each; valises, traveling bags, was my . father's son; but he was also 
suit cases, hat boxes used bv: travel- tng son of my w ;f e > s . stepdaughter, 
ers and fitted toilet cases, on the and therefore her grandson, and 'that 
amount in excess -of $25 each; purses, ma{ | fi mg gran df a ther of my step- 
pocketbopks, shopping and hand bags. brot her. Then my wife had a son, so 
the amount in excess of $5 each; my mot h e r-in-law, the stepsister, of 
portable lighting • fixtures, including my son| is also his - gran dmother, be- 
lamps of all. kinds, on the amount in causg hg Js her s tepson's child; my 



securing this 
as possible, as 



credit as expeditiously | TRAPPERS SHOULD LET 

this law was introduc- ] MUSKRAT' HOUSES ALONE 



cd andl its' passage secured by Sen- 



ator Kellogg o: 



: this state with the ap- 
repre- 



sentatives of tfie Farm Bureau. 



The following clipping from jthe 
Hutchinson" Leader will beof inter- 
est here: ; "So many trappers -have 
,. . asked the question, can we set our 
throughout the state, should do a " | traps in muskrat houses?, that the 
they can- to sde that the farmers are ; Leader to ok the matter up with State 
Enabled to take advantage of the ]aw ; Gam£ and Fjsh Commi g S i ner Avery, 



proval and assistance of the 
— Burea 
Bureau organizations 



Our Farm 



.to the 
money 

why it 
^promptly and 
meet the need 
nesota. 



fullest^ extent possible. - The iwho ^ rf as foUows . , It is a (,-io- 
is available and there is no ^^ , q£ ^ Jaw t0 moleat raus] pat 



should not be moving 
n sufficient x volume to ; _""_„,.' 
i of the farmers of Min- 



How 



lentirelv.new 

;real sports 

' Just . Kow Hiar'ry 



motive engineer 
his deer on 
hunting season 
to uiofet peof 
the' tale was 



r 



to the| most 
tainable and 
r.ietl b'y Mr. 

On |thi' -m(J 
Mr 

to Int 
a Ion* 
beioi'e 

were two mt 
b; 



excess of $10. each; fans, on the father is the brother-in-law of my 
amount in excess of $1 each. These child> because his stepsister .is his 
taxes are included in the manufactur- ^ fe . : am the b rot h er of my own 
ers' excess taxes, and are payable by son ^ who . g also the son of my step . 
the manufacturer, producer or import- motlier . j am my mother's brother- 
er, and not by the purchaser, as re- in . laW( my w jf e \ s her own child's 
quired by the revenue act of 1918. The aunt . my son . g my other's nephew 
manufacturer may reimburse himself, and j flm . my own sra ijdfather. 
by agreement --with the purchaser, by 
quoting the selling price and tax in 
separate and exact amounts., or by 
stating to the putchaser in advance of 



grand 
"That's why I am here sir!' 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. 

Whereat), Defaults hare .been made in 
Ijhe conditions of a certain mortgnce dnly 
executed 'and deliTered by Selma Ricfenon, 
a widow, mortgrogror, to. First. -State Bank 
of Tq.Ief River Falls, (a corporation un- 
der tbe laws of the State of Minnesota), 
mortgagee, bearing date the.21fet day of 
March, 1917, and with a power of sale 
therein contained duly recorded in the of- 
fice of the Register of Deeds in and for 
the County of Pennington and State of 
Minnesota, on the 20th day of March, 1917. 
at 10:30 o'clock a. m., in Book 53 of 
Mortgages, on page 464, 

Which said mortgage.- together' with 
tot debt secured tllereby, vt&s duly as- 
signed by said First State Bank of Thief 
Riyer Falls, mortgagee, to First "And Peo- 
ples State Bank (a corporation under the 
laws of the State of Minnesota), b'y writ- 
ten assignment dated the 17th day -of De- 
cember, 1D17, and duly recorded in the of- 
fice »f the said Register of Deeds on the 
14th day of NoTember, 1021, at S:30 o'clock 
a. : m;. In BookiU3 of Mortgages on Page 
360, and 

Whereas, The said Firsi And Peoples 
State Bank, the assignee and holder of 
said mortgage, has duly elected and does 
hereby elect to declare the whole princi- 
pal sum of Bald mortgage dde and pay- 
able at the date of this notice under the 
terms and conditions of said mortgage 
and tie power of sale therein contained, 
and 

Whereas. There is actually due and 
claimed tpi'be due and payable at the date 
of this notice upon said. -mortgage and 
the IndebtednsM secured thereby the to- 
tal sum of One Hundred Eighty-two and 
72-100 Dollars, as follows: The aam of 
»?lff7.73 thereof beinff for Interest paid by 
said assignee of mortgagee upon" a $rior 
existing mortgage upon the premises se- 
curing the mortgage hereby being fore- 
closed and for which 'said assignee of 
mortgagee, is entitled to. a Hen pursuant 
to law. an'd the terms of said mortgage, 
and tbe sum of 923.00 thereof being the 
amount of the balance of the principal se- 
cured by-the mortgage hereby being fore- 
closed, said sums making tbe total amount 
afereaald, and whereas the said power of 
sale has become operative and no action 
proceeding haTlng been" instituted at 
law or otherwise to recover the jdebt se- 
cured by said mortgage, or any part there- 
of: 
. Now, Therefore, Notice is Hereby Given, 
that by virtue of' the power of sale con- 
tained In said mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute in such case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage will be foreclosed 
by a Bale- of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said .mortgage, viz: The 
Northeast Quarter (ueVi) of Section No. 
Seventeen (17), in Township No. One Hun- 
dred Fifty-four (154) North, of Range No. 
Forty-one (41) West of the Fifth Princip.nl 
Meridian In Pennington County and State 
of Minnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances; which sale will be made 
by the Sheriff of said Pennington Coun- 
ty at the front door of the Court House 
in the City of Thief River Falls, in said 
County and State, on the 21st day of Jan- 
aary, 1022, at 10:00 o'clock a. m„ of that 
day, at public vendue, to- the highest bid- 
der for cash, to pay said debt of $182.72. 
and Interest, and taxes, if any, on said 
premises, and Twenty -five Dollars, attor- 
ney's fees.. as stipulated in and by said 
mortgage in case of foreclosure, and the 
disbursements allowed by law: subject to 
redemption at any) time within one year 
from the day. of sale ns provided by law. j 
Dated November 15th. 1021. , 

FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE'BANK. 

Assignee of Mortgagee, j 
PERLitW- MABEY, ! 

Attorney for Assignee of Mortgagee, Thief, l 
River Falls, Minnesota. 

Friday, Dec. 9-16-23-30, Jan. :(1-13 | 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. 

Default having been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of One Thousand Eighty- 
eight and no-100 'dollars, which is claimed 
to. be due and is due at;the date of this 
notice upon a certain Mortgage, duly ex-- 
ecuted and delivered by J. G. Turnbaugh 
and Florence Lena, Turnbaugh, his wife. 
Mortgagors, to Goodridge State Bank, (a 
corporation under the laws of the State 
o*. Minnesota), Mortgagee, bearing date 
the ISth day of December, 191<j. and with 
a power of sale < therein contained, duly 
recorded in the office of the. Register of 
Deeds In and for the County of Marshall 
and State of Minnesota, on the fith day 
of January, 1920, at 10:00 o'clock a. m., 
in .Book ' 93 of Mortgages, on page 038, 
and duly recorded in the office of the 
Register of Deeds in and for the County 
ef Pennington and State . of Minnesota, 
on the Sth day of January, 1920, at 9:00 
o'clock a. m.,' in Book 54 of Mortgages, 
on page 594, and no nction or proceeding 
having been instituted, at law or .other- 
wise, to recover the debt' secured by said' 
Mortgage or 1 any part thereof. 
•. Now,- "Therefore. Notice Is Hereby. 
Given, That by virtue, of the power of 
Bale, contained in said Mortgage, and pur- 
suant to the statute in such case made and 
provided, the said Mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises describ- 
ed in and conveyed by- "said" Mortgage, viz: 

■The Northwest Quarter (nvr'/i ). of Sec- 
tion numbered Ten (10). in Township 
numbered One Hundred Fifty-four (154) 
North, of Range numbered Thirty-nine 
(39) West of the. Fifth Principal Meridian, 
in the County of Marshall and State of 



Minnesota, and 

The Southwest Quarter (sw^) of Sec- 
tion numbered Ton (10), in Township num- 
bered One Hundred Fifty-four (154) North, 
of. Range numbered Thitty-nine (39) West, 
of the Fifth Principal,' Meridian, in the. 
County of Pennington 'and State of Min- 
nesota, and 

Together with the .. hereditaments nnd 
appurtenances thereuhtb belonging, which 
sale will be made by the Sheriff of said 
Pennington County at. the front door of 
the- Court House, in the City of Thief 
River 3 Falls, in said Coifnty and State, on 
the 21at day of "January, fn22, at 10:00- 
o'clock a. m., of that day, at public ven-' 
due, to the highest bidder for cash: to 
pay said debt of §10SS.OO and interest, and 
the taxes, if any, on. said premises, and 
Seventy-five Dollars, being statutory at- 
torney's fees, as stipulated in and by 
said Mortgage in case of foreclosure, rnd 
the disbursements allowed by law; subject 
to redemption at any time within one year 
from the day of sale, as' provided by law. 

Dated December 5th. A. D.. 1921. 

'GOODRIDGE STATE BANK, 

PERL -W. MABEY, ' Mortgagee. 

Attorney for Mortgagee, Thief River Falls, 

Minnesota. / 

Dec. 9-10-23-30 J-fi-13 



FORCE OP HABIT 

Darling," said she, "do you love 
the sale, what portion of the quoted lne as m uch as ever? 



STILll THEY COME 
An M. & I. Train Crew 



Huntmg de^r by locomotive is 



This means that the rats 

cannoti.be ! speared in houses |and 

houses cannot be opened for placing 

x Itraps therein.- The law prior to 191Q 

\ ! permitted setting traps in houses. 

X tMariy arrests have been made for this 

Jon*ense.' It might be stated further 

G^kor^the information of trappers that 

i muskrats can be taken in no way ex- 

! cept withxtraps, also that dogs cannot 

311 be used i\ getting -mink; otherwise 



cSparture in theweof.^ ■ ^ ^ laken ^ any manner/ 



Northern Minnesota. . —- ," re "^ s have been current of 
Bndgeman, loco- ; ^^ ^T in this count y being 



the II. & I., got 
opening 

has been a mystery 
until recently 
reluctantly unfolded 



H,v of fhe 0P ened toipemrit of traps being set 
da> of the £ \ i( . wlU be 



"Yes, dearie, 
buried in his newspaper. 



said he, with-his nose 



It happened, this way, according 



Tin- 
vei.-fai 
leg ana- 
came 
i. led b 



reliable information ob- : 
which has not been de : 
3^-idgeman. 

of November 10, 

Bridgeman was making his way 

matioi.al Falls at the head oi 

freight" train, when suddenly 

along the right-of-way 

lister deet in a pitched 

locked. 

unquWior finally threw his ad- 

thc ditch, breaking a 

' on the body. The train 



price represents the price chargfed for 
the article, and what portion repre- 
sents the tax. • That ought lo have satisfied her, 

The taxes on sporting goods, (ten- DUt sne had to ask "why?" 
nis raquets, fishing rods, baseball and - "Qh, I don't know. Habit, 1 sup- 
football uniforms, fishing rods, etc.) pose .» 

are repealed, also the taxes on' chew- ; . : 

inir gum portable electric fans, ther- mortgage foreclosure sale. 

■"b b""'. r' __j. „f Default havlne been made in tbe nay- 

mostatic containers, articles made oi ment o£ [he sum ot Tw0 Hlmdrea sixteen 

fur ' and toilet articles and musical in- and 04-100 (S21B.04) Dollars, which is 

Aui, at.w claimed to be due and is due at the date 

struments. ( t^is notice upon a certain Horttrase, 

The tax on sales of jewelry, real duly executed and delivered by, Ole o. 

•_•!. t;„n ;= C n»r font iTid is nav- Overerold and Hulda Orererold, his wife. 

or imitation, is 5 per cent, ana is pay MortKaEO „, t0 Firat Stot e Bank of Okiee. 

able hy the vendor. The tax on the jiorfgacee, bearing date the oth dar of 

„i» „t ,™i-L-= nr art (naintmgs stat- December, 1019, and with a power of sale 

sale of works or art (paintings, iiai thereln c ' ontail]Ed dulJ reco rded In the 

uary, art porcelains, and bronzes) is oflice of the Renter of 'Deeds in and ftr 

rodi'ired from 10 to '5 per cent. This tbe County of Pennin B ton and State of 

reaucea iroin ±u '» " V" „„_,!._ Minnesota, on the 2nd day of Jannarr. 

-•- — -.-■ :; . \ t i„ „w,> if- will be tax, payable by the vendor, applies ^ M 8:30 . clock j^^ in BcK , k 13 „, 
therein, and froirixthe abo\e it mu oe h ■ ■ x le D tne a rt- uortgnse.. on pane 545. 

.^ „ -^ violating [except m ^e originai^a .^J.^.^ ^ ^ hich Mld iiortg.^ together with the 

debt Bei 

by Bald 

eaffee, to Merchmts State Bant of Ueri 
Lake Falls bj written* assignment dated 
the 3rd day of January, 1920. and recorded 
in the office of Baid Register of Deeds, on 
1920. at 8 o'clock 



NOTICE 

State of Minnesota,* County of Pennington;^ 
District Court fourteenth Judicial Dis- 
trict. . 
In the Matter of the Dissolution of Thief 

River Music Company. 
To Whom It May Concern : ; 

Notice Is Herehy Given, That all the 
■stockholder,? of the Thief River 
Company, a corporation; created, organiz- 
ed and existing under and by virtue of 
the laws of the State of Minnesota, and 
having its principal officer; and place of 
business in the City of Tlilei River Falls, 
in the County of 'Penninjrtim. ami. State 
of Miiinesota, have presented their Petition 
,to the District Court, of Pennington 
Cminty, Minnesota, praying that said Thief 
I River Music Company be; dissolved -and 
■its affairs wound up and closed. 

Notice la Hereby Further (liven. That 

a hearing on . said Petition will be hi 

before said Court, at the Opening d; 

ofLthe next General Term. of. said Court 

to .be -held in ;'-:d for the County i>t"Penn- 

iiirton. .-"-d State of Minnes<ii;i, in the. 

(V'irt R..".se in the City id" Tliief River* 

"::lls. i:i :•:::.! County and State on the 

TtU dav <: February, VM% at 10 o'clock: 

! A. M., "or as S.ion thereafter as may suit 

; the convenience of the Court, at which 

i time and place all parties interested in 

I said matter will be heard. ! 

Dated this :Ust day of December 11)211 

ANDREW GIMNDELAND. j 

Judge of the District Court 

iFou'rtheenth Judicial IMstricu I- 

iVnuiiifrtoii County. Minnesota. ! 

H. 0/ CIIOMMIE. " ■ 

Attorney for Petitioner. '" I 

ThieJ"- River Falls, Minnesota. 



t'.-i:.-2D 



MORTGAGE FOa^CLOSURE SALE j 
Default haTlnir been made in the pay- j 
ment of the sum of Two Thousand One i. 
Hundred Sixty-w/en and 5R-100 Dollars. 1 
which is claimed tb he due and is due at! 
the date of this notice upon a certain ; 
Mortgage, duly executed and delivered by ; i 
Perley P. Palmer and Regina Palmer, his." 
wife, Mortyaeors, to Goodridge State Bank ; 

(a- corporation under the laws of the State i - , v 

of Minnesota), Mortgagee, bearing date the ; an( J g f£ coa } fl'Om the Chl'lS^ 
18th day of November, 1010. and with r wuuo^« | 

power of sale therein cohtained^dnly re- i rpTl'SOIl & VOeiZ Hardware 
corded in the office of the lteglstez^of -, 



COAL— Order your hard 



cpati that such trdppers are violating | «■«-*• »» , ° , . , j-rfWinn nr Which said Uortgasc together with the 

when seei \ tnat ° ucn „^ ■ r tn arrest and 'ist, or to an educational institution or Becured thereby, was duly assigned 

„i the law and are subject to a rres ^"_| putl i c ar t museum, or a- sale by a b y said First State Bank ofOkiw. Mort : 



skratsX^ctiAlV theirecogn ized dealer in such articles to 
fur-bearing animal left in this ! another such dealer 



y into 



It 



&<• 



ond ami 




,- .ilr. 
. battle 
id not 
vJinner - 
ktedthej 
Ji'liej venistn 
the a-ew ai d 
line, c|ach hayiri; 
Mr. Bl-u'iLjer 
he always,')? 
ner, lii|yit i 
his soyte of 
ships'! than 



■i ,-ilf -n.il the train crew, j invented the pneumatic tube ""Shtj^jsed; tax on -works of art and jewel- ""'i'iS "wbor«as: the said Norths-atom 

' ' took charge: properly, be challenged, there is no I form 728 A> r(n . ise(1 , regulations ¥.tlnn.l m, ...m^.cm,™, ot Min 

' ' -doubt of the fact that he was one ot J 4 g_ rev ; se d; tax on beverages, form - -"- 

726, revised, regulations '52, revised. 



Bridgeman, 



fine: The: laws are 
tion of the mu: 

only .-- ~ N . . 

section in iany great numbers. 11 in- 
discriminate trapping methods are al- 
lowed the rats will in a short tune 
become 'extinct and for thaf x reason j 
the law should be given- the v 
hearted support of the trappers. 



for resale. 
When payable by the manufacturer 
or vendor, taxes must be in the hands 
of the collector of internal revenue on 

or before -the last day of i-no month dcl)t Becure a thereby, was dnly aasie-ned by 

^following the. month in whicn the sale ^^^^T.TLxL^tJ^. 

was made. 1 to Northwestern National Life Insurance 



the 10th day of January 

A. M., in Book 63 of Mortgages, on page 

153. 

Which aald Mortgage, together with the 



n Town- I 
Fiftv-foui . 

Forty- '• 
Principal j 



HE INVENTED THE TIKE 
J. B. D'unlop died not long ago at 
:i.- home i in Dublin. '-,'.„ 

While the statement that ■ Dunlop i . 
' - -'-- 'might 



Following are forms for making- TC- Compsny of Minneapolis innnesota, 
, Imi; i„^;„n. .' t-n written assignment dated the lith 



day 
n- the 
'cint*]c 

M.. in Book CI of said Mortfja^os- on 

page 1C2. and no action nr proceeding 

manufacturers' excise tax haytu? been Institnted. at law ..r ofo.-r 

wise, to recover the debt secured by said 

Mortpace or any part thereof. 



turns and regulations relating i to ' t '"january."i82o. "«nd recorrledi 
taxes,- which may be had on applica-. loth day of January. 1320. at s 
tion. to offices of collectors of intern 
al revenue 
'orm 723 revised, regulations 47, re 



Deeds in and tor the County of Penmn*>- 
ton. and State iof Minnesota, on the 22nd 
day .of November, 1019, at 0:00 o'clock a. 
m.. In Book 13 of Mortgages, on pace 
520 and no action or proceeding Having 
been instituted, at law or otherwise, to 
recover the debt secured by said Mortgage 
or any part thereof.. . 

Now, Therefore, Notice is Hereby Oiven. 
That by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute in such case inuile anil pro- 
vided, the said Mortgage will be fore- 
closed' by a- sale of the premises described 
in and conveyed by said Mortgage, viz: , 
The Northwest Quarter (uwi,i) o£ hoc 
tion numbered Twenty-four 121 
ship numbered One Hundred 
(lot) North, of llange numbered 
one (411 West of the Fifth 
Meridian, containing • 1P0 acres, ni-re »r 
less, according to the United States l.ov- . 
-r'rn»'!t surrey thereof, in r.cntiiiigtpn i 
County and State ot Minnesota, with the 
hcrcditnriionts mid appiirtenar..es , wliieli 
sale will be made by- the Shenfl or Saul 
Pennington County at the front do-'r ,.; 
the Court noose, in the City ,.i Hum 
l'.iver Fails, in said County and Mare. 
,,u tli" "1st .lay of January, 1022. at 10:1)11 
i.-clook a. m.. ,.f that day. at Mblic ven- 
due to the highest bidder lor ("ish. m pay 
said de'-t of >2U'i7.r,il and interest, and the 
l:l-:es. if any. on said preni;.-:»s..and Seven- 
ty-five Dollars, being statutory alt<.rney s 
fees as stipulated in mull by said Mort- 
gage in case, of foreclosure, and the dis- 
O'trsenienls allowed by ifiw : subject to 
redemption at any time -fc-ithin one year 
from the dav of sale, as lirovnleil by law. 
Vlatod December oth. A. !>.. 102,. 

COODKIIICE STATE. BANK. 

P'-P.I, W. MABEY. Mortgagee. 

Attorney for, mortgagee, Thief UiVer lulls. 



€q.. Phone 23. 



■tf 



ADK1NS 



Physician and Surgeon j 

Office Over First National' Bank:, 
riiief -River 'Fails, 'Minn. 




take them long to decide : the inventors. For most of the great 

and without firearms of inventions of the world seem to Have 

captured the two prizes, broken out simultaneously in' different 

was divided among [ places at about the same time. 

elnplovces along .the- At any rate, we know Dunlop was 

i- a feed fit for a king, an incurable inventor. By profession 

'did not admit that he was a veterinary surgeon. 

k his 'deer in this man-, Along about 1888. his 10 year old 

c generally conceded that 'son had a tricycle which bumped un- 

hunting has fewer hard- pleasantly, along on the Insn roads. 

other form now be- Mr. Dunlbp went to work to remedy 

: this. He gives this account oi what 

ijie did: , 

I formed the rims of the .wheels 



ny 



actiseU.— Bemidji Pioneer. 



PROGRESS IN NORWAY 



The i\orw«. 



gian Association of Ani- 
ieties held its sec- 



ual n|eeting, Sept 7, at Christ- 
subjects discussed were 
humane education, laws for humane 
uansport of animals by 
sept. The association has 
inducing the government 



kiltinK and 



uccee.dt ! i 



to ap: 



propria e 10.000 kronen for anti 



cruelty work . and 
bout 2.000 humane 
ments. 



Rats have, 
gnawed thro 
rendering 
itable until i 



A LESSON IN THRIFT 



Nice Nest Egg Results From Saving 
Pennies 

Seventeen thousand two hundred 
and' fifty pennies! 

That is the "crop" of a country- 
storekeeper, N. S. Whitaker, Green- 
ville, S. D., who carted them to town 
and deposited them in one of the city 



the Assignee, anil 
Holder of said Mortgage, has duly, elected 
and does hereby elect to declare the whole 
principal sum of said Mortgage due and 
payable at the date of this notice, under 
the torms and conditions of said Mortgage 
and the power of sale therein contained ■ 
whereas.' there is actually due and claimed 
to he due and payable at the date of this 
notice the sum of Thirty Eight Hundred 
Siiteen and -12-100 (W.slll.42 1 Dollars, with 
interest thereon at the rate of six per cent 
per annum from the :i0th day of November. 
1921, and whereas the said power of sab- 
has become operative, ami no action 01 
proceeding having been instituted at law 
or otherwise, to recover the debt secured 
by said Mortgage, or any part thereof 



Brotherhood of 

AMERICAN YEOMEN 

fTionesta Homested No. 2006. 

Regular meetings every second and 

fourth Fridays of each month at 



Mrfsonic 
welcome. 



Hall 



Visiting Yeom in 



Min 



Dec. 0-ll!-23-"0 .T-(Mr,. 



DR. A. SilKULOV 

P!:; s'.t-ian iind Surgcnp 

In '.fh'arv-e id' Dr. ; A. W. Swetlenluir 
' Office Over First National Bank 
Te'eproine :15U-1 
■lo? No. Arnold' Ave. Phone 




v said Mortgage, or any part thereof: .1 
Now. Therefore. Notice III Hereby Oiven. T 
hat by virtue of the p/wer of saie con- T. 



£ I am prepared to deliver + < 
£ promptly to any part of * f * 
t the city, any kind of + ; * 
wood. Telephone 449- W + 1 ♦ 



of American elm. I made an air tube i banks. . As tbe merchant drove. along 



; of 'rubber, covered it with cloth and 

■ then with rubber again. My son rode 

this tricvele to Belfast, and peopie 

tared arid laughed at the clumsy 



wheels. But he outdistanced the oth- i their journey. 



the country road and. down the streets 
of the city passgrsby little reckoned 
the' value of the contents of the plain 
burlap sack in which the pennies made 



er cyclists easily. 



The merchant brought the savings Thirty-one 



That -,. , 

tallied in snid Mortgag/. and pursuant t, 
the statute in such ease made and pro- 
vided. . the said Mo/tgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of/the premises describe. i 
in and conveyed /by said Mortgage, viz: 
Lot Four 14) ami the East one-half (EVj! 
of the Southeast Quarter (SEV4). and. the 
Northwest Quarter (XWU) of the South- 
east Qiiartej/ iSEV, I. and the -Northeast 
Quarter <NJK!'ii of the Southwest Q 
(SW^il, ^11 being in section 



T. FROISNESS } 

323 3rd! Street W. .. ; * 

MH> I MHM II HtUV 



has distributed 
killing iristru- 



among other damage, 
lgh gas and water pipe=, 
rious buildings uninhab- 
epairs were executed. 



There 'was a Mr. Thompson, for 
whom the claim is made that he first 
had, the Idea of an air filled tire and 
who' took out a patent in 1845, but his 
invention never came into practical 
use, and Dunlop was ignorant of it 
when he! began his work. 



rter 

numbered 

Township niimbereo 

Fifty-three (1531 North o! 

numbered Forty (!0'i West of th- 

*. M.*. containing 200.112 acres, jmorr 

iod of time in which he, has been col- 'or/ess. according to the i-'uitati srato- 
locting the pennies. He tried to save 2t"t"'"Z\ stated ''Minnesota' "vviJii"^ 

a penny a day, he said, excepting the/liered'itnnionts and appurtenances: jvhicb 

national holidays. 



"In MaV, 1889^1 turned out my first j to * n e bank on his fiftieth birthday, One il/mired 

racing* bibycle with the new tire, and!- ar ;<i the amount represented the per- gjJJ. 

it ciirriod off all the first prizes at ; 01 i f time in which he, has been col- or/ 
the Queen's college sports at Belfart. 



Students of singing may now iise a 
new appliance which enables t)(em to 
practise scales, etc., without any 
sound being audible outside/yi'e room. 



sale will be made by the SherilT ofj said 
Pennington County. :at the front donr ol 
the Court -House, in the City of Thiet 
River Falls, in said County and State, oi, 
the nth day of January, 1022, at One 
o'clock P. M. of that day, at public vendue, 
to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said 
debt of Thirty-eight Hundred Sixteen nud 
42-i.nn (<:tS 1,, - i 2t Dollars, and interest, and 
the tuxes, if any, on -said premises, -—' 



and 




EmpireFarms 
Company 

' Capital S'25;000 

L.AiNDS,. LOANS' 
i Cm PROPERTY 

. . • INSURANCE 



Busine?? to Us. We ♦ 



Frnmi.se Courtesy and Efficiency 



■i 



215 Main Ave. North | 

Phone 443 
Tliief River Falls, Minnesota 



Page Eight 



....Mi 



T. 



sh\ 



opp 



Tuesday in 
.tending to 

C. Cummrngs 
nesday in 

nessJ 



M: 



spent tlie first of the week in the 



aty 



e. 



THE THIEF RIVER FAIiLS TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 6, 1922 




Johnson of St Hilaire 
er in the city on Tuesday. 



W. Hj mm of- Goodridge spent 
the city shopping and at- 
arious-busine'ss matters. 



the 



of Detroit spent Wed- 
city attending to busi- 



3. Rogers of Mahnomen 



visiting friends. 



Mrs. Laura Crandall returned Tues- 
day jmorning from Crookston where 
she. spent NJew Year's visiting friends, 

■Miss Rose Gunstad of St. Hilaire 
spent' .Tuesday in the city between 
trains shopping, and visiting friends. 

Miss Judith Erickson returned to 

her home it 'Holt Wednesday' morn 

ing after spending a day here on 

business. 

J 

Miss 01i"e Patterson who was a 
NeWj Year's guest at the H: 0. Loken 
home retuned Wednesday afternoon 
to her home at St. Hilaire. 



Miss* Ele: 
beck returned 
Goodridge 
visiting friends, 



Mr. and 
Goodridge 
Year's at 
mother 



Ill- 



Mrs. 



Mr. and 
children 
at Goodridgi 
Mrs. Babco 



■s. Theodore Tandberg of 
ivere guests during New 
fjRe home of the former's 
Julia Tandberg. . ; 

Mrs. Leon A. Babcock and 

the first of the week 

e' visiting at the home of 

r.k's parents. 



spijnt 



Miss Helfcn 
here Monday 
where she 
relatives ah 



Mr. and' 
•Wednesday 
Montana, 
past six 
relatives. 

Miss Cork 
her home r 
nesday morp 
past week 
her cousin 



Miss Al 
Tuesday mojrning 
she spent 
her broth, 
and Mrs. S 



nor and Miss Mabel Ram- 
Monday evening from 
here they spent the day 



Montgomery returned 

morning from Crookston 

spent the holidays with 

i friends. 



l)lrs. C. M. Talley returned 

evening from Denton, 

here they have spent the 

:eks visiting friends and 



Henrickson returned to 

Beaudette, Minn., Wed- 

ing after spending the 

a guest at- the home of 

H. O. Loken. 



na Jonas returned home 

from St. Paul where 

Year's at .the home of 

in-law and sister, Rev. 

sitz. I 



ivew 



Miss Mallei Rambeck, who has 
spent the holidays here ' visiting her 
sister, Miss Eleanor Rambeck, return- 
ed Tuesday afternoon to her home at 
Fargo, N. p. 



Mr. and 
Gatzke, Mi 
morning to 
a short tinii 
ren visiting 



Mrs. Clifford Englestad of 
returned Wednesday 
their home after spending 
in this city. and at War- 
friends and relatives. 



Arthur J 
afternoon t 
after ; spenc 
city attend 
matters. 



anson returned Tuesday 

) his home at St. Hilaire, 

several days in the 

ing to various business 



Mrs. J. 
returned T 
home at Fi 
spending tl 
home of 
John Ofteni 



Agile: 



Hawkins and little son 

hursday morning to their 

'ram Lake, Sask., after 

e past two weeks at the 

parents, Mr. and Mrs. 

Hahl. 



her 



Tandberg, .who has 
holiday vacation with her 
;. Julia Tandberg, return- 
evening to Northfield. 
: she is a student at St. 



Miss 
spent the 
mother, Mr 
ed Tuesday 
Minn.,- who- 
61af collegi 



Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Kelly of Devils 
Lake, N. D , were New Year's guests 
at the hone of Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. 
Mogenson. Mr Kelly returned to his 
homo Wednesday afternoon while Mrs. 
Kelly remained for a longer visit. 



Mrs. H. 
number of 



for the gue 



0. Loken entertained a 
young folks Tuesday eve- 
ning honoring her guests, Miss Cora 
Hendricksoi l of Beaudette, and Miss 
Olive Patterson of St. Hilaire. Cards 
and dancin ; furnished entertainment 



sts until a late hour when 



lunch was served. The guests includ- 
ed;. Miss Sora Hendrickson, Miss 
Olive Patterson, Miss Marrian and 
Miss Ella Miller, Morion Bishop, Carl 
Sundahl, P >rry and Guy Johnson and 
.Roy Miller. ■ I 

' ^iss The one Walker very delight-! 
fully £nter;ained a group of friends 

-Thursday evening at her home, 418 
West First street. Needlework and 
fortune telling formed the diversion 
of the evening and at eleven ■ o'clock 
an elaborate spread was partaken of. 
The guests were, Mrs. Harry L. 
Schuster, Mrs. Roy Erickson, Miss 



Miss Lulu Allen of St. Hilaire spent 
Thursday in the city visiting friends 
and shopping. 

E. F. ; Dolan left Tuesday evening 
for Minneapolis where he will spend 
a short time on business and visiting 
friends. : 

Harold Smithers left Tuesday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis to resume his 
studies at the University after' spend- 
ing a short vacation with his. parents. 

Lee Ihle returned Tuesday evening 
to : Minneapolis where he is a .student 
at; the University, after , enjoying the 
holidays here .with his folks. ! 
i \ . / 

George Lodoen of /Warren, spent 
Tuesday evening in' the city visiting 
friends, en route to Northfield (where 
he attends -St. Olaf college. j 

William Dixon of Warren was a 
guest of Kenneth Watfam Tuesday 
evening, returning to .his home -Wed 
nesday morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Sapero returned 
home Thursday morning from Minne- 
apolis/where they spent New Year's 
visiting -relatives and friends. 

E. J. Olson, state grain inspector of 
the Spalding elevator at Warren, 
spent Sunday in. this city the guest of 
Pat Keating and -family. 

. Miss Camille Warner left Thursday 
afternoon for Red Lake Falls where 
she is spending a short time visiting 
friends. : ' 

Paul Englestad is in St. Paul this 
week representing the Pennington 
County Farm Bureau association at 
the state meeting of the federation. 

Fred Peterson of Hazel spent/fast 
evening; in the city visiting friends. 
He returned to) his home this morn- 
ing. I 

Mr. "and Mrs. J. L. Bean left -Tues- 
day; evening for Viroqua; Wis., in re- 
sponse' to a message stating the ser- 
ious illness of Mrs. Bean's father. 

Louis Learce of St. Thomas, N. D., 
arrived here Thursday morning to 
spend affew- days visiting his grand- 
daughter, Mrs. C. E. Carlson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert Ostvolden re- 
turned Wednesday evening to their 
home at Minneapolis after spending 
New Year's here with' relatives and 
friends. J . , . 

Mrs. Alfred Peterson and son Lest- 
er, left Wednesday morning for Mid- 
dle River after spending New Year's 
at the home of the former's sister, 
Mrs. Carl Anderson. ... 

Mrs. Louis Rayson and , daughter, 
Lucille and Lorraine left Tuesday eve- 
ning for Madison, Wis., where they 
are spending several days as guests 
at the John Klungness home. 

Mrs. Irvin Tuppin and Mrs.' Anna 
Sorenson arrived Wednesday evening 
from Oklee, and are spending several 
days visiting at the W. A. Bishop 
home. 

Miss Edith Haugen will return this 
evening ; to Faribault. Minn., where 
she is employed, after spending sev- 
eral days visiting her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. A.i A. Haugen. 

Miss Margaret DeCremer, who is. a 
student at the University of Minne- 
sota, returned Tuesday evening to 
Minneapolis after spending the holi- 
days with her parents. 

Miss Cora Swanson will leave this 
afternoon for Breckenridge to resume 
her duties as teacher, after enjoying 
the holidays here with her parents 
Mr. and Mrs. 0. Swanson. 

Mrs. L. L. Cohn and little daughter 
Betty, returned Tuesday morning 
from Minneapolis where they spent 
the holidays as guests of the former's 
parents.' 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Barnard re- 
turned Tuesday morning from Minne- 
apolis and are making their residence 
at the home of Mrs. Anna Langseth 
where they have secured apartments. 

Mr. and Mrs. Knute-Melby and two 
sons, Kenneth and Morris, returned 
home Tuesday morning from Minne- 
apolis where they had been guests 
during the holidays of Mrs. Melby's 
father. ! ' 



Lylabelle 
derson, M 
Inez John: 
Mary Ove, 



chuster, Miss Gladys Ah- 
ss Amy R. Nelson, Miss 
on, Miss Nettie Ove, .Mrs. 

Mrs. Pearl Dale and Mrs. 



Arthur Co lins of Spokane, Wash. 
Miss Eleanor Dahlen delightfully 



entertainec 



were from 
artistically 
gestive of 
five-thirty 
-served to 
Mildred ar 



twelve girl friends at 



cards Satu rday afternoon. The hours' 



3 to 6.. The rooms were 
decorated in colors sug 
the holiday season and at 
a delicious luncheon was 
the following guests, Miss 
d Miss Dorothy Bottelson 
Miss Maybelle Ostby, Miss Beatrice 
Sandum, Miss Evelyn Tessum, Miss 
Phyllis Curtis, Miss Margaret Burns; 
Miss Eileen Arneson, Miss AHce jBerg, 
Prichard, Miss Ruth Vik 
of Strandquist, Minn., and Miss 
Kathleen Ures of Grand Forks. 




Mrs. W. ' B. Fuller returned last 
evening from Warren where she spent 
the day visiting friends.- 

Miss Irma Thompson of Crookston 
is spending! 'a short time here visiting 
her aunt, Mrs.'C. G. Mattson. 

Mrs. J. P; Jensen and 'son Ray- 
mond, of Goodridge spent Thursday 
in tine-city visiting friends and shop- 
ping. 

Miss Sybil McGinn and Miss Helen 
Langseth spent the first of the week 
at Warren visiting the former's uncle 
and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. J, O. Herrick. 

Miss Ella Anderson returned Tues- 
day evening to her home afc Chisholm 
after a brief visit at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. H. L. Larson. 

Mrs. H; L. Sande arrived yesterday 
afternoon from Steiner to spend a few 
days visiting her parents, Mr and Mrs, 
James 0. Sether. 

Rev. 0. J. Lundell_ left yesterday 
afternoon foi'St. Hilaire to attend a 
series of mission meetings which are 
being held at that place. 

Mrs. E. C. Karward returned Wed- 
nesday evening from Warren where 
she spent several days visiting rela- 
tives. 

. Miss Gilma Ostvolden left Tuesday 
evening for Minneapolis where she 
will spend an indefinite period visit- 
ing- her brother and sister-in-law, Mr. 
and Mrs. Bert Ostvolden. 

Miss Lena Kilen left Tuesday after- 
noon for Crookston where she is a stu- 
dent at .the Agricultural college after 
enjoying . a short vacation with her 
parents in this city. 

Lilliam and Gordon Johnstone left 
yesterday afternoon for Red Lake 
Falls where they will spend a few 
days visiting at the H. E. Palmer 
home. 

Miss Esther Halseth who has spent 
the holidays visiting her .brother and 
sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hal- 
seth, left Thursday afternoon for 
Slayton, Minn., where ishg_is an in- 
structor in the public /schools. 
. Bernard Barzen, who: has spent the 
past ten days here visiting his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Barzen, returned 
Tuesday evening to Milwaukee, Wis., 
where he is a student at Marquette 
university. 

Mrs. I. Amundson arrived here 
Wednesday evening from Superior, 
Wis., and will spend several weeks 
visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Oscar Williams and sister, Mrs. Ray 
Johnson. 

William Alexander and Morris, Ma- 
bey left 'yesterday afternoon .,;fpr 
Crookston where they witnessed" the 
Excelsior-Crookston basket-ball game 
which was played there last evening. 
I'Shey returned here this morning. ' 

Mr. and Mrs. F." G. Eagler left 
Tuesday evening for Minneapolis 
where they will spend a short time 
visiting. Mr. Eagler will return here 
in a few days while Mrs. Eagler will 
continue on to the western coast where 
she will remain for an indefinite 
period. 

Miss Gladys Black, Miss Stella Haus 
and Miss Josephine Eichhammer, re- 
turned to their home at Grand Forks 
yesterday afternoon after spending 
the past week here as guests of the 
latter's sister, Miss Margaret Eich- 
hammer and Miss Lottie Austin. 



Mr. and Mrs. ' M. C Burns were 
hosts Wednesday evening to a number 
of their friends at a whist party which- 
was in play at three tables. At the 
close lof an enjoyable evening refresh- 
ments were served by the hostess who 
was assisted in serving by Miss Lu- 
cille ind Miss Evangeline Burns. 

The I. 0. 0. F. hall was the scene 
of a delightful party when a number 
of the young men of. the city were 
hosts at an informal dancing party. 
ElnOr Overland, pianist, Alfred Dyb- 
vik, drums and ■ John Hendry, xylo- 
phone, furnished an excellent program 
of dance- music and the guests includ- 
ed, Miss Myrtle Helgeland, Miss'Lu- 
cille MicGinnity, Miss Elsie Sundahl, 
Miss Esther Soards, Miss Ruby Ben- 
nes, Miss .Lilliam Knight, Miss Twila 
Glines, Miss EtherErickson, Miss Dot- 
ty Krafthefer, Miss Josephine Eich- 
hammer, Miss Stella Haus, Miss 
Gladys Blaiik, Lee Ihle, Milton Lund, 
Milton Laflon, Roscoe Bakke, Harold 
Arneson, Island Knight, Allison Stitt, 
Craig Halwrson, Gregory Werstlien, 
Bernard Bischoff, Dreng Bjornora and 
Clarence Knutson. 

RAILROAD WRECK 



Remarkable Crop 
Potatoes Grown 



'3,407 



Indiana Farmer Raises _, 
Bushels on Eight Acres 
of Ground 



(Special to the Tribune) 
Last Friday was an unusually busy 
day in the Leigard railroad yards. 
There had nj>t for a long time been so 
much freight traffic as was going on 
that day. But the day did- not go by 
without a serious accident and which, 
to make things worse, . culminated in 
a heart-rending tragedy. 

A north-b'ound through freight had 
just crossedlthe Red Lakej,river bridge 
when bang and crash its engine collid- 
ed with that of the south-bound locai 
freight train. The division train 
dispatcher, it was: learned later, had 
unluckily got the' "wires crossed." Yet, 
Happily, no killing , resulted, other 
than a cow that had miscalculated her 
steps, getting in between the engines, 
was cut "square in two." 

A middle-aged, heavyweight, lady 
chancing to be walking a block's dis- 
tance away from the scene of the dis- 
aster and well within view of it, jump- 
ed right up in thu air and hollered, 



H. C. J. Sub Urban. 



were applied during the summer and 
shallow cultivation was practised [al- 
ways.' ■' • 

. Many hills contained from 18 toj 24 
marketable ■ potatoes, and showed 
what many farmers can do them- . 
selves., ' ? 



Commercial Fertilizer Proved 
of Immense Benefit in 
Making Record .- 



Barbers claim that their trade is a 
barometer of commerce. When "times 
are bad," men let their hair go much 
longer without -attention. 

" CLASSIFIED COLUMN 



. W. W. Stauffer of Akron, grew 3, 
407 bush'els of marketable potatoes 
on eight acres of virgin muck soil the 
past season, showing an average yield 
of 425 bushels to the acre. * This is 
a record for Indiana for this year and 
possibly for all past years, and is far 
above the so-called records, of sur- 
rounding states. Stauffer's big yields 



FOUND— VERT GOOD FOUNTAIN PEN, 

on 401 Arnold Ave. N. 'Owner may have 

same by paying for thlB advertisement. 

Carl Swedenburg. 88-00 



LOST — A HANDBAG CONTAINING 
. small change and letters, morning of De- 
cember 24, between 418 State Ave. Nor,- 
and Soo depot. Finder please notify Tri- 
bune. ; 87(f. 



FOR KENT— NINE ROOM HOUSE. IN- 
qoire Peterson'B Millinery. ,78iti 



'murder]" 



CO All— Order -your hard arid soft 
coal from the ChrUteruwn & Vselz 
Hardware Co. Phone 23. tf 



ANNOUNCE MARRIAGE 
Announcements |hav e been received 
in this city announcing the marriage 
of Mrs. Beatrice A nna Oilier, former- 
ly of this city td Gustav Schwartz- 
baum. The marriage took place at 
Boston, Massachusetts, December 31 
1921, at the home \>f the bride's moth- 
er.. Further details of the event are 
lacking. 

FANCY BREAKFAST EGGS 
Sunnyside Fancy Breakfast eggs — 
we will deliver to any part of the city 
if your order amounts to 2 dozen or 
more, cash on delivery. Phone 335-M, 
C. C. Schuster, 622 St. Paul Ave. S. 

The young woman was telling an 
acquaintance about her girl friends. 

"Yes," she said, "my chum,, Maud, 
is only 25, but she has been married 
three- times; And, wonderful to state, 
her husbands have all been Williams." 
( "You don't say jso," replied he; 
"why, she must be a regular bill col- 
lector." ! '■ 



COAL — Order your hard and soft 

coal from the Christenson & Voelz 

are not accidental but come from Hardware Co. Phone 23. tf 

practising good methods and appli-| r-^ — ~ 

cation of sound business principles to F ° B . SALE_NEW I ?P MEI > ° AK M-INCH 

his business of farming. I j ^T^ ?100 : wU1 !eU '« ** ™£ 

He has co-qperated the last two -_ 

years with the extension department ! wanted to but-one registered 

of Purdue in demon-itratino- the hpt-' Guer " se y bul! ola enough for immediate 
oi ruraue in aemonst.rat.ing tne Det- scrTl(:e f/y^ w H Krueger Hc , d Lab(! 

ter methods. He grows Rural New Falls, SHnn. ■ 87-tf 

Yorkers for Jiis late crop. The field 1 — -— — 

,was broken early in May and worked P ^ n 5AL rt E 7 DR ^ P ° LE ) VO , OD x / PII < B 
', „ ..' , f ... , . ,,-„ - ?2.50; delivered, 55; dry ' cord wood, 

down well before he drilled m 150 sawed In stove lengths, S7 per cord de- 
pounds of muriate of potash and 150 livered. Phone your orders, 8-F-210. Ness 

pounds of 16 per cent acid phosphate- Br0B -' • . 86-3tp 

tb 'the acre. His seed was what he P0R sale-peninsulak round oak 
had selected from the hill at digging, heater: will trade fir larger size. Wil- 
time last fall. It was Stored in. an "am Schumacher, 704 Conley ave. S. 86-tf 
outside pit where it kept in perfect " p - 0R salb _ L o ts _most " desirable 
condition until May 1st. Then it was : location ; easy ' termB. Inquire at The 
taken out, treated with corrosive sub- ' Tribune. sitf 

limate solution to prevent scab, black j lost-brilliant bar -pin satuu- 
egj- and black scurf, and spread in . dny afternoon between 1 and S. Finder ' 
a well lighted, airy space in a barn, please notify 112 Kendall ave. s. Reward 
where it green sprouted for four, offered. 72. t f 

weeks. At planting time, June 6th, 
the potatoes had nice, short, tough 
green sprouts on them ready to start 
growing as soon as they were placed 
in the ground. Those that did not, 
were discarded at once, .as Mr. Stauf- 
fer has found that it does not pay to 
use poor seed for any crops. The po- 
tatoes were cut in pieces weighing 
about two ounces and planted with a 
machine, about five inches deep. The 
rows were 36 inches apart and pieces 
were dropped 15 inches apart in the 
row. He used about 13 bushels of seed" 
to the acre. 

The field was rolled both ways im- 
mediately after planting, as the muck 
seemed loose and needed packing. Two 
Sprayings With • Bordeaux • mixture 



Deposited to secure circulation (U. S. bonds par value) 50,000.00 
All other United. States government, securities 88,000.Q0 



Miss Gena and Miss Betsy Legvold, 
who have spent the holiday vacation 
with their mother, leave this after- 
noon for Brushville and Bamesville, 
Minn., respectively, where they are 
engaged in teaching school. 

Elnor Overland and Elmer Tand- 
berg, who have spent .the holiday 
vacation at their respective homes 
here, returned Tuesday evening to 
Northfield, Minn., where they are 
students at St. Oalf college. 

0. J. 'Amundson and daughter, Eve- 
lyn, arrived, from Devils Lake, N. D. 
for a visit with 0. N. Olson and fam- 
ily, of the Minnehaha Farm, east of 
this city. Mr. Amundson is a brother 
of Mrs.; Olson. 

Ed. Mobraaten, of Wendell, Minn., 
was the guest of his brother-in-law, 
H. S. Dahlen, and family, Wednesday 
and Thursday. On Thursday he tran- 
sacted business at Goodridge in com- 
pany with Mr. Dahlen. Mr. Mobraat- 
en was for -many years one ' of the 
county 'commissioners of Grant coun- 
ty, and is regarded as one of the 
most substantial citizens of that sec- 
tion, i ■ 



=2 



Compound Interest 

—how it works 

! ! 

At ordinary rates, it takes money at simple in- 
terest five to eight times longer to double itself 
than at Compound Interest. 

Many banks compound interest only twice a year. 
This bank compounds interest four times a year, 
which makes money grow faster, 

So This Is a Good Bank f 0T Savings 

A new interest quarter starts January 1st. All 
money you have on deposit by the 1 Oth will earn 
interest from January 1st. ■ . j 

So Now Is a Good Time to Put Money in 
THE 

First and Peoples State Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 

Largest Paid In Capital of Any Bank in ' 
Pennington County. 



for rent— fully modern well- 

furnlshed room, suitable for one or two 

persons. 401 Arnold Ave. N. Phone 350-2. 

OStt 



FOR SALE, TRADE OR RENT— CITY 

property and farms. See Andrew Ness 

and-makea deal. Fl-22 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM FURNISHED - 
house on Conley ave. Immediate pos- 
session. Lawrence Mt£. Co. T9-tf 



FOR RENT— A MODERN FURNISHED 
rooms. 801 Main ave. N. Phone 309. 83tf 



FARM WANTED— WANTED TO HEAR 
from owner of a farm or good land for 
sale, price reasonable. L. Jones, Box 551, 
OIney, 111. 



LOST— FOUNTAIN . PEN, BEWTEEN 
Stebbin's Drug Store and Mulrys Bazzanr; 
on Tuesday. Finder please return to tiiis 
office. ■ 89— ltp 



Charter No; 5894. 



Reserve District No. 9 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF THE 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

at Thief River Falls in the State of Minnesota 
at the close of business on December 31st, 1921. ' 



T RESOURCES 

Loans and discounts, including rediscounts 5521,562.03 

Total loans 

Overdrafts, secured, none; unsecured, $33'0.28.......1" 



Total 



Other bonds, stocks, securities, etc 

Banking house, ?59,500.00; furniture and fixtures, 
, $10,544.54 j. 

Real estate owned other than banking house 

Lawful reserve with Federal. Reserve bank. _ 

Cash" in vault and amount due from national' banks 

Amount due from State banks, bankers, and trust com- 
panies in the United States (other than included in 
items 8, 9 or 10) ."......'. 

Checks on other banks in the same city or town as re- 
porting bank ..: : 



$521,562.03 
330.28', 



138,000.00 
15,929.21. 

70,044.54 
10,244.07 
29,918.64 
44,010.39 



1,206.27 . 
6,427.08 



Total of items 10, 11 and 13 _ ; : 51,643.74 



Redemption fund with U. S. treasurer and due from , 
U. S. treasurer ..:.:..-. .'. ; 



Total . 



'2,500.00 
$840,172.51 



Capital stock paid in 
Surplus fund 



LIABILITIES 



Undivided profits .$30,913.06 * 

Less, current expenses, interest, and taxes paid. '28 481.76 

Circulating notes outstanding i ' 

Amount due to State banks, bankers, and trust com- 
panies in the United States and foreign .countries.... 
Cashier's check on own bank outstanding 

Total of items 21, -22, 23, 24, 25 ._ 
Individual deposits subject to check . 



44,291.15 



Certificates of deposit due in less than 30 days (other 

than for money borrowed) _ 

State, county, or other municipal deposits secured by 

pledge of assets of this banE : :., 

Dividends unpaid :. 

Other demandi deposits ....:.. : ....".[" 

Total of demand deposits (other than bank de- 
posits) subject to reserve 211 451.64 

Certificates of deposit (other than for money borrowed) ■ 
Other time deposits 



Total of time deposits subject to reserve .- .'....; 415 198.42 

United States deposits (other than postal savings!) 
including' War Loan deposit account and deposits 
of United States disbursing officers ;.. 



50,000.00 , 
35,000.00; 

^2,431.30 ! 
50,000.00 

34,257.46 
10,033.69 ' 



116,145.71 

87,054.05 

5i099.4e 

3.000.00 1 

152.42 



370,661.59 
44,636.83 . 



11,800.00 



Total deposits ... 



Bills payable with Federal Reserve bank... 
Total - 



682,741.21 



■ 20,000.00 

--.-- — $840,172.51, 

State of Minnesota, county of Pennington, ss:' I 

I, W. H. Akre, cashier of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear that 
the above statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief 

W. H. AKRE,' Cashier, ' 
Correct — Attest 
■ " - C. L. HANSEN, - 

E. M. BENNES, ! 
RASMUS OEN, Djrectors. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 6th d4y of January • 1922 

GEORGE W. WEKSTLFJN, ' 
Notary Public, Pennington County, Minn. . 
My commission expires Oct. 22 1926 • 
..'<■. ' !■',-- 

■' ', '"i- 



'S 



ts- 



X: 



y 



VOL 



<v\* v -^? 






- The. Tribjine by Carrier 
Goes Direct to ft , + * 



THE 




TWICE-A-WEEK 



Twice-a-Week ; Tribune 

' ~ '■ I ■' ' 

Is First With) the News 



*ifO 



THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA. TUESDAY, JANUARY 10. 1922 



$2 A YEAR IN ADVANCE 



TWO HUSKY BASKETBALL WALLOPS 
ADMINISTERED TO EXCELSIOR FIVE 



Cornell's l|en Take Double- 

Header 3ill From Fast 

Down State Quint 



V 



Crafty Playing and Won 

derful Teamwork is 

Feature of Contests 



t:lb lineup 



THEEI 



Plummer 
Carlson 

■Hadrath, Penney, 
Holtzknecht 
Brown ..... 



I XCELSIOB. 

Maushan Right Forward 

HumlBtan Left Forward 

Louden '.: Center 

Hutton Right Guard 

De Vries...'. ...]...... Left Guard 



4M l tl.lt t HIII I IH t ttiM.< t 



RIVER FALLS. 

Right Forward 

. ." .Left Forward 

Kiland ..... .'Centers 

Left Guard 

Right Guard 



♦ TWO HARBORS FIRST TEAM ♦ 

♦ NOT BEATEN BY BEMIDJI •♦ 

♦ : . .■' > 

♦ The report circulated about the ♦ 

♦ city yesterday that Bemidji de-;* 

♦ feated Two Harbors in the latter ♦ 

♦ city a couple of nights ago has ♦ 

♦ been found to be erroneous. The ♦ 

♦ basket ball team that actually ♦ 

♦ was defeated by Bemidji is. the ♦ 

♦ Y. if. Ci A. team representing ♦' 

♦ Two Harbors, who were at the ♦ 

♦ short end of the score in a game ♦ 

♦ playeu- at Bemidji Saturday ♦ 

♦ night, 27 to 24. The Two Har- ♦ 

♦ bors team that is to play Thief ♦ 

♦ River Falls Thursday and Friday ♦ 

♦ nights of the week played a ♦ 
.♦ Duluth tank corps team. on the ♦ 

♦ night in | question and decisively.* 

♦ defeated! them. ! ♦ 
> Hl l | )lt tMltl lt ll l M I >t |M 



definitely announced when the local 
five is to play Crookston, tiut when' 
the times arrives it is certain to de- 
velop into a great game. And that is 
the very thing that the Connell men 
are conscious of, fully realizing that 
Crookston is out to scalp 'em. 

TWO HARBORS FOR TWO GAMES. ■ 



Showing great improvement over 
other games ( f this season, the Thief 
River Falls ill-star aggregation of 
basketballers laid down the law to 
the fast Excf lsior five, here for two 
games on Fr.day and Saturday eve- 
nings at the Auditorium. 

The game Friday ended by Thief 
River Falls winning 35 to 23 and the 
Saturday congest found them again 
in the lead, S 1 to 30. 

Thief Rive: Falls basket ball en- 
thusiasts surj got. a handsome half 
a dollars worth of thrills in both 
contests, fe itured by' clever and 
speedy worl: on the part of both 
quints. The largest crowd of the 
season saw 'I 'riday's contest, when it 
is estimated that the sidelines at the 
Auditorium hsld several hundred spec- 
tators, all oi i whom were geared for 
basket, ball and prepared to see what 
they' finally i .dually witnessed, a bas- 
ket ball gan e that will go . down as 
perhaps the greatest contest of skill 
and speed! evjr played in Thief River 
Falls. ■ • j '-. . 

The first game started with the 
teams settinj a terrific pace, for one 
another. Thi offensive and defensive 
tactics of ea< h were precise and quick 
and the gane was featured by com- 
paratively few fumbles on. the part 
of any of the players. 

"Swede" Carlson worked like a fer- 
\ret, with sp ;ed to burn, feeding his 
""teammates f om every position on the 
floor. Frequently he dribbled the 
ball x the lenith of the hall for clean 
baskets. He]' had Excelsior highly be- 
wildered in -nany instances and they 
generally ke it him covered by a man 
or two. x Plimmer started the scor- 
ing for Tliief River Falls by execut- 
ing a neat ci ge after a couple minutes 
of play. 

This was followed by Excelsior 
scoring six poinds, which only served 
as a spur to thelocal boys to tighten 
up, which they did in grand fashion. 
Excelsior, on the other hand, didn't 
loosen up to any'n oticeable degree : 
however, anl demonstrated again and 
again that tiey were a serious minded 
lot and mesrit business, with every 
move. Up t> about five minutes be- 
fore the\ldse.of the first half they 
lead by sevjeral points and indicated 
" that they desired to hold their posi- 
tion. The offensive tactics of Carlson 
f and Plummet cropped out at this 
stage, howiver, {and the boys from 
Excelsior ipparently seemed help- 
less in the face of it and plainly ahow- 
, cd they wete tiring. The first half 
ended with :h e score 13 all. 

Louden, ExQelsior center, has go.t 
a lot of basket ball in that foxy look- 
ing head of: his and he proved- the 
general of 3 Ikcelsior's game. It might 
be said here that he was the "glass 
man" of Excelsior's tactics. When he 
hit the flo >r it meant a signal for 
his teammates, too, to partake of its 
cooling effect. It seemed highly re- 
freshing to the big boy at center, as 
•well as for Jthe rest' of his warriors, 
who seldom [failed to sprawl out like 
kittens on ;he hearth after the fash- 
ion of their I leader. This Louden, of 
course, is sri extremely difficult man 
to reckon -ifith. In. the first place, 
he appeared with a painted leg, the 
aftermath cf a collision on the floor at 
Crookston the night previous, and this 
wounded member no doubt won him 
'at least the -'sympathy of the younger 
feminine spectators- on the sidelines, 
if not the rriore hardened basket bal 
- ; followers. What may have appeared 
to be muner to some meant merely 
a. rest .'to 1ne crafty . Louden. He's a 
mightv likible.chap, though, and five 
-' men like him would make quite a rip- 
ple on th£ S waters of basket -ball. 
' There is n >! department of the game 
■that Louden is not conversant with 
and he placed the stellar role at' the 
Auditoriun- Friday night so far as Ex- 
- celsior was concerned. _ . 

■ But to get back to the second half 
of this first' game Friday night. The 
local boys ippeared on the floor with' 
a grim bunch of countenances, caused, 
no doubt, by the final ending of the 



first half, 13 all. It was plain to see 
that they did not intend that- the sec- 
ond half should endthat way and start- 
ed the| proceedrrrgg" by hooking ; a 
cage after but ten seconds of play 
Hadraih had been sent to tlje showers 
and replaced by Jordan Penney, 
who was in a new position at center, 
with Louden towering -over him- at 
least six inches. 

With Carlson passing Plummer the 
buck, he generally hits the basket, 
Brown and Holzknecht were right and 
when such I is the case, the final out- 
come with!' Thief River Falls could 
hardly be I called as being in doubt. 
Baskets were coming the Thief River 
Falls way one after the other until 
they had 1 35 chalked up, with jEx- 
celsior struggling valiantly to recoup 
the prestige they had won during: the 
first halfc'i 

And so : ended the first game Fri- 
day night, Excelsior, 21; Thief River 
Falls) 35. ! 



Fast Team Will Appear Here Thursday 
and Frdiay at the Aaditorlam, 

The Thief River Falls basket ball team 
will .be seen in action against the ' Two 
Harbors five at the Auditorium on Thurs- 
day .and Friday evenings of this week. 

PERRY JOHNSON TO U. OF M. 

The Tribune learns that Perry John- 
son, well known and popular athlete, 
left last evening for Grand Rapids, 
Minn., there to join Prof.' A. D. Wil- 
son, of the University Extension Di- 
vision, and it is reported he will be- 
come a permanent member of the .uni- 
versity extension staff. Mr. Johnson 
has attracted widespread attention as 
a Guernsey breeder, and it is under- 
stood that university authorities have 
sought his services for some time. He 
will be greatly missed in local athletic 
circles, in which he has been^a potent 
arid inspiring influence. 



Manny Hammer 
Frost Victim 

Death From Freezing, Trag- 
ic End of Former Resi- 
. dent of This City 



Body Found' Within 200 feet 
of Cabin 17 Miles 
: South of Williams 



♦ PARENT-TEACHER MEETING ♦ 

♦ A meeting of - the Parent- ♦ 

♦ Teachers association will be held ♦ 

♦ this evening at the Lincoln high ♦ 

♦ school 'auditorium; Ah interest- ♦ 

♦ ing program, including ' several ♦ 

♦ musical selections, will bje pre-,* 

♦ sented, and matters of vital in-'* 

♦ terest to the parents of the city ♦ 

♦ will be discussed. Therefore, all ♦. 

♦ parents are urgently and earn- * 

♦ estly requested to come out, Be * 

♦ there promptly at 8:00 o'clock. ♦ 
IttMl l llltmi l lltttHtH 



GIRL'S COMMUNITY CLUB TO 
MEET WEDNESDAY EVENING 



Morlan 'Bishop r 
^InNewStateJob 



Resigns Position With Bank- 
ing Department to Take 
Treasury Post ! 



Popular Service Man to Be- 
come Assistant Cashier 
to Rines Monday 



{ Second Game 

The second game was largely a re- 
petition! of .the first in the matter of 
play and : tactics, with Thief River 
Falls leading all the way. The lineup 
was essentially the. same Except that 
Kiland, who had suffered quite a se- 
vere wrench to his shoulder in- the 
game Friday night, did not appear in 
uniform.: ICarlson and Plummer play- 
ed their same old game, time after 
time running wild around Excelsior, 
delivering telling blows to their de- 
fense. Thief River Falls did the 
leading all the .way. During the 
ond half, however, the Excelsior quint 
rallied their forces near the stage, 
held a 10-minute conference and came 
back determined to make a last stand 
to win. !"Mu'ch ado about, nothing 
was the .'result of the recess . called 
by Excelsior, as they did not score 
but one point after their return to 
play. 

Just previously Hutton of the Ex- 
clesior lineup, was taken out of the 
game after it was reported, that he 
had suffered, a broken nose when he 
collided with a Thief River Falls man. 
He was replaced by a little fellow 



Morlan .Bishop, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. M. Bishop, of this city, this week 
resigned as examiner with the state 
banking department to accept a posi- 
tion as assistant cashier in the state 
treasurer's office. He will assume 
his new duties next Monday. 

The appointment of- Mr. Bishop, who 
has-been with the banking department 
a year, is a recognition of. faithful 
and efficient sendee in Iiis present 
position. Mr. Bishop is a graduate of 
the Thief River Falls high school and 
the state university. He is a veteran 
of the World war, .'giving two years 
to army service, one year of which he 
spent in France. Prior to entering the 
service he taught history in the local 
high school. 

FLOOD DAMAGE AWARD UPHELD 



Manny Hammer, well known in Thief 
River, Falls, having been employed in 
this city as a butcher by E. L. Rol- 
land and Louis DeCremer, was found 
frozen to death a week ago Saturday 
at his homestead south of Williams. 
He worked here two years ago for Mr. 
Holland. Hammer's parents resided- at 
St. Hilaire, where his father died sev- 
eral years' ago, his mother being 
resident of this city when she died 
three years ago. The Beaudette Reg- 
ion 'gives the following account of 
the finding of the body: 

"To be lost in the woods and to be 
frozen to death within two hundred 
feet of his home was the tragic fate 
that overtook M. Hammer, a home-' 
steader who', lived seventeen miles 
souih of Williams, on Friday night 
or Saturday morning. Hammer was 
seei about his yard Friday morning, 
butfwhen he did not show up again 
by poon on Saturday his neighbors be- 
alarmed, and a party consisting 
of ffhos. '.Moe, John Brummer, Carl 
En|om arid Emil Olson started out to 
look 'for him: They had gone only 
a short distance into the woods when 
they came upon his dead body in the 
snow, and everything pointed to the 
fact that, he had become lost in the 
woods and had frozen to death. His 
tracks showed that he had walked 
in a circle, perhaps for hours, and 
that his gun, with which he evidently 
had been hunting rabbits, Had been 
thrown to one side when he became too 
weak to carry, it. 

■ "Deputy Coroner Frank .Johnson of 
Baudette was notified, but the circum- 
stances all pointed to death from 
freezing, and it was decided not to 
hold an inquest. The body 
brought to Baudette, where it is being 
held until word from deceased's form- 
er home at Red, Lake Falls is receiv- 
ed 

"Deceased was about 45 years of 
age and was not married. ; He had 
lived alone'oriihis homestead. for sev 
eral years. He was well known n. 
Baudette, having worked in the millf 
here." '. 



The Girl's Community club will 
meet Wednesday evening January 11, 
at the home of Mrs. J. M. Bishop.' 
All members and their friends are re- 
quested to be present. 



Ira C. Richardson, 
Old Settler, Dead 



Paralytic Stroke Ends Ca- 
reer of Former Posipiast- ' 
er and Probate Jlriige 



Began Practice of -Law in- 
~ Red River Valley Thir- 
ty-seven Years Ago 



Ira. Cutler Richarson died early 
Sunday morning at the family resi- 
dence, 502 LaBree Avenue, as a re- 
sult of a paralytic stroke which oc- 
curred three weeks ago, ending an ac- 
Air traveling at' 12 ce5fs a mile is ' trv,e career of more than thirty-seven 



the aim of the makers of a new style 
of French aeroplane. 



Labor to Rally 
at Auditorium 



Public is Invited to Hear E. 
G. Hall, President of 
State Federation . 



John J. Manning,' Washing- 
ton, to Speak on Import- 
ance of Union Label 



Can 



• A mass meeting and union [labor 
rally, to which the public is invited, 
will be held at the Auditorium Satur- 
day evening, January 14, when E. G. 
Hall, president of the State Federa- 
tion of Labor, and John J. Manning, 
secretary of the Union Label Trades 
'department; of the American Bedera- 
if deliv, 



years as a public official and practic- 
ing attorney. The death ofjMr. Rich- 
ardson was not entirely unexpected, 
since he suffered a stroke two years 
ago which left him in a greatly weak- 
ened condition, and causing his retire- 
ment from active -public service at 
that time. 

Judge Richardson was bom at Ne- 
banon, N. H., September 21, 1855, 
coming west with his parents ten 
years later, the family settling at 
Viola, near' Rochester, Minnesota. He 
attended school there arid at E.lgin, 
graduating from the Rochester high 
school. ' Having a penchant for the 
law, he became a student at the Uni- 
versity of Iowa, Iowa City, graduat- 
ing from the law school of that in- 
stitution. During this period he was 
a classmate and schoolmate of Sen- 
ator Frank B. Kellogg. 

On March 25, 1885, he married Miss 
Orra M. Evans, of Elgin, Minn., arid 
soon thereafter moved to northwest- . 
ern' Minnesota, settling • at Argyle, 
Marshall "county, where he served as 
county attorney for four years.. The 
family moved to Thief River. Falls in 
1892. Mr. Richardson was always a 
staunch Republican injils political af- 



Suprefhe Court Finds Farmers 
Recover From Railroads 

Farmers whose lands were damaged 
by floods' in 1918, caused by diversion 
of surface water . from its natural 
course, due to construction of railroad 
roadbeds, - can recover from the rail- 
road companies, the state supreme 
court holds. A verdict is affirmed in 
the case of Ole Eikeri against the Min- 
nesota & Manitoba and the Canadian 
National railway, brought in Beltrami. 

, county. "The finding that defendants 

who contained a mighty loTof basktet caused plaintiff's land to-, be flooded,'' 
ball, to say the least. ! \tha decision says, "by negligently fail- 



Hermanson and Hadrath both shar- 
ed honors- at center for Thief River 
Fa)ls Saturday night, and each show- 
ed up well in the tight spots. 

It cannot be said that any , one 
member of the local lineup stood out 
over his teammates to any large ex- 
tent. They all played a brilliant game 
and the crowd present evidenced their 
satisfaction at their showing. 

The contest ended with Thief River 
Falls at the top. 21 to 30. Excelsior 



Later— After the above was in type 
we learn that Tom ' Mb-e,. who found 
the-body, a resident of the east side, 
gives a slightly different version of 
the finding of the body. Instead of 
being found within 200 feet of the 
cabin,' the body was located about two 
miles away. Mr. Moe owns a home- 
stead in ? the vicinity of. the Hammer, 
homestead. ' . 

CATHOLIC ORDER FORESTERS 
•INITIATE CLASS LAST NIGHT 



ing to provide a sufficient outlet for 
surface water turned from its-natural 
course, and thereby caused him sub- 
stantial damage, is sustained by. the 
evidence." 



George Korpi, 13 year old Cloquet 
boy, while hunting rabbits, bumped 
into black bear. . The lad fired one 
shot from his 22 rifle and then ran 
.a mile home; Returning with his 
father, a bear weighing 500 lbs. was 
S puVforthtte test"they hal whThjfound dead.-Warroad Pioneer, 
was, not enough, that's all. They had 
tried out every form of play with 
which they were familiar in both con- 
tests, but the teamwork and speed of 
Connell's men evidently could not be 
downed. Excelsior can truthfully say 
that they met the better team, which 
may be (simmered down to its last 
analysis -where "the best team won." 
Perry Johnson officiated in his usual 
manner and not a single objection was 
heard to any of his decisions. Excel 
sior is represented by as clean and 
gentlemanly an aggregation of ath- 
letes as: has ever performed at bas- 
ket ball! in Thief River, Falls,; _and 
when'that is the case followers of the 
winter sport are assured of an -absence 

of wrangling and' misunderstandings. 

. It was announced Saturday ■ night 

that Two Harbors will appear in this 

city next Thursday and Friday, Jan- 
uary 12 and 13, to take on Thief River 

Falls. !. 
Last year's Two Harbors team was 

accredited by Walter Camp, famous 

sports writer, with being one of the 

five best teams in the United States. 

Thief River Falls stands undefeated 

for the I season, but it must be taken 

into consideration that they have stub- 
bom resistance yet to meet up with 

in Crookston and Two Harbors. 

Crookston has a ■ crack organization 

this year, led by Benny Sampson, 

known as one of the best, basket ball 

chiefs in Minnesota. It has npt been 



position of .labor squarely before the 
people.! 

Mr. Manning, whose work is large- 
ly connected with the problem of im- 
pressing upon labor men everywhere 
the necessity 'of demanding the union 
label on wearing apparel, etc., comes 
co deliver a message as to the best 
way to solve this as well- as, all other 
industrial problems confronting the 

workers of Minnesota. He is to make two sons to mourn his loss, 
an especial appeal to the women, the j 'Wayne Evans, is secretary 



wives and' daughters of union men. ', | Commercial club of Yakima, .Wash- 
It is , said that women spend 85 1 ! ington, and Glenn' Ira is agent for 



A class was initiated in the Catholic 
Order of Foresters by Rev. Fr. Noesen 
and State Deputy Matilda .Barcalaux 
assisted by the drill team, on January 
9, 1922. 

A banquet was served at the Evelyn 
hotel for about forty members and 
guests after which Fr, Noesen [ gave 
a very • eloquent talk for the good of 
the order. 

Mrs. Richter, toastmistress, called 
on different ones for toasts, ifrhich 
were responded to by Rev. Fr. Noesen, 
Deputy Matilda . Barcalaux, officers 
and some members. 



DeW Leaves U. S. Prison 



per ceit of the money contained in 
our weekly and monthly pay envelopes 
and^f this is true, it is not difficult 
to imagine the tremendous power they 
could wield in the event that every 
laborer's 'wife bought only those 
goods adorned with the union label. 
There has been much_good work done 
in. this connection, and-the women are 
guick to respondto* the appeals sent 
out by our department. Without a 
demand for the uriion label a large 
part of the effect and influence of 
organized labor is lost, and for that 
reason the American Federation of 
Labor is' making this branch of its 
work as effective as possible," said 
Mr. Manning. 

$tr.- Hall about two weeks ago sent 
notices to the various secretaries of 
subordinate unions of this city con- 
taining a call for a mass meeting to 
be held Friday evening, January 3, 
at which time he intimated that_ sev- 
eral persons prominent in labor circles 
would address Thief River Falls work- 
in the meantime the state fed- 



eration president secured the promise 
of Mr. Manning to come here to speaki 




tion of Labor, will deliver addresses. 

Union labor men of Thief River , filiation, and as a reward for faithful 
Falls plan 'to make this meeting the party sen-ice was appointed pqstmast- 
largest ever held by union workers , er by President Harrison, serving in 
in this section of ..the state and in an -that capacity ten years. He. was elect- 
effort to stir federation men and wo-iedjudge of probate of' Red Lake 
men to action are-bringing Mr. Hall county, retiring when, the county was 
and Mr. Manning here to place the divided. Four years ago. he was elect- 



ed to the same position in Pennington 

county, and he "retired at the end of 

two years owing to ill health. Mr. 

Richardson was a charter member of 

the city school board, a charter and 

honorary member of the volunteer fire 

department of this city,, and a member 

of the -Modem Woodmen and Royal 

Neighbors. ' . . 

The deceased leaves his wife' and. 

His son, 

off the 



the Great Northern at Bronson, Minn. 

The remains were taken to Elgin, 
Minnesota, -his old home, last night, 
accompanied by members of the fam- 
ily, and the interment will take place - 
tomorrow. Brief services were held 
at the family residence yesterday af- 
ternoon by Rev. Smith, of the Method- 
ist church. Members' of the local bar 
association acted as pall bearers apd 
accompanied the remain? to the Soo 
station last .evening. 

Judge Richardson was highly es- 
teemed . in the city and surrounding 
country, as his lengthy service in 
positions . of public trust would indi- 
cate' He saw this city grow from a 
formation ■ of tar paper shacks to a 
city of formidable proportions, and his 
best friends bear witness that he' con- 
tributed in *the fullest , measure" to • 
every worthy undertaking and enter- 
prise. • " -. 



t )) H"t" i u i MtiMimn 



RUSSIAN, RELIEF! 




♦ Attention is respectfully .' di- ♦ 

♦ rected to the -editorial in today's ♦ 

" t'V^ 1- "~ „,„<; ™.,fT,n7,»d tn the ♦ issue headed, "We Feast — They ♦ 

£X m i TrZ SS , MlManV Starve," dealing witk the pititful ♦ 

. '.j .. „„.„„„„ t „ i, !,««, 011 ♦ details of the famine in stricken ♦ 

Friir ' an!™ Mining ♦ Hussia. Itis Uo^ant that all ♦ 

C0m6S ^^Ta^g'^n a an S r h a! X W 5£E? ^SSS X 
message -for laboring men ana nab — 

rriade himself popular everywhere by 



♦ we believe to be a fair and truth- ♦ - 
♦. ful account) written,' by impartial ♦ 

♦ observers, and with this under- .♦ 

♦ standing hi mind, let us open our ♦ 

♦ hearts and_contribute something ♦ 

♦ to these unforturiate people. We ♦■ 

♦ have given much it is true, but ♦ 

♦ we cannot, we must not, shut our ♦ 

♦ eyes to the needs of -human be- ♦ 

♦ ings starving to dentil. ♦ 

♦ The Pennington 



county 'com- 
♦ mitte e authorized tfc receive con- 



♦ tributions are as fo 



Photograph taken in front of the Federal pnso....^ •"vr"- "ii",rdlii« 
Socialist leader walked out a free many.ardoned by President Harding. 
The others in the. group are Socialist friends ot ueos. _ _, 



his straight-forward statements and 
sincere, purpose. 

Mr. 'Hall, it is expected, will dwell 
on the work of the state organization, 
pointing out to the workers the pres- 
ent necessity for co-operation and fi- 
delity in face of. present-antagonism 
stirred up by the interesti opposed to 
organized labor who are bent on dis- 
integrating the ranks of the workers 
and thereby rendering them helpless 
to negotiate for wages and conditions 
as a body. 

The meeting at the Auditorium Jan 
uary 14. will open promptly at 8 
'o'clock and G. H. Husby, secretary of 
the local Federation of Union men 
informed The Tribune Saturday that 
local officers of the federation desire 
to impress upon men and women of 
Thief River Falls, sympathetic with 

the trades union movement, the'im- .,,.-■„ 

portance of the coming meeting and several days. as the guest of his sis- 
every one is urged to attend. . | ter v '■ ' 



lows: 
Chairman. 



Mrs. J. M. Bishop, 

H. S. Dahlen. 

Hans Anton. 

Mrs. H. W. Ftoelich. 

Mrs. E. J." Richards. 

Ben Roseridahl, St Hilaire. 

G. Howard Smith. 



fHllllt l llM' l HIH t l t)H,» 

. Arthur L. Auringer left Saturday, 
for Minot, N. D., where he is spending 







r 



y 



__*> 



.the Tribme by. Carrier 
j ■ ■ .',..'' 

Goes Direct to ft , -*■ 3 



VOL "' 



^TWO HUSKY BASKETBALL WALLOPS 






ADMIN 



Down 



derful 



> THIEF 

Plumnier . . . 
Carlson .... 
Had rath, .Peuue; 
Holtzkneeht 
Brown 



Mail gh an 
Huniietan 
Louden . 
Hutton '. . 
De Vrics. 




-K- 





TWIGE-A-WEEK 



Tvvice-a-Week Tribune 
Is First With the News 



!90 



THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY, JANUARY 10./1922 



$2 A. YEAR IN ADVANCE 



STERED TO EXCELSIOR FIVE 



ConnelPs Men Take Double- 
Header Bill From Fast ■ 
State, Quint 



Crafty Paying and Won- 



Teamwork is 



Feature of Contests 



TIE -LINEUP 



RIVER FALLS. 

Hight Forward 

Left Forward 

Kiland Centers 

,'. Left Guard 

Kit'lit Guard 



e: ccelsior. 



.Right Forward 
...Left Forward 

Center 

....Right Guard 
Left Guard 



tim ii t ii iiim i HHttm 

♦ TWO HARBORS FIRST TEAM ♦ 

♦ NOT BEATEN BY BEMIDJI ♦ 

♦ :- * 

♦ The report circulated about the ♦ 

♦ city yesterday that Bemidji de- ♦ 

♦ feated iTwo Harbors in the latter ♦ 

♦ city a i couple of nights ago has ♦ 

♦ been found to be erroneous. , The ♦ 

♦ basket! ball 'team that actually* 

♦ was defeated by Bemidji is the ♦ 

♦ Y. M. ! C A. team representing ♦ 

♦ Two Harbors, who were at the ♦ 

♦ short end of the score in a game ♦' 

♦ played! at Bemidji Saturday ♦ 

♦ night, '27 to 24. The Two Har- ♦ 

♦ bors team that is to play Thief ♦ 

♦ River FaUs Thursday and Friday ♦ 

♦ nights • of the week played a' ♦ 

♦ Duluth tank corps team on the ♦ 

♦ night in question and decisively ■♦ 

♦ defeated them. ♦ 
I it l tllll l ttl l M l tDt 



definitely announced" when the local 
five is to play Crookston, but when" 
the times arrives it is certain to de- 
velop into a great game. And that is 
the very thing that the iConnell men 
are conscious of, fully realizing that 
Crookston is out to scalp fem. , 

TWO HAKBOR8 FOR TWO &AMES. 



Fost Team Will Appear Here Thursday 
and Frdiay at the Auditorium: 

The Thief River Falls basket boll team 
will be Been In action against the Two 
Harbors five at the Auditorium on Thurs- 
day -and Friday evenings of this week. 



PERRY JOHNSON TO U. OF M. 

The Tribune learns that Perry John- 
son, well known and popular, athlete, 
left last evening for Grand Rapids, 
Minn., there to join Prof'. A. D. Wil 
son, of the University Extension Di- 
vision, and it is reported he will be- 
come a permanent member of the uni- 
versity extension staff. Mr. Johnson 



Showing great improvement over 



other games of this season, the Thief 
River Falls l 11-star \aggregation of 
basketballers' aid down the law to 
the fast' Excelsior five, here' for two 
games on Fri lay and Saturday eve- 
nings at the Ayditoriumv 

The game Friday ended by Thief 
River Fails win'n.ing 35 to 23 and the 
Saturday contest found them again 
in the lead, 21 to 30. 

Thief ^Jiver Falls basket ball en 
thusiasts sure got a handsome half 
a dollars worth of thrills in both 
contests, featured by clever and 
speedy work on the part of both 
quints. The argest crowd of the 
season saw Friday's contest, when it 
is estimated I treat the sidelines at the 
Auditorium he ill several hundred spec- 
tators, all of whom were geared for 
basket ball ard prepared to see what 
they" finally actually witnessed, a bas- 
ket ball' gam<; that will go down as 
perhaps the ireatest contest of skill 
playediin Thief River 



Manny Hammer 
Frost Victim 

F ; ' , 

Death From Freezing, Trag- 
ic End of Former Resi- 
. dent of This City j 



Body Found Within 200 Jeet 
of , Cabin 17 Miles- 
South of Williams j 



Manny Hammer, well known in Thief 
River Falls, haying been employed in 
this city as a butcher by E. L. jRol- 
land and Louis DeCremer, was found 
frozen to death a week ago Saturday 
at his. homestead south of Williams, 
He worked here two years ago for Mr. 
has attracted widespread attention as| Eol]and Hammer > s parents resided at 
a Guernsey breeder, and it is under- gt _ Hilairei wnere his father dierjj sev- 



>> *»»'* Hil l ' I Dttll l ll l 'lU 

♦ PARENT-TEACHER MEETING ♦ 

♦ A meeting of the Parent- ♦ 

♦ Teachers, association will be held ♦ 

♦ this evening at the Lincoln high ♦ 

♦ school auditorium. An interest- ♦ 

♦ ing program, including several ♦ 

♦ musical selections, will be pre- ♦ 

♦ sented, and matters of vital irir '♦ 

♦ terest to the parents qf the city ♦ 

♦ will be discussed. Therefore, all ♦ 

♦ parents are urgently and earn- ♦ 

♦ estly requested to come out. Be ♦ 

♦ there promptly at 8:00 o'clock. ■ ♦ 
I t lll Mll l l l t IIIMIH 



first half, 13 all. It was plain to see 
that they did not intend that the sec- 
ond half should end that way and start- 
ed the proceedings by hooking ; a 
cage after but ten seconds of play. 
Hadrath had been sent to the showers 
and replaced by Jordan Penney, 
who Was in a new position at center, 
with Louden towering over him at 
least six inches. 

With Carlson passing Plummer the 
buck, he generally hits the basket. 
Brown and Holzknech't' were right and 
when such is the case, the final out- 
come with Thief River - Falls could 
hardly be called as being in doubt. 
Baskets were coming the Thief River 
Falls way one after the other until 
they had 35 chalked up, with Ex- 
celsior struggling valiantly to recoup 
the prestige they had won during the 
first half. 

And so ended the first game Fri- 
day night, ! Excelsior, 21; Thief River 
Falls, 35. ; 



stood that university authorities have 
sought his services for some time. He 
will be greatly missed in local athletic 
circles, in which he has been a potent 
arid inspiring influence. 

Morlan Bishop 
In New State Job 



Resigns Position With Bank- 
ing Department to Take 
Treasury Post 



arid speed .eve 
Falls. 

. The first g 
teams setting 
another. Tb 
tactics of eacl 
and the game 
paratively fe 
■of any of tht 
j "Swede" Cs 
ret, with spe 
teammates fr 



ime started with the 
terrific pace for one 
offensive and defensive 
were precise and quick 
was featured by corn- 
fumbles on the part 
players, 
rlson worked like a fer 
el to burn, feeding his 



' Second Game 
The. second game was largely a re- 
petition: of: the first in the matter of 
play arid tactics, with Thief River 
Falls leading all the way. The lineup 
was essentially the same except that 
Kiland, who had suffered quite 
vere wrench to his shoulder in the 
game Friday night, did not appear in 
uniform. Carlson and Hammer plac- 
ed their same old game, time after 
time running wild around Excelsior, 
delivering telling blows to their de- 
Falls did the 
During the sec- 



Popular Service Man to Be- 
come Assistant Cashier 
to Rines Monday 



>m every position on the fense. Thief River 
floor. Freque ntly he dribbled the leading all: the way 
ball the leng.ii of the hall for clean 
baskets. He iiart Excelsior highly be- 
wildered in many instances and they 
generally kept! him covered by a man 
or two. Plupimer started the scor- 
River Falls by execut- 
; after a couple minutes 



ing for Thief 
ing a neat ca£ 
of play.'. 

This .was 
scoringl six p 



lollowed by Excelsior 
rants,' which only served 
as a spur to rhe looal boys to tighten 
up, which thisy did in grand fashion. 
Ithe other hand, didn't 
! anyn oticeable degree, 
demonstrated again and 



Excelsior, on 
loosen up t 
however, and 



again that th:y were a serious minded 



lot and mear 
move. Up to 
fore the clos 



t) business with every 
about five minutes be- 
! of the first half they 
lead byseveiral points and indicated 
that they desired to hold their posi- 
The offensive tactics of Carlson 
cropped out at this 
er, and the boys from 



tion. 

and Plummei 

stage, howc\ 



Excelsior apparently seemed help- 
less in the fa ie of it arid plainly show- 
ed they were tiring. The first half 
ended with tl e score 13 all. 

Louden, Eicelsior center, has got 
a lot of bask st ball in that foxy look- 
ing head of jhis and he proved- the 
general of Ericelsior's game. It might 



be said here 
man" of Exc 



(that h e was the "glass 
ilsior's tactics. When he 
hit the floorj it meant a signal for 
his teammati's, too, to partake of its 
.cooling effeci It seemed highly re- 
'freshing 'to i.he big boy at center, as 



well as for 
who seldom 



Che rest of his warriors, 
failed to sprawl out like 



men like hin 
jple on the 
There .is no 
that Louden 
and he play 
Auditorium 
celsior was 



ond half, however, the Excelsior quint 
rallied their forces near the stage, 
held a 10-minute conference and came 
back determined to make a last stand 
to win. "Much ado about, nothing" 
was the result of the recess called 
by Excelsior, as they did not score 
but one poin; after their return to 
play. : 

Just previously Hutton of the' Ex- 
clesior lineup was taken out of the 
game after it was reported that he 
had suffered a broken nose when he 
collided with a Thief River Falls hian. 
He was replaced by a little fellow, 
who- contained a mighty lot of basket 
ball, to say the least, 



Morlan Bishop, son ofl'Mr. and Mrs. 
J. M. Bishop, of this city, this week 
resigned as examiner with the state 
banking department to accept a posi- 
tion as assistant cashier in the state 
treasurer's office. He will assume 
his new duties next Monday. . 

The appointment of. Mr. Bishop, who 
has been with the banking department 
a year, is a recognition of faithful 
and efficient service in his present 
position. Mr. Bishop is a graduate of 
the Thief River Falls high school 4nd 
the state university. He is a veteran 
of the World war, giving two years 
to army service, one year of which he 
spent in France. Prior to entering the 
service he taught history in the local 
high school. 

FLOOD DAMAGE AWARD UPHELD 



kittens on tie hearth after the fash- 
ion of their leader. This Louden, of 
course, is. ar extremely difficult man 
to reckon with. In the first place, 
he appeared with a painted leg, the 
aftermath of a collision on the floor at 
Crookston the night previous, and this 
wounded : member no doubt won him 
at least the fempathy of the younger 
feminine spectators on the sidelines, 
if not the n ore hardened basket ball 
followers. What may have appeared 
to be murder to some meant merely 
rest to tlrfc crafty. Louden. He's a 
mighty likatle chap, though,. and five 
would make quite a rip- 
waters of basket ball, 
department of the game 
is not conversant with 
d the stellar role at the 
'riday night so far as Ex- 
ioncemed. 



But to pre'.' back to the second half 
of this first game Friday night. The 
local boys appeared on the floor with 
a grim bunch of countenances, caused, 
no doubt, by the final ending of the 



Hermanson and Hadrath both shar- 
ed honors 1 at center for Thief River 
Falls Saturday night, and each show- 
ed up well in the tight spots. 

It cannot be said that any one 
member of the local lineup stood out 
over his teammates to any large ex 
tentv They all played a brilliant game 
and the crowd present evidenced then- 
satisfaction at their showing. 

The contest ended with Thief River 
Falls at. the top, 21 to 30. Excelsior 
had put forth the best they had, which 
was, not enough, that's all. They had 
tried out; every fonh of play with 
which they were familiar in both con- 
tests, but: the teamwork and speed of 
ConnelPs men evidently could not be 
downed. Excelsior can truthfully say 
that they met the better team, which 
may be simmered down to its last 
analysis where "the best team won." 
Perry Johnson officiated in his usual 
manner and not a single objection was 
heard to any of his decisions. Excel- 
sior is represented by as clean and 
gentlemanly an aggregation of. ath- 
letes as, has ever performed at bas- 
ket balll in Thief River Falls, ; , and 
when that is the case followers of the 
winter sport are assured of anabs'ence 
of wrangling and misunderstandings 

It was announced Saturday night 
that Two Harbors will appear in this 
city next 1 Thursday and Friday,: Jan- 
uary 12 and 13, to.take on Thief River 
Fall's. ■'.] 

Last year's Two Harbors team was 
accredited by Walter Camp, famous 
sports writer, with being one of the' 
five best teams in the United States. 
Thief River Falls stands undefeated 
for the season, but it must be taken 
into consideration that they have stub- 
born resistance .yet to meet up with 
in Crookston and Two. .Harbors. 
Crookston has a crack organization 
this year, led by Benny Sampson; 
known as one of the best. basket ball 
chiefs in 1 Minnesota. It has not been 



Supreme Court Finds'! Farmers Can 
Recover 'From "Railroads 

Farmers whose lands were damaged 
by floods in 1918, caused by diversion 
of surface water from its natural 
course, due to construction of railroad 
roadbeds, can recover from the rail- 
road companies, the state supreme 
court holds. A verdict is affirmed in 
the case of Ole Eiken against the Min- 
nesota & Manitoba and the Canadian 
National railway, brought in Beltrami 
county. "The finding- that defendants 
caused plaintiff's land to be flooded," 
the decision says, "by negligently, fail- 
ing to provide a sufficient outlet for 
surface water turned from its natural 
course, and thereby caused him sub-; 
stantial damage, is sustained by the 
evidence.". , 



eral years ago, his mother being a 
resident of this city when she I died 
three years ago. The Beaudette ;Reg- 
ion gives the following account of. 
the finding of the body: j 

"To be lost in the woods arid to be 
frozen to death within two hundred 
feet of his home was the tragic; fate 
that overtook M. Hammer, a home- 
steader who lived seventeen- miles 
south of Williams, on Friday night 
or Saturday morning. Hammer was 
seep about his yard Friday morning, 
butf when he did not show up again 
by coon on Saturday his neighbors be- 
canje alarmed, and a party consisting 
of ?Thos. Moe, John -drummer,: Carl 
Engom arid Emil Olson started out to 
look for him. They had gone only 
a short distance into the woods iwhen 
they came upon his dead body in the 
snow, and everything- pointed to the 
fact that he had become lost in the 
woods and had frozen to death. His 
tracks showed that; he had walked 
in a circle, perhaps ifor hours, and 
that his gun, with which he evidently 
had been hunting rabbits, Had been 
thrown to one side when he became too 
weak to carry it. • ! 

"Deputy Coroner Frank Johnson of 
Baudette was notified, but the circum- 
stances all pointed to death -, from, 
freezing, and it was decided not to 
hold an inquest. The body was 
brought to Baudette, where it is being 
held until word from deceased's form- 
er home at Red Lake Falls. is receiv- 
ed- ' ■',„ * 
. "Deceased was about 45 years jof 

age and was. not married. He had 
lived alone on "his homestead ' for sev- 
eral years. He was well known j in 
Baudette, Tiaving worked in the mills-- 
here." ' j 

L a ter— After the: above was in type 
we learn that Tom Moe, who found 
the bodv, a resident of the east si J - 
gives a"' slightly different version 
the finding of the body. Instead 
being found within 200 feet of the 
cabin, the body was located about two 
miles away. Mr. Moe owns a home- 
stead in the vicinity of .the Hammer 
homestead. . ■ | 



GIRL'S COMMUNITY CLUB TO 
MEET AyED^ESDAY EVENING 

The Girl's Community club will 
meet Wednesday evening January 11, 
at the home of Mrs. J. M. Bishop. 
All members and their friends are re- 
quested to he present. / 

— -^v 

Air traveling at 12 ceijfc a mile is 
the. aim of the makers of a new style 
of French aeroplane, ' . 

Labor, to Rally 
at Auditorium 



Ira C. Richardson, 
Old Settler, Dead 



Paralytic Stroke Ends Ca^ 

reer : of Former Postmast-' 

er and Probate Judge 



Began Practice of Law in 
Red River Valley Thir-" 
. ■ ty-geven Years Ago 



Public is Invited to Hear E. 

G. Hall, President of 

State Federation 



Ira Cutler Richarson died early 
Sunday morning at. the family resi- 
dence, 502 LaBree Avenue, as a re- 
sult of a paralytic stroki which oc- 
curred three weeks ago, ending an ac- ' 
tive career of more than thirty-seven 
years as a public official and practic- 
ing attorney. The death of Mr. Rich- 
ardson was not entirely unexpected, 
since, he suffered a stroke two years 
ago which left him in a greatly weak- 
ened condition, and causing his retire- 
ment from active public service at 
that time. ' 

Judge Richardson was born at Ne- 
banon, N. H., September. 21, 1855, 
coming west with his parents ten 
years later, the family settling at 
Viola, near Rochester, Minnesota. He 
attended school there and at Elgin, : 
graduating from the Rochester high 
school. • Having- a penchant for the 
law, he became a student at the Uni- 
versity of Iowa; Iowa City, graduat- 
ing from th e law school of that in- 
stitution. During this period he was' 
a classmate and schoolmate of Sen- 
ator Frank B. Kellogg. 
v A mass- meeting and union labor 0n Marcn 2 5, 1885, he married! Miss 
rally, to which the public is _invited, rra M. Evans, of Elgin, Minn., and 
will be held at the Auditorium Satur- sbon thereafter moved to northwest- 
day evening, January 14, when E. -G. ern Minnesota, settling at Argyle, 
Hall, president of^ the State Federa- Marshall county, where he served as 
tion of Labor, and John J. Manning, I coun t y attorney for four years. The 
secretary of the Union Label Trades | family moved to Thief RiVer Falls in 
department of the .American Federa- 1 189 2. ' Mr. Richardson was always a 
tion of Labor, will deliver addresses. I staunch Republican in his political af- 
Umon labor men of. Thief River -filiation, and as a reward for faithful 
Falls plan 'to make this meeting the party service was appointecLpostmast- 
largest ever held by union workers ; er by President Harrison, serving in 
in this section of the state and in an ' that capacity ten years. He was elect- 
effort to stir -federation men and wo-ied judge of probate of Red Lake 
men to action are bringing Mr. Hall county, retiring when the county was 
and Mr. Manning here to place the j divided. Four years ago he was elect- 



John J. Manning, Washing- 
ton, to Speak on Import- 
ance of Union Label 



George Korpi, 13 year old Cloquet 
boy, -while hunting rabbits, bumped 
into black bear. The lad fired one 
shot from his 22. rifle and then ran 
a mile home. Returning with' .his 
father, a bear weighing 500 lbs. was 
found dead. — Warroad Pioneer. 



position of labor squarely before "the 
people. ! 

Mr. Manning, whose work is large- 
ly connected with the problem of im- 
pressing 'upon labor men everywhere 



ed to the same position in Pennington 
'county, and he retired at the end of 
two years owing to-- ill health. Mr. 
Richardson was a charter member of 
the city school board, a charter and 



the necessity 'Of demanding the union j honorary member of the volunteer fire 
label, on wearing apparel, etc., comes j department of this city, and a member 
to deliver a message as to the best of the Modern Woodmen 1 and. Royal 
way. to solve this as well as all other Neighbors. ... 

industrial problems confronting the The; deceased leaves his wife and 
workers of Minnesota. He is to. make two sons to mourn his loss. His son, 
an especial appeal to the women, thei"\Vayne Evans, is secretary of ''the 
wives and daughters of union men. Commercial ciub of Yakima, Wash- 
It is said that women spend 85 j ington, and Glenn Ira is agent for 
per cent of the money contained in .the Great Northern at Branson, Minn, 
our weekly and monthly pay envelopes I The remains were taken. to Elgin, 
and if this is true,- it is not difficult | Minnesota, his old home, last night; 
to imagine the tremendous power they | accompanied by members of the^am- 
could wield in the event that every ily, and the interment will take place 



C4TH0LIC ORDER' FORESTERS 
INITIATE CLASS LAST NIGHT 



A class was initiated in the Catholic 
Order of Foresters by Rev. Fr. Noesen 
and Statel Deputy Matilda Barcalaux 
assisted by the drill team, on January 
9, 1922. '" . ■ j ! I 

A banquet was served at the Evelyn 
hotel for about forty members and 
guests after which Fr. Noesen gave 
a very eloquent talk for the gbodj of 
the order. li i 

Mrs. Richter, toastmistress, ! called 
on different ones for toasts, [which 
weire responded.to by Rev. Fr. Noesen 
Deputy Matilda Barcalaux, officers 
and some members. , I 



Debs Leaves U. S. Prison; 



laborer's wife bought only those 
goods adorned with the union label. 
There has been much_good work done 
in this connection, and the women are 
qdick to respond to the appeals sent 
opt by our department. ' iWithout a 
demand for the'unicm label a large 
part of the effect' and influence of 
organized labor is lost', and for that 
reason the American Federation of 
Labor is making this branch of its 
work as effective' as possible," said 
Mr. Manning.: 
Mr. Hall about two weeks ago sent j 



tomorrow. Brief services were held 
at the family residence yesterday af- 
ternoon by Rev. Smith, of the -Method- 
ist "church. Members of the local bar 
association acted as: pall bearers apd 
accompanied the remains to the Soo 
station last evening. 

Judge Richardson was highly es- 
teemed in the city and surrounding 
country, as his lengthy sendee in 
positions of public trust would indi- 
cate. -He saw this city grow from a 
formation of tar paper, shacks to a 
city of formidable proportions, and hifr> 



notices to the various secretaries . of j best friends bear witness that he con- 
subordinate unions of this city con- M>uted in the fullest measure to 
taining a call for a mass meeting to j every worthy undertaking and enter- 
be held Friday evening, January 3,|P nse - ' 

at which time he intimated that sev- 

eral persons prominent in labor circles I » M M • _ * _ ** * _ * . * _ * « _ * i>- * _ t _M * ♦ < > « 

would address Thief- River Falls work- 




RUSSIAN RELIEF! 



♦ 

♦ , ' 

♦ ' Attention is respectfully di 

♦ rected to the editorial in today's 



ers. In the meantime the state, fed- 
eration president secured the promise 
of Mr. Manning to come hereto speak 
and the meeting was postponed to the- ♦ ™™ beaded, "We Feast-They ♦ 
next day for the reason tha'tMr. Man- ♦ Starve," dealing with the mhtful ♦ 
ning could not arrange to be here on ♦ details of the famine in stricken ♦ 
Friday, January 13. Mr. Manning;* Russia It is important that all ♦ 
comes to Minnesota with a ' strong!* should know and realize the truth ♦ 
an( j has ♦ of the situation. tThis statement 



Photograph taken in front of the Federal prison « Atlanta whet i the 
Socialist leader walked out a free man; pardoned by President Harding. 
The others in the. group are Socialist friends ot Ueos. ___. u 



message for laboring men 
made himself popular everywhere by 
his straight-forward statements and 
sincere purpose. 

Mr. Hall, it is expected, will dwell 
on the work of the state organization, 
pointing out to the workers the :pres- 
ent necessity for co-operation and fi- 
delity in face of present antagonism 
stirred up by the interest's, opposed to 
organized labor who are bent.pn dis- 
integrating the ranks of the workers 
and thereby rendering them helpless 
to negotiate for wages and conditions 
as a body. 

The meeting at the Auditorium Jan 
uary 14 will open proinptly at 8 
o'clock and G. H. Husby, secretary of 
the local Federation of Union men 
informed The Tribune Saturday that 
local officers of the federation desire' 
to impress upon men and women of 
Thief River Falls, sympathetic with 
the trades union movement, the im 



♦ we believe to be a fair and truth- ♦ 

♦ ful account, written by impartial ♦ 

♦ observers, and with this - under- ♦ 

♦ standing in mind, let us- open our ♦ 

♦ hearts and contribute something ♦ 

♦ to these unfortunate people. We ♦ 

♦ have given much it is true, but '♦ 

♦ we cannot, we must not, shut our ♦ 

♦ eyes to the heeds of human be- ♦ 

♦ ings starving to death. ♦ 

♦ The Pennington county com- ♦ 

♦ mittee authorized to receive, con- ♦ 

♦ tributions are as follows: ♦ 



♦ 


Mrs. J. M. Bishop, Chairman. 


♦ 


♦ 


H. S. Dahlen. 


♦ 


♦ 


Hans Anton. 


♦ 


♦ 


Mrs. H. W. Froelich. 


♦ 


♦ 


Mrs. E. J. Richards. 


♦ 


♦ 


Ben Rosendahl, St Hilaire. 


♦ 


♦ 


G. Howard .Smith. ; 


, ♦ 



fM i tiiiii i Miimt.nnm 



Arthur L. Auringer left Saturday, 

for Minot, N.,D., where he is spending 

p , orta l ncrof"the"coming"meeting and I several days as the guest of his sis- 
everyone is urged to attend.; jter. , >■ ; 




Ji 



'I 



w 



Page Two, 



^55 



a 



THE THIEF RIVER tf ALLS TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1922 



Tribune 



SEMI-WEEKLY. 



prepare the youth of today to be the [of callousness acquired from oftre- 
citiizens of tomorrow. The schools of pelted storjes of hunger and misery. 



ESTABLISHED 1901. 



J. S. ARNESON 
S. Y. ARNESON 



- ' - Editor 
Associate Editor 



Pnbliahed every Tuesday and Friday, at 
Thief Hirer Falls, Minn. * 



Entered a By second class matter at the 
post office at Thief Hirer Falls, Minn., 
milder the Act of March 3, 1870. 



SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER TEAR. 




The bird 



man who remained up in 
26 hours performed quite 
there are a lot of candi- 
dates foj£<ffice who- will have him 
■beat by Simile before next fall. 



feat, but 



We hope 
er's party" 



pie of St. Pjml last week did not enter 
the parlor 
than comrr 
boots. 



News of 



the -guests at the "farm- 
held by the society peo- 



with ' anything stronger 
ercial . fertilizer on their 



The Nonpartisan League, or the 
t.l.ereof, may not be so en 
tirely worthless, when it is considered 
what it wil brings when, dangled be- 
fore the eyss of the scared business 
men of the three large cities by solic- 
itors for campaign funds. Boohl ' 



An exchange says homely men 
make the best lovers, " says an ex- 
change. Women distrust the pretty 
man, says the same . paper, ■ and can 
see no ham in the ugly man. Since 
all the homily men have good looking 
wives, there must be some truth to 
this argument. 



the death ,at Washington 
M yesterday o I Chas. S. Mitchell, editor 
of the Washington Herald, former 
r ewspaper man, will be re- 
regret by scores of his 
admirers in this state. As 
editor of the Alexandria Post-News, 
Charlie Mitchell became well -known 
in Minnesota journalistic circles, and 
it as a country editor of the intrepid 
and fearless variety that hi§. friends 
prefer to remember him. 



Minnesota r i 
ceiyed with 
friends and 



will always 



.J. J. OpsEhl has filed for represent- 



ee Bemidji district. Mr. 
was a member of the 

; twenty years ago, has 
been extremely busy as head of the 
committee "?'hich has for its object the 

a railroad from Bemidji 
to Roseau, 4nd presumably he figures 
he can be o : -service in this matter as 

f the legislature. H e will 
opposed by the incumb 
ant, Representative Rako, ana 1 pos- 
sibly others 



ative from 
Opsahl, wh 
house abou 



member c 
probably be 



A few 
money was 
trainmen ar 
north of the 
ference 
bought only 



ars ago much Canadian 

spent in Warroad, by 
d other transients from 

line. «JThen came the dif- 
va\m\ and the Canadians 

what they absolutely had 



to have hece, because their dollars 



were worth 



the difference is' Retting smaller, and 
the Canadian trade is reviving some- 
what. Evei yone here has hopes to see 
the two kin Is of dollars at par aga"in. 
This is an i lustration on a small scale 
of what his happened to, our trade 



with all the 



anity to hive our money worth more 
jf other nations, but it 
any business. — War- 



: than that 
* doesn't get 
road Pioneir. 



If Will. Hays takes that movie job 



at $150,000 



with an a\rful handicap, for his du- 



ties as we 
the public 
being paid 



pulled off 
a farmer 
ject was 
Good City 



and Comm 
fully agre 



only with 
with the 
territory. 

"We cai 
of a city 



only eighty cents. Now 



the city ! are well organized and offer- 
to the youth an opportunity that is 
not often excelled. The schools again 
reflect the spirit of Be'midji's citizens 
and go to strengthen the statement 
which was made at the beginning., 
The churches of the city togetherwith 
the Salvation Army are well organiz- 
ed and administer in a worthy way. 
Without j these two organizations the 
city indeed would be without much 
that goes to make Bemidji a good city, 
yet there are many other organiza- 
tions that go to meet the social needs 
asjthe schools do the educational and 
the churches the spiritual. . Among 
these are lodges and fraternal socie- 
ties, the j American Legion and various 
professional clubs, the public library 
and the jCivic and Comjnerce associa- 
tion, .while doing a great social work 
are also; doing work that is, of "value 
to the education of the people. 

"The scenic beauty of Bemidji can- 
not be described^ in worth* — Come and 
See." j 



WE FEAST— THEY /STARVE 

Some j -Americans economized on 
Thanksgiving day by eating chicken 
instead of turkey. On Christmas day 
most of us will eat turkey, or chicken, 
or: goose; or ham, again, and potatoes 
roasted with the meat, and cranberry 
sauce arid- celery, and vegetables, and 
pluirf putlding or pie, and we. will top 
it off with nuts and raisins and or- 
anges and candy. Meanwhile, in the 
valley of the Volga, the great ' Mis- 
sissippi River basin of European Rus- 
sia, some ten or fifteen million Rus- 
sians think themselves lucky if on a 
feast-day, week-day, or Sunday, they 
can get enough black pancake to stay 
the -gnawing hunger inside them — 
enough black pancake made by grind- 
ing down grass torn up from the 
earth and leaves pulled from the 
bushes or picked off the* ground, mix- 
ing the ; powder thus obtained with 
gluten from boiled horses^ hoofs, and 
baking the mixture as a Substitute for 
bread. \ • 

Anna Haines, who did relief work 
in ;Russia with the Quakers under the 
Czarist, Kerensky, and Soviet regime's 
in ["1916*4918, and who has just re-* 
turned from another year of relief 
work in jMoscow which closed with a 
trip back into the villages of the^Sam- 
ara province, where s^e had worked 
three years before and which have re- 
cently been so stricken by drought, 
tells heartrending (, stories and shows 
sickening pictures of the misery there. 
March will be the .worst month, will 
it pot?"! she asked one parish priest. 
"No", he answered slowly. "No, I 
think not. This month (September) 
we have 'the melons and the sunflower 
seeds; next month there will still be 
some melons and some seeds left; in 
November we will have to use our re- 
serves. But no one is rich enough 
to have ' reserves for more than six 
weeks. ; March the worst? No. In 



We- are tired of giving to other peo- 
ple's children. Partly, too, because 
the American people, warm, and well- 
fed as it is in contrast to Eastern or 
even to Central Europe, is not so rich 
as" it was two or three years ago. But 
very largely because it" has been so 
stuffed with conflicting propaganda 
about Russia that it only half be- 
lieves the' pitiful stories of 'famine 
which come to it. There are people 
who are willing to have even babies 
starve unless their elders change their 
form of government. But such people 
are not typical of America. The Am- 
erican people is as* kindhearted as 
ever; but it wants to know.. In par- 
ticular, it wants to know whether^the 
hunger in; Russia is due to a break- 
down in government which will be re- 
peated year after year until" there 
comes some sudden change, or to an 
unusua^ and fearful drought. 

That is why the report of the Rus- 
sian commission of the Near East Re- 
ilef, printed in part, in the Internation- 
al Relations Section of The^Nation for 
December 7, has such peculiar import- 
ance". . It is the first comprehensive 
report of an unofficial non-political 
group which has had adequate oppor- 
tunities to study the famine and its 
causes on the spot. ' Its conclusions 
cannot be charged with partisanship.! 
No need here to summarize them all; 
but" one set of data should be forced 
into the consciousness of editorial 
writers from one end of this coun- 
try to the other; The rainfalKthrough 
the Volga valley- in April, May, and 
June of this year— th e critical months 
for the~ grain crop — averaged less 
than. 2.4 millimeters per month as' 
against a normal rainfall (17-year 
average) of 35.6 millimeters; and the 
temperature averaged 12.6 degrees 
Fahrenheit hotter than the 17-year 
average. Such was th e drought that 
burned the seedings in the soil and 
caked the hard earth against the pos- 
sibility of a crop. That is the rea- 
son for the hunger of the Volga mil- 
lions. Other causes — revolution, war, 
blockade — contributed to the mass of 
misery; this is fundamental. .Vernon 
Kellogg of the Hoover Relief Admin- 
istration tells the same story. "In 
Russia," he says, "the people who 
come down to the river landings and 
crowd the -refugee camps are peas- 
ants. In Belgium we never fe4 a 
single farmer. In Poland we fed mil- 
lions in the cities and industrial areas 
but sent no food into the country; 
in Russia we have to feed the peas- 
ants, the food-producers--to the think- 
ing man that tells the story.". 

Here at last we have the incon- 
trovertible facts. No one can any 
longer plead ignorance. Political pre- 
judices must be focgotten in the com- 
mon need. Senator France's name 
stands beside that of ex-Ambassador 
Francis on the National- Committee 
of the Russian Famine Fund (15 Park 
Row, New. York City) which is rais- 



ST. HILAIRE 



k (From the Spectator) 

Mrs. P. A. Brown left Friday for 
her home at -Thief River Falls after 
visiting several days here at [ the 
Branum home. < 

County Commissioners G. Naplin 
arid J. S. Roy returned yesterday af- 
ter attending the annual board meet- 
ing at Thief River. 

, Jens Almquist had another runaway 
Saturday morning while making his 
morning delivery of milk. Aside from 
a broken pole in the rig no other 
damage resulted. i 

Miss Ann Patterson was at War- 
road Thursday and Friday attending 
to business matters in connection with 
her position with the- State Home 
School for Girls at Sauk Center, i 

Brue Peters suffered a fractured 
arm last Thursday morning when the 
team he was driving ran away. Brue 
was delivering milk with the Aim 
quist rig vn the north part of town 
when the accident happened. *1 j - 

Many complaints are heard from 
(people who Jiave occasion to auto to 
Thief River on that the road north 
from "Dead Man's Corner" is ' not 1 
kept clear from snow drifts. iThe 
local patrolman keeps his part of the 
highway in fine shape all the: time so 
there seems to be no valid reason why 
the Thief- Rivej patrolman should not 
do equally as well. j 



March there wiU be no one' left!" The ™g money to aid the Quakers in their 



terrible fact is that hundreds of thou- 
sands — perhaps millions — are facing 
death with that awful Russian calm. 
A peasant woman asked Miss Haines 



relief work. Mr. Hoover is sympa- 
thetic, and President „Harding tele- 
graphs to Allen Wardwell. chairman 
of the Fund,-that he confidently hopes 



world. It may tickle our 



to take a picture of her baby. ! She that its efforts will meet with a grab- 
was hoping to get away - to Siberia. jfy»>g response. Will we go on eat- 
and she knew the baby could not stand ™g turke y or chicken or ham on feast 
the journey; she wanted the picture ■ days, and buttering our bread and eat- 
to remeniber him by. ' '^S two eggs in the- morning, with no 
Why is it that when people come fought or help, as a/nation, for the 
to such a pass, when children's homes | stricken millions along the Volga? 
have so little" food that their superin- Congress has shelved Mr. Hoovers 
tendents: hive to pick out the children modest request that unsalable surplus 
whom it is worth while trying to save war supplies be/reed for use in Rus- 
and leave the rest to die, America sia; if America/is to act atall, it must 



.a year, he will start off 



inderstand it is to convince 
:hat the enormous salaries 
to a few stars are not an 
unreasonab e tax on the industry. The 
Chicago oterators, who receive $1.30 
per hour, are striking for higher 
wages, an( it would seem Co a lay- 
man as if there were v room for ad- 
justment between such a stipend and 
.million lollars a year — no matter 
how one views the difference in .the 
service rendered. The exhibitors^Vho 
do most oi the work and take all the 
long chanc isj are clamoring for a re- 
vision of ilm prices downward, and 
this demaidj looks like the most„rea- 
sonable of all 



calmly and contentedly eats -turkey, 
or economizes on chicken —or ham ? 
Why is it that there' is no such great 
warm-hearted response as fed the ref- 
uges in France, and later,, the hungry 
children! in Germany, Poland, ] and 
Austria ? Partly, we suppose, because 



be through the gifts of individuals un- 
willing to be'so comfortable while mil- 
lions starve in Russia. — The Nation, 



Mosquitoes during dry seasons are 
rendered more dangerous to human 
beings by thirst due to lack of water. 



BEMIDJI A PIPPIN 

The Bemidji association has just 
an essay contest, in which 
:ook first prize. The sub- 
'What makes Bemidji a 
and the members of. the 
Thief Rive|r Falls delegation who re- 
cently wei e entertained ■ by the Civic. 
;rce Association of Bemidji, 
with the word picture of 
the winner* which is as follows:: 

"The ore thing above all others 
that make t Bemidji a good city is the 
her citizens, their spirit of 
co-operatidn ^ahd their realization that : 
the prosperity of Bemidji rests not 
the citizens' of the city, but 
people of the surrounding 



9 



Wis A M U P.M.0 BILE ±L^. 



CAH YOU NAME THEM ? 

!©w»owignMi ©aissDOTjasnras 

SMSHW¥Jffl©JKmnEHMAllUI 
IAWL (DfifflEBOTHAMSfirt 
$6BSlSffl®WWMHBM) 
• MJBUI&EEH ®HBEPETIAV 



p^^fctotfosfo! 



-*- — ; 



HOTVEAIHER BEING 

fcvEfvrris TIME TO 

COMPLAIN OF THE 
COLD. 




ii - nr- ■ JlpobTri-.) 

COPYlgSHjr S>gl PUR. AliTOCASTCR S£RV.,OQ 



North Comities 
Pay Heavy Taxes 



Slight Increase In State Taxes 

In Spite of Revenue 

Tax Absence 



Counties of Southern Minne- 
sota Show Decrease — 34 
Counties Report 



A slight increase in faxes for 1921, 
to be collected in " 1922, is shown in 
reports of 34 of Minnesota's 86 coun- 
ties to Ray P. Chase, state auditor. 
This increase is in spite of the fact 
that the state taxes have been low- 
est, the tax for state governmental 
purposes having been eliminated. Re- 
ports from Ramsey, St. Louis and oth- 
er counties, which have not been re- 
ceived, - may change result. Taking 
all taxes into consideration, . state, 
county, city, village, township and 
school districts, the taxes to be col- 
lected in 1922 in the 32 counties re- 
porting approximate 542,000,000 as 
compared with 540,000,000. a year ago. 

The small rural -counties in South 
ern Minnesota which have reported 
show a slight decrease while the in- 
creases are in Northern Minnesota. 
The average tax rate for the counties 
reporting, to~be collected in 1922, is 
47 mills as i compared, with 42 mills a 



THIEF RIVER CLINIC 

DR. O. F. MELLBY 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

DR. H. W. FROEHLICH 

Surgery and Obstetrics 

DR. Li Fi'FISHEft 
Internal Medicine and X-Ray 

OFFICE 
CITIZENS BANK BUILDING 



year ago. The average tax rate for 
the entire 86 counties last year was 
52 millsi The^money ^nd- credit tax 
also shows a 'decrease. The taxes to 
be collected in 1922 also will' be af- 
fected b^ the loss of 536,641,084 on 
automobiles as under the Babcock 
amendment motor vehicles are no 
longer assessed as- personal property. 

Accommodation for dining and sleep- 
ing, and electric cigarette lightersj are 
provided on a. motorbus recently de- 
Signed by a French firm. 



EHICHESTERS PILLS 



DIAMOND 



BRAND 




XADIBSI 
1A jour Dnnbt l" * CHI-CHE3- 
DIAMOND BRAND -ILLS In Rf.1 
Gold metallic boxes, sealed'with 
Jtlbboa Txr* no otxsr. Bur of 
Bniflit a»a aik for .CHX-CHES.TJ _ _ 
DIAMOND BtinD PILLS, for twentT-Sve 
yetra regarded it Best Safest, Always Reliable. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 

\ TIMB 

TRIED - 



EVERYWHERE ?S 




Start 1922 the THRIFT WAY 

LIFE INSURANCE 
i* based on THRIFT 

Buy a contract „and pay for it 
during the best part of your life 
and then enjoy the proceeds 
thereof in later years, or create 
an Estate for -your Family. -■ 

IT PAYS 

Contracts offered to fit every 
need. Will appreciate the priv- 
ilege of talking it over with any 
one interested. 

E. M. BENNES 

Geasral A£ent 
The Live Insurance Man 

90-4t 




2,770 

Effgs layed by our 
Hens in December 



Don't Reports of This Kind 

Hake You Want to Get Into thetfame? 

We can help you get into a profitable , 
poultry business by supplying you with 
■ day old chicks or hatching eggs. - 

^Reserve your order for us — send us 
one dollar and tell us your needs. 
.Wonderful matings this season. 
Fihe S. C. W. Leghorn Cockerels For Sala 

SUNNYSIDE POULTRY YARDS. 

622 St. Paul Ave. Tkicf River Fads, Minn 



not measure the true value 
by its assessed valuation, 
nor by th^ amount of money that its 
merchants receive during a period of 
economic lepression. These ar e but 
symptoms of something that is more 
■important, the prosperity and happi- 
ness of thi ■ average citizen. 

"Next ii importance to the individ- 
ual citizei and reflecting his spirit 
and qualit; r are the different organiza- 
tions and groups of citizens who are 
organized to bring about an improve- 
ment of 1 tlje citizens of today and to 



&n You Solve This Puzzle? 

Here is s puzile that everybody thotUd try. The other olgkt»t-the*Movi«'* the operator 
wanted to try a new "stunt,** $o he rearranged the names oi some of the famous actors and 
actresses and threw them on the scree/v Kk± you ^ in the picture. Everybody bad "feeds" 
of fim figuring out the correct Dames. See if you can do it yourself. No. I is Dorothy Ehtion. 
If you can solve them all you cao win $1,000 or a Husnobtle. 

Though you probably know the names of all the potolsr actors and actresses well name 
a fewiof them just to refresh your memory: » 

Mmt MIIm Winter. Dm]1n Palffewik* Huy W*Mf* JM*i)t» f-tMUMt, fc-ter Kwtoa WHHmi * «**. I 
CUn Ktmlwll Vaunt, Tern Mix. U*b«l Narmand, Tkcmw M^lwn, OauelM tla tk— A ffcyenl Wkshbum, 
Donthy Oatteo, H»r*M U»r4 P«**t Wnil% ,mU* Cm«m, Ctwto ■*■ ■§■»■ 



rKwtoa WHtta 
*k*a* pnwtt ' 

110 Points WiU Win First Prize 



Far aach nam* jraw'cwi arranoa aorrtttfy yew wilt 
r —ahra " ftva patnta or Uty point* If you utva th«m alt 
You «*« aara IS mora palnta by qualilyino your •»• 
•war. .Thai U, by proving that you hava ahaum ■ cap* 
af Tha' Si. Paul Daily Nawa to ft»* paefiU.: Tho 6n« 
» pofitte will ba awardad by tt.* Judgti, who wiU U 
tfcfva walMtftMm 6t> Paul h ua li.a u ma. 



Tha bast comet a n aw t r will bu awarded First Prist 
and tha aaoond boat comet anaww Saoond Priaa, end 
to forth. In aaaa rf a Uo both wtanara will bo uwurd. 
ad foil aaaount af tho prtza, Sand hi your antwer 
TODAY and a aampt* oVth* papar wUl'ba Mot yau 
at anoo 4a help y«u eualtfy. 



,1 



IT COSTS YOU NOTHING TO TRY 



■ Yaw da M4 hav* to aubairiha la Th* M. Paul QaHy Nawa 
prfaa. j Wa havo atvan away a ar*ot May wawdarf u l thlnga aad ; 
your aatutfauj U thU bvxbJo at own. So aura your ewa aama aa4 
and dant faraa»-VOU CAN WIN. Oat tho family tagothar, wH 



opond a aaat of yaw awn modsy to win a 



i d aVna la an yaar aolutfen to tha emit 
"la and mall your anvwar HOW. 



R. C. WILLS, 94 E. Fourth St ST. PAUL, MINN. 




I 



Ii 



Tour Voice 
At -As Other" End 



When the family is gathered together at the old 
| home for a, reunion on anniversaries, holidays or other. 
\ delightful occasions, it's wonderful to be there. 

But: if you cannot be there in person, a long dis- 
tance call is the next best way. \ 



Statioh-to-stntion a ei i i ce from 
, 8:30 p. m; to midnight costs about 
one-half the day rate; from mid- ■ 
night to 430 a.- m. about one- 
i fourth. 



Thej3tation-to-flt&tjon rate, which 
is considerably lower thnn for per- 
son-to-person service, applies when 
you will talk to anyone at the tele- 
phone called. 




| Wherever you are, drop into your home for a few 
minutes each day via Long Distance. I 



Northwestern B 




ephone Company 



^ 



*V 



V 



v^ 



I TUESDAY 



Farm 



Benefited Farmers 



One En:erprise Sponsored by 
Fede -ation Saved Agri- 
culturists $45,000 , 



Activities in South St. Paul 

Have Cut Down High 

Corimisaion Charges; 



One cooperative marketing enter- 
prise spoil sored by the Minnesota 
Farm Buisau federation has saved 
?J43,000 in less than five 
A. McKerrow, manager 
of the. Central Co-operative Commis- 
sion assoc ation, told the third annual 
ention of the farm bureau 
at the state capitol this 



farmers 
months, 



state com 
session 
week. 

The corimission association opened 
for business on the South St. | Paul 
livestock market on August 8,1 and 
time has done a gross busi- 
i 15,000,000, Mr. McKerrow 



since that 
ness of 
said. 



.A quart >r of a million animals have 
been hanc led by the organization, he 
asserted, it commission charges ap< 
proximate y 25 per cent lower, than 
those fixe 3 by private firms. | 

In less than five months, the con- 
vention de legates were told, the farm- 
ers' central sales agency has accum- 
surplus of $26,000, to bere- 
the farmers as patronage 
, and has saved the producers 
517,000 in cash by handling 



ulated a S;i 
turned to 
dividends, 

at least 



the cars* 
South St. 
the last 



292 in Nc 



half of -.December. 



' "The -s 
; ment of 
place of 
market, i 
stockers 
other sat 



JANUARY 10, 1922 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Page Three 



Bureau Has 



1 1 1 



beyond the hopes of its . staunchest 
supporters if the farmers themselves 
give it the loyal support its past rec- 
ord deserves." ; : 



DIDN'T LIKE 'EM, ANYHOW ' 
'Before we were married," said the 
young wife, "you used to bring me 
flowers i every day. Now you! never 
even think of buying me a bunch of 
violets." 

There were tears in her eyes. But 
h e was! equal to the occasion. 

'My darling," he said, with! great 
tenderness, "the pretty flower! girls 
don't attract me now as they used 

to do." : ■ j 

AfUr which, of course, she- told 
him that she didn't really care-much 
for flowers. | 



Hodbb, in the City of Thief River Falla, Eighteen (18), una the West oue-bnlf of 



in Baid County and State, on the 11th day 
of February, 1922, at ten o'clock A. M., 
of that day, at public vendUe.'to the high- 
est bidder for cash, to pay said debt] of 
Twentytfour Hundred Eighty-nine and 78- 
100 Dollara, and interest, and the taxea,|if 
any, oh said premises, and Seventy -Ave 
Dollars Attorney's fees, as stipulated |in 
and by said Mortgage in case of foreclos- 
ure, and the disbursements allowed by law : 
subject to redemption at any time within 
one year from the day of sale, as provided 
by law. - 

Dated December 19th, A. D., 1921. 
THERESA STUCT, 
Mortgagee. 
J. M. BISHOP, 

Attorney, 

ThU£ Blrer Falls, Minn. 

D-20-27 J-3-10-17-24 



HOBTOA«K F03ECL08UBB SAUL 

Default having been made in the pay- 
ment of the mm of Ob* Thousand Seventy- 
ill and i 89-100 Dellara, which la -claimed 
te be dne and Is 4ne at the date-; of this 
netiee npon a certain Mortgmje, duly exe 
eatad and delivered by Martha Ingram, i 
widew, Mortgagor, to First and Peoples 
Btat* Bank (a corporation under the laws 
of th* State of Minnesota), Mortgagee, 
bearing < date the 2nd day of February, 
1090, and with a power of sale therein con- 
tained, duly recorded in the offiee of the 
Register of Deeds in and for the |County j ascribed reaT'propVrty of "said Defendant. 



3 HB BUTT* 8 SALE. 

STAT* OF MINNESOTA, COUNTT < 
Pennington, si. 

In District Conrt, 
Fourteenth Judicial District-- 

Citiaans Stat* Bank of Tyler, a corpora- 
tion. Plaintiff, vi. Emil O. Green, «De 
fendant. 

NOTICi IS HEREBY GITBN, That by 
virtue of an Execution to me directed and 
delivered, and now In my hands, issued 
out of the District-Court at the Fourteenth 
Judicial District, State of Minnesota, in 
and for the County of Pennington, upon a 
Judgment therein rendered In said Court In 
favor of the Cltlsens State Bank of Tyler. 
Plaintiff, and against Emil O. Green,. De- 
fendant. L have levied upon the following 



the Southwest Quarter (W% of;SW^4) of 
Section" Seventeen (17), all in | Township 
One Hundred Fifty-four- (154) ; North of 
Range Forty-three (43) Vest of the Fifth 
Principal Meridian, containing i 440 acres 
of land 'according to the Government Sur- 
vey thereof. 

And that I shall, on the 6th day of 
February, 1922, at the hour of; 10 o'clock 
A. M., of Bald day, at the front door oi 
the Pennington County Court : House In 
the City of Thief River Falls, in said: 
County and State, proceed to sell all the 



CARL B. LAKSON 



LICENSED EMBALMER 
AND UNDERTAKER- 



Unos Fatautnra C — y r 



fhone 61 



Night Call 1*S 



right title and interest of the above nam- 
ed Emil O. Green fn and to the above 
described property, to satisfy said judg- 
ment and costs, .amounting to Fifteen 
Hundred Ninety-two and 19-100 ($1592.19) 
Dollars, together with . all accruing costs 
of sale, and interest on the same from 
the 10th day of November, 1921, at the 



rate of per ; cent per annum, -at Public 
Auction, to the highest bidder for cash. 
Dated December 17th, 1921. 

W. J. LaBREE. 
Sheriff of Pennington county, Minnesota. 
A. K. STAUNING, 

Tyler, Minnesota. Plaintiff's Attorney. 
Dec. 27-J-3-10-17-24-31. 



♦ ♦ MMMM HH + H t H * M »»» 



•f Pennington and state of Minnesota, on 
the 23ta day of February, 1920, at 1:00 
o'clock' P. M., In Book 54 of Mortgages, oh 
page 012, and no action or proceeding hav- 
ing been Instituted, at law or otherwise, 
to recover the debt secured by said Mort- 
gage or^any part thereof, 

Now, Therefore, Notice Is Hereby Given, 
That by virtue of the power of sale" con- 
tained in said Mortgage, and pursuant te 
the statute in such case made and pro* 
vided, the said Mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described 
In and conveyed by aald Mortgage', viz: 

The Southwest Quarter (SW^i) of Sec- 
tion Thirteen (13), and the Northeast Quar- 
ter of the Southeast Quarter (NE% of 
SE^i) of Section Fourteen - (14),: all in 
Township One Hundred Fifty-three (153) 
North, of Hange Forty-three (43) West of 
the Fifth Principal Meridian, containing 



to-wit: The Northwest Quarter (NW%) 
and the Went one-half of the Northeast 
Quarter <W% of NE%) of Section Twenty 
(20); the Southeast Quarter of the North- 
east Quarter <SE% of NEH) of ■ Section 
Nineteen (19) ; East one-half of the South- 
east Quarter (E%~ot SE%) of Section 



HMMMMHMM* l M>MM 



stock at lower) commission rates. 

"Within a few months, the farmers 
■will place -tiifeir own farmer-control- 
led and farmer-managed firms on the 
leading livestock markets of the Un- 
ited States," Mr. McKerrow | said. 
"Their success already is absolutely 
assured. 

"The farmers, of the country at this 
moment a -e carrying the heaviest bur- 
den laid i;pon any class of people in 
America. They have been gradually 
driven f n m the country to the city, 
until 34~pbr. cent of the population is 
producing the food for the other 66 
per cent. 

"The titne has come when th^/or- 
ganizatior of centralized agricultural 
marketing agencies is a 'necessity in 
order thai the farmers 1 interests. may 
be assured of protection'' and tfreir/in- 
dustry sa"ed from complete demoral- 
ization. The state and national farm 
bureau federations are making rapid 
strides, and livestock /marketing 
one of tl e major projects to which 
they are devoting their attention. 

"A con prehensive stuc^y of live- 
stock ma rketing and projection has 
been mad; by the Committed of Fif- 
teen, appcinted by the American' Farm 
Bureau federation; their jw.qrk has re- 
sulted in 
marketin; 
scale. In 
scheme fc r 
marketin j ■ 



; ; I am prepared to deliver ' '. 
;> promptly to any*part of -' 

Two Hundred (200) acres, more or less, ac" i " +U r>itir zinv tfinH nf 
cording; to the United States Government I , - tne C1L J*. ail J ^J 1 "J ., 

.^^JS3B2£gi? wood. Telephone 449-W J 

T. FR0ISNESS 

323 3rd Street W. 



surrey thereof, in 
State of 1 Minnesota, 

and appurtenances; which sale will be 
made by the Sheriff of said Pennington 
County at the front door of the Court 
House. In the City of Thief River Falls, 
In said County and State, on the 2nd day 
of February, 1022, at 10:00 o'clock A. M. ( 
of that day, at public vendue, to the|hlghest 
bidder for cash, to pay said debt ef 
$1078.89, aud Interest, and the taxes; If any, 
on saidi premises, and Fifty Hollars At- 
torney's: fees, as stipulated in and by said 
Mortgage In case of foreclosure, and th* 
disbursements allowed by law; subject to 
redemption at any time within one year 
from the day of sale, as provided hy law. 

Dated' December 16th, A. D., 1921. 

FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE BANK, 
Mortgagee. 
PERL W. MABET, 

Attorney for Mortgagee, 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 
/ D-20-27 J-3-10-17-24 



Wood 



EmpireFarnis 
Company 

Capital $25,000 

LANDS, LOANS 
CITY PROPERTY 

INSURANCE 

; * Bring Your Business to Us. We ; ; 
Promise Courtesy and Efficiency" - • 

:: 215 Main Ave. North :: 

' Phone 443 

: : Thief River Falls, Minnesota i 



i )i)n i tMtnnntwtn t» 



Practical Uses for an- 
Interest Paying Account 



TN addition to being an incentive for 
, x systematic saying,, an Interest Pay- 
ing Account with us will prove a prac- 
tical convenience for accumulating a 
reserve fund for specific purposes, such 
as. 



Payment of taxes 

Life Insurance premiums-' 

Investments 

Payment of old debts 



We will be glad to outline a plan for " 
making deposits tp provide for a def- 
inite sum to accumulate in a stated 
period of time. 



The First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minn, j 
DOUBLE your savings— It CAN be done 



f 



plan for a- co-operative 
tructure on a national 
:erwoven with this plan is a 
the development of orderly 
that goes back even jto the 
pasture aid the feed lot, and for the 
development in railroad transporta- 
tion and the establishment of ■ farm- 
er-control ed co-operative agencies to 



the marketing of livestock 
eat terminals of the; coun* 



centralize 
on the- g 
try. 

"The nost successful livestock en- 
terprise ever- launched by farmers, 
ail iproba jility, is the central selling 
agency at South St. Paul. It is made 
up of 30C local shipping associations, 
with a total membership of nearly 60,- 
. 000 farm ?rs. ' The whole investment 
of the individual farmer in his cen 
tral sellii g company does not exceed 
40 cents. I 

"Since August 8, .this agency has 
handled approximately 19 per cent of 



HORTGAGfe .FORECLOSURE SALE 
Default having j been made in the . pay- 
merit of the Hum of Two Hundred Eighty- 
nine and 78-100 (J2S0.7S) Dollars, which 
is claimed to be due and is due at the date 
of thia i notice upon a certain Mortgage, 
duly executed and delivered by Arthur J. 
Baird, a single man, Mortgagor, to Mort- 
gagee, bearing date the third day of No- 
vember, 1 11)19, and ■ "with a power of sale 
therein ■ contained, duly recorded in the 
office of the RegiBter of Deeds in and for 
the County of Pennington and State of 
Minnesota, on the fourth day of November, 
1919, "at S o'clock A. M., in Boot 57 01 
Mortgages, on page 350, j 

And. Whereas,| The said Theresa Stucy, 
the Mortgagee and Holder of said Mort- 
gage, has duly elected and does' hereby 
elect to declare the whole . principal sum 
.of said, Mortgage due and payab|e at the 
date o£ thi3 notice, under the terms and 
conditions of said Mortgage and the power 
of sale' therein' contained ; and ! whereas' 
there is nctualty due and claimed to be 
due and payable at the date of this notice 
the sum of Twenty-four Hundred j Eighty- 
nine ami 73-100 (?2-iS9.7S) Dollar^. jw.itta in- 
terest thereon at the rate of sis per cent 
per annum from the 10th day of| Decem- 
ber, 1921, and whereas the said power of 
sale has become operative, and no action 
or proceeding having been instituted, at 
laiv or) otherwise, to recover the 'debt se- 
cured by Hald Mortgage, or auy part there- 
of: ;• ! 

Now,; Therefore, Notice Is Hereby Given, 
That by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained jin* ™ id Mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute in such case made and pro- 
vided, the laid Mortgage will be foreclosed 
by a sale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said Mortgage, vis: j 

The Southeast Quarter (SEH)iof Sec- 
tion numbered Two (2), in Township num- 
bered One Hundred Fifty-three (153) North 
of Range numbered Forty (40) jWest of 
the Fifth P. M., containing 160 acres, more 
or lean, according to the United States 
' survey thereof, in Pennington County and 
State of Minnesota, with the hereditaments 
and appurtenances; which sale j will be 
made by the Sheriff of said Pennington' 
County, at the front door of the Court 



livestock arriving at 
Paul. It handled 442 cars in 
hree weeks ■ of August, 781 



in Septei iber, 1,100 in October, 1, 



vember, and 534 in the first 



cocker and feeder 
he association take 
the speculator. On 



depart- 

the 

a bad 



lis department may buy the 



ind feeders if there 
factory outlet for 



is no 
them, 



paying the highest price it feels justi- 



aying. This department is 
when -necessary; in most 

h cattle are sold direct from 
producer to the farmer 

The association has shipped 
head of cattle ini four 



fied in { 
used onl 
cases, su(J; 
the farm 
feeder, 
out il,43j0 
■months. 

''On so ne days, £he association has 
handled ' ,000 hogs, 33 to 35 per cent 
/of all ths hogs on the market; 19,- 
408 Hogs have been shipped to other 
markets, stimulating the local compe- 
tition an ong buyers and giving the 
farmers )f the northwest the benefit 
of the rh airy. 

"Farmers of Minnesota must realize 
that when they start to do business 
for themselves, men doing similar 
business will try to destroy their or- 
ganizatio \. They will try to convince 
the farmer that he doesn't ' know 
enough U run his own business.; They 
will' oppose in every possible- way the, 
farmer's efforts to better his \ conjli^ 
tion. 

"There is just one .thing theindivid 
ual farmer should remember/ That is. 
to investigate things for- "Himself, to 
complaints about coopera- 
tive mar ceting and .base his opinions 
on facts 
operative- marketing will be a success , 



Licensed EnMfniers 



: Hicks Undertaking Parlors are 

open for business. ' We aim to 

; give the best of service. 

i FREE CHAPEL | 

MODERN: AUTO HEARSE 
i MODERATE PRICES 

Dajr and Nigkt Call, Phone 30 



MODERN 
HOUSE 

JF0R SALE! 

i • ■ ■ \ ''■ 

Possesion can be' 

i ■ i 

given immediately) 

Inquire Tribune 




public knows 
JL that UithSed / States Tires are 
never marKeted' on "price." 

to the makers of 
quality traditions. 



of superiorit 
the sake of a^ 

. So we say tl 
followers of U. 



People look 
U. S. Tires for 
They do notvwant to see a policy 



Rubbled away for 
ere price appeal. 

to all those loyal 

. Tires- 



Do not buy tl 
30 x 3V2 "Usee 
Tread because 
its new price 
$10.90. 

Buy it because it\ 




Prices ^on' all U. S. Tires 
and Tubes Reduced J^ov. 
10th. Ask your dealer. 



is the greatest money's worth on 
earth today. 

Buy it because of honest quality 
as against "bargain offers", "inside 
discounts" and "special trades." 
An outstanding product- 
marked with the maker's name 
—the retail price quoted in plain 
.figures. 

A challenge to the tire-trader 
who would rather sell you an 
unknown tire on 
the basis of "so 
much off list"— 
and let you find 
outs its real value 
afterward. 





T3 TSS 
fates |§| Rubber Compa 



; The Oldest and Largest 
Rubber Orsanizatioa in the Wort4 



Two hundred end 
thirtv-Jfve branches 




Page Four 




Ldague hav 



THE THIEF SlVER [.FALLS TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JANUARY .10, 1922 



New City League 
*- Resumes Bowliri^ 

Whirlwii d Start is Made, 
Several Players Rolling 
Mere Than 200 I 



Hawks Set Lively Pace for 
| Other Clubs in Matched 
Gaines Last Week 



The newly organized City Bowling 



3 resumed their after- 



holiday .activities, and a whirlwind 
start has teen made, several |200 
scores chalk id up and a league record 
broken by the Hawks with- a total 
of 863 pins for one game. : 

There weie several reverses during 
the week, the Tigers losing three 
straight ganes and dropping -into 
n the percentage column. 



high individual totals and four for the 
four high games of the meet, and one prize 
for the lowest individual; total pins of the 
meet. ■ '' j ■ ■ ' j 

- (' Team Prizes. j 

First— "30 'per ;cent cash.- [ 

Second—; 25 per cent cash. ■ > ^ ' 

Third— 20 per cent cash. j ■ 

Pourth-^15 per cent cash. . 
Fifth— 1Q per cent cash. ;_ t 

Individual High Total. 
First — One. strip Christmas bacon.; 
Second— 'One cigarette holder. 
Third— 200 cigarettes, Christmas carton. 
Fourth— One pair ladies' ailfc hose. 

Individual High Score. ■ 
First— Ojne-nalf cord of wood. 
Second— -One pair of auto driving gaunt- 
lets. _ j 

Third— Three pounds steel cut coffee. 
Fourth— Two haircuts. 

' Individual Low Scores. 

One box; chocolates. 

No howler -can win more than two prizes, 
one cash prize and one other, consequently 
all have a chance to get some prize. 



third place 

The Highrollers lost two and |are 

now strollirj 

position. 



.long in the sec6nd 

r 'h» Invisibles, by winning 

three straight games, lead the field 
and are gong along in wonderful 
shape. The Giants; have won their 
last two games, . making a -'splendid 
race out of the' whole thing, there 
being but 'our games between ' ; the 



leaders and 
at present 

Invincibles 
Highrollers 
Tigers .... 

Cubs 

Hawks ...'. 
Hawks .... 
Giants .«. 



tailenders. T.he standing 
is as follows: 

Played. Won. Lost.iPct. 
,...24 17 
10 
15 
14 
13 
13 



'Ifawks vs. 
A. Crown , 

Jonas 

Stebbins . ... 
Pawling 
Holt 



Totals . . . 

Cubs— 
Manther- .... 
B. Stanton . 

Gentz .." 

Werstline . . 
EhbighaUsen 

Handicap 



Totals 



Tigers— 
Werstline, , 
So re u son ' :'. . 
H. Olson .. 

Morse 

Munt 

Handicap 



Totals ... 

lnvlncibles- 
George ..... 
Erickson . . . 

Holden 

Stoughton . 
FoBSom .... 



Totals ... 

Giants— 
Holtzknecht 

Dnhl 

Bun da hi . . . 

Sheldon 

Booren .... 

Handicap 



Totals 
Highrollers 



Finsanjl 
Pyer ..... 
Grendahl 
Herrbn . . 
C. Olson ; 

Totals 



...i.OSS 843 748 
BJOWLING; NOTES. 



The Havrki 
members beii 
chesty over 



of S00! failed 
Ebig'Rhausen 
position as- 
the evening, 



ter. In shor 
Kalph Munt 
you can't laj 



Dr. Booren 
getting 482 
Giants look 
Gamble took 



of the seaBoi 
of hard lucl 
practice mo 
Beem to fall 



scoreboard, 
beat them if 



M 



..21 
..24 
..24 
..24 
..24 
..21 



9 
10 
11 
11 
11 



Cubs, January 3— 

110 184 152 

121.135 100 

101 130 ISO 

142 157 182 

172 182 180 



.712 791 803 2,303 



...172 151 150 
...103, 117 168 
. . .100 ■ 141 181 
...120 144 161 
...209 140 155; 
... 10' 10' lu 



780 709,, 831 2,290 



..108 132 111 

..136 113 150 

..147 132 146 

..100 100 108 

..120 152 130 

..9 9 9 



704' 714 2,077 



..192 
. . 9S 
. .155 172 
..140 162 



182 164 
130 142 
190 
142 
118 105 



.720 704 743 2,233 



.M58 159 

. .110 158 

..121 140 

..134 123 

..IIS 133 

. . 65 05 



125 
•llrf 
'154 
132 
201 



,.745 778' 787 



.100 ISO 158 

.130 192 171 

.138 120 155' 

..117 152 131' 

.120 103 132 



„!', 



f 



Get-Rich-Quick 
Scheme Looks Good 



Promoter Sees $10,000 Daily 

Income From Cat Rarfeh 

Near Beaudette 



Cats Would Eat Rats and 

Rats Would Eat Cats in 

Endless Profit Chain-" 



Wild cat s/hemes of every nature 
are continually being foisted upon the 
unsuspectingipublic, but a correspond- 
ent writing ijo the Beaudette Region 
has a scheme which loolcs leasable 
enough, and has financial possibilities 
of sufficient proportions to appeal to 
the dreamer who has visions of get- 
ting rich over night. Note carefully 
the following cat story, minus the 
wild cats: 
"Dear Sir. 

I have a proposition to present to 
you, and : wish to ask your earnest and 
careful consideration of the same, as 
I- think there is an opportunity here 
which comes only once in a| man's 
lifetime.; I wish you would write me 
by return mail the amount of stock 
you will'take ; 

The object of the company is to 
operate a large cat ranch Ih or near 
Baudettc, vhere the land can be pur- 
chased cheap for this purpose. 

To start with we will collect, say 
one million cats. .Each cat will aver- 
age twelve kittens per year. The skin 
will runifrom 10c for \vhite 1 b'nes and 
75effor pure black. This will give lis 
twelve million skins a year to sell at 
an average of 30c each, making our 
revenue jabout $10,000 per day gross. 

A man can skin fifty cats a day 
after, a little practice and such a man 
can be Hired for two dollars per day. 
It will take 109 men to operate the 



State Convention 
to Meet March 31 



County Convention March 

18. District Convention 

Moorhead March 30 

i_ . 

Pennington County Has Six 

Delegates to State arid . 

District Meet 



The. state campaign was launched 
Saturday at St. Paul when the Repub-< 
lican Central committee issued the caH 
for county, district and state conven- 
tions to be held as follows; 

County convention at Thief River 
Falls, March 18. 

District congressional convention 
at Moorhead court house, March 30. 

State ^convention at St Paul Audi- 
torium, March 31. ■ 

Pennington county has six delegates 
in the state-and district conventions, 
based ' on one delegate for each 500 
votes cast for Preus for governor, and 
three at large. 

Under Hhe terms of the state call 
the county committee of each county 
is required to apportion delegates to 
the county conventions before Feb- 
ruary 11th, using as a basis the vote 
for governor, and certifying .the list 
to the county auditor. •; ■ I " 

Candidates for delegate to the coun- 
ty convention must file an affidavit 
with the county auditor at least fif- 
teen days before the holding of the 
county convention. f 

The election of delegates to the 
county convention takes b place on 
March 14, town meeting day, and 
such election is held in the regular 
polling places and under the same Re- 
strictions as other elections, except 
that where delegates only are to be 
voted for, the polls will be open only 
from 12 o'clock until 9:00 p. m. The 
votes are canvassed by the cou lty 
auditor who issues certificates to ;he 
delegates elected. ,. 

Following is a list of delegates! to 
the state convention by counties: .'> ... 
Delegate^. 
, Ii8 ! 

...' 1" - 

, 10 : . 

...:.... u 



Council Proceedings 

RESOLUTION. 

At a regular meeting of the City Council 
held December 27th, 1021^ Alderman O. L. 
Ihle, seconded by Alderman Carl FroBeth, 
introduced the following ■ resolution and 
moved its adoption : 

Be It Resolved, That the following bills 
Jje audited and allowed: 

Current Fnnd. 
Street Coram issldper's payroll...... $81.05 

Fire Department ■ payroll 406.23 

Paul Midderlgh, fire warden service". 22.75 

Ed Lee, repairs 7.70 

L. M.' Johnson, gravel 17.50 

Times Printing & 'Manufacturing 

Co., office supplies 50.25 

John Bratrud, expense trip to Min- 
neapolis : 42.00 

Poor Fond. 

A. M. Lnngseth, shoes 4.50 

Mrs. Nela, BurtneBs, rent 10.00 

Auditorium ;Fund. 
Thief River Grocery Company, 

sweeping compound _.. 2.75 

Larson Furniture Co.' chairs 14.25 

Pork Fund. 

Commissioners' Payroll - rT^ 10.00 

Special Assessment Fnnd. 
Times Printing & Manufacturing '. 

Co., printing 6.00 

lllectric Light Fnnd. 

Alfred Adolph, labor : 50.40 

•Lars Erickson, labor .-. . 31.50 

John Brnmund, labor 39.00 

Times Printing & Manufacturing 

Co., office supplies 107.00 

Minneapolis Bridjre Co.. coal....'.... 10.84 
Northwestern Electrical Equipment 

Co., supplies ; . .1 241.10 

Jacob AndreBen Co., supplies 21.00 

The Emerson Electric Manufacttring 

Co., supplies '....... 3.31 

Standard Oil Co., ^upplies 22.50 

Kelley How Thomson Co., supplies 8.35 
Western Electric Co., supplies .... - 4.00 

St. Paul Electric Co., supplies 1.44 

Electric Supply Co., supplies ....... 0.50 

Northwest"]" Electric Apparatus Co., 

" supplies | ." 70.00 

L. W. Perkins, labor - 50.00 

- I Waterworks Fund. 

Crane & Ordway Co., supplies .L 98.75 

Ed Lee, repairs | . 8.55 

Aldermen voting Yes— Froseth, Dahl, 
Brumund, Brandon and Ihle. 

Aldermen voting- No — None. 

Resolution declared passed. 

H. A. BRUMtJND, 
President of the 
Approved December 31, 1921, 

JOHN BRATRUD, 
Mayor. 
Attest: 

A. H. AKRE, 
City Clerk. 



^3 'ranch and therefore, the net profit of 
the ranch will be $9,800 per day.-Does 



3Sfl 



County. 

Aitkin 

Anoka 

Becker » 

Beltrami ....;. 

Benton 

Big Stone 

Blue Earth 

Brown 

Carlton 

Curves" .' . .t/A .Vi-.Ci .<» * 

Cass i. 

Chippewa - 

phisago .... ... 

Clay 

Clearwater ...... .-. . ... 

Cook - 

Cottonwood 

Crow Wing . — 

Dakota 

Dodge V 

Douglas " 

Faribault ..: 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 



.. ate 3 
.. \9x. 

..(at. 

.. 10 -v 
. 10' 

... \st 

... ut 

.. 9': 

..12 



14. 

,16.. 
. 15 

Goodhue • f '■■' 

7. 



Council Chambers, Thief River Falls, 



Minnesota. 

: A regular meeting of City Council was 
called to order by'H. A. Brumund, Presi- 
dent, at 8 o'clock P. M. f December 27th 
1021. ' 

: Roll Call: 

; Members present — Froseth, Dahl, Bru- 
mund, Brandon, Ihle. . 
; Members absent— Ness. 
; Minutes of the meeting of December .13 
were read and approved as read; 

On motion made and carried the council 
adjourned. 

' H. A. BRUMUND, 

President of- the Council. 
Attest: 

A. H. AKRE, 
City Clerk. 



CITATION FOB &EABING ON PETI- 
TION FOB ABMINISTBATION. 

Estate of Ole H. Field. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF 
; Pennington, In Probate Court. 
Ih the Mutter of the Estate of Ole H. Field, 
; Decedent. 

The State of Minnesota to Thora Field, 
Agnefl Field, Hilmar Field, William Field. 
Howard Field and Eddie Field, and all 
persons interested In the granting of ad- 
ministration of the estate of- said deced- 
ent:- The petition of Thora Field having 
been filed In this Court, representing -that 
Ole H. Field, then a resident of the County 
of Pennington, State of Minnesota, died 
intestate on the 10th day of December, 
1921, and praying t that letters of adminis- 
tration of his estate be granted to Thora 
Field, mid the Court, having Iixed the time 
and place for hearing said petition; 
i Therefore, You, And Each 'of You, Are 
hereby cited and required to show cnusc. 
if any you have, before this Court at the 
Probate Court Rooms in the Court House, 
in the City of Thief River Falls., in the 
County of Pennington, State of Minnesota, 
on the 2nd day of -February, 10^2, at 10 
o'clock A. M., why said petition should 
not be granted. 

WitnesB, -the Judge of said Court, and 
the seal, of said Court, this 7th day of 
January; 1922. 

LARS BACKE, 
(SEAL) Probate Judge. 

THEO. QUALE, 

Attorney for Petitioner. Jan -10-17-24 



John Johnson of Newfolden was a 
business caller in the city on Saturday, 
returning to his home on- Sunday 
morning. 

; Mra. ffenry "Carlson was In town -from 
Thief River Falls on New Year's- day to 
visit with Mrs. Eva Carlson and other 
relatives. 

; Miss Linnea Backlund returned to Thief 
River FallB Monday evening" after spend- 
ing a few days with friends here and at- 
tending the Remmem Christmas tree. 
; AH the boys who- 1 have been employed at 
gravel hauling on the Babcock road be- 
tween Thief River FallB and Holt re- 
tqrned home last Saturday, the work be- 
ing completed. 



Boys Conference 
at Virginia, jMinn. 



Thief River Falls Should Be 
Represened at Import- 
ant Meeting I . 



'S 



High School Boys, Employed 
Boys, Y. M. C. A. 1 Mem- 
bers Eligible ; ■ . 



An older boys' conference j is to be 
held January 13, 14 and 15J at Vir- 
ginia. All boys who are sixteen years 
of age, or Sophomores in hign,school, 
or are employed, are eligible to at- 
tend providing they come in the spirit 
of the conference and believe in its'' 
purpose. Boys from high schools^Y. 
M. C. A.s, Sunday schools and church- 
es, or boys who are working are cor-, 
dially invited. The purpose of the 
conference is to challenge the older 
boys to strong Christian living, and. 
to help them in Christian service 
through offering plans and. methods of 
work in different organizations. 

It would be a fine thing if some- 
one from Thief River Falls might at- 
tend this conference. Since the high, 
school has no way of financing the 
expenses of representatives, the school 
authorities would be very glad to 
have any parent or organization^ who 
can afford it notify them in case they 
are willing to send either their own 
son or someone else's son, or both, as 
representatives to the conference. 
This would be a fine outing Jor some 
boy and it would as well be of. bene- 
fit to the rest of the boys to whom 
reports would be brought back by the 
delegates. 



*J 



COAL — Order your hard 
and soft coal from the Chris- 
tenson & Voelz Hardware 
Co. Phorie23. tf 



for Highest Possible Quality 
at Lowest Possible Price 



not this; look good to you? 

! Now, as to feeding this large num- 

!.H3 -b er f C ats, will say that^ have P VCT jHemieplii '•'.!!!!.'.'".'.'.'.V.'.V.'.'.'.'.!'.'!'.'.!'.l?8. 

the problem much careful study and, Houston .!...' t°j£ 

™ have found a solution of .the iproblem. HubBtaa ■,; 1**' 

413 Here it is: We will start'a rat ranch|j« ult ! '""""■•.'.'.".'. ii' 

400 near by. The rats will multiply four j~^, n ' ^!ll^V.'.V.V"l!!i!i'K!l"l j»fe 

451 times as fast as the cats. If we. start, Kanabec ••• '••••• j 7 ; 

„"^ ' with one I million rats we: will have four Kandiyohi •-;•••• »° ■ 

" -rats a day for each cat. Now then, Klt'ion... ,•••• < -.- 

i ",i,i i j 1.1. i. .i. -Koochiching '"' j„ 

'we will; feed the rats on the car- | 1-tc qul p arle; .-. .'. ... p 

■were out in full force, all casses of the cats from which th'.'- Lake .........' • • ",-jj 

,i m present. They feel pretty s kj ng naVe b 6en taken, giving each rat Le Snenr !| 

their 863; score, one member rf I t I t will thus be seen that '■''"■" , '' ' 

Uf *here would be nothing to '* v .-■-.. 

first place by January 15. 
h man with 534, for an aver- 



rpmnrkinir that there would be nothing to 7* « • . . 

?™rom now U .'flrat olace by January 15. the business Will be selfsupporting 
Holt waB hig 
age of 178. 

The Cubs 1 
not far behl 
In 



and entirely automatic all the: way 

through; The cats will eat the rats 

W it .11 to luck, as they pvere and theirats will eat trfe cats and we 

ii. having 831,. being beaten ! will . get : the skins and the long green 

hnril-foiKht game. Very few games that we are looking for. 



to -win ithis season. Henry I Awaiting your prompt reply and 
Cno^rmai^mblor .trusting, that you will appreciate my 
an average of 170 pins. ; .proposition and the opportunity I ot- 

. i ! f er you to acquire quick wealth, I beg 

The lesa" si Id about the Tigers, the; bet- 1 1 rema i n Yours for Independence 

terms, they were "hay wire, j w 'jA. 

.claims there are days when ana weaitn, ■ 

1 Shorty O'Neu." 



up a cent, 



The Invinc blea look like the real article 
Blnce Georgl has joined the ' team j and 
Holden is hick on the job after hiBi sick 
spell. George totaled 538- and Holden 517 
for averages of 170 and 172. Incidentally 
George is- lei ding the league with an aver 
age of .177 fir nine gameB. Jens Erickson 
claims a ca itain don't have .to hit them 
hard. He at ys it juat takes a little judg 
ment in cho islng the, right playera and a 
little encouragement during the game to 
win. JenB 
extended lisl 



USES OF POTATOES 



eems right according /to hla 
of playera". 

had high total for the Glap.ta; 

The 

Don. 



for an. average of 161. 
like a new team since 
charge, showing lota of j pep- 
per and thi "never-quit" spirit was in 
evidence, eBieclally In the last gameiafter 
and loalng one. Come on, 
are only four games from the 



winning ont 
Giants, you 
top. 

Finsand elf the Hlghrollera has rolled 
500 or bettejr every night Blnce the ; start 
Grendahl is having a streak 
He can get a 200 g,anie in 
any time, but they 'rfob't 
, in the regular games. 



Any time i"ou mention beating the Hlgh- 
rollers to O Tal Herron he points to the, 



ind' says, 
yon can.' 



"Look at my team; 



Ed Stotigtton claims he Is with .unreal 
club now si ice he joined the Hlghrollera. 
.. . . ; D 

The doublhs tournament entries are ra- 
pidly filling up, which assures a success- 
ful meet The Bhift time Ib as follows 
each day: !:00 P. M.; 2,:5G p. M.;| 3:40 
IVM.; 4:30 P. M.J -night stiift, 0:30, ; 7:20, 
R-10. 0:00 aid 9:50! The cash prizes' will 
go toHeanis ta follows: First, 30 per cent; 
second!' 25 lei" cent; third, 20" ner cent 
foartWjIS pefr cent; fifth, 10 per cent.. The 
fcttiecrWizeB will be given for -the font 



A 



Lincoln 

McLeod ...- • }? 

Mahnomen -. ! * 

Marshall :...- ^9 • 

Martin' ** ., 

Meeker -J . 

Mille Lacs * 

Morrison *^ 

Mower • *•• ^ 

Murray ; • • •■ £ 

Nicollet ?9 

Nobles ■' :;-*?■•• ^ 

Norman ^ 

Olmatead - • • ? • * • JJJ 

Otter Tail ■ -• fj 

Pennington '• ■<* 

Pine I 

Pipestone • ■ ® • 

P^olk }?' 

Pope 

Ramsey .. 
Red'' Lake 
Redwood 
Renville . 
Rice ..... 
Rock ..... 
Roseau..... . 

Scott 

Sherburne-, 
Sibley .... 
St. Louis , 
Stearns . . . 

Steele 

Stevens .,. 

Swift „][ 

Todd 

Traverse ... 
Wabasha . . 
Wadena . . . 
Waseca .... 
Washington 
Watonwan 
Willi In 



, 10 
. 10 
. 14 



. 10 



.12- 



• 1? 



(By Adele Koch in Minnesota Farm- 
ers' Institute Annual) 

There! are many ways of preparing 
potatoes and also' of using leftover 
potatoes' and a few recipes are added 
as suggestions: 

Hashed Brown Potatoes 
' Melt in the frying pan four table- 
spoons sausage fat, beef drippings, or 
other fat, add two cups chopped 
boiled potatoes, season, arid cook 
slowly twenty minutes, or until well 
browned; fold double and garnish 
with parsley. 

|Pan-Roasted Potatoes 

Prepare potatoes as for boiling, boil 
ten minutes, drain and cook' in roast- 
ing panfwith meat about 40 minutes, winona 

baste often with fat in pan. w *s" ■•j""- ". 

Scalloped Potatoes With Cheese ie,W Mealclne "I 

Wash; and pare four potatoes, cut Totn i ...1, 

in very] thin slices, put half of them ^g ]; st f d e i ega tes to the 9th dis- : 
in a greased baking dish.idredge with trjct conven tibn to be held at Moor- 
flour,, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and head March 31. by counties: 
two tablespoons grated cheese; re- Connty , ' V " Delegates, 

peat; cover with hot milk and bake 
in. a moderate oven one hour or until 
potatoes are tender. 

i 

:, HANSON- WIKEN 

Miss Hannah Wiken and Albert 
Hanson'; of* this city were united in 
marriage at the Municipal Court room, 
Saturday afternoon, January 7. Judge 
Tatrant; officiated in the presence : of. 
'Miss- Mildred Pierson and . Weslsy 
Piersoni ...:*•-■■ - .' "UtS^'i 



Becker 

Clay 

Clearwater 

Kittson ./. 

Mahnomen' '- 

iHrahnlw.'i?;.'..-...'. 

Norman 

Otter Tall 

Pennington 

Tolk 

Red Lake 

Roseau- *-* ...... . . . v. 

Wilkin ...,., 



.... 
.... 3 
.... 4 



.. 21 
.. 3 
.. 15 




After smoking your first Spur, you might 
say "just right," ''immense" or "great" — 
means the same thing. Means : "There was 
room at the top for a cigarette that can refresh 
a tired and much tried taste. And Spur's that 
cigarette." ! 

In the new Spur blend you find : ■ 
The richness of the full-bodied Oriental leaf 
tempered by the mildness and fragrance of 
fcurley and other choice home-grown tobaccos. 
It's a happy blend that brings out to the full • 
that pood tobacco taste. . 

And what's more ! Satiny imported paper, 
crimped, not pasted — makes an easierrdrawing, 
slower-burning cigarette. A mighty neafbrowrf 
and silver" package, with triple wrapping, 



1 . 



keeps Spurs fresh and fragrant. 
Spur and 



Just smoke a 



1 F your deaUr cannot supply you*, 
~ send ua $2100, and we shall be 
pleased to. send you. by prepaid parcel 
post, a carton of 200 Spur Cigarettes 
(10 packages). Address: 

111 niTH ATBTOZ, HEW TOES CRT 




BT 



i.-iT't^m^fcLiLi: 



X. 



s 



/■ 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, . 1922 



The Saddest Feature 



■y iar-old 



pi it-haps 



' am 



act 1 



i lowe 



li trltage 

b' ire i 



In many \v 
pf the Kelley 
: found In a little 
wit ere a 19-; 
block scnrs 
above two 
serves to mokje 
m e morles tlmt 
- arrest of her 

No one couli 
without being 
ness and with 
to bitterness c i 
man who wre 
fore ever she I ncl £ 

Looking up( 
for she Ik .onl; 
'^azed before 
added to the 
Hlonmcnt, one 
hrntnl deed \j\ 
Kelley was 
the fate visHepI 
nelplesH 
perfect hatred 
he has done 
what he did 
let. Quickly 
the man who 
ner. Slowly, 
concern he 
young wife, r 
portunlty of- 
body with hi 
motherhood a 
all with the 
the shadow 
Infamy, and 
bles with a 
'. She never 
Bhe was marr 
'this, as In" 

5 led her unde: 
np her that 
United Stnte» 
served during 
that during 
service for hi 
an inmate of 
he was -a croc 
she ever; met 

WhJIe the 
Ing the story 
tborltles In 
wife sat silent 
home that is 
of home, ex< 
it of the holi 
upon the bed 
months old 
as If there w. 
but love and J»: 
a .boy less/t u 
about and /fell jl; 
visitors. /Loo ti 
both, of' then: 
happy /w 
depravity of 
could not be 
fidelity _ by th 
of helpless ch 

No word of 
lips; no tears 
was beyond 
tlfe had. air 
and of reaei 
horror come 
deprivation 
hope there 
girlhood, and. 
and accepted: 
even tasted of 
with h eras li- 
had left her .1 

Looking arc 
felt a fierce 
the man. 
of his callou 
Buttons of 
fitted In with 
of this little 

Out of hfs 
time made 
dollars 
and clothe 
left her, In 
a few p'ennlei \, 
charity for 
and herself. 



l" ev sry 



tie 



tie 



vinsoi ie, 



1 tie 



her 



th> 



Dots 



tertal lment. 



Seventeen 
tallied at the In 
Dols at their hi 

. urday evening- 

, rummy en ; 

: at play, three ai 

I First prize at w 
won by Olof Oi 

1 Chester Dols, 

■ rummy prize, i 
by Mrs. James 
eon was served 
her daughter, p 
midnight. The 
Mr. and Mrs. 6. 
J. E. Thoinps; 
Rahum, Mr, 

' L. H. Aos, Mral 
Sagrmoen, Olof 

.Stafford, Benny 

The Rlndal 
of -Mrs. A, T. 

. was well atte 

: of Thief River 
out-of-town r~ 

: H.iKyan and 
'dames Eriekac 
KiTer Palls, 



. aiit. 



ifr. and Mrs 
' ter, Irma, left 



C. E. " Hellquls 
\ over Sunday. 
. A carload, of 

H. SL B. elevatoi 
• . Miss Gladys; S' 

ning for Thief; 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



(WINNEBAGO ENTERPRISE)! 



iys the snddest feature 
murder case Is to be 
house in Winnebago, 
girl, bearing the 
f tragic life, watches 
, whose laughter but 
lore bitter to her the 
have culminated in the 1 
husband for, murder. i 
stand within' this home ! 
overwhelmed with sad" ] 
sympathy that turns ! 
gainst the cruelty of the i 
!ked this girl's life be- ] 
a chance to live. j 

n this sad-faced child — 
a child — as she stands 
he blow that has been 
other blows of dlsilln- 
feels suddenly that the 
sited upon poor Frank 
less vicious than 
upon this forlorn and 
and one feels a more 
for thlB brute for what 
to his family than for 
o the victim of his hul- 
id deliberately he killed 
nccepted him as a part- 
and with fiendish un- 
billed the hopeB of his 
ibbed her of every op- 
happtness, starved her 
selfishness, made h e r 
slavery, and crowned It 
thnt leaves her und<>r 
an eternal memory of 
ered his helpless ba- 

f shame. - 

the name of the man 

ed to. Deceiving her Id 

_ other thing, he mar- 

an assumed name, tell- 

he was just out of the 

navy, where' he had 

the war. She never knew 

years of his alleged 

country, he had/been 

\ state prison, ana that 

k and a Jail-bird before 

him. / 

hjasband was. calmly tell" 

of his crime to the au- 

Minneapolls Jail, the 

and dazed In the little 

mockery of every Idea 

toy the presence in 

motherhood. And 

aby less than two 

Doing and laughing 

nothing In the world 

while. the older child, 

than twb years, toddled 

ly made friends with the 

ng upon 1 these babies, 

beautiful, healthy and 

one wondered at the 

the man whose heart 

chained to honor and 

little '.clutching fingers 

ldren who were his own. 

complaint come from her 

fell from her eyes; she 

trivialities of weeping. 

(-'-drained her of tears, 

Birts, .before this final 

pon her. Suffering and 

sapped whatever of 

been budding In her 

left her old with misery 

gorrjjw before she had 



hid 
hid 



end ' 
Hire 



ujir's sweetness. It was 

reiterated blows of fate 

.Insensible to added pain. 

ufid the bare room one 

rising wrath against 

was every evidence 

disregard of the obll 

lyuBband and father. . All 

the frail, starved body 

woman. 

c arnings he had for some 

an allowance of three 

;k upon which to feed 

entlro family. He had 

Fi^Armont a week ago with 

bo that Bhe must beg 

istenance for her babies 

Chen In a sudden prince- 



ROSEWOOD 



By J01-L B. SHOBEUG 



EZobW at Whist. 



liness of generosity as he contemplated j 
the easy money that murder was to : 
bring him, !he had heaped upon h e r 
the munificent gift of *25 as he started , 
blithely off,! whistling a merry tune 
which was the nenreBt to a clean thing: 
that rose out of his polluted and eor- , 
rupted heart; started ofT for his Christ- 
mas celebration, his mind, made, up to 
hang upon 'the Christmas tree of his 
little family the hideous Bkeleton of 
his rotted life. 

He had come sneaking, back to his 
home the very day after the murder, 
to change Ills clothes, and hang upon 
a nail the b'lood-stalned coat that was 
to be the final proof of his guilt; then 
hurried off again to do the one. good, 
unpremeditated thing of IiIb recent life 
—to walk Into the trap that should 
take him forever out of the home he 
had dishonored, and the lives that he 
had blighted. 

It is a .tragic thing to be robbed of 
treasures we have had, but there - is 
left the memory of possession that Is 
little less beautiful than the posses- 
sion Itself. JBut to be robbed of that 
which one never had, to lose dreams 
before the dream Is born, to dwell In 
silence ere ever song baa dwelt upon 
the lips— that Is the Great Tragedy—, 
this Is the JdeathleBS death thnt has 
fallen upon -this poor woman.. 

But the saddest — and the happiest — 
thing in thi^ woman's life must be the 
fact that this man's crime is to her a 
negative thing. It prevents the pos- 
sibility of any realization of her life : 
of -any thing, she might have hoped for. ■ 
It does not shadow any memory of 
,exultant and exalting Joy. It does' not 
kill any dream; It merely confirms n 
constant fear. 

The luckiest day in her unhappy life 
was that which took the man forever 
from her. Of no woman can a more 
terrible and 1 bitter and hopeless thing 
be said. S 

If anywhere In this world during I 
this season 'of tender holiday recollec-; 
tlon Is a home that should appeal to 
every loving; human heart; If anywhere 
Is- a woman IwhoBe dumb agony -should] 
win the ten'derest sympathy and help 
of human beings — here In Winnebago 
Is this home and this woman. 

So after all, this Is the terrible thing 
that McDonongh has done — this tomb; 
which he has built for those be should; 
have loved and protected. The mur- 
derer's* immediate' victim had hls- 
chance at life; and he suffered but a 
moment. This woman, these-, bablea, 
were stricken before life had given 
them anything, and they will suffer 
forever. Before any bar of Judgment, 
human or ■ Divine, this brute could 
more easily! answer for the murder of 
Kelley than for the slaughter of hl_ 
own innocents. 

Here in this home where dilapidated' 
furniture worth ' a few dollars elo-f 
quently attests the character of this 
man's human affection — Is the truest 
symbol of his depraved soul, and the| 
most perfect expression of how terrl-; 
ble his crime was. 

Above the hue and cry of the Law 
as it follows the murderer's trail* 
above the clamor of ^Tlghjgous f , wrath 
that arises 'from every* clean heart In 
denunciation of thlH crime, above the 
arrest,' the trial, the conviction, above 
the Imprisoning grey walls that will 
give McDonough the only fit home he 
ever "had, rises; and will forever rise, 
the one picture, the one sound that 
constitute the genuine symbol of his 
deed in all its bratnlity, depravity and 
viciousnesB-f-the picture of the silent 
woman, ricking herself to and fro, In 
a broken phalr as she wafts, for life 
to strike again — and the sound of In- 
nocent laughter and cooing "and bub- 
bling from; a baby's lips, as in help- 
less Joy It ploys with shadows on the 
bed, unknowing that there "Is anything 
In the' world but sunshine and muslo. 



morning from Thief River FallB for a few 
days' visit with the A. Oullseth family. 
"■•MrsY-l*. H. Aos arrived Wednesday, morn- 
ing ,from Gully and will spend the re- 
mainder of the week visiting with her 
brother, James Thompson and family. 

Ingrld Nordhagen spent a couple of 
day h at Thief River Falls thla week visit- 
ing with Mesdames Johanna Nyhiis and 
A. C. Vprseth and attending to shopping. 

Ivan Erlckson and Arthur Ostvold came 
out from Thief River Falls Tuesday morn- 
ing and will join a huutirig party that is 
located on ;.the MJelde farm northwest of 
town. ". 

iBabelle .Sagmoen left: Wednesday eve- 
ning for Thief River Falls, where'she will 
visit with hr Bister, Mtb. S. Benson and 
family for some time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Severt Benson and two 
Bona spent New Year's with the B. P. Sag- 
moen family, returning to their home . at 
Thief River Falls Monday evening. 

Herbert Carlson and Isabel Sagmoen 
went to Crookston last Thursday, where 
they will remain until Sunday visiting 
with Mr. and Mrs. Dave Mosbeck. 

MIbb Violet Furan returned Thursday 
from .Thief River FallB, where she has 
spent a few days with the A. B. Reinmem 
and E. Ba'cklund youngsters. She waB 
accompanied home by Gbldie and Ruth 
Remmem, who will visit here for a few 
daye. 



Farmers Invited 
to Ask Questions 



At Auditorium Meeting -Fri- 
day Cavert Will Discuss 
Dairy Matters ; 



Prof. Hay to Speak on Or- 
ganization of Co-oper- 
ative Associations 



Page Five 



Mr. Wm. L. Cavert Farm Manage- 
ment Demonstrator of the University 
of Minnesota announces a very in- 
teresting program for the Farm Man- 
agement schools to be held in Thief 
River Falls on Jan. 13 and in Good- 
ridge on Jan. 14. Mr. Cavert will 
discuss the cost of producing butter 
fat and more economical feeding ■ ra- 
tions that should be used to secure 
better returns. 

Mr. J. H. Hay will have, some very: 
useful information along tbe line of 
organizing co-operative associations. 
The question of fixing farm prices and 
co-operative marketing will be fully 
discussed by G; Halvorson and W. l J. 
Brown of Thief River Falls. 

These are subjects of vital interest 

to the farmers of- this locality during 

the present depression and we believe 

that you will feel well repaid if you 

will take the time to attend one of 

| these Farm Business schools. Tell 

'your neighbors "and come prepared to 

j ask* questions along ""the* foregoing 

j lines. Have your pencil and paper or 

notebook as there will be material that 

'you will wish to put down on record 

I for future reference. 

! The morning session -will be devoted 

| to the organizing of a Pennington 

County Milk Testing association and 

the securing of additional names of 

those interested in. having their herds 

placed on.official test. Eighteen local 

dairymen have already signified their 

intentions of carrying on the work 

and starting operations immediately 

after Friday's meeting. 



were pleasantly enter' 
me of Mr. and Mrs. ] 
me east of town last Sat 
combined whist and 
Four tables were 
whist and oue at rummy, 
list, a carton of eggB, was 
setb, and second prize by 
ion of the house* Tlie, 
box of candy, was' won 
Thompson. A fine' lunch- 
by Mrs. Dols, assisted by 
Una, and son, Chester, at 
following were the guest* : 
S. Hellerud, Mr. and Mrs. 
Mr. and Mrs. Beuhard 
Mrs. John Rauum, Mr:. 
.1". S. Sagmoen, Miss Gladys 
pseth, J. E, Shoberg, Fred 
Ranum. 

dies' Aid met at tbe home 

Ihoreson last Tuesday and 

Rev. George Larson 

?allB bad charge. Anion]? 

present were Mrs. 0. 

daughter, Lorraine, and Mes- 

and Olson, .all of .Thief 



Emll Anderson and daugh- 
atiirday evening for Thief 



River Falls, whero they will visit at the 



ind James Johnson homes 



rye- was shipped from the 
last Wednesday, 
wenson left Saturday eve^ 

«, „, : Klver FallB, where she will 

visit with her 1 aunt, Mrs. Severn Branden, 
over Sunday..; 

Howard (Carlfeon Is spending Sunday 
with relatives aW friends at Thief River 



Falls. 

The following 



were pleasant Sunday vis- 



itors at the Sir home: Mr. and Mrs, 



Alma, Alice, Edna and 
,[Mr. aud Mrs. A. T. Thof- 
i tesetb. [ 

Peter Woldneas of town 
la couple of days last week 
visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S. Rnfteseth.j 

Mrs. T. jMellem left Saturday for Viking, 
where she will visit with her daughter, 
i Mrs. S. S/Nor,degaard. 



! Emll Blomberg, 

; Kuth Blomberg; 

. eson and S. Ha 

Mr. and Mrs. 

of Norden spent 



School opened 



Miss Alice Thompson of Thelf River Palls 



■ as teacher. '.Mis 



i Thompson- comes to take 



the place of ^ijss Ann Tharaldson, who 
*'r two months of teaching, 
a larger school south" of 



has resigned aft 
having secured 
her former school. 



Monday at Busy Bee, with 



! 

The teacher [at Hosebank, Mrs. . J^blia 

Sagmoen, is -on :he sick list this week and 

her school will hot open before' WerfneB- 

j day. 

Miss Minnie |S 
; ing for. Thompi 
duties, at a'fnrn home after spending a 



! 

irenson left Monday morn- 
N. D., to resume her 



few weeks' yaeation 'with ter folks north 
of this place." 

Lewis Alby and Hans Hanson returned 
to Minneapolis Monday evening after hav- 
ing spent the holidays -with the former's 
folks here, j ' 

About 70 friends and neighbors met! at 
the home of; Mr. and Mts. Fred Jarshaw 
last Saturday evening to tender them a 
surpriae party. A "beautiful set of dishes 
was left in iremem'branee of the occasion 
and after ' a pleasant social evening: a 
dainty midnight lundieon was served. 

A surprise: party was tendered Mr. and 
Mrs. John Haider at their home Satur- 
day, a rocking cnalr being given aB a 
present and « pleasant evening spent with 
friends and nelgriboTS. 

Edwin Lap'pegaard and Elry Carlson left 
Friday evening' for Thief River Falls, the 
former after jBpendlng his Christmas vaca- 
tion at the O. Lappegaard home. 

Mrs. James iJohnBon and son,' Earl, 
went to "Viking Friday morning to visit 
with the former's BiBter, Mrs. Morris 
Halvorson and family. The Johnson's 
spent Thursday here visiting with Mrs. 
Johnkon'B father, J. "E. Hellqulst, and Mr. 
Johnson returned to their home at Thief 
River Falls the same evening. . j 

Little Florence Ostrom returned to Thief 
River Falls [Friday evening after a few 
days' visit with Miss "Gladys Sagmoen. 

Mr. and Mra: O. S. Hellerud arrived on 
Friday morning from Twin Valley and 
will make their "future home 'here, Mr. 
Hellerud .having been appointed cashier 
of tbe Farmers' State bank:. Mrs. Helle- 
rud Is a sister of A. S. Solm, the former 
caBhler, j 

Swen Swerison went to Thief itlver Falls 
Friday evening' to.. bring "home his daugh- 
ter, Geneva, : who has spent Christmas .; at 
the Severn Branden home. 

School opened at Willowdale school on 
Monday morning following a two weeks' 
Christmas vacation. 

Carl- Ranum trapped a wolf last Mon- 
day. There -seems to be more wolves this 
winter than! usual, and -there are numer- 
ous hunters lupon their trail. j 1 

Mrs. Gust.Nakken and daughter, Gladys, 
and Jalmer! Rafteseth, went to Dakota 
Junction Wednesday evening to vlBit with 
their sister,] Mrs. Carl Stromberf, for a 
day. ' | 

Mrs.; Ape Stroble, accompanied by a son, 
arrived Tuesday evening from Angus, and 
will visit with the Sorenson and Haugen 
families the j remainder of tbe week. ! 

John Bloom Bpent Tuesday at Warren 
attending toi matters of business and visit- 
j ing with a. friend. j 

Mrs; James Thompson shopped and vis- 
'ited with MrB, Ben Harris at Thief River 
' Falls between trains last Wednesday: i 
i Miss Viola AxelBpn returned Thursday 
'morning from a combined business and 
' pleasure tour, to Thief River Fails. j 
j The two , merchants, Herbert Carlson 
and John Remmem went to Thief River 
I FallB Thursday .evening on business, and 
the former will remain to visit with friends 
and relatives. ,_. I ■' 

!• Miss. Bertha Remmem arrived Thursday 



XMAS AT OjAKLAND PARK SAN- 
AXORIUM 



(Contributed) 

The Christmas and New Year holi- 
days at the Oakland Park Sanatorium 
were very happy ones for 'the patients. 
The festivities seemed to begin when 
they came down for supper Christmas 
eve. and found the tables and dining 
room beautifully decorated by che able 
hands of Miss Knudson and her help- 
ers, Miss Malm, Miss" Stradtnian and 
Miss Nomeland. 

Later in the evening they all gath- 
ered in the reception room to admire 
the Christmas tree and to receive all 
the mysterious packages which were 
j piled high on a table near the tree. 
It was found that all the patients had 
been remembered by both friends and 
relatives. 

A great many toys were in evidence 
and much fun was derived from cag- 
ing the crazy bugs, blo%ying horns; 
watching climbing monkeys spinning 
tops, admiring dolls, etc. 

Nuts, candy and apples were eaten 
in great quantities by all, no one 
seeming to think 1 of consequences in 
the least 

Nine o'clock, the usual bed time 
hour passed hy unnoticed and the pa- 
tients, and nurses enjoyed themselves 
still nearly midnight. When they fin- 
ally went to ned, they all agreed they 
had had a wonderful evening. 
: There were also a great many more 
pleasures in store for them before the 
Christmas season was over and to the 
following people, Miss Hamre, Miss 
Quale, Miss Gladys Anderson and the 
itisses Tandberg who entertained 
them with music and singing and left 
boxes of lovely candy and gifts; Miss 
Clauson who^gave each one of the 
patients a big box of her homemade 
candyj Rev. Kreidt and the young 
ladies who came with him.to sing; the 
Presbyterian young people who enter- 
tained so well with song and music; 
Dr. Milan, the nurses and all others 
who helped to make it a cheerful 
Christmas, do they extend their most 
heartfelt thanks. . > 

The patients had most likely look 
ed forward to a lonely Christmas away 
from home and friends, but they were 
surprised to find when it was all over 
that there had been no y>om for 
homesickness or the dreaded blues. 




V ECONOMIES 

For the Whole Family 

Just a few minutes in our store at this time', will uphold 1 to your 
)uymg economies that you cinhot afford to pass by. Every department is de- 
monstrating our year round values for the whole family 



Our Policy 
One Price 

To 
Everybody 




Incorporated 

312 DEPARTMENT STOREF 
TVER FALLS, MINNESOTA 



Our Policy 
One Price 

To 
Everybody 



Work Shoes 

Real Service For Men 

High-grade Eetan lea- 
thers which resist the 
barnyard acids. Excep- 
tional values at 

$2.98 



Flannel Shirts 

Men's and boys' grey 
and tan flannel Shirts 

98c 

itlen's tan and grey 
wool flannel Shirts 

l$2.49 



Dress Pants 

For Men 

Worsted, serges, cas- 
simeres — in blue, brown 
and gray stripes. Plain 
or cuff bottom. Extra 
good values 

$4.98 



Wool Unions 

Real Value For Men , . 

Men's natural gray 
heavy ribbed wool un- 
ion suits. Well-made, 
comfortable garments, 
moderately priced 

$1.69 



, Work Pants 

Men's heavy grey wool 
: and mackinaw Pants 

$3.98 

Men's corduroys, extra 
\ heavy and serviceable 

$3.50 



Overcoats 

For Men 

Warm, stylish', single, 
double breasted and 
belted. Made of special- 
ly selected fabrics in 
popular shades '- 

$23.50 



Bleached "Honor" Muslin 

J. C. Penney Co. Brand 



Months of careful study have been ex- 
pended to produce a grade of "Bleached" 
muslin which would permit affixing the J. 
C. Penney Iafiel. Our buyers have been ex- 
tremely successful. '...'; : 

In offering our branded HONOR Muslin, 
it is with our fujl recommendation. We are 
confident you Will agree with us that its' 
excellent quality makeB.it the best muslin 
on the market at the price. . . 



1YARD 



15c 



•Besureto'ask for the-. 
Company HONOR Muslin. 



•J.-' C... Penney. J 



Sheeting 

Dan River, bleach- 
ed 9x4, per yd 49c 

Dan River, bleach- 
ed, 9x4,' per yd. ,.._58c 

Pequot, 9x4, bleach- 
ed or unbleached_....65c ... 

Pequot, 10x4, un- 
bleached or bleach- 
ed, per yd i..75c 

Pepperell, 10x4, 
bleached, per yd 158c 



White Goods 

White India linen, . 

per yd. 15c 

White Flaxons, per - 

yd. _ __23c 

...49c 



40 in., per yd. . 
White satin bloomer 

cloth, 36 iivper yd. 49c 
White, domestic or- • 

gafidy, per yd. ...:_58c 
White imported or- 
gandy, 44-in. wide, 
per yd. l._ ir .„.„..7.3c 



Long Cloth and Cambric 
i "" Muslin' 
jBerkley coronet 
i cambric, 36-iri., per 

I yd. ._...._.._ _.......25c 

Berkley No. 60 cam- 
: brie, 36-in., per yd._25c 
Berkley No. 100 : 
: cambric, 36-in., per 

; yd : __..35c 

Long cloth, 

at 12c, 15c, 19c, 23c 

Lonsdale sheeting, 

I per .yd. 19c 



Stylish, New Dresses 
Tricotine and Poiret Twill 

The newest navy blue Tricotine and poiret twill 
Dresses, which' are exceedingly popular. Some 
are trimmed with block designs of heavy black 
silk embroidery, brightened >by a gold thread. 



$9.90 



to 



$19.75 

It has been many seasons since a Dress of such 
attractive style and good quality could be pur- 
chased at so small a price! 
Every seam is well tailored and the linds.are. 
unusually graceful and youthful. 
Sizes 16 lio 44. 



Dress Goods Bargains 

Renfrew plaid suit- 
ing, per yd — .: 39c 

Red Rose plaid ging- 
hams, 27-in., per 
yd. _.. — . 15c 

American prints, 
per yd. i_10c 

Apron gingham, col- 
or fast,'per yd. _.__14c 

Fancy plaid ging- 
hams, 32-in., per 
yd. ___:__. 4 29c 

Percales, light and 
darks- per yd. 17c, 19c 



Tablets 

90 large sheets _ 
75 large sheets . 
130 6x9 sheets _ 

Ink tablets 5c, 8c 

Composition books ;_.5c 



..9c 
„5c 

_8c 



White outing!, 36-in., 
per yd; (_.. ...19c 

White outingi, 27-in., 
per yd. . IjOc, 15c, 19c 

Light stripes and 
fancy, 27-in., per 
yd :.,.... 17c 

Darks and greys, 
27-in., per yd 19c 

Plain, pink and blue, 
27-in., per yd 19c 



WAISTS 

Ladies' georgette crepe, 

and crepe de chine in 

all the latest shades, 

styles and designs at' 

$2.98 $3.98 

Ladies' Waists,' fancy 
Canton crepes, silk ra- 
tine, with beaded de- 
signs, from 

$4.95 to $9.80 

Table Oil Cloth 

( 48-in. wide, light and 

darks 

29C yard, 



Hair Nets 

Unusual Values 

Hand-made of real hu- 
man hair. Single or dou- 
ble mesh,- cap shape 
tyles. All colors.' Ex- 
tremely 'popular at, each 

8c 



Notions 

,Coats, cotton thread 4c 
Bias tape . ' i . Sp. 

Hook and eyes' i _4c 

Snaps ._ _!_._...:.._ 4c 

Pen Olive toilet . 

soap , !...__ 5c 

Pearl buttons J • 5c 



SWEATERS 

Smart Sweaters in Tux- 
edo, slipover and coat 
styles, all popular 
shades, 

$2.68 t<> $3.98 

MOCCASINS 

Men's moose hide, 
6 to 8 $2.69 

Boys' moose hide, 
3 to 5 $2.25 

Youths' moose hide, 

til to 2 _.$1.98 

Sheepy lined moc- 
casins 98c 

COTTON SATTS 

3 lb..fulLs-ze batt 73c 

72x90 wool batt ......$2.49 



/ 




\ 



• ■ 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1922 



The Saddest Feature 



for sli<5 is out} 
diizod before 
q tided to th< 
sionment, one 
brutal deed 



THE THIEF RIVER PALLS TRIBUNE 



(WIXNEBAOO ENTERPRISE) 



In inuny \vi ys the saddest feature 
of the Kelley murder on»e Ih to be 
found in a Itti le house in Winnebago; 
where a 19-year-old pirl, ' hearing: the 
black Hears ! of tragic life, watches 
above two bill ies, whose laughter hut 
serves to malt" more bitter to her the 
memories that have culminated in the 
arrest of her husband for murder. 

No one could stand within this home 
without being overwhelmed with Bad" 
ness and with u sympathy that turns 
to bitterness a rainst the cruelty of the 
man who wije'kcd this girl's life be- 
ever she laid a chance to live. 
Looking uixvn.thi* sad-faced child — 
a child — as she stands 
i he blow that has been 
other blows of disillu- 
feels suddenly thnt the 
sited ti]ion poor Frank 
Kelley vrus icrhaps less vicious than 
the fate visited upon this forlorn and 
helpless wonai; and one feels n more 
for this brute for what 
:o his family than for 
> the victim of his bui- 
ld deliberately he killed 



perfect hatred 
he has done 
what he did 
let. duickly 
tlio man who lecepted him as a part- 
ner. Slowlj , nnd with fiendish un- 
concern he k iilcd the hopes of his 
young wife, ribbed her of every op 
port unity of happiness, starved her 
body with il * selfishness, made h L "r 
motherhood a slavery, and crowned it 
nil with the a -t that leaves her under 
the shadow of an eternal memory of 
Infamy, and! towered his helpless ba- 
bies with a heritage of shame. 

She never bore the nnme of the 

she war. married to. Deceiving her ip 
this, as In ertry other thing, he mar- 
ried her under an assumed name, tell- 
ing iier tha le was just; out of the 



United States 
served during 
that during 
service for hi 



ho was a croo 



she" ever me iilm, 



navy, wftere lie had 

the war. She never knew 

tl le years of his alleged 

country, he had been 



an Inmate of i state prison, and that 



It and a jail-bird before 



h ishand was calmly tell - 
of his crime to the aa- 
tne. Minneapolis Jail, the 
and dazed in the little 
home that Is a mockery of every Idea 
of home, exci pt for the presence In 
It of tho Iiolln iSH of motherhood. And 
a baby less than two 
,-ks cooing and laughing 
s nothing In the world 
but love andjj'iy, while tho older child, 
a boy less tlian two years, toddled 
about and shy y made friends with the 
Looi Ing upon these babies, 
beautiful, healthy and 
happy, winson e, one wondered at the 



While the 
ing the story 
thorltles In 
wife sat silent 



upon the bad 
months old 
as If there wi 

.i t 



visitors, 

both of them 



depravity of 
could not be 
fidelity by tb 



lips; no tears 
was beyond th 



of his cnlloui 
gations of u.b 
fitted in with 
of this little 



the man whose heart 
chained to honor and 
little clutching fingers 
of helpless chi dren who were his own. 
'So word of <omplaint came from her 
fell from her eyes; Bhe 
i > trivialities of weeping. 
Life had alreaiy drained her -of tears, 
and of resenti nents, before this final 
i jon her. Suffering and 
deprivation hi d sapped whatever of. 
hope there ha 1 been budding In her 
girlhood, and eft her old with misery 
and accepted sorrow before she hail 
even tasted of ' lire's sweetness. It was 
"with h eras U reiterated blows of fate 
hud left her '.Insensible to added pain. 
Looking aro md the hare room one 
felt a fierce a id rising wrath against 
the man. Her* was every evidence 
disregard of the obli- 
ijusband and father. Atl 
the frail, starved 'body 
woman. 

Out of his cuttings he bud for some 
time made liei an allowance of three 
dollars a wet k upon which to feed 
and clothe the entlro family. He had 
left her in Fafrmont a week ago with 
so that she must beg 
charity for sustenance for her babies 
and herself. : Then In a Budden prince- 



Hness of generosity as he contemplated 
the easy money that murder was to" 
bring him, )he had heaped upon h B r 
the munificent gift of *25 as he started 
blithely! off,; whistling a merry tune 
which was the nearest to a clean thing 
that. rose out of his polluted and cor- 
rupted heart; started oft" for his Christ- 
mas celebration, his mind made up to 
hang upon the Christmas tree of his 
little family the hideous skeleton . of 
his rotted life. 
He had come sneaking back to his 

; home the very day after the murder. 

. to change his clothes, and hang upon 

i a nail the blood-stained coat that was 
to he the final proof of his guilt; then 
hurried off again to do tho one good, 
unpremeditated thing of his recent life 
—to walk Into the trap that should 1 
take him forever out of the home he 
had dishonored, and the lives thu* he 
had blighted. J 

It Is a tragic thing to he robbed of 
treasures we have had, but there ■ is 
left the memory of possession that Is 
little less beautiful than tho posses- 
sion itself. But to be robbed of that 
which one never had, to lose dreams 
before the dream Is born, to dwell in 
silence ere ever song has dwelt upon 
tho lips— that Is the Great Tragedy— 
this is the i deathless death that has 

: fallen upon ;this poor woman. 

But the saddest— and the happiest — 
thing In this woman's life must he the 
fact tha't this man's crime Is to her a 
negntlve thing. It prevents the pos- 
sibility of any realization of her life 
of any thing! she might have hoped for. 
It does not' shadow any memory of 
exultant and exalting Joy. It docs not 
kill any dream; It merely confirms u 
constant fear. 

The luckiest day In her unhappy life 
was that which took the man forever 
from her. Of no woman cun a more 
terrible and ', bitter and hopeless thing 
be said. 

If anywhere In this world during 
this season of tender holiday recollec- 
tion is a home that should appeal to 
every loving | human heart; if nnywhero 
Is a woman who Be dumb agony should 
win the tenderest sympathy and help 
of human beings — here in Winnebago 
Is this home; and this woman. 

So after all, this is the terrible thing 
that McDonough has done—this tomb - 
which he has built for those he should 
have loved and protected. The mur- 
derer's Immediate victim bad his \ 
chance at life; and he suffered but a 
moment. This woman, these babies, 
were stricken before life had given 
them anything, and they will suffer 
forever. Before any bar of Judgment, 
human or .Divine, this brute could . 
more easily [answer for the murder of 
Kelley than 1 for the slaughter of his 
own Innocents. - 

Here In this home 'where dilapidated 

- furniture worth a few dollars elo- 
quently attests the character of this 
man's human affection — Is the truest' 
symbol of his depraved soul, and the 
most perfect expression of how terri- 
ble his crime was. 

Above the hue and cry of the Law 
as it follows the murderer's trail; 
above the clamor of rglghteoTiB wyath. 
that arises from every' clean heart In 
denunciation of this crime, above the 
arrest, the trial, the conviction, above; 
the Imprisoning grey walls 'that will' 
give "McDonough the only fit home he 
ever had, rises, and will forever rlBe, 
the one picture, the one sound that 
constitute the genuine symbol of his 
deed In all Its brutalfty, depravity and 
viclousness— the picture of the silent' 
woman, rocking herself to and fro. In 
a broken chair as she waits for life; 
tp Btrlke again — and the sound of In- 
nocent laughter and cooing and bub- 
bling from a baby's lips, ns in help-. 
less joy It plays with Whaflows on the; 
bed, unknowing that there Is anything 
In the world but sunshine and muslo. 



I 



I 



morning from Tblef River Falls for a lew 
days' visit with the A. Gullseth family. 

Mrs. h. H. Aos arrived Wednesday morn- 
ing ,froni Gully and will spend the re- 
mainder of the week visiting; with her 
brother, James Thompson and family. 

Ingrld Nordhagen Bpent a couple of 
days .at Thief River Falls this week viBit- 
lng with Mesdames Jobanne :Nyhus and 
A. C.- Vorseth and attending to shopping. 

Ivan Erickson and Arthur Ostvold came 
out from Thief River Falls Tuesday morn- 
ing and will join' a hunting party that Ib 
located on the MJelde farm northwest of 
town. 

Isabelle Sagmoen left Wednesday eve- 
ning for Thief River Falls, where she will 
visit with hr BiBter, Mrs. S. Benson and 
family for some time. 

Mr. and. Mrs. Severt Benson nnd two 
sons spent New Year's with the B. P. Sag- 
moen family, returning to their home at 
Thief River FallB- Moiftlay evening. 

Herbert ' Carlson and Isabel Sagmoen 
went to Crookston last Thursday, where 
they will remain until Sunday visiting 
with Mr. and Mrs. Dave Mosbeck. 

Miss "Violet Furan returned Thursday 
from .Thief River Falls, where she has 
spent a few days with the A. B. Remmem 
and E. Backlund youngsters. She was 
accompanied home by Goldie and Ruth 
Remmem, who will visit here for a few 
days. r 



Farmers Invited 
to Ask Questions 



At Auditorium Meeting Fri- 
day Cavert Will Discuss • 
Dairy Matters 



Prof. Hay to Speak on Or- 
ganization of Co-oper- 
ative Associations 



Mr. Wm. L. Cavert Farm Manage- 
ment Demonstrator of the University 
of Minnesota announces a very in- 
i teresting program for the Farm Man- 
| agement schools to be held in Thief 
1 River Falls on Jan. 13 and iniGood- 
| ridge on Jan. 14. Mr. Cavert will 
I discuss the cost of producing butter 
Ifat and more economical feeding ra- 
'tions that should be used to secure 
I better returns. 

Mr. J. H. Hay will have some very 
j useful information along' the line of 
organizing co-operative associations. 
The question of fixing farm prices and 
co-operative marketing will be fully 
discussed by G. Halvorson arid W. J., 
J3rown of Thief River Falls. 

These are subjects of vital interest 
to the farmers of this locality during 
the present depression and we believe 
that you will feel' well repaid if you 
will take the time to' attend one ,of 
these Farm Business schools. Tell 
'your neighbors and come prepared to 
i ask~ques*tforis" t ~afong' '"Oie' foregoing 
| lines. Have your pencil and paper or 
notebook as there will be material, that 
! you will wish to put down on record 
jfor future reference. 
i . The morning session will be devoted 
: to the organizing of .a Pennington 
County Milk Testing association and 
!the securing of additional names of 
\ those interested in having their herds 
I placed on official test. Eighteen local 
dairymen have already signified their 
i intentions of carrying on the work 
and starting operations immediately 
after Friday's meeting. 



_£_ 



ROSEWOOD 



By JOHL E. SHOBERG 

Dols Hosts at Whist. - 
Seventeen guests were pleasantly enter 
talned at tha home of Mr. and Mrs. F. G. 
Dols at their home east of town last Sat 
urday evening! at a combined whist am 
rummy entertaiiunent. Four tables were 
at play, three at 
First prize at wli 



Chester Dols, ' 
" rummy prize, 



whist and one at rummy 
1st, a carton of eggs, 
won by Oiof Op: eth, and second prize hj 
mi of the house. The 
box of candy, was won 
by Mrs. James Thompson. A fine lunch* 
eon was served by Mrs. Dols, assisted by 
.her ^daughter, Dejlma, and son, Chester, ni 
midnight. The f dlowlng were the guests: 
Mr. and Mrs. 0. 3. Hellerud, Mr. aud Mrs. 



upson 



J 

Ranum, 

L-. H. A 

Sagmoen, Olof OpsetU, J 

Stafford, Benny tauum. 

The Rindal Laiies' Aid met at the homi 
'if. Taoreson last Tuesday ant 
:d. Rev. George I.arsoi 
I alls had charge. Anion;' 



Mr. 



of Mrs. A, 

was well attend 

of Thief River 



out-of-town pers ms present were Mrs. 



ghter, Lorraine, and Mes 
and Olson, all of Thie: 



Mr. and Mrs. Beiihard 
Mrs. John Ruuum, Mrs'. 
Sagmoen, Miss Gladys 
Shoberg, Fret. 



H. Ryan and dai 
dames Erickson 
River Falls. 
Mr. and Mrs. Emll Anderson and daugh 
/ ler, Irma, left Si turday evening for Thie 
River Falls, 'where tbey will visit at tht 
C. B. Hellqulst t nd James Johnson home: 
over Sunday, 

A. carload of Bye was shipped *from thi 

last Wednesday, 
Miss Gladys fS'ceuson left Saturday eve 
nlng for Thief! River Falls, where she wil 
visit with her aunt, Mrs. Severn Brandon 
over Suuday. 

Howard [Carlson is spending Sunday 
with relatives and friends at Thief Rive 
Falls. 

vere pleasant Sunday vis 
home : Mr. and Mrs, 
Alma, Alice, Edna and 
Mr. and MrB. A. T. Thorj- 
:eseth. , 

Peter Woldness of town 
i couple of days last week 
and Mrs. S. Hnfteseth. I 
left Saturday for Viking, 
visit with her daughter, 
;aard. 

Monday at Busy Bee, with 
;>son of Theif River Falls 
Thompson comes to take 
s Ann Tharaltlson, who 



The following 
Itors at the Sor 
Emil Blomberg, 
Ruth Blomberg, 
eson and S. Itaf 
"Mr. and -Mrs. 
of Norden spent 
visiting with Mr 

Mrs. T. Melleiu 
where she will 
Mrs. S. S. Norde 

School opened 
Miss Alice Thorn 
as teacher. MLss 
the plac(* of Mi 
has resigned after two months of teaching, 
having secured i larger school south of 
. her former schoo , 

The teacher it Rosebank, Mrs. Ebba 
Sagmoen, is on t lie sick list this week and 
her ' school will pot open before Wednes- 
day. 

Miss Minnie Sorenson left Monday tntirn 
Inpfor Thompson, N. D., to resume 'ner 
duties at a farri home after spending 




few weeks' vacation- with her folks north 
of this place. : 

Lewis Aiby and Ham Hanson returned 
to Minneapolis Monday evening after hav- 
ing spent the holidays with the former's 
folks here. 

About 70 friends and -neighbors met at 
the home of jMr. and Mrs. Fred Jarshaw 
last Saturday evening to tender them a 
surprise party. A beautiful set of dishes 
:was left in remembrance of the occasion 
!and after a- pleasant Bocial evenlnjg a 
dainty midnight luncheon was served. 

A surprise [party was tendered Mr.|and 
Mrs. John Haider at their home Satun- 
day, a rocking •chair being given as a 
present and -a pleasant evening spent with 
friends and neighbors. 

Edwin Lappegaard and Elry Carlson left 
Friday evening for Thief River Falls, the 
former after spending his Christmas vaca- 
tion at the O. Lappegaard home. 

Mrs. JameB Johnson and son. Earl, 
went to Viking FTiday morning to visit 
with the former's sister, Mrs. Morris 
Halvorson and family. The Johnson's 
spent Thursday here visiting with Mrs. 
Johnson's father, J. "E. Hellqulst, and Mr. 
Johnson returned to their borne at Thief 
River Falls the same evening. . 

Tjittle Florence Ostrorm returned to Thief 
River Falls Friday -evening after a few 
days' vlBit with Miss Gladys Sagmoen. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. S. Hellerud arrived on 
Friday morning from Twin Valley and 
will make their future home j here, Mr. 
Hellerud haying been appointed cashier 
of the Farmero' State bank. Mrs. Helle- 
rud Ib a sister of A. S. Holm, the former 
cashier. 

Swen Swenson went to Thief River Falls 
Friday evening ti. bring home, his daugh- 
ter, Geneva, who has spent Christmas at 
the Severn Branden home. 

School opened at Willowdnle school on 
Monday morning following a two weeks' 
iCnrlBtmas vacation. 

Carl Ranum trapped a,^ wolf last Mon- 
day. There seems to be ntqje wolves this 
winter than "usual, and there are numer- 
ous hunters upon their trail. 

Mrs. Gust Nakken and daughter, Gladys, 
and Jalmer ! Rafteseth, went to Dakota 
Junction Wednesday evening to visit with 
their sister, IMrs. Carl Stromberf, for a 
day. 

Mrs. Abe Stroble, accompanied by a son, 
arrived Tuesday evening from Angus, and 
will visit with the Sorenson and Haugen 
families the remainder of the week. 

John Bloom spent TueBday at Warren 
attending to matters of business and visit- 
ing with a friend. j 

Mrs. James Thompson shopped and vis- 
'Hed with Mrs. Ben Harris at Thief River 
Falls between trains last Wednesday.' 
j Miss Viola; Axelson returned Thursday 
'morning from a combined business and 
' pleasure tour to Thief River Falls." j 
; The two ' merchants, Herbert Carlson 
and John Remmem went to Thief River 
[Falls Thursday evening on business, and 
the former will remain to visit with friends 
and relatives'. 
,. Mies Berthii Remmem arrived Thursday 



XMAS AT OAKLAND PARK SAN- 
ATORIUM 



(Contributed) 
' The Christmas and New Year holi- 
days at the Oakland Park Sanatorium 
were very happy ones for the patients, 
The festivities seemed to begin when 
they came down for supper Christmas 
eve. and found the tables and dining 
room beautifully decorated by che able 
hands of Miss Knudson and her help 
ers, Miss Malm, Miss Stradtman and 
Miss Nomeland. 

Later in the evening they all gath 
ered in the reception room to admire 
the Christmas tree and to receive all 
the mysterious packages which were 

! piled high on a table near the tree. 

;It was found that all the patients had 

jbeen remembered by both friends and 

| relatives. 

A great many toys were in evidence 

'and much fun was derived from cag- 

jing the crazy bugs, blowing horns, 

'watching, climbing monkeys spinning 

j tops, admiring dolls, etc. 

Nuts, candy and apples were eaten 
in great quantities by all, no one 

j seeming to think of consequences in 

I the least - ! 

Nine o'clock,, the usual bed time 

ihour passed by 'unnoticed and the pa- 
tients, and nurses enjoyed themselves 
still nearly midnight. When they fin- 
ally went to bed, they all agreed they 
had had a wonderful evening. 

There were also a great many more 
pleasures in store for them before the 
Christmas season was over and to the 
following people, Miss Hamre, ' Miss 
Quale, Miss Gladys Anderson and the 
Misses Tandberg who entertained 
them with music and singing and left 
boxes of lovely candy and gifts; Miss 
Clauson who gave each one of the 
patients a big box of her homemade 
candy* Rev. Kreidt and the young 
ladies who came withThim to sing; the 
Presbyterian young people who enter- 
tained so well with song and music; 
Dr. Milan, the nurses and all others 
who helped to make it a cheerful 
Christmas, do they extend their most 
heartfelt thanks. ' 

The patients had most likely look- 
ed forward to a lonely Christmas away 
from home and friends, but they were 
surprised to find when it was all over 
that there had been no npom for 
homesickness or the dreaded blues. 




Our Policy 
-One Price 

To 
Everybody 



incorporated 

312 DEPARTMENT STOREF 
THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA 



Page Five 



Our Policy 
One Price 

To 
Everybody 



JANUARY ECONOMIES 

For the Whole Family 

' -Just a few minutes in our store at this time will uphold to your 
buying economies that you cannot afford to pass by. Every department is de- 
monstrating our year round values for the whole family 



Work Shoes 

Real Service For Men 

High-grade Retan lea- 
thers which resist the 
barnyard acids. Excep- 
tional values at 

$2.98 



Flannel Shirts 

Men's . and boys' grey 
and tan flannel Shirts 

98c 

Men's tan and grey 
wool flannel Shirts 

!$J2.49 



Dress Pants 

For Men 

Worsted, serges, cas- 
simeres — in blue,. brown 
and gray stripes. Plain 
or cuff bottom. .Extra 
good values 

$4.98 



Wool Unions 

Real Value For Men 

Men's natural gray 
heavy ribbed wool un- 
ion suits. .Well-made, 
comfortable garments, 
moderately priced 



$1.69 



Work Pants 

Men's heavy grey wool 
and mackinaw: Pants 

$3.98 

Men's corduroys, extra 
; heavy and serviceable 

$3.50 



Overcoats 

For Men 

Warm, stylish, single, 
double breasted and 
belted. Made of special- 
ly selected fabrics in 
popular shades 

$23.50 



Bleached "Honor" Muslin 

J. C. Penney Co. Brand 



Months of careful study have been ex- 
pended to produce a grade of "Bleached" 
muslin which would permit affixing the J. 
C. Penney label. Our buyers have been ex- 
tremely successful. y 

In offering our branded HONOR Muslin, \ 
it is with our full recommendation. : We are j 
confident>you will agree with us that, its I 
excellent quality makes it the best muslin A 
on the market at the price. '/ 



YARD 



15c 



Be sureto. ask for the> --J: 
Company HONOR Muslin. 



C.-I 



Penney . 
.1 



Sheeting 

Dan River, bleach- 
ed 9x4, per yd .49c 

Dan River, bleach- 
ed, 9x4, per yd. 58c 

Pequot, 9x4, bleach- 
ed or unbleached 65c . 

Pequot, 10x4, un- 
bleached or bleach- ~ 
ed, per yd _ ; ....75c 

Pepperell, 10x4, 
bleached, . per yd 58c 



White Goods 

White India linen, 

per yd. .._ 15c 

White Flaxons, per 
,yd 23c 

40 in., per yd 49c 

White satin bloomer : 

cloth, 36 in., per yd. 49c 
White, domestic or- : 

gandy, per yd _.58c 

White imported~or- 

gandy, 44-in. wide, ; 
. per yd. :_ : 73c 



: Long Cloth and Cambric 

| "" Muslin 
Berkley coronet 
' cambric, 36-in., per 

| ydi _ _ .25c 

Berkley No. 60 cam- 
; brie, 36-in., per yd..,25c 
Berkley No. 100 ' 
: cambric, 36-in., per 

yd. _...__.__ ,.._. 35c 

Long cloth, 

i at _ 12c, 15c, 19c, 23c 

Lonsdale sheeting, 

i per yd : .-. -19c 



Stylish, New Dresses 
Tricotine arid Poiret Twill 

The newest navy blue Tricotine and poiret twill 
Dresses, which are exceedingly popular. Some' 
are trimmed with block designs of heavy black 
silk, embroidery, brightened by a gold thread. 

$9.90 to $19.75 

It has been many seasons since a Dress of such 
attractive style and goo.d quality could be pur- 
chased at so small a price! 
Eyery seam is well tailored and the lines are 
unusually graceful an d youthful. 
Sizes 16 to 44. , 



White outing, 36-in., 
per yd. ._.■. ...19c 

White outing, 27-in., 
per yd. .. : .. r ...10c, 15c, 19c 

Light stripes and. 
fancy, 27-in., per "' 
yd. : 17c 

Darks and greys, 
27-in., per yd 19c 

Plain, pink and blue7 
27-in., per yd. _.... 19c 



WAISTS 

Ladies' georgette crepe, 

and crepe de chine in 

all -the latest shades," 

styles and designs at- 

$2.98 $3.98 

Ladies' Waists, fancy 
Canton crepes, silk ra- 
tine, with beaded de- 
signs, from 

$4.95 to<$9.90 



Table Oil Cloth 

48-in. wide, light and 
darks 

29C y ar d 



Dress Goods Bargains 

Renfrew pjaid suit- , 

' ing, 'per yd 39c 

Red Rose plaid ging- ' 
hams, 27-in., per ]. 
yd. ._ _ 15c 

American prints, ! 
per yd. _ ..._i6c 

Apron gingham, col- ' 
or fast, per yd _l4c 

Fancy plaid ging- 
hams, 32-in., per j 
yd... .....J r . -29c 

Percales, light and j 
darks, per yd. 17c, 19c 

Tablets 

90 large sheets 9c 

75 large sheets 5c 

130 6x9 sheets 8c 

Ink tablets _ 5c, 8c 

Composition books .....5c 

r 



Hair Nets 

Unusual Values 

Hand-made of real hu- 
man hair. Single or dou- 
ble mesh, cap shape 
styles. All colors. Ex- 
tremely popular at, each 



8c 



Notions 

Coats, cotton thread 4c 

Bias tape 8c 

Hook and eyes .'._..4c 

Snaps ._ —•...._ 4c 

Pen Olive toilet 

] soap _ :._ _.5c 

Pearl buttons -... 5c 



SWEATERS 

Smart Sweaters in Tux- ' 

edo, slipover and coat 

styles, all p o p u 1 a r 

shades, 

$2.68 to $3.98 

MOCCASINS 

! Men's moose hide, 

,6 to 8 .....$2.69 

Boys' mqose hide, 

3 to 5 __ $2.25 

Youths' moose hide, 

11 to 2 _. __... $1.98 

Sheep lined moc- 
casins. _ _98c 



COTTON BATTS 

31b. ! fullsizebatt 73c 

72x90 wool batt $2.49 





GREATEST 



Com, j 
Wheat, 
Cotton, 



THE THffiF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1922 



STRIKE, IN HISTORY; THIRTEEN 
MILLION FARM FAMILIES CANNOT 
I BUY GOODS 



AND, THAT IS EXACTLY THE CAUSE OF. ALL THE -HARD 
TIMES IN AMERICA TODAY— THE FARMER'S NOW 
GETTING PRE-WAR PRICES, BUT HIS DOL- . 
j LAR IS ONLY WORTH 38 CENTS AS , ' 

' COMPARED WITH PRE-WAR 

: | j PRICES OF THINGS 

■ . : | HE MUST BUY. "i - 

WHAT THE FARMER IS UP AGAINST 



er bushel . . 
per bushel 
per pound 



WHAT THE FARMER RAISES 
(Average Prices) • 

! 1921. 

•..! $0.40 

94 

.;. -.17 

...;. 16 



Wool, per pound , 

Oats, p:r bushel j • : -^ 

Hay,' per ton j • • H'H 

Horses 

Hogs, 100 pounds 

Beef, 100 pounds 

Sheep, 100 pounds 



But 
forced. 



And 



85.00 
7.30 
4.81 
3.96 



1913.. 

$0.70 

.77 

' .13 

.15 

.38 

11.50 

138.0t> 

7.60 

6.05 

4.16 



WHAT THE FARMER MUST PAY ' 
(Average Prices) 

1921. 
Farm Wagons .: $146.60 



Mowers 
Fertilizer, per ton 

Harness 

Plows .......... 

Shoes . ; 

Coal 

Harrow 

Salt, per barrel :. 
Overalls 



84.35 

35.00 

28.25 

40.50 

4.00 

10.50 

29.50 

3.26 

1.55 



1913. 

$77.00 

48.70 

23.75 

15.00 

14.75 

2.25 

5.75 

11.50 

1.68 

.80 



By S. T. HUGHES 
Special Correspondence '';,-. 

WASHINGTON, D. C.-j-The American farmer never strikes. 
Parac oxically, he is on strike now. 



's a strike that he has 



him. 
It's nb riddle at all. 
not buy 



The 



not "called," that he is against, that has been 



the farmer buying again and reurn 
prosperity not only to him but to all 
business and all workingmen? 

That's a question that must be an- 
swered . during the next few months. 



From all I can hear down here in 
Washington they are going to! do 
something. Just what, it is hard to 
say at this writing. 
Watch 'em ! 



farmer's strike is a buying strike, and he does 
for the plain, simple reason that he can't. 

because the more than THIRTEEN MILLION farming families 
in the United States cannot buy, the business of the whole country is suf- 
fering. 

What's going to be done about it? 

Well, the great financiers of the country are beginning to see that the 
farmer nust have money so that he can go to the stores and the factories, 
and big dealers and buy goods. They are; beginning to see that there will 
be no prosperity for themselves arid for manufacturers and business men 
generally until the members |of those THIRTEEN MILLION families 
can buy the necessities, and more. They hre beginning to wake up to the 
fact that closed factories and idle w.orkingmen in the cities are only an effect 
of the inability of the farming folks to buy] the products of shops and of all 
mechanical labor. 

The 
see it, ■ t 
tens of 
Finance 
country 
lending 



A YEAR'S WORK OF THE AMERICAN ! 
u FARMER; NO STRIKE THERE! !' 

9 i 



government is beginning to 
jo, as witness the loaning of 
millions by the U. S. War 
Corporation to hundreds of 
banks for the sole purpose of 
that money cheaply to farm- 
ers. : As witness President Harding's 



urgent 
busv. 

And 
ington, 
captains 
THEIR 



Wv 



The 



to Congress jto get 



New York and] Wa'sh- 

! find captains of finance and 

of government PUTTING 

HEADS TOGETHER 



TO FINDTHE WAY OUT. - 



armer is on a forced buying 



strike, >ut lie never strikes | against 
work. He is always producing — al- 
ways; — \ear in and year our, good 
times o: bad, good weather :or bad 
even 'though he knows that he wi. 
lose mo: ley on his crops. 

This winter he is losing! FIVE 
BILLIONS OF DOLLARS on the 
1921 -things he produced in toil and 
sweat. 

THFj PURCHASING VALUE 
OF Hl|S DOLLAR IS ONLY 38 
CENTS. 

He nust spend $2.59 for the ne- 
cessities he bought in 1913 for $1, 
or 159 jer cent more. , 

The "ear before the war he got 70 
cents a bushel for his corn ; inow he 
gets about 40 cents. But4— AND 
HERE S THE BRUTAL RUB— 
before the war he paid $5.75 a ton 
.'for his coal (on the average). This 
winter Ine pays about $10.50 a ton. 



So the purchasing value in coal , of 
the 40 cents he gets this winter for 
his corn, is only about 21 or 22 cents. 

Before the war, the farmer got 
$7.60 per hundred pounds for his 
hogs; now he gets about $7.30. For 
a wagon to haul the hogs to the rail- 
roadi he paid $77 in 1913 — and here 
is that dirty rub again — now he pays 
$145 to $150 for the same wagon! 

The cotton farmer, it is true, gets 
$34;for a hundred pounds of cotton, 
where he got $26 before the witf. 
But i the majority of cotton growers 
are small farmers raising only a few 
■bales, and it takes a huge pile of that 
light, fluffy stuff to make 100 pounds. 
How much good does the $8 raise do 
him ] when he has to pay about $75 
MORE for his wagon than he did 
before the war — must pay out almost 
his total profit on a thousand pounds 
of that same light, fluffy stuff? 

I could cite instance after instance 
like these— it works on almost every- 
thing that the farmer produces. and 
buj'S. 

Look at- the table that accompanies 
this jarticle. That tells the story in 
figures. 

Then look at the picture and see 
what the farmer does when it comes 
to working and sweating to produce 
the necessities for a hundred millions 
of people. 

Now, what is your Congress going 
to do to change the situation? What 
is the country going to do to start 




By special arrangement, this jnewspaper is able to print the above 
??f?, m t",£ lcture from ,he corni,1 S month's issue of the SCIENTIFIC. 
AME RICAN It shows at a glance the enormous production of food 
tttrffs on the farms of America inione year, and Which in terms of trade 
tells for only 38 cents on the dollar this winter. 



State Beavers 
Damaging Farms 



Granti 



Beltrami County Farmers 
ted Permits to Trap 
Little Animals ; 



Can Be Taken Only 
Damage is Shown 
State Supervises 



When 
and 



Abov. t 20 years ago two 



beavers 



were i laced in the Minnesota state 
park, a; Itasca by .the state with the 
idea of starting a beaver colony there 
and sir ce that time the little fur bear- 
ing animals have multiplied until they 
have spread to all parts of this section 
and in many places have become nuis- 
ances. 1 In some places they are doing 
so mi ich damage that it has been 
many jermits have been issued dur- 
found lecessary to trap them and 
ing th. past few months by Game 
Warden John Cline of this city, 



lermits 



been iisued except where they are 




beaver have 



actually doing damage such as flood- 
ing meadows, farm lands or roads and 
when permits are issued they are is- 
sued to resident farmers. 

In the vicinity of Northome great 
dams have been built which force 
water back on farm lands and it has 
been found necessary to trap beaver 
there to protect the farmers. In the 
vicinity of Wilton streams have been 
dammed in such a manner that roads 
are flooded. 

Permits to trap beaver are issued 
after the premises have been investi- 
gated by the game warden or com- 
missioner and it is found that damage 
is actually being done: "The person to 
whom the permit is granted pays a 
fee of §1 and when beavers are trap/ 
ped the person trapping them must 
pay | a bounty of $3 for each animal 
to the state. The hides are then stamp- 
ped by the game warden and may then 
be sold. Beaver hides are now selling 
at from ?25 to 540 each, so- that in 
places where the animals are/numer- 
ous trapping is a profitable' occupa- 
tion! / 

During the past few weeks permits 
to trap beavers have been issued to 
the [following: Henry '/Anderson, a 
farmer who lives near Northome and 
who; will trap in Vicker's creek; John 
Vanjiouse, who lives near Kelliher; 
A. J. Porter, who has been given a 



u _ .'■-./:■- 



permit to trap, 30 beavers in Plum 
creek near Northome; W. T. Angell, 
who has been granted a permit to trap 
all beavers in Section 11 near Alida, 
where hay meadows are being flood- 
ed; JEdward "Phelps who lives onjthe 
star route southwest of Bemidji jhas 
been granted a permit to trap beavers 
in Henepin creek and W. A. Murphy 
who lives near Wilton has been -grant- 
ed a permit to trap beavers in Section 
S2-147-34, where.they have been flood 
ing. roads. i 

Persons trapping beavers must fur- 
nish a bond in the amount of $500 to 
abide by the law in every respect and 
they can trap only where damage' is 
being done. 

Not only is beaver trapping popular 
in this' part of the state this year, but 
settlers throughout the north are 
trapping all kinds of fur bearing Ani- 
mals and siriee the opening of the 
trapping season County Auditor A. D. 
Johnson of this city, has issued 325 
trapping licenses. 

Fishing is also claiming the atten- 
tion of many sportsmen and 125 net- 
ting licenses have been issued as well 
as 91 fish, house licenses and a num- 
ber of non-resident licenses. 

A colony of beavers has been dis- 
covered near Island Lake which is'be- 
lieved to be the farthest north that 
the Lake Itasca beavers have traveled. 



Aged only ten, Rose Reeve, of Lon- 
don, Ontario, has passed examinations 
qualifying her to enter the University. 

During a dense London fog there is 
as much as 200 tons of soot suspended 
In the air overhead. , 



Some person has been tampering with 
the-beayer house there and the place 
is now being closely watched by Game 
Warden Cline. The beavers which are 
found in the vicinity of Northome are 
believed to have come from the Rainy 
Lake territory. — Bemidji Sentinel. 



When Is Best 
Potato Market? 

Professor Wilson Discusses 

Question of Best Time 

to Sell Potatoes 



A Consistent Policy of Sel- 
ling' Either Fall or. 
Spring is Advised 



Prof. A. D. Wilson, writing to a 
subscriber in tht Farmer, 'in answer 
to the question, "Should I sell my po- 
tatoes now or store them T If I store 
them, how long should I hold them?" 
says: 

This question is often asked but 
seldom answered, because no one can 
be very sure of his answer, and one 
who dislikes to mislead others will 
hesitate to give advice on such ques- 
tions. Even" experienced potato buy- 
ers quite often guess wrong and lose 
considerable money either by buying 
when they should not or by not buy- 
ing when they should. 

"Potatoes differ from most of the 
other ' important farm products such 
as grain, meat, cotton, etc., because 
potatoes must all be used before the 
next crop is. available; none can be 
carried over, except a-yery negligible 
amount that is converted into ' starch 
or potato flour. Likewise, import.' 
and exports of potatoes are very 
small because-bf their bulk. So, prac- 
tically speaking, the whole of the 
United States crop is used in the 
United States, and our population 
must depend on what is grown here. 

"Normally we consume in the Unit- 
ed States between 3.5 bushels and 3.8 
bushels per capita. A study of the 
prices for December 1 each year and 
for May 1 the following year inr 
dicates that each year when produc- 
tion fell below 3.5 bushels per capita 
the price was lower in December than 
the following May, and likewise that 
each year when production exceeded 
3.8 bushels per capita the price was 
higher in December than the follow 
ing May. 

"Production in the United States 
this year (1921) is about 3.2 bushels 
per capita. If the usual thing happens,' 
the price should be higher next 
spring. We do not know whether this 
will be the case or not. The present 
industrial depression, with many peo- 
ple out of work and a general ten- 
dency to economize, may prevent the 
price of potatoes from going as hiffh 
as the^ supply would now indicate. 
Likewise, a generous supply of most 
other' farm products accompanied' by* 
low prices may. have a similar effect. 

'As to the question, when to sell if 
you store your' potatoes, we are also 
unable to answer that intelligently; 
hence we will not answer it, but 
publish a table prepared by W. L. 
Cavert of the Minnesota) Agricultural 
college. 

"Average price of potatoes per cwt. 
on the first of the month for ten 
years, 1909 to 1918, inclusive: 

"August '. ; .'..' ....$1.28 

September 1.10 

October! -'- ; 1.00 

November 1.00 

December 1.00 

January 1.05 

February 1.13 

March .... 1.18 

April 1.17 

May , 1.30 

June _....; 1.28 

July 1 1.32 



"This shows, the average farm price 
of potatoes in Minnesota On. the first 
of each- month fdr the ten years 1909 
to 1918 as reported hy the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

'It is evident from the above table 
that those who held; over potatoes 
until May 5 got' just about enough on 
the average over the fall priee to pay 
for shrinkage, interest on investment, 
and storage. The table also indicates 
that it does not make much difference 
whether one sells every year in the 
fall or holds over every year. If one 
wishes to gamble and can guess right, 
he will surely - make some money. 
Few are able to do this. Personally 
we think the conservative thing" to do 
is to decide .upon ^ome plan and stick 
to it, that is, market in the fall of 
every year or else in the spring of 
every year. Probably a plan that will 
pay as well, both in money and in 
satisfaction, is to sell half the crop 
in the fall and half in the spring." 

FINDS SMALL FORTUNE 
. It isn't often that one finds a small 
"fortune but occasionally such is the 
case, says the Jeffers Review. A 
Mr. Falk, who lives southeast of 
Lamberton on the road due north of 
Jeffers about ten days ago found $500 
in a bed tick. About eleven years ago, 
so the story goes Mrs. Falk went in- 
sane and hid $500 somewhere about 
the premises, but . no one was ever 
able to -find it though it was searched 
for weeks. And about ten ,days 'ago 
Mr. Falk had the occasion to throw 
away an old mattress that had been 
in the house for a long time, ' and, 
imagine -bis surprise to find the $500. 
No doubt the find at this time is quite 
acceptable. j " ' 



COAL — Order 1 your hard 
and soft coal from the Chris- 
tenson & Voelz Hardware 
Co. , Phone 23. tf 



DR. A. SHEDLOV 

Physician and Snrgeo»- 

In Charge of Dr. A. W. Swedenburg 
Office Over First National Bank, 

Telephone 350-1- 
403 No. Arnold Ave. Phone 278 



THEO- QUALE 

Lawyer ' 

Practice in all Courts and J»» 

fore D. 8. Imnd Office 

McGinn Building 

THIEF BTVEB FAILS, MINN. 



CITY DRAY & FUEL COMPANY 
_l L. MANTHER, Manager. 

FUEL OF ALL KINHS , 

Phone 176. Thief River- Falls, Minn. 



C. M. ADKINS 
Physician and Surgeon 

Office Over First National Bank 
Thief River Falls, Minn. 




Brotherhood of 

AMERICAN YEOMEN 

Tlanesta Homested No. 2006. 
Regular meetings every second and 
fourth FridmyB of each month at 
Masonic HalL Visiting Yeomen 
welcome. < 



H M ii inoiiiii ii Ht ti munuHmunin tt* 



Your Wife and Children 




rightly; look to you to pro- 
vide a I home for them. It is 
your duty to see that they 
are placed beyond the dang- 
er of being -.made homeless. 
Fire insurance is the only 
thing that will supply this 
protection. If ; you have so 
far neglected to be insured 
neglect it no longer. Hav 
us issue you a policy to-da 
against the fire which m. ' 
come to-night.. 



- ;i 

Lawrence Mortgage Co. 

Thief River Falls, Minn. > 



' » 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j | 




T. M. EOLBERG, D. C. 

Doctor of Chiropractic 



: Palmer (graduate 



mr" 



"The Sure Tload to Health Is Through, the Nerves" 



Phone 107 



Office Over * 
First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 




V 



V 



-3- 



v. 




! .« 



Will Reward Fi 




[o] Icjopi \o\ icndizp l \o\ 



® 



V 



NE of the leading national weeklies predicts that Competition 

will be the big word In industry in 1922. Production has ex- 

e===i ceeded consumption in every line. It will be a buyers' market 

— those who wish to sell will have to hustle for business. The vigorous,-)the alert, the'selfassertive, 
THE FIGHTER, will emerge stronger. The weak, the unambitious, the timid, the unaggres- 
sive— well, some of them will not be doinj^business ayear from now. 



Such is 1 922— as The Tribune sees it! 



!\ 



The business men of Thief River Falls are Fighters. They will offer better values and , 
better service than the other fellow. Like honest men, as they are, they will take you into their 
confidence— they will advertise their wares — quality and price — in the columns of this paper from t 
week to week, in order that people round about may know, as they themselves know, that they are 
giving bigger and better values than the average run of merchants. 



i During the past year many people, some of them living far from Thief River Falls, have 
learned by reading advertising in this paper and coming here to buy, that Thief River Falls is the 
best trading point in this section. More will learn that in 1 922. The advertising of local busi- 
ness interests in a fair and truthful way is as much a part of the service which this newspaper gives, 
as recording the passing events of the community and commenting on the things that are transpiring 
from week to week. Those who don't read the advertisements are missing an important part of 
the paper; Those who don't trade at Thief River Falls are passing up an opportunity. 




Make Thief River Falls I Your Trading 

Point in 1922 



—The Editor 




l* 



w, 



m 



■t=x 




THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



oced Iffevi^ 



callei 



spent 



J. J. Viracek was a business 
at Warre 1 on Friday. 

Leonard Peterson of Crookston' 
Monday 1 ere on business arid renew- 
ing acquaintances. 

'^Attorney Quale spent .Monday at 
Mahnome 1 attending to various busi- 
ness mat ers. I 

Mrs. J. P. Jensen and daughter, 
Miss Rubf Jensen of Goodridge were 



Saturday 

Allison 
Minneapo 



shoppers in the city. 

Stitt left Friday evening for 
is where he is spending a 



I 



short time visiting friends. 

Miss Gina Olson of Warren is 
guest this week at the C. M. Carlson 
home. 

Rev. 0. J. Lundell returned Monday 
morning from St. Hilaire where he 
has spew: several days attending a 
series of mission meetings. 

Miss Dotty Krafthefer returned 
the lattei part of the week to her 
home at J Mahnomen after spending the 
past weel: here visiting numerous 
friends. \ 

- i- 

Miss Diris Halvbrson left Friday 
afternoon for Fargo, N. D., where she 
is spendmg several days visiting 
friends. She returned home last eve- 
ning. | 

Miss Mj.ude Johnson, music instruc- 
tor in the public schools, returned yes- 
terday morning^from Minneapolis and 
Winona,' vliere she spent the holiday 
vacation; 

Miss Eniry Hielman returned Sun- 
day morning from Marshall, Minn., 
where she spent the holidays, j Miss 
Hielman i; a member of the 'high 
schoo faculty. . 

Miss Lyda Batten returned Satur- 
day evening from Rosewood where 
she spent the Christmas vacation, to 
resume her duties as instructor in the 
Central sciool 

Mrs. R. '. ?. Porteous of Middle River 
spent the week end here as a guest, 
at the J. A. Ralston home. Mrs. Por- 
teous retu-ned to her home Monday 
morning. 

Miss Eleanor Dahlen returned ! Sun- 
day evening to Fosston where she is' 
teaching school, after enjoying a|two 
weeks' vacation with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. S. Dahlen. 



Miss Ag 
tor at the 



Stavig, Norse instruc 
local high school, returned 



here Monday morning from her home 



atSissetor 
the holidaj 

Miss A^ 
morning tt 



S. D, where she spent 

is Akre returned Monday 
Bemidji where she is an 
1 the high school, after 



spending tie holidays here wit? 



parents, M 

Miss Bel 
her vacatin 
Toint, Wii 



school, of 



and Mrs. A. H. Akr 

1 Foxen, who has spent 
at her. home at Stevens 
returned Monday morn 
ing to resurie her duties at the Knox 



her 



inch she is principal. 



I 



Miss Hilkla Hammerst'en of High- 
landing wi s a guest of Miss Alice 
Berg on F -iday before continuing on 
to Grand Forks where she attends 
business cc liege. i 

Miss Aim Tharaldson left Friday 
evening' fo. - Janesville, Minn., where 
has accepted a position as sixth 
uctor in the public schools 
ice for the reniainrier of 



shi 

garde insti 
of that pi 
the school 

Milton Y 'eeks, who spent the jholi- 
days here with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. J. Weeks, returned Sunday 
evening to St. Pau] where he is a stu- 
dent at Luther Theological Semin- 
ary. | 

C. 0. Gran Ifrom Thief River Falls 
came' up New Year's Day to visit! with 

his sons Henry " 

at the Tim 



and Albert, and: also 
i es and Lofthus homes^ Mr. 
Gran is .or e of the early settlers of 
this vicinity residing at one :$ime 
south of tewn in the Granville neigh- 
borhood. — Oslo Tribune. . 



A gi-oiip 



of young folks were guests 



of Miss Jlyrtel Helgeland Thursday 



evening at 
North. .. C: 
•which was 
.a delicious 
-ed, Lucil 
son, Eileen 
.Langseth, 
Ella Krohr 



er home on LaBree Ave. 
rds forhied the diversion 
followed by the service of 
lunch. . The guests includ- 



Harry Booren, of Plummer spent 
Monday evening in the city on busi- 
ness and visiting friends. , , 

Herbert Haraldson left -Saturday 
for Crookston where he will spend 
an indefinite period at his home. 

Ingyald Bergren returned Sunday 
morning to Strandquist after spend- 
ing a <lay here attending to business. 

Miss Clara Thorson of Gully, Minn., 
was the guest of Miss Alma Thune 
Friday evening returning to her home 
the following morning. 

J. C; Holgate, who has been a guest 
at the Ole Legvold, Sr., home the past 
two weeks, returned Friday after- 
noon to his home at Baker, Minn. 

Mrs.; Harold Page Miller returned 
Friday, afternoon to her home at 
Crookston after spending a few days 
as a giiest at the G. Halvorson home. 

Mrs.' R. E. Spinks came down from 
Middle River Friday afternoon to 
spend a short time shopping and visit- 
ing, friends. 

Dreng Bjornoraa of Wanke, a mem- 
ber of j last year's graduation class, is 
spending the week here visiting 
friends. , ■■: 

MrsJD. Patterson, Mrs. O. Gunstad, 
Miss Olive and Miss Margaret Patter- 
son of St. Hilaire spent Saturday .here 
between, train shopping. 

Bertha and Evelyn Gullingsrud re 
turned Thursday evening from Plum- 
mer where they have been visiting 
their aunt, Mrs. Hans Holden, for a 
few days. 

Miss:Aldora Berg, instructor in the 
Northrup school returned here Satur- 
day evening from Rolette, N. D., 
where she spent the holiday vacation 
with her parents. 

MissjLorna Dodge arrived here Sat- 
urday evening from Rock Lake, N. D., 
where phe spent the Christmas vaca- 
tion with her folks. Miss Dodge is a 
member of the Central School faculty. 

Miss Jennie Sande returned Friday 
afternoon from Steiner where she 
spent a week visiting her brother and 
sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. H. L, 
Sande. 

Mrs. Jj. J. McCarty and Mrs. W. H. 
Mondurant returned Saturday: morn- 
ing from Minneapolis where they have 
spent the past two weeks as guests 
of their parents 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1922 



Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Paul Nybak- 
ken, January 9, a daughter. 

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. 
Paine, a boy on January 6. 

Thore Carlson left last evening for 
Minneapolis on a short business trip. 

E. 0. Mogenson left last evening for 
Minneapolis on a few_days business 
trip. 

Mrs. Oscar Blimsmor of Newfolden 
spent Saturday here visiting friends 
and shopping. 

Verner Nelson of St. Hilaire spent 
the week end here on business arid 
visiting - friends. 

Mrs. E. Bakke left this morning for 
Holt, where she will spend a few days 
visiting friends. • 



Miss Dorothy Loen of Radium spent 
Friday ; evening here visiting friends, 
leaving, for Trail the following morn- 
ing to resume her duties as teacher 
in the schools of that place. 

Miss Mary Prichard, who has spent 
the holidays here with her parents, 
Mr. and, Mrs. W. W. Prichard, Sr., re- 
turned : Tuesday evening to Minne- 
apolis .where she is a student at the 
University of Minnesota. 

Clarence Knutson, student at the 
University of Minnesota returned 
Tuesday evening to Minneapolis, after 
spending the holidays here with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Knut- 
son. 

Ole R. Sande arrived here Friday 
evening from Gully, and spent a few 
days visiting his parents, ill-. 
Mrs. Hans Sande, before returning 
to Hazel, where he is engaged in 
teaching school. 

Miss Amy R. Nelson returned Sat- 
urday evening to Minneapolis, near 
which place she is teaching, after 
spending the past two -weeks visiting 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 0. H. .Nel- 
son. ' 

Miss ,Cora Swanson left Friday af- 
ternoon for Breckenridge, Minn., near 
which place she is engaged in teach- 
ing school, after enjoying a short 
vacation with ■ her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. 0. Swanson. 

Miss .Olive Booren accompanied by 
her mother, Mrs. A. Booren of Still- 
water, Minn., are in the city this 
week, the former a guest at the E. O. 
Mogenson home, while the latter is 
visiting! her son and daughter-in-law, 
Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Booren. 

Alice ; and Annie Froseth inform- 
ally entertained a few of their friends 
McGinnity, Esther Erick-j Thursday afternoon at their home, 421 
Arneson. Helen and Palma . Horace j Ave. N. Cards, dancing and 
Men Warner, Ruth HoppajJ music \yere the diversions. A sumpt- 



Sybil McGinn, Ruby Bon- 



nes, Haroli Arneson, "Craig Halvor-| 
son, Math Barzen, Stephen Arneson. 
Bernard Bishop, William DePar'cq, 



Roy Holm 



?ren, William McGinnity, 



Reuben Hadrath and Milton Larson. 

■ A number of social courtesies were 
extended Mrs. Harold Page Miller of 
Crookston, former resident of this 
city, who vas a guest at the home of 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Halvorson last week. 
Thursday ifternoon,' Mrs. Halvorson 
informally entertained a small com- 
pany of ladies, former friends of Mrs. 
Miller's, "he hours were devoted to 
needlework and light refreshments 
were serve 1. Thursday evening, Mrs. 
E. 0. Mogenson and Mrs. H. W. Froeh 
lich deligh fully entertained eight la- 
dies for Mrs. Miller at the home of 



the former 



and was in play at two tables. At a 



late hour a 



Bridge was" the diversion 



delicious lunch was served. 



Friday noo i at the Evelyn hotel. Mrs. 
Miller was honor guest at a three 
course lunc leon given by Mrs. Nathan 
K. Harris. Covers were laid for six 
at a prettily appointed table. 



■■»«»»w»w !r . 



A 



uous (lunch was served at 4:30. The 
guests iincluded Mrs. Jas. Franklin, 
Mrs. Clyde Nason, Miss Twila Glines, 
Miss Dotty Krafthefer, Miss Dagny 
Tharaldson, Miss Ethel Erickson, Miss 
Grace McCrum, Miss Helen Nordquist 
Miss Ethel Arneson and Miss Edla 
Nordquist. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. Mogenson in- 
formally entertained a number - of 
their friends, Monday evening at i 
delightful New Year's party. An en 
joyable ievening of dancing, music and 
cards was spent which was followed 
by the iserving of a boullion supper. 
Those present were, Mr. and Mrs. R. 
H: Ross, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Akre, 
Dr. and Mrs. G. W. Booren, Mr. and 
Mrs. L.; H. Lawrence, Mr. anii Mrs. 
L. A. Lampert, Mr. and Mrs. ;H. W. 
Protzeller, Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Mc- 
Knight,: Mr. and Mrs. G. Howard 
Smith, Dr. and Mrs. L. F. Fisher, R. 
M. Sheldon, Mrs. Mae Rowan,' D. P. 
Gamble; C. L. Hanson, Mr. and Mrs. 



C. L. Hanson will leave tomorrow 
evening for Minneapolis where he will 
spend a day on business. 

A. S. Sapero will leave tomorrow 
for Chisholm wher e he will spend a 
few days attending to business. 

A. 0. Powell of Moorhead spent 
Saturday in the city transacting busi- 
ness and calling on friends. 

Perry Johnson left last evening for 
Grand Rapids where 'he will spend 
sometime in the interest ofVstate ex- 
tension work. 

Mrs. A.S. Sapero and Miss Olive 
Booren will spend the latter part of 
this week at Plummer as guests at 
the Harry Booren home. 

Dave Gustafson, of th e firm of 
Gustafson & Son, left last evening for 
Minneapolis where he is attendin'g 
the Machine Dealer's convention. 

Miss Olga Wold returned to her 
home at Roseau yesterday morning, 
after spending the previous evening 
here with friends en route from Lan- 
caster. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Nelson return- 
ed to their home at Gadzki this morn- 
ing after spending a few days here 
visiting friends and attending to var- 
ious business. 

R. B,. Stenhoff, coach and general 
science teacher at the local high 
school, returned yesterday morning 
from Minneapolis where he spent the 
holiday vacation. 

Mrs. Gaston Ward and little daugh- 
ter, Vivian, left this morning .for 
Middle River where they will spend 
a few days visiting the former's sis- 
ter, Mrs. Lovied. 

Miss Dorothy Bottelson returned; to 
her teaching duties at Lancaster Sun- 
day morning after enjoying a two 
weeks' vacation with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. A. Bottelson. 

Miss Bernadette Gormley returned 
Monday morning from Minneapolis 
where she spent the holidays with jier 
parents. Miss Gormley is; a member 
of the Lincoln high school faculty. 

Miss Ruth Soule and, Miss Velrria 
Webster, instructors in the local high 
school, returned here the latter part 
of the week from their, homes' at 
Grand Forks and Bozeman, N. D., re- 
spectively, where they spent the holi- 
day vacation. .--i-v - 

i ■ f. 

Frank Reed, who tried .to beat 'lip 
the sheriff with a chair, at Roseau; 
recently, while suffering from the ef- 
fects of bad moonshine, was given 
forty-five days in jail by Judge Watts. 
He would have got considerably more, 
but the sheriff asked for lenience for 
him, explaining that he hadn't been 
able to do him much damage. — War- 
road Pioneer. 

Mrs. A. S Sapero informally en- 
tertained twelve ladies on Friday af- 
ternoon at her home on Duluth Aave. 
North. The diversion' which was Nor- 
wegian whist was in play at three 
tables, high score being won by Mrs. 
A. Booren of- Stillwater and the 
booby prize was carried by Mrs. 
Walter R. Patterson. At the close 
of the afternoon a delicious lunch was 
served by the hostess who was assist- 
ed in serving by Miss Olive Booren. 
The guest list included, Mrs. E. 
Mogenson, Mrs. H. 0. Loken, Mrs. 
R. H. Ross, Mrs. G. W. Booren, Mrs, 
H. W. Froehlich, Mrs. Julian -Pro- 
vericher, Mrs. A. Anderson, Mrs. F. 
C. Niclai, Mrs. H. A. Brumund, Mrs. 
W. R. Patterson, Mrs. .A. Booren, of 
Stillwater, Minn., and Mrs. J. C. Kel- 
ly of Devils Lake, N. D. 

COAL — Order your hard and soft 
coal from the Christenson & Yo'elz 
Hardware Co. Phone 23. . tf 



Club Members 
Favor Farm Bloc 



Resolution Commending Ac- 
tivities of Friendly Mem- 
bers of Congress 



Mayor Bratrud Author of Res- 
olution Expressing At- 
titude of Club 



MACCABEE INSTALLATION 

HELD AT I. O. 0. F. HALL 



The installation of officers of the 
Lady Maccabees was held last eve- 
ning at the I. O. O. F. hall. Mrs. 
Robins, district deputy of Crookston 
was the installing officer and Mrs. 
C. T. Christenson and Mrs. J. L. Gas- 
ow, lady at ceremonies. -Mrs. Pierce 
of Crookston was visiting guest. The 
officers installed were: Commander, 
Mrs. Ruth Halldin; lieutenant com- 
mander, Mrs. Joe Holmes; seargent, 
Mrs. John Rolland; fcplle'ctor, Mrs. 
Bernice Bothun; past, commander, 
Mrs. I. G. Lane; chaplin, Mrs. C. M. 
Carlson; lady at arms, Mrs. C. S. 
Simonson; recorder, Mrs. Esther Rol- 
land; sentinel, Mrs. Francis Schmidt; 
picket, -Mrs. S. C. Reedy; musician, 
Mrs. J. H. Hermanson; commander of 
the guard, Oscar Melby. 

Following the cereVnonies the re- 
mainder of the evening was spent at 
cards, dancing and a lunch was served 



...,;, *r> -i t v -XT r« m- at midni 8 nt ' Ar > excellent program 

S-,?A K ^L y .u°l eV i' S , L ,? ke ' N - ?" , S of dance music was furnished ivy Miss 
jidith Schibsby of Minneapolis and Theone Walker> ; anist and \ Uted 

Miss Olive Booren of Stillwater. iDybvik drums. 



At Thursday's noon meeting-of the 
Commercial club, the most important 
proceeding was the passage of a res- 
olution endorsing the present agricul- 
tural bloc in congress. Mayor Brat- 
rud presented the resolution, which 
was championed by W. J. Brown, who 
thoroughly explained, the object of the 
same. He stated that no politics or 
partisanship was involved in the res- 
olution, which was simply presented 
for the 'purpose of expressing the 
friendly attitude of the Commercial 
club with the most friendly and ag- 
gressive organization now dealing 
with thp problems of the farmer. Fol- 
lowing jthe remarks of Mr. Brown the 
club unanimously gave its endorse- 
ment tjo the resolution, which read; 
as follows: 

"Whereas the farming interests of 
the United States are the keystone of 
the wealth' and prosperity of the coun- 
try, and the unwarranted decline in 
the price of farm products has been 
such that the return of the industry 
of the farmer is not sufficient to pay 
the cost of raising and marketing 
farm products, i 

And Whereas the manufacturing in- 
terests, the farm machinery combin- 
ation, and the steel trust which have 
furnished material for, or have manu- 
factured the articles necessary for the 
farmer to buy, have-,all been in secret 
combination to raise and maintain an 
exhorbitant price for those articles,. 
And Whereas the packing house 
combination and the big exporting 
grain interests have each likewise 
secretly combined to depress the price 
of the farm products, 

And Whereas in the past the agri- 
cultural interests themselves have 
never succeeded in combining or in 
entering into any combination tending 
to maintain at a proper level the pro- 
duct of the farm. On account of the 
varied nature of farming, any com- 
bination organized for the purpose of 
maintaining a fair price of farm pro- 
ducts or bettering farm conditions 
must be by means of a combination 
of the representatives of the farming 
interests and not . of the individual 
farmer, 

And Whereas there has been form- 
ed, and is now openly functioning, in 
the congress, a loose alliance of mem- 
bers of both houses representing an 
agricultural constituency or otherwise 
interested in the upbuilding of agri- 
cultural pursuits, which alliance is 
termed "The Agricultural Bloc," 

And Whereas the purpose of the 
said "Agricultural Bloc" is avowed 
and open and is for the purpose of 
enforcing proper legislation in; the in- 
terest of the farmer and the-'farming 
interests, and thus of the"- Country at 
large. -.; 

Now Therefore Be It Resolved by 
the Commercial club of the city of 
Thief River Falls', that we unhesitat- 
ingly and enthusiastically apprpve of 
the organization of "The Agricultural 
Bloc" and of its purposes and dbjects, 
and we urge upon our representatives 
in congress to co-operate therewith, 
And Be It Further eRsolved^That 
copy of these resolutions be/'for- 
warded to each of our congressmen in 
Washington." ( 

Dr. Froelich suggested that tdie of- 
fice of the Farm Bureau be made a 
clearing house for unemployed men, 
all persons needing employment reg- 
istering at that office in order that 
anyone needing help may secure quick 
action. 
The city's handling of electrical- 



goods and supplies, 'wiring, etc., was 
discussed from the standpoint of giv- 
ing a clear field in that line to in- 
dividual business houses/Mayor Brat- 
rud explained that the city charged 
the usual profits on all its goods and 
could not be- considered an unfair 
competitor. No definite action was 
taken. 

Announcement was made' that. the 
city water rates would be considered 
at the next meeting of the club— next 
Thursday. 



AT THE CHURCHES 



WANTED — SALESMAN WITH AUTO ; 
prefer man with selling experience' in 
small towns and country districts. Op- 
portunity for energetic man to build up 
permanent and profitable business in own 
community. Stetson" Oil Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. it 



Evangelistic Meetings— A series of 
gospel meetings will be held in the 
Swedish Baptist church, corner of 
Markley Ave. arid Schuneman street, 
commencing Friday, January 13, and 
continuing every evening at 7:30, ex- 
cept Saturday. The Norwegian and 
the English languages will be used 
Sunday 11:00 a. m. Norwegian; Sun- 
day evening, English. Rev. A. A. 
Ohm and Rev. L. 0. Williams, both 
traveling under the auspices of the 
Minnesota Baptist State convention, 
will conduct these meetings. We de- 
sire the heartiest co-operation of the 
public. .Come and hear for yourself. 
Our preaching will be strictly evangel-; 
istic. ; no-2t 



Evangelical Lutheran Augustana — 
Services in the American language, 
10:30 a. m. Bible class and Sunday 
school at 11:95. Services in Swed- 
ish language 7:45 p. m. Sunday school 
teachers will meet at the parsonage, 
Friday evening, ' Jan. 13, 8 o'clock.— 
Abbin A. Larson, pastor. 



The Zion Lutheran Ladies' Aid have 
an Augsburg day Thursday afternoon, 
2:00 p. m. Rev. J. Mortenson, presi- 
dent of the district, will speak. Zion 
young people's meeting in the even- 
ing, 8:00 p. m., same day, Rev. Mort- 
enson will speak. All are invited. 
Cojne and help Augsburg Sunday. The 
oldest Lutheran Seminary in the 
United States.— George Larson, pas- 
tor. 



LOST— CLASS PIN OF 1017; LOST BE- 
tween Trinity church and 510 Red Lake 
boulevard. Finder please return to Mrs. 

W. H. Halbert for reward. Phone 379. OOlt 



GIRL FOR GENERAL HOUSEWORK— 

One who can stay at own home nights.' 

Inquire Tribune. ooitp 



FOR RENT— MODERN 4-ItOOM APART- 
ment, kitchenette and bath; may be had 
after Feb. 15. Please phone for appoint- 
ment. Mrs. A. W. Swedenbrirg. S9tl 



WANTED TO BDY— ONE REGISTERED 

Guernsey bnll.pld enough for immediate 

service. Write W. H. Krueger, Red Lake 

Falls, Minn. 87-tf 



FOR SALE— PENINSULAR ROUND OAK 
■ heater; will trnde f jr larger site. Wil- 
liam Schumacher, 704 Conley ave. S. 84tf 



LOST— BRILLIANT BAR PIN SATUR- 

day afternoon between 1 and 8. Finder 

please notify 112 Kendall ave. S. Reward 

offered. ' 72-tf 



FOR SALE, TRADE 
property and farms, 
and make a deal. 



OR RENT— CITY 

.See Andrew Ness 

Fl-22 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM FURNISHED 
houBe on Conley ave. Immediate pos- 
session. Lawrence Mtg. Co. 79-tf 



FOR RENT— A MODERN FURNISHED 
rooms. 801 Main ave. N. Phone 309. S3tf 



FARM WANTED— WANTED TO HEiR 
from owner of a farm or good land for 
sale, price reasonable. L. Jones, Bor 551 
Olney, 111. 



COAL — Order your hard and soft 
coal from the Christenson & Voeiz 
Hardware Co. Phone 23. tf 



Methodist Ladies' Aid will meet in 
the church basement Wednesday, Jan- 
uary 11, at 3:30 p. m., entertained by 
Mrs. C. A. Joslin, Mrs. T. P Ander- 
son, Mrs G. J. Conklin, Mrs. Oscar 
Melby. Everybody welcome. 



St. John's Lutheran Church — Eng- 
lish services Sunday morning 10:30; 
Sunday school after services 11:30. 
Children will please remember the 
change in time of Sunday school. Ger- 
man services at Holt Monday after- 
noon at one o'clock. 



Each of Germany's blinded ex-sol- 
diers is provided with an official "care- 
taker" and a specially trained dog. 



CLASSIFIED COLUMN 



002 Main ave. 



ROOM— MODEI.N ROOM FOR RENT AJT 



Mrs. O. H. OlBon. 



HEMSTITCHING — SELMA 
Johnson. 318 Horace nve. 
. i 



AND ID(A 

oo-o: 



- .ife'shfF^'""" 



\>m 



VM 






A'.-iSi'lp" 



CHIROPRACTIC 
will give Vou health 



JUST RECEIVED 
car of choice Poplar 

WOOD 

Sawed and 
Delivered 

$7.00 

Per Card 



Also Tamarack, 
Jack Pine, Oak, 
and other wood. 

PHONE 15 

Hall Bros. Co. 

"A Good Place to Trade" 

Hardware-Farm Machinery 



Jennie M. 

EASTMAN 

Pioneer Chiropractic 

Hours 10-12 a. m., 2-5 p. m. 

Evenings by appointment. 

i Phones: 213-1. Ees. 213-2. 

Offices over First and Peoples' 
Bank'Bldg. 




Souvenirs For All Tomorrow at 

Shanahan s Grocery 

OPEN FOR BUSINESS WEDNESDAY, JAN. 11th 



TO THE LADIES AND GENTLEMEN OF 
THIEF WER FALLS:— 

^Come in tomorrow and get acquainted. Look ooer our up-to-date store, with its stock 
of new, fresh groceries— it will be a pleasure to meet you all. Souvenirs will be dis- : 
tributed — Flowers for the ladies — cigars for the men. 



WE DELIVER TO ANY PART OF CITY 

» Phone 35 



Sh 



anahans 



105 E. 3rd St. 



■fcr-T«r-*% .. 



rocery 

Laird's Old Stand 



j 



> 




V0L..21 



^ ,:;' 






The Triburi, by Carrier, Twice 

a Week at Two Dollars a 

Year; Subscribe -for It 



NcOl 



THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 13. 1922 



$2 A YEAR IN ADVANCE 



Bank Will Devote $10,000.00 to Purchase of Dairy Cows 



Directors of First arid Peoples, With 
Faith in Community as a Dairy 
Section, to Supply Cattle to Farm- 
ers at Very Low Rate of Interest. 



Noting tie tremendous progress 
made by the dairy industry of Min- 
nesota, and with unbounded faith in 
the trade ter -itory adjacent to Thief 
River Falls ss being especially adapt- 
ed to cows, c over, corn and potatoes, 
the directors if the First, and Peoples 
State bank of this city, at their annual 
meeting held 



First 1922 Meet 
of City Council 



H. 



A. Brumund Unanimous- 
ly Elected to Succeed 
Himself as President 



the ideal time to give impetus to -the 
cow industry, for at this time foun- 
dation stock may be purchased at a 
fraction of the cost which prevailed 
a few years ago. 

As outlined in their announcement 
in another column, the bank will ap- 
point a committee of experienced 
dairymen .who will buy only grade 



Tuesday, set apart the! cows of the best quality that can be 
had for. the money. Good cows, it 
is estimated, may now be had at from 
$60 to $125, or an average price of 
about $100 for each animal. At this 
figure, 100 cows will be added to the 
herds of Pennington county. 

Iti means that anywhere from 



sum of $10,000 to be used in the pur- 
chase of high-grade dairy cows for the 
farmers of tiis section. The dairy 
cows will be purchased by a compe- 
tent committee and sold to farmers at 
the low rate >f 6 per cent interest. 
A suitable questionaire, reciting 



the circumstances of prospective pur- $10,000j to $15,000 will annually be 
chasers, is being prepared for mailing ' added to the purchasing power of the 
by officers of the bank, but as The] community. That is the immediate 



Tribune understands the matter, 
strings are at:ached to the proposition 
except that 01 ample feed and housing 
facilities. 

In the hun ble opinion of this news- 
paper, the progressive action of the 
First and Pec pies bank is the first rift 
of light on the horizon of better times 
coming since the declining prices fol- 
lowing the World war plunged agri- 
culture into i depression such as this 
country has never before experienced 

In large measure, the action of the 
bank was prompted by observations 
made during this period of depression 
— namely th it only those who have 
stuck to dai ying, who have milked 
■ cows to the exclusion of all small 
grain f armin *, have been enabled to 



liquidate the 



prciable exteit. To summarize, the 



sections of th 
been regarde 1 



the world, tie finest wheat-growing ; to give space to all of his arguments, 



area that is 
lies bleeding 



to function, in the face of a condition jformance.; In receiving the backing 



vhich has 
tain high, 



interest, 



whi 
regions of 
with , small 
small grain 
rose — and 
prosperity 



nothing but 



CORN— POTATOES. 



Realizing, 
the state is b 



r obligations to any ap- 



Northwest which have 



benefit. But in a larger sense, and 
viewed in the perspective of the fu- 
ture, it means added life to the one 
local farming industry which has 
flourished when other things failed — 
it means encouragemnt to the farmer 
who despairs of the future; it means 
more monthly cream checks, and con- 
sequent benefit to the entire commun 
ity. ^ 

The idea of thus lending its as- 
sistance to the purchase of cows was 
suggested to the board by Vice-Presi- 
dent H. S. Dahlen, who in 1914 
sponsored ! a similar venture by trie 
bank. Mr. Dahlert has never ceased 
to regard jthe dairy cow as the sheet 
anchor of prosperity — he has an ar- 
ray of facts and figures to show what 
kind of a town Thief River Falls 
would be'; if ten cows were placed 
on every '; quarter section of vacant 



as the bread basket of i land in the county, and we intend 



to be found anywhere, ! which are jnot visionary, but are solid, 
and prostrated, unable reliable facts based upon actual per- 



piled obligations -moun-t 
with prices so low that 



many cannot even meet accumulated 

le the despised cut-over 

Northern Minnesota — 

clearings, unfitted for 

have blossomed like a 

hive been surfeited with 

b xause they could raise 

nothing- — they could keep nothing — 



of the board of directors, Mr. Dahlen 
feels the future will abundantly jus- 
tify them land him. The transaction 
involves a temporary loss to the In- 
stitution, but it will mean added de- 



A. H. Akre is Again Named 

City Clerk- and H. 0. 

Chommie Citv Atty. 



The first meeting of the City Coun- 
cil of Thief River Falls for 1922 was 
held Tuesday evening and all the old 
appointees wer e re-elected to their 
old positions. H. A. Brumund will 
serve for two more years as presi- 
dent of the body and Carl Froseth 
was re-elected to succeed himself as 
vice-chairman. 

A. H. Akre's re-appointment as city 
clerk was moved by Councilman O. L. 
Ihle, which was carried without dis- 
sent. P. G. Peterson, assistant clerk; 
H O. Chommie, city attorney; O. L. 
Legvold, superintendent of the water 
and light department; E. (J. Cook, 
custodian of the Auditorium; Martin 
H. Owen, incinerator superintendent, 
and Henry Froseth,°manager of Au- 
ditorium. Dr. O. F. Mellby was nam- 
ed city physician. 

Mayor John Bratrud read his bi- 
ennial statement to the members, in 
which he offered various suggestions 
for needed improvements which he 
hoped the city council would see fit 
to soon bring into effect and dwelt on' 
other aspects of the welfare of the 



but- of this matter you are (the best 
judges. \ ' 

I- am strongly of the opinion that 
a- city scales should b e installed; It 
has been proven in a number of towns 
in this section that such scales are 
self-supporting and provide great sat- 
isfaction to the public. With the of- 
fice of city »weighmaster . might be 
combined a municipal employment of- 
fice. This has proven a great con- 
venience and a valuable aid in pre- 
venting unemployment in other cities 
of this size. ' = ■ 

One of the serious problems facing 
the city at this time is the future of 
the electric light system. The change 
from the direct; to an alernating cur- 
rent must b e made in the near future, 
both in the interest of economy and 
efficiency. The contract with the 
power dam owners is also nearing 
termination and plans for the future 
will have to be considered. The only 
recommendation on my part possible 
at this time is that the council at- 
tempt to secure an expression of 
view and preference from the .people 
of the city and be guided largely by 
such expression. ; 

I strongly urge upon you the nec- 
essity of ascertaining the cost of op- 
eration of our city water and light 
department. The accessory and elec- 
tric utensil department of the city 
should show a yearly profit and the 
accounts of this department should be 
separately shown. I recommend a 
monthly invoice] of electrical supplies 
and accessories and that a system of 
bookkeeping be installed to show the 
monthly profit or loss from this de- 
partment. 

Within a very short time it will be 
necessary that something in the way 
of renovation and repair be under- 
taken on the Auditorium interior., Un- 
less something is done towards the 
upkeep of the building its value will 
deteriorate very rapidly. More^atten- 
towards 



city. 

C. L. Hansen spoke in support of' tion should 'also be given 
the city scales proposition and thought keeping the assembly room and the 
that the mayor's suggestion in regard 8 t age clean as there have been many 
to the installation of the scales should j com plaints on this score. In my 
be effected as soon as possible. Mr.j op j n j on ;j wo uld also be better if the 
Hansen did not wish to be misunder- management of the Auditorium be 
stood as questioning the integrity of i ve stea in some person with an office 
the fuel dealers and other business j m the building. The present plan is 
men of the city who use scales, butl^^g^^gfy f rom many viewpoints. 

Permit me at this time to particul 



thought it advantageous to all con- 
cerned that public scales be installed. 
It is thought that the proposition will 
receive early attention at the hands 
of the members of the council. 

The matter of salaries for the year 
was not taken up but wilt be consid- 
ered at the meeting scheduled ^ 
Tuesday. . , 



the 



THE MAYOR'S MESSAGE 

To the ■ Honorable Members of 
City Council; 

This body of men has again been 
posits in the near future, and what is'honored by their fellow citizens by be 



COWS— CLOVER- 



too, that no section of 
b:tter adapted to dairying 
than the one in which we live, the 
bank officials decided his would be 



of more and greater importance tojing elected for the handling of the 
the bank, is the satisfaction it will] affairs of the city for another two 
have, aside from any pecuniary bene- .?*"*■ wlule tlus m <* be regarded 
fits, from its efforts to- place the farm- 
ing community on a firmei 

tion — a solid base of butter fat — the f u t ure we must now look and it 
which means ap permanent return of ; 3 by present and future needs of the 



■ in the light of an endorsement of 
, , lour actions in the past, the fact 
tounda- . never the!ess remains that it is toward 



material prosperity to ever}' resident 
of Th'cf ;River Falls and the farm- 
ing section tributary. 



WOMAN'S (JLUB MEETS AT 

COMMERCIAL CLUB ROOMS 



The regular meeting of the Wo- 
man's club ■ jvas held Monday after- 
noon at tliej Commercial club rooms. A 
-short business session was held and 
the club voted to assist in soliciting 
funds in support of the movement to 
■build a state -industrial school for 
adult blind. A. S. Sapero, who has 
been appointed county chairman, will 
name the "tag day." 

A vocal solo by Mrs. W. W. Prich- 
ard, Jr., was the first number of the 
program and was greatly appreciated 
by the club. Mrs. H. W. Froelich 
was in charge of the lesson on the 



MRS. J. M. BISHOP WILL 

ADDRESS W. C. T. U. MEETING 



- organization 



of woman's clubs and she 



gave a very interesting account of the 



Mrs. E. M. Stanton 
told of the work of the clubs through- 
out the state and also dealt with the 
different branches of the federated 
clubs. C urn Hit Events, with Mrs. J. 
Q; Cronkhite as leader, was assisted 
by Mrs. Junr and Mrs. A. P Fox 

Mrs. Rounls, the state president in 
a letter to lis. Froehlich stated that 
she' would in the near future choose 
one club in the state to make the 
; quilt, and tie local, club feels highly 
honored by Mrs. Rounds request to 
make her a quilt. Mrs. Froehlich as 
appointed to buy the material and ar- 
range for th ; making of the quilt. 



national clubs. 



Mrs. J.' M.- Bishop, whose subject 
will be "Shall Law be Sovereign in 
the United States" will be the princi- 
pal speaker at the meeting of the 
W. C. T. U. on Tuesday afternoon at 
which time the second anniversary of 
the National Constitutional Prohibi- 
tion victory will be observed. A splen- 
did program has been arranged and 
it is earnestly desired that there be 
a good attendance. The meeting starts 
promptly at three o'clock and will be 
at' the home of Mrs. Christ Storholm, 
corner Eighth street and LaBree Ave. 
Mrs. Storholm will be assisted in serv- 
ing by Mrs. Carl Hillard. 

FIRST AND PEOPLES ELECT. 



Mr. and Mrs. John Sletten of Se- 



dalia. Alta, 



Canada, have been visit- 



ing at the Ei lil Ness home west of the 



city, leaving 



will also vi 



Wednesday morning for 



Clearbrook, Minn., for a visit. They 



=it Bagle'y, Fosston and 



Board and Offfficers Are Re-elected at 
Annual Meeting. 

The directors of the First and Peo- 
ples State bank held their annual 
meeting at the banking room Wednes- 
day and re-elected their staff, of offi- 
cers as follows: A. M. Sheldon, pres- 
ident; Math Barzen, vice president; H. 
S. Dahlen, vice president; R. M. Shel- 
don; cashier; L. A. Hermansbn, assis- 



city that our bourse must be guided, 
In congratulate you, as councilmen, 
upon the record you have made and 
beg- leave to submit a few suggestions 
which I Hope you will find of suffic- 
ient importance to merit your consid- 
eration during the coming term. 

It is probably unnecessary for me 
to dwell upon the necessity for strict 
economy, in the administration of the 
city's affairs. While conditions in 
Thief River Falls, as compared with 
other places in the country are very 
good, yet the situation everywhere is 
such as demands the very closest 
scrutiny of public expenditures. The 
aim should be the holding down of 
the city's running expenses in every 
possible way to the end that taxes be 
made as light as possible. 
The first paving contract 



larly express my appreciation for. the 
manner in which the council has co- 
operated with the park board and the 
library board at all times. A nucleus 
for a park system has been secured 
at a very small outlay and the prop- 
erty already owned by the city great- 
ly, improved. T 

Gentlemen, I wish to thank you for 
the willingness you have at all times 
shown to embrace any suggestions for 
the common good, and for the cheer- 
fUl"co-operation you have at all times 
extended me. It is my earnest\hope 
that these pleasant relations may 
continue, as in that way only can we 
work effectively together for the good 
of the community. Ours is a posi- 
tion of trust, and to us the people 
look as the instruments for carrying 
out their wishes! The closer we get 
to the viewpoint and the more near- 
ly we are able to conform to their 
wishes, the better we will be able to 
serve them and the more creditable 
will be our records as public serv- 
ants. 

Respectfully, 
. JOHN BRATRUD, Mayor. 
Thief River Falls, Jan. 10. 



MISS HAMRY ON BANK BOARD 



First Woman to Serve on Board of 
Directors 

At the annual meeting of the Farm- 
ers' and Merchants' bank directors 
held Tues&ay several changes were 
made in the board of directors, the 
most important being the election to 
membership of Miss Hamry, the effic- 
entered ient assistant cashier of the bank 



into by the city has been completed Other changes are the election ol_Ai- 
and I am of the opinion that no one'bert Lonson, cashier, to replace ram 
would now wish the work undone. Engelstad, John Morgan to replace M. 
As concerns the future, I would urgeJT. McFarland, Frew W. Johnson to re- 
that no further undertaking along place L. A. Lampert.. In other re- 
this line be entered upon except upon spects the board remains the same as 
express order of a majority of the last year. The officers elected =~ 
taxpayers who will have to foot the as follows: President, R. Mctann 
bills. If there is a desire for more ' -—"■ 
paving, the demand should come from 



the property owners, 

The needs of the city for a supply 

of pure water is to you well known, 

and I have at this particular time 

nothing to present which would add 

uon; casmerj jj. «.. uciuiauauu, n^u- to that knowledge. I believe every j 

tant cashier; A. H. Holzknecht, assis-istep you have taken during the past I 

tant cashier; Stanton Dahlen, teller; 'year has been in the right direction' 



are 
1st 
vice-president, Herbert Fuller; 2d 
vice-president, Waldie Christenson 
cashier, Albert Lonson; assistant 
cashier* Efiie Hamry; teller, F. E. Mc- 
Ginn; bookkeeper, Roy Barzen. 



Tag Day Tomorrow 
to Assist Blind 



Young Ladies of Thief River 

Palls to Collect Pounds 

' For Unfortunates 



Circulars Distributed Thru- 
out City Emphasizing 
Need For School 



Tomorrow will be tag 'day for the 
collection of funds for the blind — 
helping them help themselves. The 
Woman's League, with Mrs. A. Sa'p- 
ero in charge, has charge of the 
drive, and young ladies will be sta- 
tioned at ali prominent corners in the 
city with collection boxes. It is a 
worthy cause and one which our citi- 
zens would do well to give their aid to, 
inasmuch as all moneys collected will 
go into a fund for the establishment 
of schools and institutions. V 

HELP THE BLIND TO HELP THEM 
! SELVES i 

If I were stricken blind, what 
would I do? Think it over. 

Could I follow my present occupa- 
tion? Probably not. 

Where could I go to learn to be- 
come self supporting? If over 21 
years old, no such place exists in Min- 
nesota. . 

It would be a pretty rough road 
to travel — wouldn't it ? 

Sixteen hundred blind men and wo- 
men of adult age in Minnesota, accord- 
ing to the last U. S. census report, 
have had to face these questions alone 
in the darkness. Twelve hundred of 
them lost their sight after they reach- 
ed maturity. How pitifully they have 
failed to solve the .problem of exist- 
ence is strikingly shown by the fact 
that but slightly over two per cent 
are self supporting. To these people 
the tragedy of the "light that failed" 
is approached only by the tragedy of 
making a living— by such pititful 
means as you have often seen employ- 
ed, a reproach to modern civilization. 
As a climax to his human tragedy, 
many of these unfortunates are fur- 
ther disabled by the deafness, loss of 
speech and bodily infirmities. 

And remember that these blind men 
and women seek only, an opportunity 
to help themselves. It is the plain 
duty of every thinking person to help 
lighten : their dreary road. 

FIRST NATIONAL ELECTS 



Officers and Board of Last Year Re- 
elected - 

The First National bank held its 
annual board meeting at the bank 
Tuesday afternoon, President C. L. 
Hansen presiding. After auditing the 
books of the bank, which were found 
to be in most satisfactory condition, 
the old board of directors were elected 
as follows: Rasmus Oen, E. M. Ben- 
nes, O. D. Ostby, C. L. Hansen. The 
board re-elected the following offic- 
ers; President, C L. . Hansen, vice : 
president, Rasmus Oen; vice-president, 
■E. M. Bennes; cashier, W. H. Akre; 
auditor and assistant cashier, Theo- 
dore M. Thronson. Appointments were 
also made as follows: Teller, L. C. 
Neilsen; manager insurance depart- 
ment, Geo. Werstlein; stenographer 
and bookkeeper, ' Reuben Hadrath; 
bookkeeper, Philip Larson. 

LABOR MEETING TOMORROW 



t+4 * » 

AUTO CLUB TO MEET ♦ 



Crookston before returning to Canada. 



Falling ii love doesn't lower 
egotist's opiiiion of himself. 



Laura Lund, bookkeeper; Inez John- 
son, stenographer. | 

No changes were made in the board 
of directors, which is as follows: Math 
Barzen, A. M. Sheldon, Halvor A. 
Loken, Perl W. Mabey, Bernard Khud- 
sen, A. G; Loftnes, Hans Anton, O. D. 
Ostby, Carl B. Larson, F. J Stebbins, 
H. S. Dahlen, R. M. Sheldon. , 



And the bottom of a cup of joy is 
seldom far from the top. 



and resulted in a great improvement, 
of the water supply. Doudtless, the 
subject will have to. be approached 
with a view to its ultimate solution 
in the near future but I am not in 
position to recommend that any def- 
inite steps be taken at this time. If 
you find it possible to provide a bet- 
ter supply than we now have without 
adding too greatly to the tax burden 
of the citizens I would most heartily 
recommend such action on your part. 



Every human being in the city ♦ 
who likes the ■ smell of gasoline, ♦ 
whether or not. he or she drives ♦ 
a motor car, is invited to attend .♦ 
a meeting of the Pennington ♦ 
county Automobile club at the * 
Commercial club room next Tues- ♦ 
^ day evening. Besides a lot of ♦ 

♦ high powered conversation, those ♦ 

♦ who attend will be treated to ♦ 

♦ cigars, candy, etc. .♦ 

♦ 
t MII I M I II I II I IHIHIItH 



Organized Workers Bring Prominent 
Speakers to Thief River Falls 

President E. G. Hall of the Minne- 
sota State Federation of Labor, and 
John J. Manning of Washington, D. C., 
representative of the labor depart- 
ment of the American Federation of 
Labor, will deliver addresses at the 
Auditorium tomorrow evening when 
organized labor of Thief River Falls 
will hold a labor rally and mass meet- 
ing. . 

President Hall will address the 
workers on the work of the state fed- 
eration and- will give a review of the 
efforts put forth during the past year. 

Mr. Manning, who comes from fed- 
eration headquarters, will speak on 
the work being done by the label de- 
partment and wishes particularly to 
address the' women of Thief River 
Falls on the importance of the label 
as it concern's organized labor every- 
where. 

Dnntitt iii imiHiii i *' 



Two Harbors Wins 
From Local Team 



Defeat Local Aggregation 

at Basket Ball Last 

Night at Auditorium 



Record Crowd Turns Out to 

See State Champions 

Win, Score 19 to 28 



In a game, almost devoid of sen- 
sational and fancy basket ball but, 
packed with speed and wonderful' 
teamwork on the part of Two Har-. 
bors, and with the Thief River Falls 
five fighting doggedly to cut down a 
lead of 12 points run up during the 
first half of the game, the fast Two 
Harbors all-star .quint won from 
Coach Connell's men last night by a 
score of 28 to 19. 

A game that commenced with both 
teams playing a rather slow and safe 
form of attack, developed into a con- 
test vyhere perfect liason and faultless 
teamwork won the evening. 
j "Swede" Carlson and "Red" 
rlummer, Thief River Falls for- 
wards, did not hit a stride last night 
and semed unable to solve the aggres- 
sive tactics of Two Harbors. Each 
frequently fumbled various openings 
at different stages of the game. 

Louden, who appeared in a Thief 
River Falls uniform last night, did 
not put up the star game he did on 
former appearances in this city.. He 
played at center for the locals, a po- 
sition that he knows as perhaps no 
other basket ball playe-r in Minne- 
sota, but somehow his playing, as well 
as that of>the others of the team, did 
not develop tp the high state, of effi- 
ciency they nivc displayed in former 
Contests this year. 

Two Harbors are a mighty tough 
collection to do business with. They 
put up a rather slow but precise 
method of play and each move and 
pass is well-timed, and calculated to 
produce baskets. They missed com- 
paratively few openings last night. 

Jordan Penney Started the scoring 
for Thief Riv :r ' Fall.--, which was 
shortly followed by Two Harbors 
putting a pass over for their first 
count. Both fives at this stage "dug 
and it was difficult to ascertain 
the best team. Each went scoreless 
for about 10 minutes until Two Har- ' 
bors stepped out ahead and run up a 
dozen tallvs. The local boys seemed 
unable to check the determined style 
of attack put up by Two Harbors and 
the first half ended with the lake 
town boys leading, by a score of 18 
to 6. 

Thief River Falls came back in the 
second chapter and pounded Two 
Harbors for 13 points. They made 
the going fast and momentarily 
threatened to cut down the slight 
margin held by Two Harbors". ■ The 
Swede" and Plummer had taken on 
a new le ase of lif e and had the -visi- 
tors bewildered lit "their speed and 
cleve'rness. They were holding their 
own until the final ten minutes of 
play when Two Harbors flung ,two 
of the prettiest baskets 'ever seen in 
Thief River Falls. 

The largest crowd of the season 
witnessed last night's contest when 
several .hundred paid admission .to 
see the two star teams perform. The 
sidelines and gallery were packed to 
overflowing and enthusiasm was at a 
high pitch. 

The second contest of the double- 
header bill is scheduled for tonight 
and the local team is determined to 
even up the series. A hot contest is 
expected to develop—as a result of 
last night's defeat, the first, suffered 
in nearly two years. 



♦ 

♦ DOC. WANTS-HIS OWN CAP ♦ 

♦ Will gentleman who exchang- ♦ 

♦ ed seal skin caps at Commercial ♦ 

♦ club lunch Thursday, please trade ♦ 

♦ back, as yours is too small for ♦ 

♦ me. * 

♦ -*-Dr. H. W. Froehlich. ♦ 

♦ ' ' ' :♦ 

tt t m i nttum i MMiM i 't 



*♦♦+♦♦«♦!>> 1 1 nuruum t 

♦ ♦ 

♦ KNOX DEDICATION TONIGHT ♦ 

♦ ' -j - ♦ 

♦ Prof. Hay, the principal speak- ♦ 

♦ er at tonight's dedicatory exer- ♦ 

♦ cises at the Knox school, arrived ♦ 

♦ this morning from St. Paul. A ♦ 

♦ musical program will be carried ♦ 

♦ out prior to the formal presenta- ♦ 

♦ tion of the building by the con- ♦ 

♦ tractor to the architect, and by ♦ 

♦ him to th e Board of Education. ♦ 

♦ The public ia invited to attend ♦ 

♦ the exercises at the beautiful au- ♦ 

♦ ditorium of the new, school, be- ♦ 

♦ ginning at 8:15 this evening. ♦ 



■ MMH I HIIMHHHtm i tt 





Page' Two, 




THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



The Tribune 

SEMI-WEEKLY. 



ESTABLISHED 1001. 



J. S. ARNESON 
S. V. ARNESON 



Entered as 
post ofllce 



Editor 
Associate Editor 



PubliBhed every Tuesday and Friday at 
Thief RiVer Falls, Minn. 



second class matter at the 
Thief Hirer Falls, Minn., 



•nder the Act of March S, 1879. 



SUBSCRIPTION $8.00 PER YEAB. 



Amongst 
bors harbors 



Dther things, Two Har- 
a basket; ball team that 



knows how to make things hot. 



We have studied the situation 



from 



angle the past week 



or ten days nnd we have-come to the 
honest concl ision that those who are 
opposing Frank B. Kellogg's re-elec- 
tion in the hopes of swinging the gen 
eral sentiment of the people to. Hal- 
lam, are a lunch of slippery poltti 
cians with tl:c Twin City boys in the 
lead. You rountry editors who are 
swallowing the cleverly concealed 
hook thrown out to you — spit 'er out 
before you : eel the prick." — Albert 
Lea Tribune. 



An Iowa- ;x-soldier is greatly em- 
barrassed. Not since his discharge 
March 27, 1319, has he been able to 
convince the war department that he 
was not killed in action in France. 
His widow in the meantime has been 
receiving lar : |;e allotments of insur- 
ance which sle has regularly returned 
to Washington only to have them 
come back just as regular allotments 
of insurance which she has regularly 
returned to Washington only to have 
them come bad; just as regular with 
notations informing her that her hus- 
band was killed October 2, 1918. 
She and her husband have now re- 
ceived word from . the department 
that the husband's body is to be ship- 
ped to his wife for burial and the ex- 
service man is virtually ordered to 
' burv his own corpse. — Capper' 
Weekly. 



made large purchases and turned 
over their holdings tomewcomers 
from prairie states who did I not 
' understand pioneering conditions 
and who were unfitted to 'cope 
With the problem of developing 
this new country. The result of 
all this has been that the progress 
of Northern Minnesota has been 
hindered rather than aided by the 
methods, or lack of methods, pur- 
sued by the state itself in get- 
ting rid of its real property. 
i It therefore is good to know 
that the state 'land department, 
under the directions of State Au- 
ditor R. P. Chase, has determin- 
ed that these evils shall not re- 
cur, and that a program has been 
formulated calling for the sale 
of only such lands as are found 
to be fit for cultivation . at this 
time. No poor lands or lands too 
far distant from roads; railways 
and market centers will be ^of- 
fered, and the purchaser may feel 
some assurance that he is hot 
acquiring a tract which will be 
worthless for settlement for many 
years to come. Complete resur- 
veys and reappraisements. are' to 
be made in this connection, -to- 
gether with soil analysis and land 
classification. The new policy is 
the only sensible one and should 
have been adopted years ago. But 
now that it has been 'announced 
it is to be hoped that; it will ; be 
extended and applied to the full- 
est possible extent and that the 
auditor will have the co-operation 
of the legislature. — Pioneer Press. 
The new policy of the sjtate land de- 
partment, (outlined in the £bov e editor- 
ial, should have been adopted many 
years ago. In -time we 'shall outlive 
the bad name we have sustained by 
reason of; the state's questionable 
dealings with prospective settlers, and 
then will :be a good time to attract 
people from other states with legiti- 
mate farm bargains which are to be 
had in almost every county in the 
state. We are more glad than we can 
say ;to note this disposition "on the 
part of the state to go straight in the 
future. 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1922 



Rules Governing 
March Convention 



Attorney General Construes 

Operation of Party 

Convention Laws 



Voters Should Carefully 
Study Provisipns This 
Important Act ■ 



canvassed as at general elections," ex- 
cept that the county auditor acts in 
place of the' county canvassing, board. 
Candidates elected' as delegates will 
receive a certificate to that effect from 
the county auditor, A list of the dele 
gates elected will be certified by the 
county auditor to the county chairman. 
4. Calling of County Conventions. 
The time of holding the county con- 
ventions will be fixed by the state 
central committee. The date select- 
ed must be within ten days after the 
delegate election. Upon receiving no- 
tice of the date of the county conven- 
tion, the county committee should se- 
lect some place for the holding of 
same and should issue a call stating 
the time and place thereof. Care 
Attorney General Clifford L. Hil-! should be taken to notify the county 
ton, referring to the party convention auditor before the delegate election 
law enacted by the last legislature, of the time and place fixed for the 
Sa J,<L t0day: 'county convention. That officer will 

The new law requires the holding be unable to issue certificates of elec- 
<tf an election on March 14, 1922, for tion to delegates unless he has this 
the purpose of choosing delegates to : information. I 

county political conventions. No ad-l 5. Powers of a county convention, 
vance registration is necessary. Party: The duties and powers of a county 
committees and officers as well as convention are prescribed by law. The 
public officers have certain duties to delegates will be called to order by 
perform in connection therewith. The the county party chairman. The con- 
various steps leading up to the holding , vention ~ may adopt a platform, and 
of a county convention are as follows: should' elect delegates to the state 
1. Apportionment to be made by convention, elect delegates to congres- 
county committee befor e February 11, jsional district convention, and choosS 
1922 - ' ,' la county committee. Each (delegate 

The county committees of the var- j elected by th n count- convention to 
ious political parties determine the ' the state or congressional district con- 
representation of each election dis-| vention should receive a certificate to 
trict, (precinct), using as a basis the , that . effect signed by the officers of 
vote cast for the party candidate for th e convention, who should also'certi- 
governor at the last election. The fy a list of the delegates elected to 



"Coon" Farm New 
Aitkin 'Co. Venture 



Between "Coons" and Bees 

This Farmer Ought to 

Be Well Occupied 



Breeding Fur Bearing Ani- 
mals Rapidlv Growing 
Industry in State 



BOY SPREADS SUNSHINE 



IF "BLOCS" ARE BAD THE FARM- 
ERS WILL CURE THEM 
There is great excitement among 
the big city papers over the agricul- 
tural "bloc" n Congress. It seems 
that it is a most terrible thing for. 
, Senators elected to represent farming 



Grygla Lad Fights Disease With Big 
Smile 



The St. Paul Pioneer Press recently 
published a picture ui vjuerc Svenplad- 
son of Grygla, Minn., and the follow- 
ing item about him: ! 
■ "Lad wins fight with tuberculosis, 
smiles. \ 

Obert Svenpladsen, 9 years old, has 
the greatest "fighting cna.t" at Walk- 
er Sanatorium, according to Drl P. 
states to reallv represent their con-j M - Hal1 . superintendent of the insti- 
stituents, regardless of politics. tu " on ; ° n August 2, he was stricken 

Yet,- if theke same representatives , Wlth *»*«™1?* Peritonitis and his life 
, , ' . i -nT !_• was despaired of. Two months and a 

of farming states went to Washing- ;haIf ]aterj ; when this picture was tak . 

ton and thereafter gave their atten-; en> he was back on his feet "part 
tion and their votes to he financial time" and spreading sunshine thru- 
and manufacuring interests, there out the institution with his smile, 
would be no outcry at all. \ Oliert's jsmile won the admiration 

Every American knows that for of the entire group of Remsey county 
more than a! half century— aye, for officials who recently made a trip oi 
a century— the financial interests '"section ito the hospital at Walker, 
have been we'll looked after in Con- » isn't a mouth smile; his who e face 
TT7i. 1 -n- n- c i -j j enters into it. Laughing crow s feet 

gr.ess. When Wall atreet decided „„_ _ f f i,„ „„_ ' . ,- ; .. 

fe j- .. _- come at the corners of his eyes, his 

upon a certain policy, many Demo- c h ee ks pucker merrily, a row oi election boards who serv e at the dele 
cratic and Republican congressmen teeth, farjenough apart to;spit thru gate election will also serve at the 
forgot their pilitics to unite for, and easily, become very apparent, ^and'primary election and genera! election 
make into laws, such important bills even; his ears seem to wiggle wit" next following. In towns and vil- 
as the great financiers and captains of. delight. Mayor Hodgson and Com lages where an annual election is also 
industry dem-inded It is true that missioner Mike Carr were especiall.i being held on the day of the delegate 
off and on certain progressives of both attracted by the boy and the Mayo: election the polls will remain open 
parties-sometimes led by a Roosevelt. ^.written a letter to the lad.! durmg the hours of such annual elec- 
r T> , ' • ii l i There are twenty- seven little chi'- tion. In other districts the hours of 

or a Bryan— protested against all the dren Jn th( , fresh air cMage at ^n,. (voting are from 12 noon to 9 p.m. A 
good things of legislation going to one er where obert is making his fig],; form of ballot will be prepared and 
class of business men and none to the back to health. There are between; sent to county auditors by the sec- 
class of business represented by the fifty and ; sixty ' more children on a retary of state. Names of candidates 
farmer and the small tradesman. But waiting list who are unable to get'need not be rotated on these ballots, 
they were smiled upon indulgently, into the hospital because of lack of Ballots are cast,.'counted, returned and 
or sneered atj and the "bloc" in Con- j accommodation." 
gress went on votingifor Big Business f bert 's father died a year ago of 
the same as ever | tuberculosis and shortly afterwards 

it was learned that Obert had tuberc- 
ulosis. Miss Newman, executive : sec- 



county committee must certify the ap 
portionment made by it to the county 
auditor at least thirty days before the 
election. Thus the apportionment of 
delegates must be in the hands of the 
county auditor before February 11, 
1922. 

2. Candidates for delegates must 
file before February 27, 1922. 

Any eligible person may have his 
name placed as a candidate for dele- 
gate to. the county convention on the 
official precinct ballot, by filing a pro- 
per affidavit with the auditor of the 
county in which he resides at least 
fifteen days before the delegate elec- 
tion. Blank forms of affidavits for 



the state convention to the secretary 
of state.. 

G. Congressional district conven- 
tions. 

The apportionment of the delegates 
to which any county is entitled in a 
congressional district convention, in a 
congressional district containing more 
than one county, will be made by the 
state-central committee, and said com- 
mittee will also fix the time and place 
of the holding of all congressional dis- 
trict conventions. A list of delegates 
elected will be certified to the, con- 
gressional district chairmen by the 
secretary of state. Each congression- 
al district convention is empowered to 



filing as a delegate may be obtained ; endorse a candidate for member of 

congress from the ' district, it repre- 



of those persons who have properly 
filed on or before February 27, 1922, 
will appear upon such official ballots. 
Blank spaces for the writing in of 
names will appear on the ballot as at 
general elections. 

3. Place of holding election, ap- 
pointment of judges, hours of voting, 
certificates of election for delegates 
chosen. 

The . delegate election will be held 
as a rule in the same election districts 
(precincts) in which' the last Novem- 
ber election was held. The boundaries 
of an election district may not be 
changed after March 3, 1922. In 
towns the board of supervisors will 
act as judges of election. In villages 
having but one district the council 
will act. In other municipalities the 
council is required, not later than 
February 16, 1922, to appoint . three 
judges for each district. Vacancies 
are filled and additional appointments 
made as a general elections. The, 



sents, and may also select a congres- 
sional district committee. At the con- 
clusion of the convention the proper 
officers; should certify the name of the 
candidate endorsed to the county au- 
ditor or other officer with whom the 
candidate endorsed is required to file. 

7. State convention: 

The time and place of the holding 
of the state convention will be fixed 
by the state central committee. The 
powers of th e state convention are 
prescribed by law. No person may file 
as a candidate at the primary elec- 
tion until after the time prescribed 
for the holding of 'the state conven- 
tion. Thus no person may file as a 
candidate at the primary election un- 
til aftei- March 31." 



COAL — Order your hard and soft 
coal from the Christenson & Voelz 
Hardware Co. Phone 23. tf 



Mr.& Mrs. H.M, Kicks 

Licensed Embalmers 

We table full charge of funer- 
als. Special attention given to 
shipping cases. 



Day and Night Call, Phone 30 
MODERN AUTO HEARSE 



The following article from the Ait- 
kin Republican speaks of a new in- 
dustry, which bids fair to be a suc- 
cess: 

Mr. Wm. Craig pi Aitkin, who lives 
just across the Mississippi bridge, has 
embarked in raccoon farming. He re- 
cently dug the postholes for a fence 
which he will put up .in the near fu- 
ture, and which will enclose ground to 
the extent of about half of a city 
block. The fence will be such as used 
on the breeding farm's of fur bearing 
animals, and the cap will be a ten- 
inch board, laid flat, with a twelve- 
inch extension of tin, so that when 
the coons climb the fence they will 
be unable to get a toe-hold on the 
tin and will be prevented from getting 
out of the enclosure. 

"Mr. Craig has already secured part 
of his foundation stock. On Jan. 2 
he received by express one male and 
two females from Warm Springs, Vir- 
ginia. Previous to that time he got 
two males from New Ulm, Minn., and 
three females from Kentucky, and he 
expects further' shipments from Ohio 
and Illinois points. 

Mr. Craig was a resident of Mich 
igah several years ago, engaged in the 
general store business and in buying 
hoops. When the timber.' 1 supply be- 
came exhausted'' in his neighborhood 
in Michigan he moved to Aitkin and 
engaged' in hoop, manufacture and 



sale. This has been, his principal busi- 
ness for a number; of years. But he 
has some side lines that engage his 
leisure time and afford him profit as 
well as pleasure. One of these is a 
good sized garden which is always one 
of the best in Aitkin county. Another 
is bee culture. Last year he had 36 
swarms of bees and they were pretty 
busy all the season' and manufactured 
for their owner about 3000 pounds 
of honey, besides laying up in store 
enough to keep them over the winter. 

Now Mr. Craig has tackled another ■ 
side line — the breeding raccoons. This 
is not a new business for Mr. Craig. 
When he Jived in Michigan he- had 
a "coon farm," and did well with it 
while he gave it^jjroper attention. But 
his main -business required his being 
away from home a great deal, and 
while away on one of his trips the 
coons got out of the enclosure, and 
neighboring sportsmen camped on 
their trail until they Were 'extermin- 
ated. Mr. Craig does not anticipate- 
any trouble of this kind now. and will 
take such precautions as will prevent 
his coon family from getting. out of 
their enclosure. His experiment will 
be watched with interest, and if he is 
successful it -will point the way for 
Aitkin county farm boys to start a 
new business that will be of interest 
to them as well as supplying them 
with an additional income." ' 



CASH MARKET 

For your Eggs, Live and Dress- 
ed Poultry, Veal, Hides, Furs, 

Wool and Pelts , - 
SEE US BEFORE SELLING 

ELSEWHERE! 

Northern Trading Co. 

One Door North of Court House 
J-13-20 



^HESTERS PHIS 



DIAMOND 




GO 1 

LADIKSI 
As* yo»r Oramfit tot CHINCHES -TEH S 

DIAMOND BRAND FILLS it 

Gold metallic boxec, lenled 

Ribbon. Taxh xo otmer. 

Drvgglit •»« uk f*r CHI. _ 

DIAMOKD BKAND PILL*, for twenty-Are 

years regarded aa Beit Safest, Alwaya Reliable. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS 
•535. EVERYWHERE = 



ALONG ABOUT THIS TIME. 

"Ralph," said his father, "what 
good' resolutions are you going to 
make for the* new year?" 

-"I'm not going to fight with Frank 
Ross any more," replied Ralph. 

"I'm . glad to hear that, my boy," 
said his father; "but why do you 
make that resolution?" 

" 'Cause," was the answer, "I al- 
ways get licked." 



CITY DRAY & FUEL COMPANY 
L. MANTHER, Manager. 

FUEL OF ALL KINDS 

Phone 176. Thief River Falls, Minn; 



*■ 



C. M. ADKINS 



Physician and Surgeon 



Office Over First National Bank 
Thief River Fails, Minn. 



THIEF RIVER GUI 

DE. O. F. MELLBY 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

DE. H. W. FROEHLICH 

Surgery and ^Obstetrics 

DR. L. F. FISHER 

Internal. Medicine and X-Ray 

OFFICE 
CITIZENS BANK BUILDING 




itable that other "bloc: 

up. It the great farm- retary of ; the MarshaU County Red 



It was ine\ 
- would spring 
ing-stock raising industry would get, Cross" anci Child'"weifare"To'ard; ac- 
nothing from the government, it was companied Obert to the Sanitorium ir 
natural that it" would take the very j February, 1921. j 

steps that were plainly successful for ! ' i 

other interests. I 

The agric iltural "bloc" has been I 
the result. I 

. They say "like cures like." If the 
"bloc" that las represented high fi- 
nance for a century was a bad thing, 
perhaps the new "bloc" which so 
much distresses the eastern newspa- 
pers and poli :icians and big guns gen- 
erally will ;ure the whole "bloc" 
business. 

Anyway, the country folks at last 
have someth ng to trade with, and 
. trade on. 



f SENSIBLE LAND POLICY t 

There is remaining in North- 
em Minnesota approximately 2,- 
000,000 acres of state-owned land. 
Much of this under present con- 
ditions is not fit for settlement 
due to a variety of causes, among 
them being| poor soil, either rocky 
or swampy in character, absence 
of good roads, distance from mar- 
kets and railroads and excessive 
cost oi clearing. In the past such 
land has been disposed of at the 
annual state sales without dis- 
crimination. Actual settlers who 
acquired it in many intsances 
found .they could not make 1 a liv- 
ing on it aid many an abandoned 



wilderness 
. ness of this 



foolish policy. Speculators also 



homestead bears wit- 
penny wise and pound 




Start \m the THRIFT WAY 

LIFE INSURANCE 
is based on THRIFT | 

Buy aj contract and pay for it 
duringjthe best part of your life 
and then enjoy the proceeds 
thereof in later years, or create 
an Estate for. your Family. 

IT PAYS 

Contracts offered to fit every 
need. IWill appreciate the priv- 
ilege of talking it over with any 
on e interested. 

El M. BENNES 

General A£ent 

The Live Insurance Man 

! ■ 90-4t 



Convenient— 

for the burglar. 



pEIVjATE safes., in houses 
A anc| offices are "easy 
picking*' for the modern 
burglar. It is far wiser to 
keep your valuahles and im- 
portant papers ini one of our 
Safe Deposit Boxes. 

For an extremelv low cost, 
per year, you canhave them 
protected from fire, theft 
and loss. ' 



Let us explain this valuable service to you " 

The First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, | Minn. 1 

DOUBLE your savihgs-rt CAN be done ■ 



Your body has nothing in common with many 
things recommended to improve health. Study 
the matter' out, thing it over, then act. 



CHIROPRACTIC 



Includes nothing harmful and everything 
helpful. 1 1 can relieve in the majority of human 
ailments by merely adjusting the displaced 
parts that interfere with free passage of natur- 
al health_energy. . : , '" 

Disease Misdirected Energ y 

Your body is self competent to cure itself. I 
have proved the statement in recovery through 
chiropractic adjustment of scores of persons . 
variously afflicted. 

Let me examine your case and give you the 
facts. No charge for consultation. [ 



DR. J. CARLSON 

Chiropractic Office 

First and People's State Bank, front roonfback 
of stairway, second floor. J 

EXPERIENCED PRACTITIONER 

Office hours, 10-12 A. M., 2-5, 7-8 P. M. 



<\ 



~ >■& 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1922 



»♦♦*«> 



I IHttHHUUHH t HHKHHIIHlm t HHHHt 



4 t t l H 
At the 



THE THIEF RIVER PALLS TRIBUNE 



Page Three 



-B>- \ \ 

'"Che County Chairman" 



MtttttttHMIH I MMHItHI IIII HMHUI I tlM i 



general election, November 
next, voters of Minnesota will be ask- 
ed to p iss on two constitutional 
amendments, both products of the last 
. legislator ;. Amendment No. 1, as it 
will be designated, authorizes the fin- 
ancial officers of the state to loan 
money on approved security for agri- 
cultural sdvancement, while 'amend- 
ment No. .2, commits the state to a 
new form of taxation — that of occu- 
pation. 1'he latter is for the ostens- 
ible purpose of cinching beyond any 
possibility of legal interference ,the 
new six'-per cent tax on the /'occu- 
pation" of mining iron ore, but 1 inci- 
dentally a new taxation principle is 
involved and the baker, the "butcher 
and the candle stick maker is just 
as liable to be selected as state rev- 
enue marks as those engaged in de- 
veloping the - iron industry of state. 
As a rule, constitutional amendments 
have little to attract and'^figure only 
in a small way in the political con- 
troversies' preceeding a .general elec- 
tion, but the chances are excellent that 
the voters of the state will hot be 
permitted' to be in ignorance during 
tile coming campaign in the matter of 
the two I amendments spoken^ of. 
Amendment No. 1, which will be 
known asj the "Rural Credits Amend- 
ment" is (due for some publicity, but 
it will not be in it with innovation No. 
2. Already, it is said, a movement 
is on to! secure recognition by the 
several coming ' state political conven- 
tions of the "Occupation Tax Amend- 
ment." That such will be met with 
vigorous [opposition is without ques- 
tion." Reading the "Occupation Tax 
Amendment" one is rather caught by 
the adroitness,' those who drafted it 
and maneuvered its adoption by the 
last legislature. The mining of iron 
ore is tlie. only "Occupation": listed 
and the North country practically the 
only section effected, but carefully 
concealed and . available only to those 
Uegally and judicially learned; is a 
principle Which if written into the con- 
stitution of the state can only mean 
.the taxation of additional or all estab- 
lished occupation if future legislatures 
so desire. Under it the farmer would 
be no mo -e immune than the humblest 
cobbler. The two amendments are the 
two most important offered the- Voting 
public in years! 



of Chairman C. R. Adams met in St. 
Paul ^Saturday and arranged for the 
caucuses and several conventions as 
provided for under the new party con- 
vention act. The delegate caucus will 
be held March 14th, the county con- 
ventions, March 18, and the state con- 
vention to endorse Republican candir 
dates 'for; the several state offices 
March 3L The big meet, which will 
be held in St. Paul will have 1,088 
delegates.; Congressional conventions 
in each of .the districts will also be 
held, i The Democrats have not as yet 
arranged for their gatherings, but a 
meeting of the leaders will likely be 
held, this week and a general call to 
the faithful drafted. 



The state tax commission has for- 
warded blanks to the mining com- 
panies operating on the Iron Range as 
provided for under the new tonnage 
tax law arid the reception of the same 
is anxiously awaited. This is .the first 
step in the collection of the tax and 
the commission is very much in the 
dark as to whether the companies will 
comply or -prepare to fight. Argu- 
ments of those who put over the new 
infliction were that it would me«.n 
from [$4,000,000 to $5,000,000 addi- 
tional revenue for the state, but from 
present prospects it will be far below 
that' sum.[ A return of $1,500,000 is 
more j likely. Rumors are to the ef- 
fect that the Iron county is not go- 
ing to submit without a fight, but 
there'; is nothing authoritive to this 
effecti r 

What ever may have been the feel- 
ing in political circles toward Gustaf 
Lindquist, 'now state insurance commis- 
sioner, two years ago — and it can be 



:' PREFER HOME JO BUSINESS 

Most Women Who Quit Their "Jobs" 
Do So With a View to Be- 
coming Wives. 



'In normal times, twenty out of ev- 
ery one' hundred persons engaged In 
gainful occupations In the United 
States are women. At present It is 
believed that eight million women and 
girls are at work and that a fourth 
more will be when industry reaches 
normal conditions. This Invasion of 
women applies to almost every field of 
enterprise. * 

Yet these figures take no account 
of the vastly greater number of wom- 
en who are not classed as in "gainful 
occupations" yet perform the natural 
function of women — home making. 
The woman who Is a home maker may 
not be able to count her Income' In dol- 
lars as accurately as the other, who 
draws a fixed salary- yet she Is in a 
gainful occupation nevertheless. Her 
"jewels" may be her sons and daugh- 
ters and her reward may be less finan- 
cial, but she has it In the satisfaction 
of having done a woman's part In rear- 
ing a family. It does not fall to ev- 
ery woman to give such service, but 
to whomever It Is given to be a wife 
and mother the reward is not less 
though It Is -expressed In different 
terms. 

That the position of home maker Is 
the natural desire of women Is shown 
In that about ns many step out of 
"gainful occupations" annually as en- 
ter them. Thus for most women such 
employment is but temporary in con- 
templation of marriage. That so many 
are willing to exchange salaries for 
the home Is proof which occupation 
appeals with more force, to women^ — 
Marlon Star. , 



BUND TO GREAT INVENTION „LL HONOR TO-PUMPKIN PIE ; SPREAD OF RED PROPAGANDA 



French Emperor Missed Opportunity 

When HeiTurned Down" Ericsson's 

Offer to Build Monitors. 

March 8, 1862; August, 1921. These 
dates comprise the history of Ironclad 
monitors, the first of which, invented 
by John Ericsson, met and defeated 
the Merrimae at Hampton Roads on 
the date first named. The last of the 
British monitors, after seeing minor 
service In the 'World warr was con- 
signed to the scrap heap by the ad- 
miralty last August 

The history of the monitors goes 
back to the days of Napoleon HL when 
Great Britain was In a ferment, appre- 
hending invasion from across the 
channel. Ericsson, a Swedish engi- 
neer, 1 urged the French emperor In 
1854 to build; according to his design, 
armored vessels of low freeboard, with 
big guns' in revolving shot-proof 
cupolas, placed centrally on the decks. 
Such a type of armor-clad ship, he de- 
clared, would revolutionize naval war- 
fare. -The Idea was not carried out. 
and Great Britain's wooden* ships 
never had to face the ordeal of the 
Merrimae. i 

But Ericsson prevailed on the Union 
leaders of the American Civil war 
to give his Idea a trial. In 100 days 
his ship was built, armed and 
equipped, and It soon fulfilled the In- 
ventor's hope that it would serve as 
a "monitor," or lesson, to the Confed- 
eracy. 

Even before this, however, the Brit- 
ish admiralty had taken up the idea 
and had built d vessel of a similar 
type. At the time of the armistice 
the British navy had 87 of them. 



SEEK JEWELS LONG HIDDEN 



Dismantling of Famous London House 

Revives Story of a Scandal 

of Many Years Ago. 

, There Is no necessity for any se- 
crecy now If the builders at present 



T-'Wt ft i tC th,W tearin S aown and! rearranging the m . 

said with truth some of the thmgs: ^.^ & honse (n & ^^ ^ 



said of him in certain political circles 
were 'not all of a complimentary na- 
ture—he has certainly forged ahead 
since \ he took charge of one of. the 
states most important departments. 
He is now recognized as one of the 
big assets of the presept -state admin- 
istration and much of the political 
bitterness that once featured his con- 
trol in the way of state leadership has fortune in precious stones and gold- 
given' way to admiration and staunch smith's work, but some heirlooms of a 
friendship. Gus. has lots of red blood ducal family. The chatelaine was very 
and is not afraid of the cars, all of lovely, but by no means strait-laced, 
which has not been lost upon a num- One afternoon, when visiting a fnend, 
ber of fly-by-nights who have tried she died suddenly. Her husband had 
to use his department and the gullible her boudoir shut up and refused to 
for their own financial advancement, have any search'made for the jewels, 



aristocratic quarter In London come 
upon a wealth of Jewels and Jewelry. 
Some time ago , this mansion was 
bonght by a war profiteer, after having 
been the town honse of a landed fam- 
ily for many generations. 

Somewhere within the walls of a 
room which was the boudoir of one 
of its chatelaines lies not only a small 



As to his political enemies, accumulat- 
ed when he was chairman of the 
state! Republican forces, they have 
found that he is not all that was said 



Congressman, A. J. Volstead of the 
Seventh district is reported to be 
somewha; concerned regarding his 
political and official future and well 
he may. He wants to go back to con- ^ ^ _ 
gress agiin, but if there is anything • ^ "y m ' , ( 

in the dc pe wafted down this (way, a j ; 

certificate for another two yeajrs resi- 1 Tj n it e d states Senator, Frank B. 
dence at the national capitol j is not K e u gg returned to Washington this 
going to be handed to him on a silver j wee i c ; a ft er _a. conference with his man 
platter. Congressman Volsfead's one j agcr g , He doea no t exp ect to be back 
and absorbing hobby is the dry act ; unt jj ; a f ter tne conV ention campaign, 
bearing his name and the claim is that ■ g ena t or Kellogg left well satisfied 
it has been permitted to impair his 
usefulness in the matter of -the agrk 
cultural Hid 'other legislative needs of 
his district. Further, any number of 
those who aided in his return- to con- 
gress in the last campaign, follow 
- ing a crushing defeat in the, primaries 
at the hands of O. J. Kvale, a Non- 
partisan leader, who was later dis- 



which It then became known she had 
been receiving from her ducal lover, 
who was no* much embarrassed by 
reason of certain of them being heir- 
looms in his family. 

Not for three generations, and oh a 
distant branch of the aggrieved hus- 
band's family succeeding to the prop- 
erty, was the boudoir re-opened, and 
though search was then instituted 
nothing resulted. The fair lady's cache 
remained undiscovered. If and when 
the heirlooms come to light again It 
Is certain the lawyers will profit by 
the wrangling fer possession of them. 
— Chicago Journal. 



qualified because of a charged viola- 
tion of the state corrupt practices act 
think they stretched a point in enabl- 
ing Volstead to again appeal to the 
voters and that he should no longer 
impose upon their generosity. He 
wanted vindication. He got it and they 1 
believe fiat he should now retire. Con- 
gressman Volstead is now serving his 
tenth consecutive term in congress. 
Practicaly an unknown, he edged in 
during an extreme^ bitter congres- 
sional fight in 1903 in which E. T. 
Young, later attorney general and the 
late Mike bowling were the principal 
warring candidates for the Republi- 
can nomination. It was the first year 
of the primary law and its minority 
features were of material benefit to 



with [the senatorial situation and was 
confident that the convention endorse- 
ment' would be his. With the coming 
of the New Year, the report was cur- f 

rent that Fred Hadley of the Winne- j "Apples and Honey." 

bago; Enterprise would open senatorial! mo ^ Salamari| the English pojt and 
headquarters in St. Paul for Judge egsajrigt, | s the coinpller of the book of 
Oscar Hallam of the State Supreme egggy!, stories and poems, published 
Court, but so far, Fred has not ap- ' un fler the titlo. "Apples and Honey." 
peared on the scene. Since then the The material Is drawn from the Bible, 
gossips have been busy with a story the Talmud, ZarigwIU. Dlwaeli, Words- 
to the effect that Fred and Judge- worth, Longfellow, Leigh Hunt and 
Hallam are not fully in accord in thfi many other sources and the purpose 
matter of the campaign to be made Is to shew the national and spiritual 
by the St. Paul Jurist. As the sen- aspect of Zionism. The book Is In- 



atorial . campaign progresses the con- 
test runs more and more Senator Kel- 
logg's way. 



Senator- 'James A. Carley of Wa- 
basha county may be the Democratic 
offering for governor in the coming 
state campaign. Friends are urging 
him to enter either the race for United 
States senator or governor and it is 
said the latter looks the best to him. 
Senator Carley is chairman of the ex- 
ecutive branch of the Democratic 



Volstead. For several campaigns the gtate i centra i comra ittee and is high 
Seventh district congressman w as ; in t ji e COU ncils of his party. 

practically unopposed, but in 1918 op- 1 j . 

the person of E. E. Lobeck, I A i story was in circulation this'. 



tended primarily for elder children 
and presents the pathos, joy, beauty 
and heroism of Jewish life. Here are 
songs of the Ghetto and songs of the 
soil, songs of nature and of love, songs 
of the peddlers and the martyrs. The 
whole cycle of the year Is followed In 
prose and verse— feasts, fasts and 
festivals, the Passover, Yom Kipper, 
seed time and the harvest, springtime 
and autumn. 



8aving. Power on Railroads. 
• Tests on the elevated roads and sub- 
ways In New York and Philadelphia 
demonstrate that a saving in power 
from 25 to 35 per cent can be accom- 



position in the person of E •*;££>«* A jstory was in circulation this, * 

a well known prohibitionist appeared weefc to , the effect that E ™e Lundeen, P econd A ^ nne eleyat8d ^ |n NeW 

and Volbtead had anything but an f ormer congressman from the Fifth 

easy task disposing of him. j In t ne , district might take a.flyerat the'Re- 

Republuan primaries of a year ago, [publican nomination for United States 

he went down to defeat at the hands ' sena j or . One of the active ones in 

of Rev, O. J. Kvale, a leaguer, ^"Mhis campaign was reported to be 

Paul;Dehnel, a well known radical and 

former newspaper publisher. 

ATTENTION POULTRY MEN 
The annual meeting of the Pennirig- 



the corrupt practices act was invoked 
and the domination of Kvale set aside. 
In the general election which followed 
Volstead prevailed over Kvale, who 
re-filed las an independent, but it was 
only th(T appeal to the loyalty of the 
voters as made by the Republican 
leaders Ithat saved him. As jit was, 
he scraped through. That ; Kvales 
nomination represented the wishes of, 
a majority of the Republican voters 
of the district is without question but 
it was at a period when the state at 
large wis anything but pleased at the 
prospect) of a Socialist regime and 
the apreal to the corrupt P««*«*? 
J motioned gave the relief : desired. 
Things are different now and so is the 
general feeling toward the [Seventh 
district congressman. The most talk- 
ed of possible successor is Represent- 
ative Theodore Christianson I of Lac 
qui Pare county. 

state 
the call 



Members of the Republican 
committee answering 



central 



ton County Poultry s&so'ciation will 
be held at the Farm Bureau office 
Monday evening at 7:30. Every mem- 
ber is urgently requested to be pres- 
ent. | J. J. McCann, Sec'y. 



Ah enterprising tradesman sent a 
doctor a box of 'cigars, which had not 
been [ordered, with a bill fdr ?6. The 
accompanying letter stated that "I 
have: ventured to send them on "my 
initiative, being convinced that you 
will appreciate their exquisite flavor." 
Inidue course the doctor replied:, 
"You have not asked me for a con- 
sultation, but I venture to send you 
three prescriptions, being convinced 
that j you will derive therefrom , as 
much benefit as I shall derive from 



York a check was kept on the motqr- 
men by ~ the Installation of coasting- 
clocks which Indicated what part of 
the total running time had been Bpent 
In coasting. This Is hardly feasible 
or necessary on most surface lines, yet 
proper Instructions to motormen, after 
proper training for. the work, undoubt- 
edly results in an enormous saving of 
power. — Christian Science Monitor. 



. Women Is Women. 
- ^"Not many women care much for 
outdoor sports, do they?" 

"Oh, i don't know. Did you ever 
see one who did not like to hunt bar- 
gains, fish for compliments, be In the' 
swim, play a love game,, make a hit 
with her clothes — " ' 

"Senough I I was wrong." — Brook- 
lyn Eagle. 



John^ Chinaman's Birthdays. 
In China the child's first birthday 
Is made the occasion of great festivi- 
ties. It Is the custom to prepare great 
quantities of "mien," or noodles, and 
send it about to all the relatives and 
friends. After this first celebration, 



your: cigars. As my charge for a pre- ™" eefl ' n S birthdays are scarcely no- 
• L- ■ nn ii- i m need until the tenth.' Then another 

scnption is $2, this makes us eyen." gmt ■^ntlmxlBwL m a °° tner 




LAST FATALITY IN DISPUTE 



When Determined, Monument Will Be 
Erected on Spot Where Unfortu- 
nate Soldier Died. 

When was the last man killed In 
the war? This is the latest question 
asked by the French literary Journal, 
Renaissance. It promises to be taken 
up seriously by the allied nations, each 
of which has hitherto considered that 
the honor belonged to It The British 
declare that a few minutes before 
eleven o'clock on the morning of the 
armistice a colonel of machine gunners 
In- the British army received a stray 
outlet, but It Is doubtful whether this 
bullet came from a German sniper or 
from a party of moppers up. At any 
rate, the (British case is considered 
outclassed. Veterans' associations In 
allied countries are being asked to 
send In corroborated details o{ Inci- 
dents likely to aid In solving the prob- 
lem, which the Renaissance assures its 
readers is Just as important as Is the 
Identity of the first man killed In the 
war, the latter honor, of course, be- 
longing to the French soldier who 
crossed the German frontier without 
knowing war had been declared and 
was shot during an altercation ,wlth 
a German customs agent and a squad 
of German Infantry. Once the Iden- 
tity ot the last man killed In the war 
Is established, a monument will be 
raised to commemorate the fatality 
and the soldier who lost his life at 
the moment of victory. 



Fervid Admirer About Right When Ho 

Accords It First Place Among 

the Season's Dishes. 

. ^Most of us easily, and, let ns venture 
'to say, naturally,- call it "punkln" pie, 
but this— unintentionally, of course— is 
the malevolence of mispronunciation. 
There Is no punk In pumpkin. 

Pumpkin pie Is a delectable. Some, 
of the scientists, or perhaps, near-t 
scientists, say that fish is brain food. 
If they would eat a couple of quarters 
of pumpkin pie once a day for a week, 
they would know where gray matter 
really has its origin. 

The frost sometimes may be on the 
pumpkin, as the Hoosier poet tells us, 
but It Is never on the pumpkin pie. The 
only place where It meets with a freeze-, 
out Is In the restaurant where they at- 
tempt to make squash masquerade as 
pumpkin. We always have had a suspi- 
cion that some restaurant table spread- - 
era do not know what they are serving. 
We ran against proof of It the other 
day, when on ordering pumpkin pie 
we received a counterfeit slab . of. 
squash, and on remonstrating were 
told by the ungenlal personal pur- 
veyor that "squash and pumpkin Is the 
same thing." . 

It is the time of crisp days. Theb; 
seasonable companions in joy for the 
Jaded are pumpkin pie, country 
sausage and buckwheat cakes.- The 
pie, however, has the better of Its 
table comrades. With entire propriety I 
and with certainty of acclaim it" can 
appear thrice daily. Anyone who looks 
crosseyed at pie for breakfast is no 
judge either of the elegancies of life 
or of the esculents which, make life 
worth living. — Chicago Post 



Bolshevist Activities in the Various 
Countries Are Under Highly Sys- 
tematic Regulation. 

In the Deutsche Allgemeine Zeltung, 
one of the many publications controlled 
by Herr Stlnnes, an annotated map 
was published recently, . showing the 
organization 'of the Bolshevist propa- 
ganda throughout the various countries 
of Europe. 

According to this map, the entire 
organization la under a propaganda 
committee, composed of Zinovleff, 
Radek, Chicherin, Lunacharski, Lit- 
vlnoff, and Krassln. The working of 
this committee is subdivided into sec- 
tions, including an "official section," 
which" has charge of soviet diplomatic 
and commercial delegations abroad; a 
"press bureau," which controlB the 
numerous , wireless stations; and 
various "secret sections," the func- 
tions of which are not made entirely 
clear. 

The official section Is directed from 
Riga by Lltvlnoff. The Allgemeine 
Zeltung declares that Berlin Is the 
chief foreign center of Bolshevist! ac- 
tivity, and alleges that the Berlin mis-, 
slon supports the Rote Fahne (the 
Berlin Communists' organ). 

Next in Importance to Berlin Is 
Prague ; but Milan Is also an Important 
propagandist center. From this latter 
point the tentacles are spread through 
the Italian, Swiss, and . Jugo-Slav 
regions. According to the map (> Lon- 
don Is not an Independent -center, but 
Is handled from Paris,, to which city 
the! Moscow authorities devote special 
attention.— The Living Age. 



FEAT OF GIANT LOCOMOTIVE 



"MIRACLE" WAS BEYOND HER 



Sapphire With a History. 
The big sapphire on the top of the 
•toss on the state crown 'of the king 
of England once was believed to have 
th*"' power of curing rheumatism, sci- 
atica and various other diseases which 
afflicted men a thousand or so years 
ago. It is hot believed that this stone 
has lost any of the powers with wjiich 
it began life, perhaps a million years 
ago, but a large part of the British 
public seems to have lost faith in Its 
curative properties. This sapphire was 
once the setting of the coronation ring 
of Edward the Confessor, who was 
buried in Westminster abbey, and was 
taken out of his casket in the year 
1101, since which time It has been ene 
of the English crown jewels. To 
whom It belonged before It became 
the property of the pious Edward hls- 
toriana'do not tell.— Washington Star. 



Couldn't Spare Him. 

Janet's mother entered the nursery 
and, as she surveyed the child's collec- 
tion of dolls, sold : 

"Now, dear, you have had 'this sol- 
dier doll a long time and the poor, 
little girl next door Is HI and has nd 
doll at all. Don't you want to send 
her your soldier boy?" 

"No, mother," -said Janet, "I would 
rather send her any one but that. You 
see, that's the only man we have In 
the family, and he's married to all the 
ether dolls." 



j Our Plan. 

The young married couple had Just 
returned from a honeymoon and the 
wife went to ber next door neigh- 
bor. "Of course I'm horribly green," 
aba confessed, "and I want to learn. 
So you'll help me won't you, please? 
First, I want to know how to man- 
age our finances. Do you budget 
yours?" 

"Not yet," the older woman smiled. 
"We're not that far yet We still 
belong to the 'stretch If rank of 
families." 




Cop is Linguist.- 
! Lynn, Mass., has a policeman who 
has mastered seven different lan- 
guages in the last seven years. He Is 
Anthony Dychlus, a twenty-seven- 
year old Lithuanian, who came to 
America seven years ago. Since he 
has been here he served In the army 
and on the Lynn police force. He 
speaks Russian, Jewish, Polish, 
Czechoslovak, Serbian, English, and 
Lithuanian. -, 






Biggest In the World, It Pulls a Load 

of Approximately Sixteen 

Thousand Pounds. 

-Visualize, If you can, a freight train 
over a mile in length, the longest train 
that was ever hauled, carrying a load 
of coal approximating thirty-two mil- 
lion pounds, pulled over the Blue Ridge, 
and Alleghany mountains by the big- 
gest locomotive in the world, and you 
have a mental picture of the feat In 
heavy hauling that was accomplished 
recently on the Virginian railway, be- 
tween Princeton, W. Va., and Roanoke, 
Vo., In the presence of 85 prominent 
representatives of the leading railroads 
In this country, which Is described as 
Inaugurating a new era In' modern 
railroad development. 

These demonstrations represented 
tests and trials covering a range of a 
wide and exhaustive nature. It was 
shown that the operation of the loco- 
motive, consuming on an average six 
tons of con! per hour, was an easy 
matter with the duplex stoker, a 
mechanical device which takes the 
place of firemen. 

The following are details connected 
with the largest demonstration train: 
The locomotive and tender weighed-, 
449 tons and measured approximately 
125 feet In length. The train was com- 
posed of 100 cars, each of which 
weighed 40 tons and measured 51}4 
feet. The load carried by each car 
represented 120 tons of coal, making 
the total weight pulled by the engine 
approximately 10,000 tons or 32,000,000 
pounds., 



Easiest Way Out 

Recently the Woman had a friend 
visiting her from the South. She en- 
Joyed Immensely the friend's stories of 
Aunt Druscilla, a negro mammy of the 
"old school," and her daughter Sally. 
One of Aunt Druscllla's proudest days 
was when the first grandchild — a girl 
— was born. The friend, laden with 
some things]] for the mother and little 
pickaninny, went to see them. On ask- 
ing Aunt Druscilla what they Intended 
calling the Dew baby she was greatly 
amused by the answer: 

"Yo" see, Mis' Kate, I is bound It 
ehould be called after you and your 
sister. Mis' Rosalind. But then I says 
to Sally ' if we calls her Katie Mis' 
Rosalind will git mad, and if we says 
Rosalind you won't like It, 'so I jes' 
decided to name her Katie Rosalind 
and call her Gladys." — Chicago Jour- 
nal. 



That Fellow Feeling. 

"You admit you were speeding?" - 

"Yes, your honor." 

"A frank confession goes a long 
way In this court What excuse have 
you to. offer for exceeding the speed 
limit?" 

"A man in a little old rattletrap 
fllwer drove up behind me and 
bawled to me to get out of the way 
and let somebody use the street who 
could get more out of one cylinder 
than I could get out of six." 

'TJmph 1 I do a little motoring my- 
self. Til let you off with the minimum 
fine this time." — Birmingham Age- 
Herald. 



Whir Bang Goes Up. 
Because the people living at Whiz 
Bang, a boom town in the western 
Osage oil district, are squatters on 
Indian land, it is understood the fed- 
eral -government has Issued orders for 
the land to-be vacated. Titles cannot 
be given at Whiz Bang and persons 
living there pay rentals for the lots 
they occupy. It is said that Whiz Bang 
will be moved to Aperson.— The Okla- 
homan. 



Bales of Paper. ^ 

"Are the. people who use marks or 

rubles, saving any money?" 
"No. If they got together enough 

to amount to anything they couldn't 

afford to hire a warehouse for storage 

DurDOsea." 



. v. 



Unfortunate Italian Woman Threatened 
With Death by Her Supersti- 
tious Townspeople. 

Torello Rossi, a peasant of San 
Prospere, Tuscany, had been ill for 
some tune. As the 'cures given did 
not Improve his condition, the popula- 
tion decided that he was the victim of 
witchcraft After taking council to- 
gether, they decided that the witch 
must be discovered by the testa which 
have been in practice for ages, says a 
Rome dispatch. 

The family of Rossi were told to 
put his underllnen into a pot of boil- 
ing water, and then bent them with 
rods. This process would cause grave- 
physical pain to the witch, 'who would 
then call and cure the sufferer. This 
was done, and a few days later an old 
woman who had originally lived next 
door to Rossi appeared at the house. 
Her visit immediately condemned her 
In" the eyes of the populace as the 
witch and she was ordered to free 
her supposed victim from his illness. 

She promised -to do so, but said that' 
It was impossible unless she had the 
aid of three other women who were 
more .conversant with witchcraft than 
she was. But the three were not forth- 
coming, and the "miracle" was there- 
fore left, to the old woman, who tried 
everything she could thlnk-of to cure 
the sufferer, but without success. The 
crowd was finally aroused to such. an- 
ger that the unfortunate woman would 
probably have been drowned in the 
river but for the timely intervention 
of the carabineers. 



Old Knickers ?nd Golf Suit. 

The home folks were mystified the/ 
other day when Harold, who is attend^ 
ing an up-state university, wrote a 
letter to his sister,' Elsie, asking lier 
to dig into his old trunk up in the at- 
tic and send him the knickerbocker 
Norfolk suit he wore during his junior 
year In high school. Remembering 
with what Joyous abandon Harold 
stepped out of short punts into his 
first suit of long trousers, mother 
could not figure out why :he should 
want to backslide. 

, A postscript cleared up the ' mys- 
tery, says the New York Sun. 

"All the fellows are wearing golf 
suits on the campus," Harold wrote, 
"especially on Sutiirdnys and Sundays'. 
I know dad can't afford to stake me ' 
to ?65 worth of new clothes, so I'll try 
to bluff the thing through with my 
old high school knickers an.d about 
$2 worth of regulation golf stockings." 



Bobby's Comment .:,' 

A Franklin husband and wife were 
having a heated argument jover a 
member of a club to which 016* hus- 
band belonged. The husband, of 
course, was of the opinion that the 
member In question 'lyas not. guilty of 
the accusations made against him. 
The wife, bent on having- the last 
word, retorted sarcastically: 

"No, I don't suppose anyone In that 
club could do wrong." ' Three-year-old 
Bobby, who apparently had been In- 
tent on the contents of a bowl of oat- 
meal, stopped long enough to get In a 
word when there was a lull In the ar- 
gument. * 

With downcast eyes he murmured, 
"Poor fish." — Indianapolis News. 



Tours for Students; 
A committee of representative Hol- 
landers has just revived a work which 
was undertaken before the war in the 
effort to arrange aij exchange of in- 
ternational tours for students, botb 
male and female. The object of these 
journeys is, by making the acquain- 
tance of foreign countries and peoples, 
to widen the mental view and to open 
the eyes of those taking part to the. 
necessity for friendly relations among 
the civilized nations of the world.' It 
is proposed that similar committees 
In each of the countries engaging in 
the interchange shall receive the 
tourists and arrange for visits to 
places and Institutions that would b« 
of Interest and value. . 



Page Four 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1922 



Dairy, Cow Is Now, lAlways Has Been, Always Will 
Be, Mijonesbta's Most Reliable Mortgage Lifter 



The Fact That Thief River Falls Has One of the Very Best Conducted Creameries 
in the State^Gives Added Interest to Appended Article from Michigan Newspaper 



The following article, which appear- 
ed in the ast issue of the Dearborn 
Independer t with illustrations of some 
of .Minnesc ta's. splendid co-operative'' 
creameries proved intensely interest- 
ing to 'us and we believe it will be 
of interest to every business man and 
farmer of Pennington county. ;If it 
some of our Pennington 



scale, we will have ac- 
what we hoped for by re- 



this article in full. 



Here 



encourages 

county far ners to engage in dairying 

on a largt : 

complished 

producing 

it is: | 

For a good many years, Minnesota 
has called itself the "bread andj but- 
ter state." With an extensive grain 
industry, tjie ftate has produced for 



a considerable 
any other stati 

Every' ye 
butter than 



ble period more butter than 

in the Union, 
ar, Minnesota makes more 
all of Canada. It 



tributes af proximately a seventh of 



extending h 



output of creamery but- 
year a golden stream of 
s 'into the pockets of Min 
lers, who are engaged in 
very extensive portion 
bread. . In 1920, 
of the state turned out 
pounds of butter, yielding 
)f approximately $80,000, 

of which went into the 
the men who milked the 



the nation' 
ter. Each 
money flov, 
'nesota fan 
buttering 
of the coi ntry's 
creameries 
139,000,000 
a revenue 
000, most 
pockets of 
cows. 

Butter muking is almost a tradition- 
al enterprise in Minnesota. For yjars, 
it has been a highly developed art. 
Minnesota las won so many prize ; for 
butter mak ng that the winning of a 
prize has become a matter of course. 
Out of 18 
tween the sj 
creameries 



national competitions be- 
tates, 16 have gone to the 
af Minnesota. 
But Mini eosta soon must revise 
that title cf the "bread and butter 
state." Thei e will be mor e butter than 
bread on its map. Even now, the 
dairy cow represents the biggest in- 
dustry of the state, and yearly she is 



;r conquest more and more 



into the grain-farming ' sections | and 
into the cut-over lands of the north. 
The value >f dairy products in Min- 
nesota in 1920 was more than $200,- 
000,000, a'cc jrding to a recent compila- 
tion made by the State Dairy ' and 
Food Commission. That exceeds in 
value by a wide margin the output 
of the iron mines in this greatest of 
iron-producing states. It equals- the 
value of all: the products of the great 
Minneapolis' flour mills, manufactur- 
ed from wheat gathered over most of 
the Northwest and Canada. It 
ceeds by $33,500,000 the combined val- 
ue of the wheat, oats, corn, barley' and 
rye in Minnesota, according to : the 
state dnjry ! statisticians. 

Truly a humble churn of the Minne- 
sota farm has grown into a tremen- 
dous industry. 

In these days when farmers along 
with men ir a good many other lines 
are worryii g about reduced profits, 
certainly her e is a subject for con- 
sideration. How hag it been possible 
to develop '.his vast industry? Why 
is Minnesota the greatest butter-pro- 
ducing state ? Beneath the surface of 
these pretentious figures, there '.must 
be some reason, just as another ;and 
different set of circumstances made 
Wisconsin tie great cheese-producing 
center. 

So, with 
I went, over 



ed to know 
much butted 



these questions in mind, 
to see Chris. Heen, State 
Dairy and Flood commissioner. I want- 



why Minnesota makes so 
Surely in the develop- 



ment of th s tremendous industry, 
there would be a lesson for farmers 
in other states. And then I had an- 
other question to ask. I wanted to 
know how tie butter farmer is farm- 
ing these di ys of reduced prices. 

Mr. Heen motioned me to a chair, 
and I asked the last question first. 

"Take tht: dairy section of the 
state," he s;,id, indicating by a sweep 
of :his hand the great central portion, 
running dia ronally across the state 
from the southeast to the northwest. 
"See -how thick the dots are on this 
portion of t le map. These dots rep- 
resent j creameries. There are 830 
creameries i i the state. 

"N.ow') those dots measure the pros- 
perity: of Minnesota. . The dairy sec- 
tioniljj? £he richest part of the state. 
In pther sections that have depended 
chiefly on g: -am, periods of depression 
are bound to occur. But this great 
central 'portion of the state finds a 
golden strea n of money coming in j for 
its 'cream the year around, regardless 
of financial depression or crop fail- 
ures. The cow keeps on giving milk 
despite hard times. j 

"Right now, farmers in sections that 
have depended wholly on grain farm- 
ing are almost bankrupt. This is 
shown by a study of the bank de- 
posits. Farmers actually can't/bor- 
row money : n most of the grain sec- 
tions, while the dairy farmers afe as 
^prosperous es ever. j 

"In anotht r state not far from Min- 
nesota when weather conditions thru- 
put the season were the same, there 
were 304 m( rtgage delinquencies list- 



ed as coihpared with 32 in Minnesota. ; course, to the fact that not a pound 



Of the 304 listed in the other state, 
but one 'was a dairy farmer. 1 

A. J. JMcGuire, dairy specialist of 
the Minnesota College of Agriculture, 
offered this bit of testimony: 

"The farmers in the grain-farming 
sections; are in a 'serious condition, 
while the dairy sections do not show 
hard times. In both town and country: 
in those sections where farmers are 
engaged: in the dairy industry, the 
people are prosperous." 

But to return to Mr. Heen; 

•"The advantage of the dairy indus- 
try is shown in the increasing num- 
ber of men who are giving up grain 
farming: for the cow. You know, £ 
good many farmers have been dispos- 
ed to scorn the cow because they 
didn't like to milk. But the attitude 
is changing. The farmers are find- 
ing that it is better to milk cows for 
real money than spend all their time 
on grain for smaller returns. 

"Dairying got its big start in Min- 
nesota ; back in the early nineties, 
Wheat farming had decreased the fer^ 
tility of the soil, and the farmers had 
to adopt diversified farming. The 
dairy cow came to the rescue. She 
could eat the roughness and convert 
it into money. Minnesota had but 
556,000 cows then. The average re- 
turn was only -100 pounds of butter 
fat per cow. Now Minnesota has 1,- 
395,000 cows, according to our figures 
and each, cow produces an average of 
166 pounds of butter fat a year. 

"The gross returns to the state from 
its cows in 1890 was but $8,700,000. 
Now dairy products exceed $200,000,- 
000 in value every year. Since 1910; 
the production of butter in Minnesota 
had increased from 95,000,000 pounds 
to 139,000,000 pounds in 1920. The 
average ;creamery paid out to its pa- 
trons 528,000 in 1910. "In 1920, the 
amount had jumr.ed to more than 
$108,000. 

"That's hew fast- LI:? cow has been 
coming into her own in Minnesota. 
More and more the farmers are go- 
ing into : dairying.- Patrons of the 
Minnesota creameries in 1920 totaled 
more than 125.000. Dairying is sweep- 
ing the ; state, and iirdoubtedly the 
output of creamery butter will bi 
doubled in a few years. With the in 
dustry firmly .established in South- 
ern and central- Minnesota, the butter 
line is pushing rapidly northward. 
Even up 1 in the Red River Valley, 
where the farmers have always been 
devoted to wheat raising, dairying is 
gaining a foothold. 

"Settlers in the cut-over counties 
in the north, who have fought hard 
to gain -a foothold by other means, 
are turning to the cow. Possibilities 
for dairying in Northern Minnesota 
are almost limitless. There are mil 
lions of : acres of land bearing good 
summer range for stock. Tame grass 
are bountiful, and clover grows almost 
like a weed. As the clearing and set- 
tlement proceeds northward, the dairy 
cow is following. Eventually, this wil' 
be one of the great dairy strongholds.'' 

Mr. Heen stopped for a moment, 
and that- gave me an opportunity tt, 
ask him : another question — why Min;-.' 
nesota makes so much butter ? 

"The state has great natural re 
sources such as grass and clover," he 
said. "The climate,. too, is favorable. 
But the chief factor in this unusual 
development, I should say, is the co- 
operative creamery. The co-operative 
creamery has made dairying profit- 
able in Minnesota. In Wisconsin it 
was the :cheese factory. But Minne- 
sota pinned its hope on . butter, and 
the co-operative creamery has made 
possible its great progress. 

"Of -the 830 creameries in the state, 
642 are co-operative. That shows ex- 
tensively: the co-operative movement 
has grown among the dairy farmers. 
These co-operative creameries in 1920 
made 91,000,000 pounds of butter, or 
approximately two-thirds of all the 
butter made in Minnesota. No other 
state can compare with this record. 
Only half of Wisconsin's creameries 
aer co-operative. Iowa has 'but 218. 

"But here is the significant thing 
about these Minnesota co-operative 
creameries. The co-operative cream- 
ery-returns to the producing farmer 
91.3 per j cent of all the money re- 
ceived for butter. The independent 
creamery, returns but 89.3 per cent, 
and the centralizers but 86.4 per cent. 

In addition, the co-operative cream- 
eries keep up the general price le^'cl. 
saving the farmers thousands of dol- 
lars. The dairy commissioner of Mon- 
tana told | me the other day that farm- 
ers in that state received as low as 12 
cents a pound for butter fat last sum- 
mer. Montana, has but ™:o co-opera- 
tive creamery. While farmers were 
getting but 12 cents for butter fat in 
montana,' Minnesota fanners, backed 
up by the bulwark of their 640 co- 
operative; creameries, were getting 40 
cents a pound or more. The average 
price paiii the farmer fn- butter fat 
by the Minnesota creame-ies in 1920 
was 63.3 jcents a pound. The average 
price received for butter by the cream- j 
eries was 57.1 cents a popnd, the ap 
parent discrepancy being due, of 



of butter fat is required for a pound 
of butter. 

"The co-operative creameries make 
the best butter. They take every pre- 
caution to improve their products, and 
have a high reputation on the mar- 
kets. In fact, on the eastern markets, 
butter made by * the. Minnesota co- 
operative creamerregicommands from 
one-fourth to onelaiS; one-half cents 
a pound premiumfabove that made 
by other creamer^l?' 7 

Mr. McGuire likewise had eloquent 
testimony- of the results obtained thru 
the co-operative creamery. 

"During the last four years, the 



co-operative creamery paid on an av- 
erage of seyen cents a pound more 
for butter fat than the cream sta- 
tion of th e centralizers," he said. 
"That means that every year these 
farmers have saved enough through 
their creamery to more than build 
and equip their plants anew. It means 
a saving of $15 a cow, which amounts 
to an enormous sum for the state as 
a whole. 

"The co-operative creamery has 
made the dairy industry profitable in 
Minnesota. It has created an incent- 
ive for the industry. More than that, 
it has developed a community spirit. 
Business men and storekeepers, every- 
body in the dairy community, is back 
of the creamery operated by the 
farmers. Many towns are built and 
maintained largely by the dairy in- 
dustry." 

To see the wealth accruing to the 
farmers in the iutter-making busi- 
ness, one needs lut ' take a trip thru 
the co-operative Igreameries. Expens- 
ive buildings hoyge plants with .the 
most modern equipment. InVmany 
Minnesota towns,. "the. co-opjerative 



creamery is i the most pretentious 
building to be seen. 

Pelican Rapids, not long ago, com- 
pleated the erection of a creamery 
costing $125,000. ' Fergus Falls farm- 
ers put up another creamery, costing 
$100,000, with marble floors and the 
most modern equipment that science 
could provide. Creameries costing 
$30,000 and $40,000 are common. 

Just now, the co-operative cream- 
eries are uniting in the formation of 
a state-wide central agency that will 
help the farmers improve and market 
their butter more effectively. Mr." Mc- 
Guire, on leave of absence from the 
university, is aiding in the formation 
of this organjzation. Already 200 
creameries hav e enlisted in the or- 
ganization. Consignments are to be 
pooled to give the creameries" the ad- 
vantage of car lot shipments, agencies 
are to b e established on the eastern 
market, and steps are to be taken to 
advertise Minnesota co-operative but- 
ter. T 

The dairy industry is decidedly a 
growing business in Minnesota-and its 
neighboring states. According to the 
1920 census, Minnesota gained 447,- 



070 cows, an increase of 41.1 per cent, 
in 10 years. 'This would give Minne- 
sota 1,532,458 dairy cows. Of the 
3,103,989, gain in dairy cows in the 
United States in the last 10 years, 
Minnesota and Wisconsin absorbed a 
gain of 1,153,382 cows, or 37 per cent 
of the gain for the whole United 
States. No. other section of the coun- 
try can match the growth of {he dairy 
industry in these and a few adjoin- 
ing states. 

Minnesota's nearest rivals in butter 
production are Wisconsin and Iowa. 
Compared to Minnesota's total of 
about 140,000,000 pounds, Wisconsin 
produces about 95,000,000 pounds and 
Iowa about 85,000,000 pounds. Both- 
New York ■" and Wisconsin exceed - 
Minnesota in total . volume of dairy 
products. With a great city at their 
doors. New York farmers- sell "most 
of their, dairy product as milk. Wis- 
consin already had developed a great 
cheese industry when the Minnesota 
daily industry began to expand be- 
yond local demands. So, early Minne- 
sota pioneers pinned their hopes on 
butter. And butter has done well by 
Minnesota. ! 



=*= 



\ 



$10,000.00 

for High Grade Cotvs 



TpHE past few years has demonstrated that cows, 
i :-, A corn ; and clover will bring prosperity to this 
community. 



t : Thefe 
iiig than oJLrs. 
and potatoes. 



is no better land in the world for dairy- 
The'soil is perfect for clover,' corn 



\ 



The Directors of this Bank today reserved $10,000,00 for 
loans to farmers at 6 per cent for the purchase of Dairy 
Cows/ This, then, stands for the development of the dairy 
interests of Pennington County through all farmers who 
are willing to milk cows and who have the necessary feed 
and shelter. 



The best dairy cattle can now be purchased at 
at low prices and. will be supplied to farmers at 
actual cost. i 



-' Call at the Bank to register your wants, as a 
committee will soon be chosen^ to visit different 
sections and to buy the cattle. 



V 



First and Peoples State Bank 



MATH BARZEN 
PERL W. MABEY 
HALVOR A. LOKEN 
O. D. OSTBY 



=DIRECTORSt= 

. ■ F. J. STEBBINS 

i ■ 

R. M. SHELDON 
A. M. SHELDON 
HANS ANTON 



/ ' A. G. LOFTNES 

BEENHARD KNUDSEN 
H. S. DAHLEN 
CARL B. LARSON 



•M' 



Page Four 



V 



1^ 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1922 



Dairy Cow Is Now, Always Has Been, Always Will 
Be, Minnesota's Most Reliable Mortgage Lifter 



The Fact That Thief River Falls, Has One of the Very Best Conducted Creameries 
in the State Gives Added Interest to Appended Article from Michigan Newspaper 



The following article, which appear- 
ed in the last issue of the Dearborn 
-"Independent with illustrations of some 
of Minnescta's splendid co-operative 
creameries proved intensely interest 
ing-to.us and we believe it will be 
of interest to every business man and 
farmer of Pennington county. If it 
encourages some of our Pennington 
county farmers to engage in dairying 
on a larger scale, we will have ac- 
complished what we hoped for by re- 
producing, this article in full. Here 
it is: | 

For a good many years, Minnesota 
has called |itself the "bread and] but 
ter state." With an extensive grain 
industry, the rtatc has produced for 
a considerable period mor e butter than 
any other state in the Union. 

Every year, Minnesota makes more 
butter than all of Canada. It; con 
tributes approximately a seventh of 
the nation's output of creamery but- 
ter. Each : year a golden stream of 
money flows into the pockets of Min- 
; ne^ota farmers, who are engaged in 
buttering ; a very extensive portion 
of the country's bread. . In 1920, 
creameries j of ,the state turned out 
139,000,000! pounds df butter, yielding 
a revenue 'of approximately $80,000,- 
000, most' of which went into the 
pockets of the men who milked the 
cows. ] ' , 

Gutter making is almost a tradition- 
al enterprise in Minnesota. For years, 
it has been a highly developed art. 
Minnesota ijias won so many prizes for 
butter making that the winning of a 
prize has become a matter of course. 
Out of 18 national competitions be- 
tween the states, 16 have gone to the 
creameries of Minnesota. 

But Minneosta soon must revise 
that title of the "bread and butter 
state." There will be more butter than 
bread on its map. Even now,' the 
dairy cow represents the biggest in- 
dustry of the state, and yearly she is 
extending, her conquest more and more 
into the fgrain-f arming sections j and 
into the cut-over lands of the north. 
The value of dairy products' in Min- 
nesota in 1920 was more than $200,- 
000,000, according to a recent compila- 
tion made by the State Dairy and 
Food Commission. That exceeds in 
value by a wide margin the output 
of the iron mines in this greatest of 
iron-producing states. It equals, the 
value of all the products of the great 
Minneapolis 1 flour mills, manufactur- 
ed from wheat gathered over most of 
the. Northwest and Canada. It ex- 
ceeds by *::{). 500,000 the combined val- 
ue of the wheat, oats, cc.n, ; bar!ey and 
rye in Minnesota, accenting to the 
stale dairy ftatiKtician^. 

Truly a b,uinb!i> chi-rn of t':e Minne- 
sota ;farm jias grown into a tremen- 
dous industry. 

In these jdays when farmers along 
with men in a good many other lines 
are worrying about reduced profits, 
certainly hjre is a subject for con- 
sideration. How has it been possible 
to develop this vast industry? Why 
is Minnesota the greatest butter-pro- 
ducing state? Beneath the surface -of 
these pretentious figures, there must 
be some reason, just as another and 
different set - of circumstances made 
Wisconsin the great cheese-producing 
center. 

' So, with these questions in mind, 
I went over to see Chris. Heen, State 
Dairy and Food commissioner. I want- 
ed to know why Minnesota makes so 
much butter. Surely in the develop- 
ment of this tremendous industry, 
there would be a lesson for farmers 
in other states. And then I had an- 
other question to ask. I wanted to 
know how "the butter farmer is farm- 
ing these days of reduced prices.' 

Mr. Heen motioned me to a chair, 
and I asked the last question first. 

"Take the dairy section .of '■ the 
state," he said,- indicating by a sweep 
of his hand the great central portion, 
running diagonally across the state 
from the southeast to the northwest. 
"See how thick the dots are onjtjxis 
portion of the map. These dots rep- 
resent icreameries. There are i 830 
creameries in the state. i 

"Now, those dots measure the pros- 
perity of Minnesota. The dairy ; sec- 
tionals the richest part of the state. 
In other sections that have depended 
chiefly on grain, periods of depression 
are bound to occur. But this great 
central portion of the state finds a 
golden stream of money coming in for 
its' cream the year around, regardless 
of' ; financial depression or crop fail- 
ures. The jcow keeps on giving milk 
despite hard times. 

"Right now, farmers in sections'thab 
have depended wholly on grain farm- 
ing are almost bankrupt. This is 
shown by a study of the bank de- 
posits. Farmers actually can't bor- 
row money in most of the grain: sec- 
tions, while the dairy farmers are as 
prosperous as ever. 

"In another state not far from Min- 
nesota where weather conditions thru- 
out the season were the same, there 
were 304 mortgage delinquencies list- 
ed as compared with 32 in Minnesota. 



Of the 304 listed in the other state, 
but onejwasa dairy farmer." 

A. J.; McGuire, dairy specialist of 
the Minnesota College of Agriculture, 
.offered this bit of testimony: 

"The farmers in the grain-farming 
sections are in a serious condition, 
while the dairy sections do not show 
hard times. In both town and country, 
in those sections where farmers are 
engaged in !the dairy industry, the 
people are prosperous." 

But to return to Mr. Heen; 

"The advantage of the dairy indus- 
try is shown in the Increasing num- 
ber of men who are giving up grain 
farming for the cow. You know, a 
good many, farmers have been dispos- 
ed to scorn the cow because they 
didn't like to milk. But the attitude 
is changing. The farmers are find- 
ing that it is better to milk cows for 
real money than spend all their time 
on grain for smaller returns. 

"Dairying got its big start in Min- 
nesota : back in the early nineties. 
Wheat farming had decreased the fer- 
tility of | the soil, and the farmers had. 
to adopt diversified farming. The' 
dairy cow came to the rescue. She 
could eat the roughness and convert 
it into money. Minnesota had but 
556,000 cows then. The average re 
turn was only 100 pounds of butter 
fat per cow. Now Minnesota has 1, 
395,000 cows, according to our figures 
and each cow produces an average of 
166 pounds of butter fat a year. 

"The gross returns to the state from 
its cows in 1890 was but §8,700,000, 
Now dairy products exceed $200,000,- 
000 in value every year. Since 1910, 
the. production of butter in Minnesota 
had increased from 95,000,000 pounds 
to 139,000,000 pounds in 1920. The 
average creamery paid out to its pa- 
trons $28,000 in 1910. In 1920, the 
amount had jumped to more than 
$108,0001 

'That's hew fast L!.e cow has been 
coming into her own in Minnesota. 
More and more the farmers are go- 
ing into dairying. Patrons of the 
Minnesota creamerie- in 1920 totaled 
more than 125.000. Dairying is sweep- 
ing the; state, and urdoubtedly the 
output of creamery better will be 
doubled in a. few years.! With the in- 
dustry firmly established in South- 
ern and icentral Minnesota, the butter 
line is pushing rapidly northward. 
Even up in the Red River Valley, 
where the farmers 'have always been 
devoted to wheat raising, dairying is 
gaining a foothold. 

"Settlers in the cut-over counties 
in the north, who have fought hard 
to gain ■ a foothold by other means, 
are turning to the cow. Possibilities 
for dairying in .Northern Minnesota 
are almost limitless^ There are mil 
lions of. acres of land bearing good 
summer ; range for stock. Tame grass 
are bountiful, and clover grows almost 
like a weed. As the clearing and set- 
tlement proceeds northward, the dairy 
cow is following. Eventually, this wU 
be one of the great dairy strongholds. 1 

Mr. Heen stopped for a moment, 
and that gave me an opportunity ti. 
ask him; another question — why; Min- 
nesota makes so much butter? 

"The state has great natural re- 
sources such as grass and clover," he 
said^ "The climate, too, is favorable. 
But the! chief factor in this unusual 
development, I should say, is the co- 
operative creamery. The co-operative 
creamery has made dairying profit- 
able in Minnesota. In Wisconsin it 
was the: cheese factory. But Minne- 
sota pinned its hope on butter, and 
the co-operative creamery has made 
possible jits great progress. 
■ "Of tlie 830 creameries in the state, 
642 are co-operative. That shows ex- 
tensively the co-operative movement 
has grown among the dairy farmers. 
These co-operative creameries in 1920 
made 91,000,000 pounds of butter, or 
approximately two-thirds of - all the 
butter made in Minnesota. No other 
state can compare with this record. 
Only half of Wisconsin's creameries 
aer co-operative. Iowa has but 218. 

"But here is the significant thing 
about these Minnesota co-operative 
creameries. The co-operative cream- 
ery returns to the producing farmer 
91.3 per, cent of all the money re- 
ceived for butter. The independent 
creamery returns but 89.3 per cent, 
and the centralizers but 86.4 per cent. 
"In addition, the co-operative cream- 
eries keep up the general price le r 'cl. 
saving the farmers thousands of dol- 
lars. The dairy commissioner of Mon- 
tana told me the other day that farm- 
ers in that state received as low as 12 
cents a pound for butter fat last sum- 
mer. Montana has but m:« co-opera* 
tive creamery. While farmers were 
getting but 12 cents for butter fat in 
montana, Minnesota fanners, backed 
up by the bulwark of. their 640 co- 
operative creameries, were getting 40 
cents a pound or more. The average 
price paid the farmer fn* butter fat 
by the Minnesota creameries in 1920 
was €3.3 cents a pound. The average 
price received for butter by the cream- 1 
■eries was 57.1 cents a pound, the ap- 
parent discrepancy being due, of 
[ course, to the fact that not a pound 



of butter fat is required for a pound 
of butter. 

"The co-operative creameries make 
the best butter. They take every pre- 
caution to improve their products, and 
have a high reputation on the mar- 
kets. In fact, on the eastern markets, 
butter made by _ the Minnesota co- 
operative creameries, commands from 
one-fourth to one and one-half cents 
a pound premium above that made 
by other creameries." 

Mr. McGuire likewise had eloquent 
testimony of the results obtained thru 
the co-operative creamery. 
• "During the last four years, the 



co-operative creamery paid on an av- 
erage of seven cents a pound more 
for butter fat than the cream sta- 
tion of th e centralizers," he said. 
"That means that every year these 
farmers have saved enough through 
their creamery to more than build 
and equip their plants anew. It means 
a saving of $15 a cow, which amounts- 
to an enormous sum for the state as 
a whole. 

"The co-operative creamery has 
made the dairy industry profitable in 
Minnesota. It has created an incent- 
ive for the industry. More than that, 
it has developed a community spirit. 
Business men and storekeepers, every- 
body in the dairy community, is back 
of the creamery operated by the 
farmers. Many towns are built and 
maintained largely by the dairy in- 
dustry." 

■ To see the wealth accruing to the 
farmers in the butter-making busi- 
ness, one needs but take a trip thru 
the co-operative creameries. Expens- 
ive buildings house plants with the 
most modern equipment. In many 
Minnesota towns, the co-operative 



creamery is the most pretentious 
building to be seen. 

Pelican Rapids, not long ago, com- 
pleated the erection of a creamery 
costing $125,000. Fergus Falls farm- 
ers put up another creamery, costing 
$100,000, with marble floors and the 
most modern equipment that science 
could provide. Creameries costing 
$30,000 and $40,000 are common. 

Just now, the co-operative cream- 
eries are uniting in the formation of 
a state-wide central agency that will 
help the farmers improve" and market 
their butter more effectively.. Mr. Mc- 
Guire, on leave of -absence from the 
University, is aiding in the formation 
of this organization. Already 200 
creameries hav e enlisted in the or- 
ganization. Consignments are to be 
pooled to give the creameries the ad- 
vantage of car lot shipments, agencies, 
are to b e established on the eastern 
market, and steps are to be taken to 
advertise Minnesota co-operative but- 
ter. 

The dairy industry is decidedly a 
growing business in Minnesota and its 
neighboring states. According to the 
1920 census; Minnesota gained 447,- 



070 cows, an increase of 41.1 per cent, 
in 10 years. This would give Minne- 
sota 1,532,458 dairy cows. Of the 
3,103,9S9 gain in dairy cows in the 
United States in the last 10 ' years, 
Minnesota and Wisconsin absorbed a 
gain of 1,153,382 cows, or ! 37 per cent 
of the gain for the whole United 
States. No other section of the coun- 
try can match the growth of the % dairy 
industry in these and a few adjoin- 
ing states. 

Minnesota's nearest rivals' in butter 
production are Wisconsin and Iowa. 
Compared to Minnesota's total of. 
about 140,000,000 pounds, Wisconsin 
produces about 95,000,000 pounds and 
Iowa about 85,000,000 pounds.! Both 
New York and . Wisconsin exceed 
Minnesota in total volume of dairy" 
products. With a great 'city at their 
doors.\New York farmers sell most 
of their (fairy product as milk. Wis- 
consin abready had developed a great 
cbeese Industry when the Minnesota 
dairy industry began to expand be- 
yond local demands. So, early Minne- 
sota pioneers pinned their hopes on 
butter. And butter has done well by 
Minnesota. 



$10,000.00 

for\ High Grade Co bus 



r 

'TTHE past few years has demonstrated that cows, 
A corn and clover will bring prosperity to this 
community. > 

There is no better land in the world for dairy- 
ing than ours. The soil is perfect for clover, corn 
and potatoes. ' 



The Directors of this Bank today reserved $10,000,00 for 
loans to farmers at 6 per cent for the purchase of Dairy 
Cows. 'This, then, stands for the development of the dairy 
interests' of Pennington County through all farmers who 
are willing to milk cows and who have the necessary feed 
and shelter. 



The best dairy cattle can now be purchased at 
at low prices and will be supplied to ! farmers: ■ 'at 
actual cost. 



Call at the Bank to register your wants, as a 
committee will soon be chosen to visit different 
sections and to buy the cattle. . v 



First ind Peoples State Bank 



=DIRECTORS:= 



U 



MATH BARZEN 
PERLW. MABEY' . 
HALVOE A. LOKEN 
o. d: OSTBY 



F. J. STEBB.INS 
R. M. SHELDON 
A. M. SHELDON 
HANS ANTON 



A. G. LOFTNES 
BERNHARD KNUDSEN 
H. S 1 . DAHLEN 
CARL B. LARSON 



■ ! 


i 
i 








1 INTFNTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 




1 1 ':!■'■ . • 



v^ 



<s 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1922 



fl'l, rrJvTtJrrm-iiM, r~ii JgSxaOJUGMX 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRffiUNE 



B- 
\ 



Sons of Norway- 
Basket Social 



E. P. Burstad Installed 'as 

Preside it of Lodge, Sue-' 

ceeding Knudson 



Andrew Klovstnd, labor..... 2.25 
Postage ..>... 1 1.42 



23.87 



Total i ?2,102.78 

Balance In Treasury 721.52 



ttotal 



$2,884.30 



H. S. Dahlen Made President 

of Building Association i 

For Coming Year 



Tailendef Team 
Defeats Leaders 



E. P. Burst id was installed as presi- 
dent of Snorre Lodge No. 70, Sons 
of Norway last evening, and other of- 
ficers as previously announced in the 
Tribune were duly installed. Three 
new members, Isaac Halseth, Paul 
Halseth and Aug. N. K. Anderson, 
were made members of the order, [in 
accordance with a motion made the 
lodge will hold a social session at the 
next regular ^eeting, Thursday, Jan- 
uary 26, when a basket social willijbe 
held. -The ladies of the city are in- 
vited to bring baskets at that time 
and the public is invited to attend the 
social session^ which will be followed 
by dancing and card playing. 

Following the installation last eve- 
ning, a light lunch was served after 
which the lodge members played cards) 

tin a late hour, a business meeting Percentage Column Shows 

of the Sons of Norway Building as-! ° 

sociation was^ held and H. S. Dahlen 

was elected president for the ensuin; 

year. The statement of the condition 

of the association was made, as fol 

lows:. 



STATEMENT OF ASSETS, LIABILITIES 

Assets. 

Cash' on Hand 5721.52 

Lots 1, 2, 3;.4, Block 11, Alee- : 

'i ban's Addition .....2,000.00 ! 



.; Total ; ABseta 
Liabilities :.......: 



$2,721.52 
None 



THIS IS! TO CERTIFY, .That we have 
this day ' audited the accounts of L. H. 
Larson, Treasurer, for the year ending 
December 31, 1021, and found same correct 
as per statement above. 
.Dated January 7, 1922. 

: H. S. DAHLEN, 
: JORGEN EIDE, 

BERNHARD KNUDSEN, 
! T. J. REIERSON, 

j e; k. aasen, 

! EDWARD H. NESS, 

; C. C. GULRTJD, 

! Board of Directors. 



For Stragglers to Defeat 

High[ Team at Bowling 

Seems Customary 



- DIRECTORY OF OFFICERS 

BERNHARD KNUDSEN President 

EDWARD H. NESS Vice President 

T. J. REIERSON Secretary 

L.. H. LARSON Treasurer 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Bernhard Knudsen E. K. Aasen 
H. S. Dahlen C. C. Gulrud 

Jorgen Elde O. O. Nesja 

Edward H. Ness T. J. Reierson . 

L. H. Larson 

TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT 

.TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS: ' 

Sons of Norway Building Corporation, 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 
I herewith submit to you statement of 
the receipts and expenditures of the SonB 
of Norway Building Corporation, from 
• •March 28, 1921,. the date of organization, 
to December 31, 1921, a description of each 
item as received and disbursed, and 
statement of the finances of the Corpora- 
tion, Including all debts and the assets to 
discbarge the same. 

L. H. LARSON, 
Dated, January 7, 1922. Treasurer. 



Small Margin Separat- 
ing Various Clubs 



RECEIPTS , Stock 
j Subscription. 

K....I .' 550.00 

25.00 



Aasen, 
Aaseby, I. K 

Aga, Stewart 25.00 

Anderson, T. P 25.00 

Attderson, N. J 25.00 . 

■^Anderson, Oscar ...'.! 25.00 

Alidalid, T. J 25.00 

Bncke, Lars ... 25.00 

Burringrud, A. O.. 25.00 

Burstnd, E. P ; 25.00 

Bensen, S, ; 25.00 

Bennes, E. M. . . I . . 25.00 

Bundy, John T;.-; 25:00 

Bnkke, D. B...1 • 25.00 

Borry, J \ 25.00 

Chommie, H. OJ 50.00 

Christofferson, Carl 25.00 

Clausen, Jens .J 25.00 

Dablen, H. S...I '.... 50.00 

Dahl,- K. E I 25.00 

.Dahl, Erllng ..! 25.00 

Elde, Jorgen ..J 50.00 



Ehgelstad, Peter 
Evinson, M. V. 
Eyde, Henry . . 
Flattum, Ole .. 
Flattnm, ' Alfred 

Gulrud, C. C 

Gulrud, Carl .. 



25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
Gulllngsrud, John 25.00 



It seems to be customary for the 
tailenders to wallop the leaders. The 
Invincibles; were trimmed three 
straight by the Giants and the High- 
rollers lost ty?o out of three to the 
Hawks. The race is so close a team 
can go from first to last place in one 
nights rolling. The Cub-Tiger game 
was postponed until January 20 on 
account of the illness of Capt. Ben 
Erickson and the absence of several 
members, who are out of town. 

The standing of the clubs at the 
close ; of this week's booking is as 
follows: j 

Ply'd W'n Ls't Pc't 

Highrollers 27 

Tigers '. 24 

Invincibles ....27 

Cubs' [ .24 

Hawks :_ 27 

Giants 24 

NOTES 

Don Gamble was high- man for the 
Giants with 492 for an average of 
164, Ralph ■ Sheldon was second with 
451. The Giants have won five out 
of siv, starts in the last two weeks 
Some of the invincibles had a night 
off. Jens Erickson and Mosteau had 
creditable averages of 163 and 161. 



17 


10 


629 


15 


9 


625 


17 


10 


629 


14 


10 


583 


15 


12 


555 


13 


11 


542 



will have an opportunity in getting 
practical experience with latest and 
most modern machinery. 

The course will be devoted entirely 
to instruction in creamery work, and 
will include cream grading, pasteur- 
ization and ripening; use of starters 
in producing desired flavors; proper 
methods of making butter in order to 
control its composition with reference 
to moisture, fat, and salt; proper 
treatment and preparation of butter 
containers to eliminate mold and pre- 
vent shrinkage; and the importance 
and relation of accuracy in weights 
and tests to the success of creameries. 
The demand for well trained men in 
creamery work is greater than the 
supply according to Professor Keith 
ley. } 

Following the close of the present 
course the cheese plant operators' 
short course, which begins Feb. 13, 
and ends March 11, will be given. 

GIRLS' CLUB MEETING 



Interesting Program is Rendered at 
J. M. Bishop Home 

■ ■ ! - ' 

The Girls' Community club gave a 
delightful affair Wednesday evening 
at the home of Mrs. J. M. Bishop, 
when she invited them to make use 
of it for their first meeting of the new 
year. .'The regular business session 
was held which' was followed by a 
musical program, the first number be- 
ing a violin duet by Henry Arneson 
and Leih Anderson, with piano ac- 
companiment by Miss Eileen Arneson. 
A group of songs were then sung by 
Mrs. Irma Mallory Fisher and S. Carl 
Sundahl, which were greatly appreci- 
ated. Supt. I. T. Simley then address- 
ed the club and his subject was "Pal- 
estine", which proved to be most in- 
teresting and instructive. A book of 
verses entitled, "Songs From The s Sil- 
ence" by John Francis Glynn, a form- 
er inmate of the state prison at Still- 
water, were introduced by Mrs. Bishop 
and several of the touching verses 
were read. A social hour of dancing 



and music followed and a committee 
on refreshments served a light lunch 
before the guests departed. 

ROSEMOUNT COMMUNITY CLUB 

How Housekeepers Made Notable Pro- 
gress 

Rosemount community in Dakota 
county, Minn., has offered a particular- 
ly interesting example of success in 
securing community co'-operation thru 
home demonstration work. About a 
year ago the home • demonstration 
agent for the county showed a small 
group of 10 housekeepers in the com- 
munity how to make a dress form. 
This interested them in clothing work, 
and a series of clothing meetings was 
held giving the women attending much 
practical help in providing for the 
needs of their families through its 
useful teachings. A permanent com- 
munity club was started after the in- 
troduction of the dress form, which 
took charge of the hom e demonstra- 
tion activities in. clothing work. ' ' 

At the> same time- Rosemount had 
become concerned over the problem of 
underweight children to the extent of 
purchasing scales and asking for a 
community .project under the state 



"minium,, , ,,,,,, 

•?2© tax now 

LUDEH'S 

menthol 
cougk drops 

OJ straight 

GIVE QUICK RELIEF 

1=3 • Sold ri, w„IJ , r „' 

»VAWA\|WAV.V.V.V.V. 



nutrition specialist, and demdnstra- 
tional .instruction was given in such 
topics as "Why the body needs food," 
"What kind bf food," "Food and the 
child," and "Special adult cgpditions." 
The Rosemount Community club, 
which has a membership of 52, 20 vil- 
lage women and 32 farm women, has 
accomplished within the year between 
December 1, i920, and December 1, 
1921, the following community im- 
provements; the. establishment ef a 
rest room and traveling library; the 



Page Five 

purchase of a standard scale; the reg-: 
ular physical examination of 47 chil- 
dren; a project in nutrition; a food 
preparation project; a clothing demon- 
stration; the .building of a band stand; 
many social and "get-together" en- 
tertainments. A splendid spirit of co-: 
operation has been developed in the 
town, all growing out of the original 
efforts of the home demonstration 
agent of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and the State 
agricultural college^ 




prxe 



(AS WELL AS COWS, CORN AND, CLOVER) 
when well housed, fed and cared for will net a 
greater profit than cows, this ha§ been demon- 
strated in Pennington 1 County, an accurately kept 
record to prove it. 

Get started with stock that has proven them- 
selves excellent layers— not only that, but they 
have won firsts at northwest's leading shows. 

We are selling cockerels from 230-264 egg 
line very reasonable. Would like to have your 
order for DAY OLD CHIX or HATCHING EGGS. 

Our breeders will all pass th« Hogan Test before being placed 
in our pens. DON'T WAIT, PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW and 
avoid disappointment later. Prices right and satisfaction guaranteed 

ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO 

SUNNYSIDE 
POULTRY YARDS 

C. C SCHUSTER & SON, S. C. W. Leghorn Breeders 
622 St. Paul Ave. Thiel River Falls, Minnesota 



Si Simonson has joined the Hawks 
and rolled for his first night 450 pins 
an average bf 150, a good showing for 
no practice^ this season. Hold and 
Stebbins were high with 496 and 477. 



The Highrollers were high total pins 
for the week with 2365. Carl Olson 
leading his' teammates with 536 for 
a 175 average. 



Grolid, 
HobUii, 



s. o: 

Peter . 



25.00 
25.00 



Halvorson, Christ 25.00 

Helgelsnd, E.. LJ 25.00 

Haavland, Andrew .t 25.00 

Heckne, Hans ..' 25.00 

Hanson, Hognn 1 25.00 

Johnson, H. C..I 15.00 

JohuBon./j. H..J .-. 25.00 

Jenson/O. E....L. 25.00 

Knudsen, Bernhdrd 50.00 

Larson, L. H { 50.00 

La/son, C. B I 25.00 

Ltnde, John J 25.00 



/Lnngseth, A. M 
Larson, Albert . 
Myrum, Sig .... 
Melgaard, T. L. 
Mellby, 'Dr. D. F 
Mynrum, .Peter . 

Ne.sja. O. O 

Ness, Edward H 

Keset Olof 

Oen,' Rasmus . . . 

Ostby, O. D 

Offerdal, Ole ... 
Pederson, Peder 
Parbst, W. A... 
Paulson, Dr. A. 
Reierson, T. J... 
Rambeck, O. A.. 
Rustad, Christ . 
Rhodegaard, Ole 



25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
50.00 
50.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00 
25.00. 
25.00 
50.00 
25i0O 
25.00 
N" 50.00 



Rhodegaard, Halyor 25.00 

Sorenson, Olof. H 25.00 



Storhaug, Gunvold 25.00 

Storholm, ChriBt 15.00 

Steen, Christian 25.00 

Snustad, Ole J 25.00- 

Tessunv Olof . 25.00 

.Vignes, G. O .'. . 25.00 

Waag, John ... J 25.00 

Snorre Lodge Nc. 70.. 200.00 

M. V. Eyenson, sale building. 475.00 
M. V. Evenson, interest...... 15.62 

Miscellaneous receipts enter- 



tainments 



5054J0 .654.31 



_ Total Receil ts $2,884.31 

I DISBURSEMENTS. 

H. O. Cliominid,. attorney 

I fees, incorporation ?25.00 

Secretary of State 1 , filing and 

J fees [. 51.50 

Times Printing Co., publi- 
cations .-. 16.50 

K. J. -'Anderson, recording. . . 655 

Miller-Davis Co., recordB, etc. 
.Tessnm tfecd Gral 1 & Supply 
I Co., Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, Block 11 . .2,(190.00 

Times. Printing 1:0., adver- 

; tising ' 1T.25 , 

The Tribune, advertising.. 2.1)5*- 




$0955 
39.00 



A real lively interest is, being taken 
the Doubles tournament. :-Some 
bowlers are; under the impression that 
our best average men have all the 
prizes cinched which is impossible as 
no bowler can have more than one 
Jprize on the list outside of a cash 
prize. There will be 12 different win- 
ners. The day entrees are about filled 
now. - : 



Hawks — i 

Crown „ 134 

Si Simonson 145 

Stebbins 159 

Pauline L 157 

Holt A 158 

Handicap ...J. 24 

Totals i 777 

Highrollers — 

Finsand i 171 

Ryer i 137 

0. Herron ..: 134 

Eliason ........ 155 

C. Olson ....: 201 

Totals ; 798 

Giants— i 
Booren 122 



164 
147 
168 
158 
162 
24 



139 

158 
150 
-145 
176 
24 



419 
450 
477 
460 
496 



805 792 2302 



159 
127 
■212 
127 
172 



165 
159 
157 
134 
163 



495 
423 
495 
416 
536 



787 778 2365 



Sheldon 

Sundahl 

Gamble .... 
Holtznecht 
Handicap ... 



.........171 

155 

...::...134 
,..;.„:143 
„:.'_:...40 



143 
145 
155 
173 
161 
40 



179 
135 
129 
185 
134 
40 



444 
451 
.439 
492 
438 



Totals ....J 765 

Invincibles! — 

Farr 1 131 

C. Erickson 1 154 

Holden L :.... 137 

Mostian j 142 

George ■ --162 



817 802 2264 



101 
179 
126 
169 
147 



152 
155 
155 
173 
145 



384 
488 
-418 
484 
454 



Totals 



..726 722 780 2228 



36 STUDENTS TAKING 

"UV CREAMERY COURSE 



Laying special emphasis on effic- 
iency of operation and creamery ac- 
counting, 36 students at University 
farm are registered in the creamery 
operators' short course, which began 
Jan. 2, and will end Feb. 11. While 
the course is given primarily for be- 
ginners, according to Prof. J. R. 
Keithley, who is in charge, many of 
the students have had wide experience 
in creamery ! work. With a large 
arnount of :.n,ew .equipment installed, 




i 



THE American public knows 
that United States Tires are 
never marketed on "price." 

People look to the makers of 
U. S. Tires for quality traditions. 
They do not want to see a policy 
of superiority nibbled away for 
the sake of a mere price appeal. 

So we say this- to all those loyal 
followers of U. S. Tires^- 

■ ~r r r'— ■ 

Do not buy the 
30 x 3% "Usco"' 
Tread because of 
its hew price of 
$10.90. 

Buy it because it 



Prices on all U. S. Tires 
arid Tubes Reduced Nov. 
10th. Ask your dealer. 



.is the greatest money's worth on 
earth today. 

Buy it because of honest quality 
as against "bargain offers", "inside • 
discounts" and "special trades.'^ 
An outstanding product- 
marked with the maker's name 
—the retail price quoted in plain 
figures. ' * . ' 

A challenge to the tire-trader 
who would rather sell you an 
unknown tire on 
the basis of "so 
much off list"— 
and let you find 
out its real value 
afterward. 



l 




United States 



tates Tims 

Rubber Company 







Page Six 



AW, WHAT'S THE USE 




THE OfHIEF RIVER FALLS TRDEHJNE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1922 



ByLF.VanZelm 

* ©. Western Newspaper Uakm 



What Is so Rare as a Sleep in the Sleeper? 




Woodrow Wilson 

Foundation Fund 

. i' ■ i — 



State Campaign to Be; Made 
for | Million Dollar Mem- 
orial For Leader 



A. Sapero to Head Local Or- 
ganization for Penning- 
ton County Quota 



row V 
awards 
mocracj 
thought 



Minnesota is reaay to begin; on Jan- 
uary 16 to raise its share of a fund 
to be known as the Woodrow Wilson 
Foundation. Practically every county 
in the state has been organized with 
committees of men and women of 
prominence. Beginning on the third 
Mondayj of January "the opportunity 
will be J given for this state I to ex- 
press tangibly its faith in the:' liberal 
ideals and in the world democracy for 
which Woodrow Wilson' has been chief 
spokesman." , | 

Announcement to this effect came 
today from the office of George H. 
Partridge of Minneapolis, chairman of 
the foundation in this state, jln part 
the announcement i,s as follows: 

"The national free-will offering to- 
ward an endowment of $1,000,000 or 
more to provide, through the Wood- 
'ilson Foundation, periodic 
for 'meritorious service to de- 
public welfare, liberal 
peace througfi justice' is 
£p begin in this state and the other 
'states of the country on January 16. 

Hundreds of friends of the former 
administration, friends of th> board 
idealism which Mr. Wilson bespoke, 
Democrats, Independents, and Repub- 
licans, alike, have become parties to 
this movement to establish in America 
awards somewhat akin to the Noble 
Prizes.-. | 

"The purpose of the Foundation has 
been defined in the following terms: 

" 'Created in recognition of the na- 
tional and international services of 
Woodrow Wilson, twice president of 
the United States, who furthered the 
cause o ' human freedom and was in- 
strumental in pointing out jffective 
methods for the co-operation of the 
^liberal brces of mankind throughout 
the world. 

" 'The award or awards from the in- 
come oi the foundation will be made 
from tiiie to time by a nationally con- 
stituted committee to the individual 
or group that has rendered, within a 
specifie :1 period, meritorious service to. 
democracy, public welfare, liberal thot 
or peace through justice.' " | 

"In this state, and throughout the 
country, 'driye' methods wil| not be 
pursued in the campaign, "-It is the 
feeling. of- the organization that such 
an appeal will not be necessary and 
that the spirit of those who first con- 
ceived the plan wil^-be best served, by 
seeing to it that the work everywhere 
takes the form of a free-will [offering. 

"The; committee on permanent or- 
ganization has recommended that a 
board of trustees , consisting of 15 
members have charge of the fund, in 



Farmers around Hill City, real- ♦ 
.♦ izing the need for more good ♦' 

♦ dairy cows, recently purchased ♦ 

♦ a j carload of highgrade Guern- ♦ 

♦ seys. The cattle came from Luck, ♦ 

♦ Wis., and reached Hill City last ♦ 
.♦ week. According to Chas. Olson ♦ 

♦ of Spang, who was interested in ♦ 

♦ the shipment of ' these ' twenty ♦' 

♦ head of cattle, all are good milk- ♦ 

♦ ere with excellent records. Mr. ♦ 

♦ Olson obtained two from the car ♦ 

♦ arid is well pleased with his pur- ♦ 

♦ chase. Prices on the cows range ♦ 

♦ from $75 to $135 each. These ♦ 

♦ prices are considered very rea- ♦ 

♦ sohable for good milch cows of ♦ 

♦ this grade. — Grand Rapids Her- ♦ 

♦ aid Review. ■ .♦ 

itiM i i ii.t i ti wm* 

! THE COUNTRY TOWN 



HOI I HM I MM I HM I I MM 



FARMERS BUYING COWS 



Bond of Human Sympathy Weak in 

; Cities 

Last week, because God is often 
very! good to me, I^got back on Main 
street. I had forgotten what it is to 
have real neighbors. I met men in 
the club car and later ran -across 
theni on the golf course. My wife 
said itheir wives were, cats and I have 
not the slightest doubt they detected 
a resemblance to one of our softest 
domestic animals in Mrs. Pilgrim. We 
were all on the defensive. The' mo- 
ment one of the good fellows at the 
club began to get the least bit cordial 
I avoided him. 

No one is ever neighborly unless 
he has a skinning in prospect," was 
my reaction to friendly approaches. 

Last week I visited a little town m 
the interior of a western state. A 
friend I had met a few times met me 
with: his car at the black hour of 6 
when my train reached that 
towri. The hotel keeper saw to it 
personally that my room was what it 
ought to be. We had a luncheon at 
which .wives were welcome guests. 

i! wouldn't live in a big town* 
..._re than one man arid woman said 
with | every appearance of sincerity. - 

They hadall read Sinclair Lewis 
and | pleaded guilty frankly to cer- 
tain [counts in his indictment. Main 
street is in some ways just what he 
said ! it is. But back of that re a 
cordial kindness toward each other 
thatiwe haven't got along the Great 
White Ways. The women said they 
were reading this up to date novel, 
and that they might not be abreast 
of the current of modern thought— at 
least not of all the currents-^but they 
were 1 in the current. They knew 
what was going on and why. To top 
it all there was a .neighborliness we 
miSs entirely in the cities. The two 
commercial-, clubs of the»town— the 
Kiwanisi and the Rotarians— met with 
their 1 wives in a joint dinner that 
night. It was a combination of old- 
fashioned singing school and business 
meeting and civic boost. One could 
trace the ancestry of that gathering 
right back to the* old town meetings 
which helped make New England 
character and through it the Amer- 
ican .Character what it is. 

"Most of us are big-city people, 
jtoo." said these dwellers on Main 



.............. ---=--,.. r . , , itoo." said inese uweiico .... 

esting it and annually disbursing the I tr ^ t „ But we pre fer. the small 



ito the jury of awards. As a: 
nucleus of five members for this board; 



town. Life means more here." 
the names of Franklin D. Roosevelt j ' MONEY IN CHICKENS 



Urge County-Town 
Road Go-Operation 



Babcock Points Way 'to Get 

Bigger Results on Local 

Koads With Funds 



Combine County, Township 

Funds, Pull! Together for 

Systematic Results 



former assistant secretary 
navy; Cleveland H. Dodge 
York; President E. A.. Alderman of 



of the 



the University of Virginia] 



Allen 
Carrie 
been. 
"Th 



of twmty-five persons, ten to bei They laid 7,963 eggs, an average 
name; by the board of trustees and production of 159.26 eggs per bird 
fif teei to be nominated by national peri yeSr. ; ■ 

organ zations designated by the. The tojal income from birds for 
hoard." . j market, hatching eggs and eggs for 

The executive committee of the market was $346.53. 
foundation is headed by Cleveland H.! The total expense in feed, etc., was 
Dodg< of New York, as chairman. $116.30, leaving a net profit of $228.23 
Franllin D. Roosevelt is chiirman-of and an average profit per bird of 
the national committee,, and Hamil- $4.56, 

olt is executive director. Na- From these figures it would appear 

headquarters are at 160 Nassau that a flock of birds is a splendid ad 

dition to a lad's income if he will take 



ton r 
tional 
street 



Oth sr officers 'of the Minnesota com- the' trouble to look after them. — Beau- 



mittei are Mrs. Charles P. 
St. Paul, vice-chairman and 



Wold, 



quet, 



The 
A. Si: 



William 



of N^lB^^gfteLaa Made p ro fit From 
• \ ■ Flock 

A' Henderson Avenue man started 
off ^the year 1921 with fifty chick- 
ens,! an d here is what they did for 



White of Kansas, and Mrs. 
Chapman "Catt of Iwa have 
Uggested. 
jury of awards is to consist him during the year: 



Pennington county, with other 
counties in the state, can secure a 
complete system of good local roads 
in the shortest tune and with least 
expense by adopting a definite pro- 
gram of systematic improvement; 
pooling its road and bridge funds with 
those of the townships, and applying 
modern roadbuilding methods. 

Charles M. Babcock, state highway 
commissioner, this week made the 
foregoing statement, and recommend- 
ed a call for an ! early convention in 
each county seat,] or centrally located 
town in the county, at which county 
commissioners and the supervisors 
from every 'township may meet with 
the county highway engineer to work 
out a definite systematic plan of coun- 
ty good' roads development. By end- 
ing commonr patch-work practices, he 
added, the proposed .plan will produce 
the greatest results and biggest meas- 
ure possible from the money used. 

Funds available; for roads other than 
trunk highways in Pennington coun- 
ty last .year exceeded $75,000, he said, 
indicating the importance of prompt 
action. Good roads conventions are 
being recommended to all Minnesota 
counties — even Renville, Carlton and 
some others which already are operat- 
ing with success I under the plan but 
where a general meeting promises ad- 
ditional benefits. 

Minnesota county and township 
road funds combined are now consider- 
ably larger than! the trunk highway 
fund total," said Mr. Babcock. "While 
the trunk mileage is less, it requires 
more costly improvements and main- 
tenance, and all things considered, lo- 
cal road improvements should, easily 
keep pace with those on the trunk 
routes. We are suggesting the. coun- 
ty roads conventions because we be- 
lieve great accomplishments possible 
from county-town co-operation. 

Commissioner Babcock made it 
plain that the critic i sm is drawn by 
the practices of ' long standing, and 
not by the efforts of the county or 
town road authorities, whom he credit- 
ed with earnest work to get results. 
But new and far, better methods can 
be employed to great advantage, he 
added, predicting hearty co-operation 
of the local officials to that end. -_ 

"County and town road officials in 
convention with tie highway engineer 
should agree upon a definite plan of 
road improvements based upon the 
actual needs and importance of each 
road and extending over three or more 
years," said Mr. Babcock. "They 
should then pool' town | with county 
funds to carry it out. Better methods, 
heavier equipment and so forth, and 
the systematic plan can be combined 
for economy and best results— increas- 
ed satisfaction for taxpayers .and; 
even more road jobs for farmers 
Every county engineer, I am sure.wfll 
be glad to assume the extra work put 
upon his office because pi the bigger 
benefits that will come. 

"Just as the trunk highway pro-^ 
jeots disregard comity lines, so :will 

. < ,, j: *, ao y frnm the 



KXI4L MARKETS 

Hanson & Barren, 

Wheat, Ko. 1 northern, per bu $1.09 

Wheat, No. 2 northern, per bti 1.04» 

Wheat, No. 3 northern, per bu...-. .. ..ifi 

Durum wheat, No. 1, per bu 71 

Durum wheat, No. 2, per bu CD 

Durum wheat, No. 3, per bu Ui 

Oata, per bu '. 22* 

Rye, per bu .01 

Barley, per bu ..31 

Flax,. No. 1, per bu 1.81 

Flax, No. 2, per bu 1.70 

Bran, per cwt 1.10 

Shorts, per cwt ._. 1.10 

Thief Biver Produce Co. 

Spring ChlckenB; per lb " .15 

Old Boosters, per lb .10 

Hens, light, per lb ....... .10 

HenB, heavy, per lb .15 

Geese, per lb........ 40 

Ducks, , per lb .14 

Cow- Hides, per lb 04 

Milk, per quart .09 

Cream,' per quart 35 

Butter, per lb..' 37 

Eg-ga, per dozen .30 



$8,250,000 voted by counties under 
laws no longer in effect. x - 

"So it is plain," said Mr. Mullen, 
"that the great sums raised for local 
road work should be well used; also 
that the Babcock plan is mainly a 
farmers* road plan, the so-called farm 
road funds exceeding the trunk funds 
even in 1921 when the big part of 
the bond money was used." 



MORTGAGE FORBCXOSUBE SALE 

Default .having be'eR made in the .pay- 
ment of the sum of Two Thousand One 
Hundred Sixty-seven and M-100 Dollars, 
which is claimed to be due and 1b due at 
the date of this notice upon a certain 
Mortgage, duly executed and delivered by 
Perley P. Palmer and Eeglna. Palmer, his 
wife, Mortgagors, to Goodridge State Bank 
(a corporation under the laws of the State 
of Minnesota), Mortgagee, bearing date the 
18th day of November, 1019, and with a 
power of sale- therein contained, duly re- 
corded in the office of the Register of 
Deeds In and for the 1 County of Penning- 
ton, and State of Minnesota, oh the 22nd 
day of November, 1010, at 0:00 o'clock a. 
mt in Book 13 of Mortgages, on page 
520, ond no action or proceeding having 
been Instituted, at law or otherwise, to 
recover the debt secured by aald Mortgage 
or any part thereof. 

Now, Therefore, Notice is Hereby Given, 
That by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute In such case made and pro- 
vided, the- said Mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described 
in- and conveyed by said Mortgage, viz: 

Th& Northwest Quarter (nw'/i) of Sec- 
tion numbered Twenty-four (24) In Town- 
ship numbered One Hundred Fifty-four 
(154) North, of Range- numbered Forty- 
one (41) West of the Fifth Principal 
Meridian,, containing 160 acres, more or 
leaa, according to the United States Gov- 
ernment survey thereof, In Pennington 
County and State of Minnesota, with the 
hereditaments and appurtenances ; which 
sale will be made by the Sheriff of said 
Pennington .County ai the front door of 
the Court House, In the City of .Thief 
River Falls, in said County and State, 
on the 213* day of January, 1022,- at 10:00 
o'clock- a: m., of that day, at piblic ven- 
due, to the highest bidder for cash, to pay 
said debt of 52167.50 and interest, and the 
taxes, if any; on said premises, and Seven- 
ty-five Dollars, being- statutory attorney's 
fees, as stipulated 1 In' and by said Mort- 
gage in; case of foreclosure, and the dis- 
bursements allowed Br law; subject to 
redemption at nny tiine within. one year 
from the' day of saler as provided by law. 

Date* December Sfcft, A. D., 1021. 

GOODRrDGH STATE BANK, 

PERT, W. MABESY,. Mortgagee. 

Attorney for mortgagee-, Thief River Falls, 
Minnesota. 

Dec. 9-W-2SV30 J-6-13 



r MORTGAGE FOKEtXOSUBE SALE. 
iWhsreas, Defaults have been made In 
the conditions of a certain mortgage duly 
executed and delivered by Selma Rickson, 
alwiddw, mortgagor, to First State Bank 
of T&Jef River Falls, (a corporation nn 
der the laws of th* State of Minnesota:)!. 
raoBtgSigee, bearing date the 21st day of 
March, 1917, and with a power of sale- 
therein contained duly r^orded in the of- 
fice- of the Register of Deeds in and for 
the County of Pennington and State of 
Minnesota, on the 20th day of March, 19CT, 
at '10:30 o'clock: a. m., in Book 53 of 
Mortgages, on page 404, 

Which said mortgage, together with 
Ike debt secure* thereby, was duly as- 
signed by said First State Bank of TWef 
River Falls, mortgagee, to First And Peo- 
ples State Bank (a corporation under the 
laws ot the State of Minnesota), by writ- 
ten assignment dated' the 17th day of De- 



New York City, 
ki 



vice-president of the Northwest- 



ern National Bank of M: 



nneapolis. 



treasvrer. Mrs. Peter OlesU of Clo-ithe, juvenile class, "can any of you 
Dr. W. J. Mayo and Ex-govern- .tell me the meaning of vice versa.' 



or Jo'.n Lind, represent Minnesota on 'fYes'm I can," replied the young- 

.... e<-o»> «f +ha -F/iriT nf rhO (MASS. 



the national committee. 



Tribune understands 



duct the foundation campaign in 
nington county. 



Noyes of dette Region- 
Theodore ; 



VICE VERSA 
"Now, children," said the teacher of 



ster at the foot of the class. 
that Mr. I 'fWell, Billie, what is it?" 



pero has been selected to con- 1 f^^^/^^^J^ 
L foundation campaign in Pen- , toward _the /head of -. the bed, - an- 



iwered Billie triumphantly. 




town lines disappear from the .best 
county plans, and as the state high- 
way' department advises and. assists 
counties .with state aid and other 
work, so will the counties help the 
townships." . ■ v - * 

Current funds in Minnesota last 
year totalled $18,390,520 for local 
roads entirely, under county and town 
control, and §8,690,000 for trunk high- 
ways under the state department, ac- 
cording to official figures quoted by 
John H. Mullen* deputy commissioner 
and chief highway engineer. 

To $10,843,682 of county and $6,- 
862,560 of town; tax funds was added 
$2,084,000 of state aid to make up the 
local road total That was exclusive 
of $1,308,794 of street and road funds 
in the- cities and villages outside of 
St. Paul, Minneapolis and Duluth. Mo- 
tor vehicle taxes of about $5,750,000 
and federal aid. of $2,840,000 repre- 
sented the trunk total,. as;de from re- 
imbursement bond funds estimated at 



cember, 1917, and duly recorded in the of- 
fice ef the said Register of Deeds on the 
14th day of November, 1021, at 8:30 o'clock 
a. m., in Book 03 of Mortgages on Page 
308, and 

Whereas, The] said Pint And Peoples 
State .Bank, the assignee and holder of 
said mortgage, hat duly elected and does 
hereby elect to declare the whole' princi- 
pal sum of said mortgage due and pay- 
able at the date of this notice under the 
terms and conditions <of said mortgage 
and the power of Bale therein contained, 
and 

Whereas, There is actually due and 
claimed to be due and payable at the date 
of- this notice upon said mortgage and 
the indebtedness secured thereby the to< 
tal sum of One Hundred Eighty-two and 
72-100 Dollars, as v follows: The sum of; 
$157.72 thereof being for interest paid by] 
said assignee of mortgagee upon a prior 
existing mortgage upon the premises- se-j 
curing the mortgage" hereby being fore- 
closed and for which said assignee of 
mortgagee is entitled to a lien pursuant 
to law and the terms of -said mortgage,, 
and the' sum ef $25.00 thereof being the 
amount of the balance of the principal se- 
cured by the mortgage hereby being fore- 
closed, Bald sums making the total amount 
aioraaald, and whereas the said power. of 
sole has become operative and no action 
or proceeding having been instituted at 
law or otherwise to recover the debt se- 
cured by said mortgage, or any part there- 
of. • 

Now, Therefore, Notice li Hereby Given, 
that by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said mortgage^ and pursuant to 
the statute In' such case made and pro- 
vided, the said mortgage will be foreclosed' 
by a sale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said mortgage, via: The 
Northeast Quarter (ne%) of Section No. 
Seventeen (17), in Township No. One Hnn^ 
dred Fifty-four (154) North, of Range No. 
Forty-one (41) West of the Fifth Principal 
Meridian in Pennington County and State 
of 'Minnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances ; which sole will be made 
by the Sheriff of "said Pennington Coun- 
ty at the front door of the Court House 
in the City of Thief River Falls, in said 
County and State, on the 21st day of Jan- 
uary, 1922, at 10:00 o'cloek a. m., of that 
day, at public vendue, to the highest bid- 
der for cash, to pay said debt of $182.72, 
and Interest, and taxes, If any, on said 
premises, and Twenty-five Dollars, attor- 
ney's fees, qb stipulated in and by said 
mortgage In case of foreclosure, and the 
disbursements allowed by law; snbject to. 
redemption' at any time within one year 
from the day of Bale as provided by law. 

Dated November 15th, 1921. 
FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE BANK, 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 

PERL W.. MABEY, 
Attorney for Assignee of Mortgagee, Thief 

River Falls, Minnesota. 

Friday, Dec. 9-10-23-30, .Tan. 6-13 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. 

Default having .been made in the pny- 
ment of the sum of One Thousand Eighty- 
eight and no-100 dollars, which is claimed 
to be due and Is due at the date of this 
notice upon n certain Mortgage, duly ex- 
ecuted and delivered by J. G. Turnbangh 
and- Florence Lena Turnbaugh, his wife. 
Mortgagors, to Goodrldge State Bank, (n 
corporation under the laws of the State 
of Minnesota), "Mortgagee, bearing date 
the 18th day of December, 1919, and with 
a power of sale therein contained, duly 
recorded in the office of the Register of 
Deeds In and for the County of Marshall 
and State of Minnesota, on the flth day 
of January, 1920, at I0:0O ro'clock a. m.. 
In 4Book 93 of 'Mortgages, on page 538, 
an<J duly recorded in the ;ofTice of the 
Register of DeedB in and for the County 
of -Pennington and State of Minnesota, 
on the 8th day of January, 1920, at 9:00 
o'clock a. m., In Book 54 of Mortgages, 
on page 594, and no action or proceeding 
having been Instituted, at law or other- 
wise^ to recover the debt secured hr said 
Mortgage or any part thereof. 

Now, Therefore, Notice Is Hereby 
Given,. That by virtue of the power of 
sale contained In said Mortgage, and pur- 
suant to the statute in such case made- and 
provided, the said Mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises describ- 
ed' In and conveyed by sard Mortgage-, ris: 

The Northwest Quarter (nw^i) of Sec- 
tion numbered Ten (10). in Township 
numbered One Hundred Fifty-four (154) 
North, of Range numbered Thirty-nine 



THEO QUALE i 

Lawya 

Practice In all Oonrts and B» 

ton U. 8. Land office 

McGinn Building 

THIEF BIYHR VALJjS. BUXN. 



CARL B. LARSON 



LICENSED EMBALMER 
AND UNDERTAKER 



Larson Furniture Company 

Phonal Night Call I48 




BILIOUSNESS— SICK HEADACHE, 
call for an K? Tablet, (a vntetabla 
aperient) to tone and atrenethen 
tho oi*an8 of dJeeation and elimi- 
nation. Improve* Appetite, Believes 
Constipation. y 





Brotherhood of 

AMERICAN YEOMEN 

. TIc©esta Homested No. 2006. 
Regular meetings every second and 
fonrf4 Fridays of each month at 
' Masonic Hall. Visiting Yeomen 
welcome. 



y j. •; ''^^teac:- 




(39) West of the Fifth Principal Meridian, 
in the County of Marshall and State of 
Minnesota, and 

The Southwest Quarter (sw^i) of Sec- 
tion numbered Ten (10), in Township num- 
bered One Hundred Fifty-four (154) North, 
of Range numbered Thirty-nine (33) West, 
of the Fifth Principal Meridian, in the 
County of Pennington and State of Min- ' 
nesota, and 

Together with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances, thereunto belonging, which 
sale will be made .by the Sheriff of said 
Pennington County at the front donr of 
the Court House, in the City of Thief 
Itiver Falls, in said County and State, on 
the 21st -day ot Jnnuary, 1922, nt 10:00 
o'clock n. m., of that day, at public ven- 
due, to the highest bidder for cash, to 
pay said debt of $10SS.OO and interest, and 
the taxes, if any, on said premises, and 
Seventy-five Dollar's, being statutory at- 
torney's feeB, as stipulated in and by 
said Mortgage in case of foreclosure, and 
the disbursements allowed by law; subject 
to redemption nt nny time within one year 
from the day of sale, as provided by law. 

Dated December Oth. A. D., 1021. 

GGODRIDGE STATE BANK, 

PERL W. MABEY, Mortgagee. 

Attorney for Mortgagee, Thief River Falls, 
. Minnesota.' 

Dec. 0-16-23-30 J-6-13 



NOTICE 

State of Minnesota, County of Pennington, 
District Court Fourteenth Judicial Dis- 
trict. 
In "the Matter of the Dissolution of Thief 

River Music Company. 
To Whom It May Concern: 

Notice Is Hereby Given, That all the 
stockholders of the Thief River Music 
Company, a corporation, created, organiz- 
ed and existing under and by virtue of 
the laws of the State of Minnesota, and 
having its principal .office and place of 
business in the City of Thief River Falls, 
in the County of Pennington, and State 
of Minnesota, have presented their Portion 
to the District Court, of Pennington 
County, Minnesota, praying that said Thief 
River Music ConYpany be dissolved and 
its affairs wound up and closed. 

Notice Is Hereby Further Given, That 
n hearing, on said Petition will be had 
before said Court, at the Opening day 
of the next General Term of snid Court 
to be, held in and for the County ofPenn- 
ington, and State of Minnesota, In the 
Court House in the City of Thief River 
Falls, in Eald County and State on the 
7th -day of February, IKH/at 10 o'clock 
A. M., or as soon thereafter as may suit 
the convenience of the Court, at which 
time and place all parties interested in 
said matter win be heard. I 

Dated this 31st day of Derfemher 1021. 
ANDREW GRINpELAND, 
Judge' of the District Court 
t Fourteenth Judicial District, 

Pennington County, Minnesota, 
n. O. CHOMMIE, 
Attorney for Petitioner, 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 

Jan. fl-13-20 



DR. A. SHEDLOV 

Physician and Surgeo* 

In Charge, of Dr. A. W, Swedenburg 
Office Over First ^National Bank 

Telephone 350-1 
403 No. Arnold Ave. Phone 278 



M M ♦ * i M ♦ ♦ M » ♦ ♦ ♦ 4 M M ♦ 4 + » 

| EmpireFarms ;; 
Company 

Capital $25,000 



LANDS, LOANS 

CITY PROPERTY 

INSURANCE 



Bring Your Business to Us. We • ■ 
Promise Courtesy and Efficiency - . 

215 Main Ave. North :: 

Phone 443 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota : : 



ttn i int i M i UDm i MM 



Get a -^g^sa^ Yooi- 
25c. Box \^j|>/ D ™gg's» 

IJUfBEBT'S DBTJG STORE 



ttMttt t Mm il tUMtMM 



Wood 

; ; I am prepared to deliver 
; ; promptly to any part of 
;; the city, any kind of '■'■ 
;; wood. Telephone 449- W '■'■ 

T. FR01SNESS 

323 3rd Street W, 

M i iitmM i tm i iMH t t ' 



MODERN 
HOUSE 

. FOR SALE! 

Possesion can. be 
given immediately 

Inquire Tribune 



^ 



*K 



* 



J 



FRIDAY, . JANUARY 13, 1922 



WHEN ETIQUETTE WAS RIGID 



Man of/Fa6hion, 

Had Many Difficulties 
/ tend 



grandmother's day 



■\ ■*-.-. ^ 



•US^aKm*6Bb3&jEg& 




THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Century or So Ago, 

to Con-/' 
With. ■! / 



Women considered It unladylike In 



to walk rapidly. Ex- 



tremely rapid walking ls'/not-'usacaiy 
graceful, but so liar aa "being a algn' 
oi [bad heeding tl ere seems to be^ao 
such' Idea nowaday s. If a woman^as 
tb;covjer a certain distance oa' foot in. 
a limited time nowadays she acceler- 
ates her pace accjrdlngly. It la un- 
comfortable, but 1 ardly bad manners. 
i The i man of fast Ion bad many more 
difficulties to encounter In going about 
In society than he has now when draw- 
ing room furniture is more substantial 
and when there ar 3 neither hoopsklrts 
nor trains to become tangled In one's 
hundred years ago, 



boots or spurs. A 

observes a writer In the New York Sun, 
It was ( not so easy, and a book of de- 
corum for young men, written a century 
ago, describes the] plight of the awk- 
ward fellow" who, yhen he first comes 
lflto a |drawlng roo n, attempts to bow, 
with the result that "his sword, If he 
wears one, goes between his legs and 
nearly |throws him lown," and proceeds 
from one gaucherl ( to another during 
hl3 presence In a drawing room. A 
great deal used tt _ be said about the 
manner. In which a' young man sat In 
a chair. To sit up stiffly was to In- 
dicate j awkwardness and timidity. To 
loll back was rude and indicated vul- 
garity.! He was, lerefore, urged to 
"lean with elegano;" against the back 
and arms of his chair and '.'by varying 
his attitude from time to time show 
he was used to g( od society." 



EMERSON'S ONE LOVE AFFAIR 



Groat jPreacher Wpn the Girl of Hli 
i Heart? but Their Mutual Happl- ' 
nees Was Short. 



■ Ralph Waldo 
land's famous 
pher, fell In love 
for good. He wok 
■when he met pretty 

.then sixteen, the 
merchant. 

}He did not see 
after 'this, but her 
lire remained In 
he returned to Cc 
living with her n 
He became deeply 
beautiful and 
physical charms b 
sponse from his 
than from his sens 
not only beautiful, 
clear-cut verse, 
at a time when it 
for women to 
exercise. 

i During their 
"the beautiful 
poetically called 
But, she improved 
months later they 
But Ellen's span 
and their 'time 
fatal lung trouble 
leal attention, and 
twenty, years old 



Enerson, New Eng- 

preicher and phfloso- 

>ut once, and then 

only twenty-four 

little Ellen Tucker, 

daughter of a Boston 

hup. 



his 



delic; tte 



says 



Indu ige 



for a whole year 
fair face and fig- 
memory. Then 
1, where she was 
r and stepfather, 
infatuated with this 
creature, whose 
•ought forth a re- 
maglnation rather 
But Ellen was 
She wrote fairly 
a commentator, 
was quite unusual 
In such mental 



frli;nd," 
; he-, 



courtship Ellen, or 

Emerson 

was seriously 111. 

rapidly and six 

were married. 

of life was short, 

together limited. A 

ti lumphed over med- 

when she was but 

died. 



she 



I Teheran Has Tijvelve 

;'fAt the distance 
great part of the 
stands, is only distinguished 
surrounding plain 



its 



i bv 



many gardens, 
Sykes In "Persia ar 
«i the traveler gets 
the outline of the 
and the tiled domes 
'jhosques. He will 
aj [grandiose gatevtay 
glazed bricks In pa 
ihg tones being 
Heved with black 
giving a touch 
squalid surroundings. 

'"These gateways 
some are adorned -ri-ith 
Rustum, the- Herci les 
rant of Persia, and 
Persian solder of t 
however, look best 
do not bear a close 



blue 
: and 



Pantomime Fo 

Pantomime, one 
forms of dramatic 
ated until the draipa 
established for ov 
latter was the invention 
but the pantomime 
man idea. - 

Two aspiring 
was afflicted with 
'Pylades and Batliyllus, 
• performance of thli 
£2 B. C. It was 
their part because 
of the performers, 
was so delighted 
with the production 
drama. 



The Egyptian SJstrum. 

■**A thousand yau* or so . . .** 

Carl Van Vechten In "The Tiger in 

the House," telto u, "the Egyptians 



associated the cat 



Izlng the graceful' head and figure of 



„tbe beloved animal 
of I the; slstra. The 



of 'a frame of bronze or brass, Into 
which three or fou: metal bars were 



loosely inserted, so 



Gateways. 
Teheran, built In 
mud on which it 
from the 
the green trees of 
writes Ella C. 
d Its People," "but 
nearer he will see 
constellated city wall 
and minarets of 
anter the town by 
adorned with 
terns, the prevail- 
and yellow, re- 
white, the whole 
splendor to its 



are 12 in number; 

the exploits of 

and knight-er- 

others depict the 

)day — all of them, 

at a distance, and 

examination." 



lowed Drama, 

of the simplest 

art, was not orlgln- 

itseif had been 

500 years. The 

of the Greeks, 

was a purely Ro- 



omy 
of 



that 



i, one of whom 

throat trouble. 

gave the first 

kind' In the year 

a make-shift on 

the illness of one 

but their audience 

they continued 

of the wordless 



as to produce a 



S 



Jingling noise when the Instrument 
was shaken. Occasionally a few metal 
rings were strung on the bars to In- 
.crease the sound a id very often the 
top of the frame, was ornamented with 
th^ figure of a cat" 



Quite 

"•A noted scientist 
give bat wearing < 

"Maybe so, but 
that baldness cau 
wearing?" 



Right 
says that exces- 
ses baldness." 

have you noticed 
excessive hat 



Pointers On Income 
ax Return Issued 



\ 



Every Single person Over 

21 Years of Age Must 

Pile Statement 



Net Income is Gross Less 
Deductions for Expens- 
es, Losses, Etc. 



With the approach of the period for 
filing income jtax returns, — January 
1 j to March 15; 1922,— taxpayers are 
advised to lose no time in the compil- 
ation of their accounts for the year 
1921. A new and important provision 
of the revenue act of 1921 is that 
eyery person whose gross incomes for 
1921 was! $6,000 or over shall file a 
return, regardless of the amount of 
net income upon which the tax is as- 
sessed. Returns are required of every 
single person ;whose net income was 



$1,000 or over and every married per- 
son living with husband or wife' whose 
net income was $2,000 or over.; Wid- 
ows and widowers and persons sep- 
arated or divorced from husband or 
wife, are regarded as single persons. 

Net income is gross income, less 
certain deductions for business ex- 
penses, losses, taxes, etc. : Gross in- 
come includes practically all income 
received by the taxpayer during the 
year; in the case of the wage earner, 
salaries, wages bonuses and commis- 
sions; in .the case .of professional 
men, ail amounts received for*' profes- 
sional services; in the cases of farm- 
ers all profits from the sale of farm 
products, and:- rental or sale of land. 

In making ah income tax; return for 
the year 1921, every taxpayer should 
present to himself the following ques- 
tions: : 

What were your profits from your 
business, trade, profession or voca- 
tion? ' 

Did you receive any interest on 
bank deposits? '• 

Have you any property from which 
you received rent? | ' 

Did you receive any income in the 
form of dividend or interest from 
stocks or bonds? 



Did you receive any bonuses during 
the year? 

Did you make any profit on the 
sale of stocks, bonds, or other proper- 
ty, real or personal? 

Did ybu act as a broker in any 
transaction from which you received 
commissions? • 

-Are you interested in" any partner- 
ship or other firm from which you 
received any income? 

Have you any income from royal- 
ties or patents?. 

Have you any minor children who 
are working? w . 

_ Do' you appropriate, or have the 
right to appropriate, the earnings of 
such children? If so, the amount 
must be included in the return of in- 
come. . * 

Has your wife, any income from any 
source whatsoever? If so it must be 
included in your return or reported in 
a separate return of income. 

Did you receive any. directors' fees 
or trustees' fees in the course of the 
year? 

Do you hold any office in a benefit 
society from which you receive in- 
come ? 

Answers to*all of these questions 



Page Seven 



are necessary to determine whether a 
person has ( an income sufficiently 
large to- require that a return be filed, 
and may be the means of avoiding 
the heavy penalties imposed for fail- 
ure to do so .within the time' pre- 
scribed. 






CORN "HOGGING" ADVISED 

FOLLOWING EXPERIMENT 

The cost of gathering corn is prac 
tically saved by hogging it down, E. v 
F. Ferrin and L. A. Jessup of the* 
animal husbandry division of the Uni- 
versity farm, says, following a com 
hogging experiment just completed. 
Where it cost $3.09' to produce 100 
pounds of gain by the'dry.lot method, 
the expense of prqducirfglthe same 
gain by hogging' down methods 
amounted to $2.58 and $2.59. The ex- 
periment/ which was begun- Sept. 26 
-and ended"" Nov. 3, was conducted 'to 
determine the practicability of hog- 
ging down corn from an economical 
and feeding viewpoint. 

Three lots of 15 hogs each were 
used. In the first lot the hogs were 
allowed corn and tankage at will. The 
hogs in the second were given stand- 
ing corn of one acre in size and with 



an estimated yield of 62.85 bushels, 
supplemented with tankage fed in a 
self feeder. In the^third lot the hogs 
were given standing" corn with an esti- 
mated yield of 57.57 bushels measur- 
ing approximately one acre, and con- 
taining rape sown at the last cultiva- 
tion. Tankage was 'also fed. While 
less feed was used to produce l6o 
pounds of gain in the dry lot, the 
cost in producing (he gain was 50 
cents more than for the second, lot and 
51 cents more than for the third. The 
difference was due to the cost of husk- 
ing, which amounts to six cents a 
bushel. 

"Hogging down corn is a success- 
ful and economical method of produc- 
ing pork," say Mr. -Ferrin and Mr. 
Jessup. "Hogs are efficient corn har- 
vesters. The method eliminates the 
cost and loss of corn, storage. The 
manure is conserved and distributed 
evenly over the field." 



COAL— Order your hard 
and soft coal from the Chrjs- 
tenson & Voelz Hardware 
Co. Phone 23. tf 



with muilc, util- 



In the decoration 
sl8tmm constated 




^published- 



\. 



Twice-a*Week 

$2.00 P er year 
Tuesdays and Fridays 

The biggest newspaper bargain in Min- 
nesota and one that jshould not be over- 
looked. Issued two times each week, it 
is in a position- M print it when it's 
news. 

The Tribune \Tfaoroughly 
Covers the Northwest 



'I 
■i' 




Page 




Eight 




/ 
THE 



THIEF RIVER FALLS TRffitfNE 




Jacob Nelson of • Holt spent Wed 

. neSday here on. business ana* visiting 

friends 



W. 



ing a 



W. Prichard, Jr., left 



evening for Detroit where he is spend- 



few days on business, 



Tuesday 



Mrs. D. Denhart of Haz& spent 
Tuesday in the city shopping and 
visiting friends. : I 

C. E. Saunders, bird and game 
warden arrived here .Wednesday af- 
ternoon from Roseau t» transact busi- 
ness. 

G. P. Sorter o'f Holt spent Wed- 
nesday in the city on business and 
visiting friends. He returned to his 
home 'Thursday morning. 

S. ioveid . returned Wednesday 
mornin; ; to his home at Midc le River 
after si ending a short time in 
on business. 

Mrs. A. J. Odih and little daughter 
returnel here the first of tie week 
from Minneapolis where they 
short time visiting relatives. 



the city 



7 



spent a 



Mrs, A. S. Sapero and 5Jiss Olive 
Booren left last evening for Plummer 
where t ney will spend a shortJ time as 
jruests at the Harry Booren home. 

Henry Thompson .returned here 
Wcdnes lay morning from Grekt Falls, ' 
Jlontanu, and is a guest at the home 
of his brother, Theodore Thompson. 

Dann returned Tuesday af- 
to St. Hilaire after spending 
in the city attending to var- 
ious business matters. 



F. J. 
ternoon 
the day 



Mr. aid Mrs. Louis Hamre 



mantown are guests this week at the 



home oi 
ter, Mr. 



daugh- 



their son-in-law and 

and Mrs. Arthur Ranbeck. 

Williaii F. Munch, game warden, 
arrived iiere from Cropkston Wednes 
day moi ning to attend to 



matters. 



Miss jlarie Dablow who spent the 



past two 
Mr. and 
Monday 
attends 



weeks here with her parents, 
Mrs. F. P. Dablow, returned 
evening to Detroit whjere she 
;chool. 



Miss '^elia Morrissy returred the 



first of 



Mrs. 'fl 



Cumberland 
where th 
relatives, 



j B< rt Paulson of Badger spent Tues- 
day uid Wednesday in the city attend- 
ing :o business.' 

Ms. John Sorensoh returned Mon- 
day afternoon from Holt where she 
spen; a week visiting friends. 

C. L. Hanson left Wednesday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis on a short, busi- 
ness trip. ' 

A. S. Sapero left Wednesday eve- 
ning for Minneapolis and Chisholm 
on a few days' business trip. 

| Jo il Gulseth returned Tuesday 
moning from Grand Forks where he 
spen the past two weeks visiting his 
fathtr. 

• ■ Mi s. Charley Lieberman returned 
last ;vening from Warrert where she 
has spent several' days on business 
and dsiting friends? 



of Ger- 



business 



he week from Gatzke 
she spen ; the holiday vacation 
sume hejr studies at the loci.l high 
school. 



H. Frisell and child 



where 
to re 



turned the first of the week from 



and Richardson 



Miss I'elle Blair returned the first 



of the week to Carlos where 



school, 



n teaching' 

the holidays with her par 



engaged 
spending 
ents. 

Miss Tjhora Lyland returned 
day afternoon to Grand Forks 
she is attending school, after 
ing the fast two weeks here 
folks. 



Mrs. Ida Kinsela who has spe it sev- 
eral wi-e'cs here visiting her mother 
and frier ds, returned Tuesday after- 
noon to Crookston where she is mak- 
ing her home with her daughter, Miss 
" "i lsela. 



Grace Ki 

A. R. feobert, sales manager of the 

Cipu-ni T? jroducts company, spet.t sev 

in the city on business with 

firm. He returned to his- 

Crookston Wednesday after 



Kiewel I 
eral days 
the local 
home at 
noon. 

Mrs. H, 
returned 
home at 



L. Sandte and little da lghter 

Thursday morning to their 

Stoiner, after spending a 

short time here visiting the former's 



E. C . Mogenson returned today from 

wis -. th e Twin Cities, where he attended 

;y spent the holidays visiting a sesi ion of the Retail Clothiers of 

the state. He also visited Duluth 

during his absence from the city. 



she is 
after 



Tues 
where 
spend- 
th her 



parents, J 



Miss E:!na Larson returned 
the first (if the week from Milw 



Wis., where she 



and Mrs. 



Pierce, <V. 
-cabce lod 



ter _ spen( 
installing 



Ir. and Mrs. James 0. 



Seth- 

home 
lukee, 



a guest during 



Christma; 
and fami 
a few da\ 
other brcther and sister-in-lav^ Dr. 



at tlie hom e of her b 
y. On returning she 



rother 
spent 



s at Minneapolis visiting an- 



Clarence Larson. 



Mrs. E hel Robbins and Mrs. 



trict deputies of the 
re, returned Tuesday 



noon to their home at Crookston' af- 



ing the day previous here 
the officers for the ensuing 



Ruth 
Mac- 
after- 



:year of the Thief River Falls Review 

Clarenc j Knutson entertain id a 
number ot his friends Saturday eve- 
ning at lis home on Horace Ave., 
North. A n enjoyable evening of cards 
and danciig was spent until midnight 
when de icious refreshments were 
served. : 'he guest list, included Miss 
Twila Gliie's. Miss Dotty JCrafthefer, 
,Miss Dors Richter, . Miss Elsie 1 Sun- 
dahl, Miss Dagny Tharaldson, Lynn 
Halvorsor, Roscoe Bakko, iklilton 
Lund, W lliam Alexander and Clar- 
ence Knutson. 

Arthur Battenfeld celebrated his 
eleventh birthday by entert lining 
eleven of his playmates last Saturday 
afternoon Target parctice, boxing, 
wrestling and chosing a runawaj team 
passed th; time till six o'clock when 
a substantial supper was serve!, the 



Friday; January 13, 1922! 



The farm home of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Longren, northeast of the city 
was the scene of a delightful party 
Wednesday evening when thirty young 
folks gathered ip enjoy an evening 
of music apd games. 



EASTERN 

'♦ 



STAR INSTALLATION 

♦ 



AT THE CHURCHES 



Mi;s Elizabeth Sanfasaon who has 
;een a guest of Miss Martene Cloutier 
left ast evening for Minneapolis 
wher ! she is employed. 

! C. F. Franze, cashier of the Gully 
State bank, was a visitor in Thief 
Rivei Falls Wednesday, being the 
guest while here of Dr. A. Shedlov, 

Re ■'. 0. J. Lundell returned yester- 
day afternoon from Middle Rivei 
wher 1 he spent a day conducting mis- 
sion neetings, 

J Mil s Eva Stovern returned the first 
ofth i week to her home at Mcintosh 
after enjoying a few days visit with 
h>r s ster, Mrs. Irving Dale. 

Mr and Mrs. Val Yager of ! Spokane, 
■V'asr. ., former residents of this city, 
arrivi d here the first of the week and 
will ! pend an indefinite period visit- 
ir g d friends. 

A. S. Lieberman returned Tuesday 
e'enii:g from California where he ac- 
cmvpi.nied Mrs. Lieberman and -chil 
dren .vhere the latter' will spend the 
wdnte 

Mis; Esther Lunsetter who has 
spjent the 'holiday vacation with her 
paren :s -at Gatzke returned here the 
first < f the week to resume her studies 
atj th< local high school. 



At eight-thiry Monday evening, Jan- 
uary 9, Mrs. L. G. Larsen as Instalh 
ing Officer assisted by Mrs. C. A. Na- 
son as Marshall, I installed the follow- 
ing officers of th e Eastern Star' for 
the ensuing year: . Worthy Matron, 
Ann Quale; worthy patron, Edward 
Brevigj associate matron, Minnie Mo 
genson; secretary, Lillian Cronkhite; 
treasurer, Anna : Kingnorn; conduc- 
tress, Bessie Robinson; associate con- 
ductress, Hattie , I Manther; chaplain. 
Daisy Gobler; organist, Jessie Bran- 
ett; Adah, Adeline Heggan; Ruth, Ida : 
Tandberg; Martha, Lois Prichard; 
Electa, Adeline Quale; warder, Ethel 
McClelland; sentinel, H. A. Pratt. 

Helen Brink and Edna Larson, as 
Esther and Marshall, respectively, 
but who were unable to be present, 
will be installed/at a later date. 

Immediately following the installa- 
tion, bouquets of Mioses were present- 
ed to the installing officer and mar- 
shall in appreciation of their efficient 
work, which wa's followed by Mrs. 
Irma ! Mallory Fisher singing two so- 
los. 

. Lunch was then served by a com- 
mittee and during the refreshment 
hour Miss Palma Langseth played sev- 
eral piano solos. -The remainder of 
the evening was spirit in dancing, 
music being furnished by Miss Esth- 
er Smith and Miss Jessie Barnett.. 

Out of town guests were, Mrs. ' 0. 
Isaacson, of. Mahnomen, Mrs. C. J. 
Kelly, Devils' Lake, N. D., and Miss 
Olive Booren of Stillwater. 



CALL MEETING OF RUSSIAN 

COMMITTEE ON RELIEF 



Mis j Tillie Brandrud left Tuesday 
momi lg for Roseau where she is 
teacluhg school after spending the 
holiday vacation here with her par- 
ents, 



glory of which was a 



■ crowning 

birthday (Jake containing fortunes and 

The following boys en 

fun and the feast: Roy and 



feld. 



large 



■raisin pie. 

joyed the 

Johnnie donklin, Ray Clayton and 

Ralph Amiindson, Arthur Sorum, Roy 

Farrow, Gillman'and "Fatty" Grinde- 



land, Artrur, John and Fred Batten- J. p. Kelly, Mrs. H. W. Froehlich and 



J. H. .Hermanson returned here 
Wednesday evening from Bemidji and 
surroinding towns where he spent 
severe 1 days attending to various busi- 
ness natters, 

Misi Marie Wicks left the first of 
the wjek for Her home at Detroit af- 
ter si ending the past two weeks ... 
the cil y as a guest at the home of her 
sister, Mrs. F. P. Dablow. 

Mrs 0. Isaacson returned Tuesday 
momiig to her home at Mahnomen 
after spending the evening previous 
here ittending the Eastern Star in- 
stallat on. 

G. A , Darnell, representing Lindeke, 
Warm r & Sons of St, Paul, and who 
has be m in charge of the sale at Oen'_ 
will have tomorrow evening for his 
home it St. Paul. 

Mis: Ingrid Wassgren who has 
spent ;he holiday vacation at Warren 
and in this city with her brother and 
sister-: n-law, Mr, and Mrs. J. A. Wass- 
gren, left yesterday morning for Mid- 
dle Ri\ er near which place she : teaches 
school. ' 

Miss Edna A. Larson returned Mon- 
daj- ev ening after having spent her 
ChiistAias vacation visiting her broth- 
er,! Laivrenc e C. Larson, in Milwau- 
kee, aid her brother Dr. Clarence M, 
•Latson in Minneapolis. She also spent 
a few days in La Crosse and Tomah, 
Wisconsin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Johnson and Mr. 
amjl Mrs. H. C. Johnson leave this 
evening for Minneapolis. The former 
will return here in a few days while 
the, latter will continue on to Cedar 
Rapids; la., where they will spend a 
short time visiting before returning to 
this city. , i 

Mr. and Mrs. K. A. Sundahl were 
hosts ; on Wednesday evening when 
they entertained th e nurses, superin- 
tendent and assistant superintendent 
of the, Physicians hospital at their 
hoi le The guests included, Miss Stein- 
ke, Miss Stella Nelson, Miss Amend, 
Miss Wedmer, Miss Mollie Hermanson, 
Miss Lillian Provencher.'-Miss Grace 
McCrum, Miss Helen Norquist, Miss 
Dahl, Miss Wilde, Miss Ingeborg Dale 
and Miss Anna Aalberg, 

In compliment to Mrs. A. Booren 
of j Stillwater who is a guest at her 
home, JMrs. G. W. Booren, informal- 
ly [entertained a small company of 
ladies, j The diversion which was Nor- 
wegian whist was in play at three 
tables, thigh score being won by Mrs. 
H. jA. Brumund, while Mrs. J. C. Kel- 
ley; of; Devils Lake carried the low 
score. J The guest list included Mrs. 
A. Booren, Mrs. H. A. Brumund, Mrs. 
John Bratrud, Mrs. E. 0. Mogenson, 
Mrs. 0. F. Mellby, Mrs. A. S. apero, 
Mrs. E. F. Dolan, Mrs. F. H. Her- 
rick, Mrs. Lucile Johnson, ■ Mrs. H. 
WjJPnjtzeller, Mrs. R. H. Ross, ; Mrs. 



A meeting of the Russian commit- 
tee has been called by its chairman, 
Mrs. J. M. Bishop, to meet Monday 
evening, "January 16, at the Commerc- 
ial club rooms. It was decided not 
to put on a drive, but as there has 
been a great-deal of interest express- 
ed in regard to the work, the com- 
mittee feels justified in doing 'some- 
thing, but just what this may be has 
not as yet been decided uponi' It is 
thought that some definite plan for 
raising funds will be decided upon at 
the next meeting of the committee. 



Lutheran Church, Goodridgp— Sun- 
day, Jan. 15: German services at 10 
a. m. Sunday school at 2:00 p..m. 
English services at 3:00 p. m„ at Ger- 
manf own. .i Holy Communion will.be 
celebrated' in both services. — H. Lutz, 
pastor.' 



Trinity Lutheran Church— Confirm 
Mlon class meets at the parsonage 
Saturday at 10 a. m. Divine services 
in; English with communion 11 a. m. 
Special music. In Norwegian at 7:45 
p. m. Graded Sunday school and 
Bible class at 9:45 a. m. Annual busi- 
ness meeting of the congregation 
Tuesday, January 17, at 2 p. m. All 
vdting members asked to attend. - La- 
dies' Aid society will be entertained 
in the church parlors Thursday', Jan 
uary 19, by Mesdames Olaf Ramstad, 
James 0. Sether, 0. H. Nelson and 
Severt Benson. Young People's league 
holds its semi-annual business meet- 
ing the same evening. A good pro 
gram promised. Mesdames Louis 
Vevea, Adolph Williamson and T. E. 
Sweger entertain. Choir Practice 
Thursday evening. — T. E. Sweger, 
pastor. 



Scandinavian Evangelical Church — 
Services Sunday the 15th at 11 a. m. 
and 7:30 p. m. Sunday school 10 a. 
On Wednesday 7:30 p. m. the mid- 
week meeting for Bible study and 
testimony. You are cordially wel- 
come. — Bot Nyborg, pastor. 



ESSAY CONTEST 'I 



Red River Valley Winter Shpw s at 
Crookston Feb. 6 to 10 

The Red River Valley shows, which 
will be held at Crookston, February 
6-10, 1922, will carry out the- essay 
contest again this year. The contest 
is open to all school students up to 
and including the eighth grade. 

The subject should be of special in- 
terest: "The Future of the Red River 
Valley." This portion of our country 
is known world-wide. It is as yet 
only in the beginning of its develop- 
ment but has possibilities that' one 
can realize only after some study. 

Participation on the part of school 
children will serve a double purpose — 
to enlighten them on some of -the 
facts, of this wonderful valleyj and to 
offer material for language work. A 
committee was appointed by the 
Northwestern Minnesota Educational 
association to have this matter in 
charge, consiting of Supt. S. A. Aas, 
Fertile; Supt. Jos. Hamre, Erskine and 
Supt. David Johnson, Warren. They 
have- sent the rules and regulations 
to all schools in this district. Teachers 
would do well to get their pupils to 
work on this subject. Write to the 
Northwest Experiment Station at 
Crookston for material. 



Presbyterian Church— Sunday school 
at 11:45 a. m. Services at 11:00 a. 
m. Miss Clinton Cook will speak. 
Junior Endeavor at 3:00 o'clock. Chris- 
tian Endeavor at 7:00 o'clock. Bible 
class at 7:30 p. m. 

Don't miss the "Bible class Sunday 
evening 7:30 in the lecture room of 
the Presbyterian cnurch. You will 
miss it, if you miss it. F. F. Haynes, 
teacher; Mr. Kinghorn, president; Mr. 
Rhodes, secretary. You will fin a wel- 
c6me there. 



4 



^ ii H l t iti i ii M i ntinni 



PRESS 



ik; 



Y RUSH 



■♦ Several columns of r,important ♦ 

♦ local news matter was crowded ♦ 

♦ out of this issue owing to' a last ♦ 

♦ hour rush in the composing room ♦ 

♦ of the Tribune. ' ' * ' 4 

♦ .♦ 

♦ t lHUHHHH I HHHIIH 



FIFTY DIFFERENT WAYS 



Swedish E T engelicaI Mission Church 
— Sunday, .January 15, Sunday school 
10:00 a. m. Tuesday 8:00 p. m. pray- 
er meeting at the home of John Erick- 
son, Tindolph Ave. N. Friday 8:00 
p. m. Young People's- meeting and 
Bible study at church. Wednesday, 
January 18, at 2:30 p. m., Ladies' Aid 
will be entertained at the home of 
Mrs. L. D. Bjorkman, Zah St. and 
Riverside Ave. Welcome. — O. J. Lun- 
dell, pastor. 



ANNOUNCE MARRIAGE 
Announcements have been received 
here of the marriage of Miss Lillian 
Korstad, daughter of ! Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew Korstad of Henning, Minn., to 
Henry A. Petterson of Gwinner, N. 
D., the wedding taking place at the 
home of the bride's parents- on Jan- 
uary 4. The bride is well known here 
and is a highly accomplished young 
lady, having attended 'the local high 



Evangelistic Meetings — A series of 
gospel meetings will 'be held in the 
Swedish Baptist church, corner of 
Markley Ave. and Schuneman street, 
commencing Friday, January 13, and 
continuing every evening at 7:30, ex- 
cept Saturday. The Norwegian and 
the English languages will be used. 
Sunday 11:00 a. m. Norwegian; Sun- 
day evening, English. Rev. A. A. 
Ohm and Rev. L. O. Williams, both: 
traveling under the auspices of thei 
Minnesota Baptist State convention, 
will conduct these meetings. We de- 
sire the heartiest co-operation of the 
public, Come and hear for yourself. 
Our preaching will be strictly evangel- 
istic. 90-2t 



Are you using potatoes in 50 differ- 
ent ways? 

1. Baked potatoes. 
Stuffed potatoes. 
Riced potato. 
Mashed potato. 
Pptatoe cake. 
Boiled potatoes. 
Potato puff. 
Pptato pie. i 
Potato border. 
Potato soup. 
Potato chowder. 
Codfish balls. 
Potato loaf. 
Potato fritters. 
Potato cutlets. 
Potato croquettes. 
Potato and meat balls. 
Vegetable| scallop. 
Potato meat loaf. 
Fish and potato loaf. 
Hash. 

Potato stuffing for fowl. 
Curried potatoes. 
Scalloped potatoes. 
Creamed potatoes. 
Potatoes au gratin. 
Delmonico potatoes. 
French fried potatoes. 
Potato salad. 
Browned potatoes with 

roasts. 
Potato and fish salad. 
Potato biscuits. 
Potato dumplings. 
Potato muffins 

Potato, and cornmeal muffins. 
Potato pancakes. 
Potato pastry. 
Potato drop cakes. 
Potato cake. 
Potato bread. 
Potato rolls. 
Potato yeast. 
Holiday pudding. 
Potato custard. . ' 
Potato sponge cake. 
Potato doughnuts. 
Potato, roses. 
Potato nests. 
Potatoes with white sauce. 

— Home $ureau. 



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meat 



Patience is 
others." 



a splendid vixtue — in 



NOTICE FOR BIDS. 

Notice Is Hereby Given, That the 
undersigned will receive sealed bids 
for two buildings owned by Independ- 
ent School District No. 18, as follows: 
The old Knox school building, and the 
frame building located on the grounds 
back . of the Washington school, suefr 
buildings to be removed from the 
premises within a reasonable space of 
time. Bids will be opened on Monday, 
January 30, 1922, at 7:30 P.-M., at 
the Lincoln high school, and tne board 
reserves the right to reject any or all 
bids. 

By order of the Board of Educa- 
tion, this 11th day of January, 1922. 
MRS. L. G. LARSON, 
J-13-20-27 Clerk. 



NOTICE FOR BIDS. 
City Depository. 

Notice Is Hereby Given, That sealed 
bids will be received by the City Coun- 
cil of the City 'of Thief River Falls, 
Minn., for depositories of the moneys 
in the city treasury during the year 
ensuingl after January 31st, 1922, and 
that such bids must be filed with the 
City Clerk of said city prior to 8:00 
oWock P. MWanuary 31st, 1922, at 
which time all bids received will be 
opened and read and contract let for 
such depositories. 

Dated at Thief River Falls, Minne- 
sota, this 12th day of January, 1922. 

By Order of the City Council. 
• . A. H. AKRE, 
J-13-20 City Clerk. 



SOCIAL WELFARE SECTION OF 
WOMAN'S CLUB MEET MONDAY 



The Social Welfare section of the 
Woman's club will be held on next 
Monday afternoon. Work will be done 
in the room formerly occupied by the 
Scientists in the Auditorium and 
lunch will be served in the Commercial 
club rooms. Mrs. H. O. Chommie and 
Mrs. W. H. Akre will be hostesses. 
The demand for clothing has increas- 
ed during the recent cold weather and 
it is hoped that a large number of 
women will turn out and avail them- 
selves of the opportunity of assist- 
ing in this work. 



NOTICE 

Will the ladies of the' auxiliary to 
the American Legion who are mak- 
ing the pajamas for the service men 
in the hospitals send same tp the 
Lawrence Mortgage company by Sat- 

sXol^S^npa.^^-™- Mr, A. W. Sweden- 

1915. While here she made her home 



HAPPY NEW YEAR! 

"Grandpa," said little Eva, as she 
entered the library holding her 6- 
year-old brother by the hand, "we 
have come to wish you a Happy New 
Year." 

"Thank you, my dear," replied the 
old gentleman, "and I'm sure " 

"Yes," interrupted little Eva, "and 
mamma said we vjere to thank you 
if ypu gave each of us a silver dol- 
lar, and be sure not to lose them on 
the way home." 



NOTICE FOR BIDS. 
I ' City Printing. 

Notice Is Hereby Givem.That sealed 
bids will b e received by the city coun- 
cil of the City of Thief River Fails, 
Minnesota, for the publishing of the 
ordinances and proceedings of the 
council and other public notices re- 
quired by law, and the financial state- 
ment of the city, for th e year ensu- 
ing after January 31st, 1922, and that 
such bids must be filed with the 
city cleric of said city prior to eight 
o'clock P. M., January 31st, 1922, at 
which time all bids received will be 
opened and read and contraet let for 
such publishing. 

Dated at Thief River Falls, Minne- 
sota, this 12th day of January, 1922. 

By order of the city council. 

A. H. AKRE, 
Jan. 13-20 " City Clerk. 



CLASSIFIED COLUMN^ 



FOR RENT—ROOMS IN MODERN 

house, one block from post office. 

Inquire at the Tribune office. 91-lt 



FOR RENT— FULLY MODERN, 

well furnished rooms. Phone 280, 

8237 Knight Ave. N. 13-20-27 



EOOM— MODERN KOOM FOE RENT AT 
602 Main are. Mrs. O. H. OlBon. 00tf' 



HEMSTITCHING — SELMA 
JohliBon. 318 Horace ave. 



and; IDA 

'00-OTp 



Variety must truly be the spice of 
life or young ladies wouldn't be so 
anxipus to change their names. 



Afterthoughts are sometimes best, 
Woman was an afterthought. 

' NOTICE 

The Woman's Auxiliary and tht 
American Legion will hold a ; social 
meeting at the Masonic hall, Friday 
evening, January 17. 



BOMB SUSPECT 

fjfjWfflltea.-. 



with her cousin, William Korstad and 
family. During the past three years 
she has been employed as bookkeeper 
for the Munsingwear company at 
Minneapolis. Mr. and Mrs. Petterson 
will be at home after February first 
on the groom's farm near Gwinner. 



GIVE COWS A CHANCE 

SEE INCOME INCREASE 



Miss Olive Booren. 



'*. 



E. A. Hanson, dairy extension spe- 
cialist at University farm, ^renews 
the inquiry, "Are you keeping cows 
or are they keeping you," in a collec- 
tion of feeding suggestions recently 
issued by him. '■ 

"Put the cow to work," he.saysi 
"and she is the most efficient money 
maker on the farm today. A cow 
producing twenty-five pounds of four 
per cent milk daily makes one' pound 
of butterfat a day worth fifty cents. 
This cow needs rations and hay and 
sileage • which should not cost more 
than fifteen cents daily,' leaving thir- 
ty-five cents daily above the cost of 
her feed. Where can you invest your 
time and efforts to better advantage? 
Give your cows a chance. They are all 
capable of doing better when proper- 
ly fed." . ..;.-, 



PIANOS TUNED. 
Card. Phone 24 



Call 



A. L. 
91-3t! 



burg, president. 



'COAL — Order your hard and soft 
coal from the ChristenBon & Voelz 
Hardware Co. Phone 23. tf 




FOR RENT— MODERN 4-ROOM APART- 
ment, kitchenette and bath; may be had' 
after Feb. 15. Please phone for appoint- 
ment, Mrs. A. W. Swedenburg. 89tf 



WANTED TO BUIT— ONE REGISTERED 

Guernsey bull old enough for immediate 

service. Write W. H. Krueger, Red Lake 

Falls, Minn. 87-tf 



FOR SALE. TRADE OR RENT^-CITY. 

property and farms. See Andrew Ness 

and make a deal. Fl-22 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM FURNISHED 
h'ouse on Coniey ave. Immediate pos- 
session. Lawrence Mtg. Co. 79-tI 



FOR RENT— A MODERN FURNISHED 
rooms. 801 Main ave. N. Phone 309. 83tf 



FARM WANTED— WANTED TO HEAR 
from owner of a farm or good land for 
Bale, price reasonaBle. L. Jones, Box 551, 
Olney, 111. 



teleJctetJbsfo 



SHOW MB A REAL,. : 
WOMAN WHO WON'T 
S/5/E MONBx' IF HUBBY 
GIVES HER A CHANCE. 




i Picture is of Wolfe 'Lindenfeld, 
\ who has been arrested in Warsaw. 
; Poland, by the United Stales, as 
' the man who knows all about the 

Wall Street bomb explosion that 

killed 38 innocent people 



CARLOAD OF 

Corn 



<IWill have a carload of 
corn in Thief River Falls 
about fhe middle of 
next week. 

Get Your Order In Now! 

Prices Will Be 
Right ■ 



-INQUIRE- 



RetfLake Falls Milling 

Company 
■125. South LaBree 



(PTKAMO 
DOMtAJM 
MAIN ' 





fttr^nrni — t-AHwt: 



SHAU. 
EOWEV 
LA3CB 



CHJROPRACTiC 

VWLL GIVE yoU HEALTH 



Jennie M. 

EASTMAN 

Pioneer Chiropractic 

Hours 10-12 a. m., 2-5 p. m. 

Evenings by appointment. 

Phones: 213-1. Res. 213-2. 

Offices over First and Peopres' 
Bank BIdg. 



f 



^ 



_/t!ff.*^ - '. 




une by Phone If 
to Receive Your 
'wice a Week. 




[Loss of 
Causb 



V 



\ 



S' 



Back of 
Broken 

' is 



Local Lineup is 
When "Swede" 
Fore 3d to Eetire 



Bad Victory 
in Friday 
: Gam ein 



■ MHMMM I- 

♦ . : 
♦ 

♦ • 

♦ Two Harbors 

♦ Strand, L. 

♦ Knutson 
♦. Johnson 

♦ : 

♦ Stein 

♦ Strand 

♦ ; 
♦ I HtMMH 



order to 

team, when Twc 

the game after 



contests of thei 
it to their fri 
Had it not beer 



4 



Carlson 
of Defeat 



Tucked Awaj 
's Basket Ball 
Auditorium 



■ : ":". l"'? l ^?:~?-?&^i"r ! ;': '"■ v".55^'^|^*?f 



I- • i 



■ l. . .!!. . !!., .! . ^ .,!,,!,, . !jfe ^ _ 



•-.- ■V'~ 




r. I 



TWICE- A- WEEK 



■iv.- 



The Tribun, by Carrier, Twice 

a Week at Two .Dollars a 

Year; Subscribe for It 



u 



THIEF RiVER FALLS, MINNESOTA, TUESDA^, JANUARY 17, 1922 



$2 A YEAR IN ADVANCE 



THE LINEUP 



IIIIHM II HHt 

1 

Thief River <f 

Plummer <► 

Carlson <f 

Louden, 4 f 

Hadrath *| 

Holtzkhecht «| 

Brown, 4| 

Penney < 



SANITORIUM STAFF HOUSE COMPLETED 



If 



rg. 

is 



In the secont basket ball game oi 
a doubleheader bill played at the Au- 
ditorium Friday night between Tw< 
Harbors and T|hiei River Falls, thf 
two strongest fives of the Northwest 
were compelled to battle for suprem- 
acy in two extra five-minute sessions 



;ablish the winning 
Harbors carried away 
'Swede" Carlson, stai 
forward for Thief River Falls was 
seriously injured and had to be as- 
sisted from the floor. 

Although Two Harbors won by e 

! score of 27 to 25, the boys, from th( 

I other, end of th : state knew that;they 

had been through one of the toughest 

iir career, and admittet 

isnds after the game 

for the element of il 

luck which 1 ente red into the argumeni 

during the latt:r stages, it is safe t( 

Harbors would have 

not fared nearly so well. 

In a game leplete with action, ii. 
n 1 teamwork played th<; 
most . importan ; part, Thief River 
Falls carried the milling to their op 
ponents during the entire game. The 
contest started with a bang and end 
ed the . same \ 'ay, with the men o ! 
both teams up on their toes during 
which neither o|f the two crack teams 
gave an inch. 

Thief River trails started the .scor 
ing and durinj the first 15 minutes 
of play had run up what looked lik<; 
a comfortable jnargin. At this stage, 
Johnson, Two Harbors substitute, was 
taken from tha lineup and replacejl 
by Stein, who seemed to instill the 
necessary balaice to their attack and 




OAKLAND PA*Iv SASITORITJ31 AND" OKOCXI1 



Herewith is presented a view of the new j residence 
just i completed for the medical staff and nurses at the' 
Oakland Park Sanatorium. The building which » was 
completed at a cost of approximately $30,000, was ac- 
cepted by the commissipn on January 5th. Construc- 
tion! began last June.!; The structure is along colonial 
lines of [architecture, hollow tile andibrick.construction, 
two-jstory and basement, presents a ! most pleasing ap- 
pearance, and is in perfect harmony with the main San- 
atorium building and its beautiful surroundings. 

The first floor has .Six living. rooms, two; sun par- 
lors, three baths and a 'linen closet: The second floor 
has six living rooms, kitchen and two baths. The base- 



ment has eight living rooms, a reception room and two 
storage closets, . cement floors with oil sizing and en- 
amel paint. The interior of the building is finished in 
birch. 

General contractor— A. E. Rydlum, Minneapolis, 
i Plumbing and Heating— Ed. Lee, Thief River Falls. 

Electrical Contract— Arnsten Electrical Co., Min- 
neapolis. ' 

j Furniture for the new building was purchased 
through the; Larson Furniture Company, of this city. 
Medical Director Milan and the nurses are occupying 
their. new. quarters this week, thus releasing room 
greatly needed for patients in the Sanatorium. 



floor, where he lay for a few mo- 
ments painfully wounded. Time was 
immediately; called and Carlson assist- 
ed from tire" floor. 

The>whistle blew with the teams 
tied, necessitating another five min- 
utes of play, in which neither five 
was able to jscore the winning basket. 
Still another five-minute period was 
played' and Two Harbors talleyed four 
points, while Thief River Falls, owing 
to their crippled lineup, could muster 
but two. ' 

The greatest credit; must be given 
the local boys for the; high quality of 
the game they put up Friday night. 
They had as their Opponents a basket 
ball team that has experienced but 
four defeats in as many years. The 
Two Harbors five has played profes- 
sionally in various parts of the coun. 
try and have been accredited by Wal- 
ter Camp, famous Yale coach and 
famous sports writer, with being 
one of the! five best teams in the 
United Statees. To hold such a team 
to a tie is { something worth talking 
about v Taking the foregoing facts 
his teammates took matters in hand I into consideration, it is not too much to 
until they evened the score in the firs ( t|say that Thief River Falls has an all- 



half, which ended 12 to 13. 

Thief River Falls was on the of- 
fensive all the way and carried the 
Rattle to Two Harbors during the en- 
tire half, settiiig a pace so. fast that 
the lake town boys seemed highly 
confused at th( ir speed and accuracy,. 
Two Harbors, >n the other hand, put 
up the most stubborn kind of resist- 
ance and fought the terrific on- 
slaughts of tie local stars as best 
they could. 

Carlson was sverywhere and no im- 
portant play came off without his hav r 
ing a hand in it. He easily walked 
off with the lonors of the evening. 
Two Harbors Epparently was amazed 
' at his speeds i ,nd accuracy when he 

\ flung basket ifter basket from difj- 
,'ficult positions and tore^hrough their 
'defense like a vild cat. J 

Louden, whe again appeared in 
. Thief River Fills uniform, played an 

■ excellent gam< and perhaps not an 
opening occuri ed . but what he took 
advantage of tie situation and chalk- 
ed up a tally ::or Thief River Falls.| 
Almost every basket ball game has 
its spectacular and brilliant plays, 
but the basket flung by Lpuden dur- 
ing the game Friday night perhaps 
stands head over heels above any sp 
far seen here tjhis year. From a deep 
left position he flung a cage that went 
through the ri; n for the cleanest kind 
of a score. The ball didn't even touch 
the rim and ilmost took the breath 

i of the spectatc rs. 

! Holtzknecht, Brown, Louden, Plum- 
mer, Carlson- stars all of there 
went down fiihting for Thief River 

i Falls as they had never fought befori. 
Had it not bem for the unfortunate 
accident that -befell the gallant and 
militant "Swede" during the final fe- 



!star aggregation of basketballers that 
must be reckoned with whatever and 
whomever they play and local follow- 
ers feel that they are represented by 

team of the highest order. 

Although ! they lost both games to 
Two Harbors, they demonstrated 
both contests, more particularly in the 
game Friday night, that they are an 
extremely difficult aggregation to 
contend with. 

Another record crowd turned out for 
Friday night's game and enthusiasm 
for Coach Cpnnell's men- ran high. The 
eager; crowd of basket ball followers 
made the walls of the Auditorium ring 
every time ; Thief River Falls scored 

THIEF RIVER FALLS UNION 
MEN HOLD WEEKLY MEETING 



minutes of pi; 



The contest 
ory for Thief 
final few mini 
son, in attemi 



fered with by 



y, there would ha\ 



been an entire y different outcome 

His services wjre lost to Thief Rivdr 

Falls at the cracial moment when the 

local boys had victory within their 

grasp and as s lddenly had it snatched 

from them wh m the backbone of tte 

team was brolen in the loss of the 

aggressive forward. 

' looked like a clean vie;- 

River Falls until the 

tes of play when Car 

ting to fling the wii- 

ning basket fir his men. was inter- 



Strand, Two Harbois 



guard, who interfered with his plajy 
arid sent the "Swede" crashing to thje 



Russian Relief 
Week Jan. 20-27 



Week's Drive to Be Conclud- 
ed With Monster Dance 
at Auditorium 

Store Room to*" Be Opened 
" For Collection of Art- 
icles of Value- 



Labor Turns Out 
at Mass Meeting 



Seyeral Hundred Workerg 
and Farmers Attend Ral- 
ly at Auditorium 



The Thief River Falls Federation 
of Union Men held their weekly meet- 
ing last night, - at which various 
phases of ,the local labor situation 
were discussed and activities of the 
future decided upon. 

Various committee's were appointed 
at the meeting last night, one of 
which; will Icollect money from local 
unhtai men [in behalf of the strikers 
at"the South St. Paul stockyards; 

RIVERSIDE ENCAMPMENT IN- 
STALL- OFFICERS SATURDAY 



Riverside I Encampment, No. 22;"held 
their installation of officers Saturday 
evening, January 14, at the I. O. O. 
F. hall. District deputy, Grand Patri- 
arch Fred Dablow, installing officer, 
assisted by High Priest E. M- Stanton; 
Sr., and Aridy Anderson, installed the 
following officers for the ensuing 
year: ■ j • '" 

Chief Patriarch, John Gasow; senior 
warden? Hans Hickne: high priest, 
Xrttrif Berg; scribe, Bernhard Knut- 
son; treasurer, T. P^Anderson; guide, 
A. G. 1 Gabrielsonj inside sentinel, Ole 
Hedalen; first watch; George Swan- 
son; second watch, A. B. Stenberg; 
third watch, C. F. Erickson; fourth 
■watch, Arthur Johnson; first guard of 
tent, Henry McMahon; second guard 
of tent, H.; Lazier. 



-Touched by the tales of want and 
suffering sent out by Russian relief 
expeditions, the local committee de- 
cided to revive the idea of a week's 
drive in order to raise the quota asked 
of Pennington county by the* state 
committee, and accordingly called 
a meeting last evening at the Com- 
mercial club rooms. Mrs. J. M. Bishop 
chairman, presided, and Mayor Brat- 
rud was ^elected secretary. 

It was determined to conduct a 
week's drive for funds, beginning next 
Friday, January 20, to continue for 
a week, ending with a monster dance 
at the Auditorium on Friday evening; 
January 27. Quarters are being sought 
today for a store room, which will be 
in charge of M r - Quist, where articles 
which can be converted into cash will 
be collected. Here articles of furni- 
ture, clothing, and particularly grain 
and produce, may be left for sale. for 
the benefit of the relief fund. . 

In addition to the general commit- 
tee announced in a previous issue of 
the Tribune, the following committee 
members were selected last evening: 

Goodridge — Messrs. Jensen, Rockne 
and Elmer Olson. ■ 

St. Hilaires— Messrs. Burkee and 
Holm. 

Mavie — Thos. Smith. ; 

Hazel — Paul Borgie. 

Thief River Falls — 1st ward, Bern- 
hard Knudson; 2d ward, O. A. Naplin; 
3d ward, Frank Mousley; 4th ward, 
Mr. Ecklund. 

Town of North — Mr. Rustad. 

Dance comrhittee — L. A. Lampert, 
chairman, Chas. Lieberman, Geo. Lok- 
eri, H. S. Snyder, L. Lawrence, Chas. 
Vprachek, 0. F. Huldeen, Mrs. Mont- 
■omery, Mrs. Froelich, Mrs. Bottle- 
son, Mrs. Brumund, Miss Lena Loh- 
son. 



On 



January 27 the camp will have 
Patriarchial Degree and refreshments 
will be served. ■ > 



Some species of shrimps are said to 
lodge' particles of sand in their an- 
tennae to enable them to hear. 




PRIZE CONTEST COMES TO 
1 CLOSE SATURDAY P. 



M. 



The free prize contest inaugurated 
by the Thief River music company 
shortly before the holidays, will come 
to; a close at 3 o'clock Saturday after- 
noon' when the winners will be" an- 
nounced. - 

The company offers an opportunity 
to its patrons to win more than $200 
in prizes in a Brunswick nhonograph 



President E. G. Hall and 
.. John J. Manning Give 
Stirring Addresses 



The labor rally and mass meeting, 
given under the auspices of the Thief 
River Falls Federation of Union men 
at the Auditorium Saturday night, at 
which ; . E. G. Hall, president of the 
Minnesota State Federation of Labor, 

d John J. Manning, representative 
of [ the label department of the Am- 
erican Federation of Labor, delivered 
the .principal addresses, was well at- 
tended. It is estimated that several 
hundred workers, including a number 
of farmers and sympathizers of the 
labor movement in this vicinity, heard 
the messages delivered by the two 
labor leaders. 

Mr. Hall gave the opening address 
and presented a general review of the 
federation's work in the state during 
the past year. He outlined to those 
present the great necessity of organ- 
ization, more particularly now than at 
any other time in the history of labor, 
in view of the present object of the 
predatory interests at work in the 
United States bent on destroying the 
least semblance of organizationon the 
part of the workers. 

If organization on the part of 
those who oppose us," declared Mr. 
Hall, "is beneficial to them, why is it 
not a good thing for us? We have 
already demonstrated to the world 
that our aim csoincide with every 
argument for civilization, yet they 
call us un-American and are at- 
tempting to force upon us their vers- 
ion of the square deal in industry, 
namely the "American plan,"- which 
has for its object the taking away 
from labor of its contsitutional rights 
under the law for collective bargain 
ihg in the matter of hours, conditions 
and wages, and substituting their idea 
by forcing upon us a plan whereby 
they will be the absolute dictators, 

j'We are all aware of what their 
success has been. It need not be said 
here that they have been defeated in 
almost every attempt to strip labor of 
its inherent rights." _ ■ 

"- Mr. Hall told of various activities 
of the federation , in Minnesota, par- 
ticularly in the larger cities of the 
state,- such as Minneapolis, St. Paul 
and-Duluth. He said that the, work- 
ers in these cities present a solid 
front and the reports sent broadcast 
by their enemies that labor there had 



a violin and a choice' of a number of _„ _ 

phonograph records. Tickets entitling become an unknown, quantvty were 
the holder to a chance on any one of characterized by him as deliberate 



the foregoing articles are issued on 
each dollar's worth of merchandise 
purchased and the drawing of the win- 
ners Saturday afternoon promises to 
be an interesting event to all who 
have numbers entered in the contest. 



Genius has been explained by an 
Irish surgeon as the product of a 
germ which gets into and round the 
human brain. 



falsehoods and that he could prove it 
by facts and figures. 

Mr. Manning spoke on the benefic- 
ial effects of the union label as it 
concerns the workers everywhere. He 
said the label is labor's weapon of 
peace and that it stands for the square 
deal in industry and guarantees the 
article bearing it inasmuch as it is 
the symbol of a fair Say's work for 
a fair day's pay. He urged all pres- 



ent, as well as all sympathizers of 
the cause of labor, to pay more at 
tentibn to its meaning and that they 
should demand it on every thing they 
purchase. 

Mr. Manning spoke more fully re 
garding labor's program at Washing- 
ton and urged his hearers to in fu 
ture pay mor e attenttion to the doings 
of their representatives in Congress 
than they had heretofore. 

The Poindexter bill, which recently 
passed the senate, he classed as espe- 
cially vicious in that it provides severe 
penalties upon labor leaders when 
their utterances on labor questions fail 
to meet the views of the mayors or 
police chiefs in any part of the couh 
try. The law stipulates that a fine 
of ?10,000 or 10 years imprisonment, 
or both, may be inflicted upon the 
victims of the law, and that persons 
arrested may be tried in any part of 
the country which the trial judge may 
designate. He took severely to task 
the two Minnesota senators. 



DAVID EVENSON^ACCIDENT 

VICTIM, FULLY RECOVERS 



Knox Dedication; 
Draws Crowd 



Prof. Hay Pays Compliment 

to Board of Education 

for Building Economy 



W. W. Prichard, Jr., Con- 
' tractor, Gives Credit to 
Faithful Workmen 



David Evenson, son of Martin Ev- 
enson, who two weeks ago had his 
left forearm shattered by the ac- 
cidental discharge of a 38-calibre re- 
volver while on a skiing expedition 
south of th e city, is thought to have 
fully recovered from his injury. He at- 
tended school Monday for the first 
time since the fatality and apparent- 
ly is none the worse off for his nar- 
row 'escape. 



BREDESON & CO., GROCERS. 
MOVE TO LARGER QUARTERS 



Bredeson & Co., 'of Thief River 
Falls, dealers' in groceries, fruits, etc., 
and everything connected with a gen- 
eral grocery business, have recently 
moved into more spacious quarters. 
The firm, which was formerly located 
at 303 Main- avenue North, have 
moved next door, 301 Main avenue 
North, arid all. day Saturday they will 
serve free coffee and cake to their pa- 
tronsl 

The concern has made numerous im- 
provements in their new quarters and 
invite all their- old friends to come in 
Saturday for .coffee and cake and in- 
spect their new quarters. 

Announcement is made- in an adver- 
tisement in The Tribune of the good 
things in store for. Saturday visitors 
to the Bredeson store. 



TOM K. HOVET, GRAIN 

MAN, DEAD AT ST. HILAIRE 



Tom K. Hovet, grain huyer at St. 
Hilaire died Monday morning of ap- 
pendicitis. The'deceased. was born in 
this state and was 45 years of age 
at the time of his demise. Burial 
will take place Wednesday, January 
18, at St. Hilaire. 



NORDEN TOWNSHIP, OLD 

i SETTLER, DIES SATURDAY 

Ole Rogne, age sixty years and 
an old- settler of Norden township, 
passed away Saturday morning after 
a lingering illness. Funeral services 
will be held Friday afternoon at Lar- 
son's undertaking parlors, Rev: T. E. 
Sweger, officiating, and interment will 
take . place at Greenwood cemetery! 

. Deaf people are . to have . special 
churches in Germany, with telephone 
between the pulpit and the news. 



, If the friends of Knox school are 
worshippers at the shrine of hoodoo 
signs, their fears of bad omen must 
have been dispelled by the overwhelm- 
ing success of the dedicatory exercises 
on the evening of Friday, January 
13th. The exercises were somewhat 
delayed by the counter attraction at 
the Auditorium — the basket ball game 
— but the people spent the interim in 
a critical inspection of the building, 
which was illuminated from cellar to 
garret. "When the ■ exercises opened 
every chair in the spacious auditorium 
was occupied and hundreds stood up, 
filled the vacant spaces at the sides 
or viewed the ceremony from vantage 
points around the light well on the 
second floor. 

Prof. J. H. Hay, who delivered the 
principal address, devoted himself to 
h general discussion of education, or 
to be more exact — the lack of it in % 
certain rural communities. He brush- 
ed aside the sentimntal viewpoint sur-/ 
rounding the little red school house, 
and insisted that means must be found 
for extending better educational ad- 
vantages to the children of the coun- 
try. This led him to make, as a com- 
parison, a statement of the service 
rendered by the high schools and con- 
solidated schools that- exist in many 
communities. Particularly did he call 
attention to instances of great service 
and benefit bestowed upon worthy pu- 
pils from isolated townships by the 
Thief River high school, arid he re- 
cited how several graduates of .the 
local schools who have since won high 
standing and respect in their chosen 
professions, were assisted in their 
early struggles by men well known 
locally. Prof. Hay, who served as 
principal of schools in this city for 
many years, reviewed the east side 
schools from their inception. He spoke 
of the several additions to the .old 
Knox wooden building, and successive- 
ly recounted the evolution which has 
culminated in the present magnificent 
Knox — a credit to the east side and 
the school system of the city. Prof. 
Hay expressed his personal pleasure 
at being in Thief River Falls among 
his old friends, where, in contrast to 
the big cities, he claimed to find the 
purest democracy and an absence of 
snobbish arictocracy. In conclusion he 
dedicated the new Knox to the aris- 
tocracy of- Intellect. Character . and 
Energy — The dominating influences of 
education. Prof Hay took occasion to 
compliment the board upon their-fpre- 
sight in planning the building, making 
the statement that more than 5100,000 
had been saved to the tax payers by 
delaying construction a year and then 
utilizing the basement and parts of 
the walls of the old building. 

Supt. Simley spoke briefly on edu- 
cational subjects and Dr. Froehlich 
then opening the . exercises by intro-! 
ducing W. W. Prichard, Jr., who re- 
turned to the architect the plans and 
the key to the new building. Mr. 
Prichard gave all. credit for the per- 
fections of the building to th e ef- 
ficient workmen who interpreted^the 
plans submitted. Following his re- 
marks the architect, Mr. Dunham, of 
the firm of Sund &. Dunham, who su- 
pervised the construction, made a 
short address, at the conclusion of 
which he presented the plans and key 
of- the Knox to President Froehlich, 
who made the acceptance on behalf 
of the board and citizens of the city. 

Several musical selections enlivened 
the exercises. Carl Sundahl. sang a 
solo in his usual happy manner, and 
a piano solo by Herman Bischoff, the 
blind musician, received viciferous ap- 
plause froin the audience. He re- 
sponded with an encore. 

Several selections were rendered by 
the high school orches&a under the ' 
direction df Miss Maude L. Johnson, 
and to say that this excellent musical 
organization acquitted themselves K>. 
a manner which captured the audience, 
is putting it mildly. The juvenila^per- 
formers are on a fair way to be come 
artists of renown, and they demon- 
strated their sportsmanship by ap- 
pearing on the scene early and con- 
tributed much to the pleasure of the 
assemblage at a time when the temp- 
tation was great- to be elsewhere^ — at 
a basket ball game, for instance. The 
board of education, and for that .mat- 
ter all who attended the exercises, are 
deeply, indebted^ to the young women 
and men who gave the musical selec- 
tions. - • • ■ 



Passengers and others killed in 
French railway accidents during 1920; 
numbered 122. 



J 



.V 



1 




' * 




PageTJvo. 



The Tribune 

SEMI-WEEKLY. 



ESTABLISHED 1901. 



J. S. AKNiESON 
S. V. AHKESON 



Published 

Thiif Hirer Falls, Minn, 




THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1922 



Editor 

Associate Editor 



ADAM WISHED APPLE 

! ! ON MALE DESCENDANTS 



Entered at second| class matter at the 
post office it Thief| River Falls, Minn., 
ander the A:t of March 3, 1879. 



SUBSCRIITION $2.00 PER YEAR. 



HENRY FORD 

The Tribune is in receipt 
lenghy con munication from the *'Fer- 

are 



tilizer-Trpfet" in which figures 

submitted to show how the govern^ 

ment woul 1 lose millions of dollars . . 

should Heijry Ford acquire the Muscle .Jj to ' ^ effect thafc when Adam , at . 



Shoals nitiate plant. AJ1 of which is 
piffle and bunk. This newspaper is 
not in accord with all of Ford's ideas, 
and we si all not now undertake to 
discuss the sale of th e Muscle Sioals 
plant, for the^very good reason that 
we lack fa :ts and figures upon which 
to base such discussion, but neverthe- 
less, and lie point we wish to nake 
is that if the government conducted 
its business with one-half the wisdom 
displayed by Henry Ford the peojle of 



the country would have cause for 
gratulation Furthermore we 
much suspt ct the interest of the 
mentioned Fertilizer Trust in prctect- 
ing the government in the sale o. the 
nitrate plant, is nbt based so much on 
their desiri to save the people from 
loss as it i; their fear that Ford 
prove a to igh competitor in the 
tilizer business. 



Wheni the world was not so full of 

books as it is at present the Bible was 

more thoroughly read, although it 

may not have been as widely read 

rery Tuesday and Friday at 'as it now is. Our forefathers were 

" .fond of j pursuing the stories and the 

incidents contained therein even fur- 
ther than the scriptural explanations. 
Legends go much further than the 
Book of Genesis, which merely relates 
the episode of Ev e and the apple in 
the briefest and most concise lan- 
guage, and connect different kinds of 
birds and animals with the Fall of 
Man. incidents are introduced that 
do not appear in the original version. 
jOne such legend is responsible for 
the name "Adam's apple" as applied 
to 1 the thyroid cartilage of the larynx, 
a | projection which is more apparent 
man! than in woman. This legend 



of a 



con- 
very 
bove 



will 
fer- 



that 



The real] point concerning Judge 
Hallam's campaign for United S;ates 
senator wHle he holds the offiqe of 
justice of ;he supreme court is 
the farmers of the Minnesota 
stitution felt the danger of judicial, 
officers mi::ing in non-judicial politics 
and forbad > such practices. The peo- 
ple will agree that our forefa;hera 
were wise when they made the rule, 
and, when they fully understand the 
situation, wll insist that it be not 
violated or dodged or evaded. -Those 
who have expressed themselves vith 
out prejudice declare that Judge Hal- 
lam's attitude toward our fundanent- 
al law is i nproper and unethica . He 
is sworn U support the constitut on — 
and that means both its spirit and it? 
: letter. ' ' 



ARE GIHJLS' ANKLES GETTING 
BIGGER7 

Dolly 'Verden, according to tin: old 
song, had dainty little feet anc 
kles — but, iccording to the modern 
observer, I oily never wore low shoes 
in season rnd out ofreeason. The re- 
sult was that Dolly'sjankles were kept 
neat and trim and *hat the modern 
: girl's ankles are getting anything but 
no at. 

It has Ung been the boast o1 ad 
herents of the American girl that no- 
where on earth are there t 
ankles as s 



tempted to swallow the bite of hi 
apple from th e Tree of Life he choked 
arid the fruit stuck in his throat. 
All males since Adam have. had this 
protuberance as silent evidence of the 
indiscretion of their ancestor. In this 
legend Adam received the punishment 
of: eating the apple although he 
never had the delight of swallowing 
it. 



ESTATE OF CHARLES W. TLAIN. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY* OF 

Pennington, In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Charles W. 

Plain, Decedent, j 

The State of Minnesota, To Agnes M. 
Plain, Karl A. Plain; Urban L. Plain, 
Thomas H. Plain, Dorothy Plain, and all 
persons interested in the granting of ad- 
ministration of the estate of Baid deced- 
ent: The Petition of John Wild and H. 
.G. Halvorson having j been filed In this 
Court, representing that Charles W. Plait), 
then a resident of the | County of Ca ( valier, 
State of North Dakota, died Intestate on 
the 28th day of November, 1020, and pray- 
ing that letters of administration of his 
estate be granted to John Wild and H. G. 
Halvorson, and the Conrt, having fixed the 
tune and place for hearing said petition: 

Therefore, You, and; Each of You, Are 
Hereby cited and required to show cause, 
if any you have, before this Court, at the 
Probate Court Kooms in the Court House, 
in the City of Thief River Falls, in the 
County of Pennington, State of Minnesota, 
on the 10th day of February A. D., 1922, 
at 10 o'clock A. M., iwhy said petition 
should not be granted, 

WITNESS, The Judge of said Court, and 
the seal of said Court, this 10th day of 
January", 1022. 

LARS BACKE, 
(SEAL) Probate Judge. 

THEO. QUALE, 

Attorney for Petitioners. J-17-24-31 



age American girl, once upon a 



Since th 
things are 
getting a 
say franklV 



it is due nore to the fact that 



walk more\ and take more exercise of alimony, 
than their mothers and grandmothers j '■ 
did. Whici is to blame for the larg- 
er ankles- -exercise or low shoes? | 



WHAT 



JUDGE WOULD DO. 

"When Ji dge King of Boston refused two broilers at her and followed them 
to find Jsmes G. McLean guilty of with the platter on which the fowl re 
kcepin gar d exposing liquor for sale, posed, Mrs. Jane D. Lenz asked the 
still was discovered :n his court to award her alimony of $2F 
ixplained that he was not a week and counsel fees of $2,500, in 
the prisoner to encourage her seperation suit. The court 
of moonshine. The judge 'awarded her $30 a week alimony and 
many counsel- fee of §200. Lenz malces a 



although £ 
barn, ' he 
dischargin 
v the makin 
further sdid: "In Boston are 
men, some 
. are assist 



of whom are wealthy, who sweeping denial of the charges against 
id by their wives in the him and claims that his wife took his 
manufacture of moonshine. I venture motor car from in front of a New 
to say thtt some of our most promi-^York City hotel one evening, and 
nent citizens, who have their own lit- 'drive away in it leaving him "flat." 

tie stills, may be hiding in the bushes i ' ■ — 

when the aolice arrive to seize the il- \ [MURDEROUS LOWE 

legal appa ratus. If I had one I should , Sarah Kline, 23 ; years old, a Brook- 



have probably done the same." 



IN 



centuries 
mous by 



Anthony 
Island, N. 



love and e 
children 



sons $1 er 
tato. whijeh 
S2.000. 



Gas- tar 
from the 
"work. 



SHUNNED LOVE 

Four brothers started a small farm 
at] Rossville, Station Island, N. .Y., 
more than half a century ago and 
prospered in their endeavors. They 
decided that bringing a wife or wives 
inio the home would cause dissention 
anjd made a pact not to marry. This 
pact has been kept and only one of 
thi brothers, Andrew Drake of West- 
field, Station Island, now past the four 
score mark, survives. Jesse Drake 
died recently. John Drake died a few 
years ago and William was killed by 
a trolley car a year later. They were 
allj well known characters on Staten 
Island and Andrew, who inherited the 
property of his brothers, is the only 
one of) the family remaining! 

BOOTLEGGER VS. MILLIONAIRE. 

Frank A. Vanderlip, the well known 
New York banker, recently tried to 
clean up the village of Sparta and to 
do! so bought up the entire village, 
paying fancy prices f^ r pome of the 
property. The objectionable inhabi ^ 
tants were requc'-i".! '* fnd another 
place to; live in, while the. law abiding 
wejre invited to remain. A former sa- 
loonkeeper, who sold Ms real estate at 
a high price, left the village for some 
tinje but has returned and has openea 
soft drink" emp->rium. where hard 
liquor can be secured. Before he sola 
his property the saloonkeeper had 
been arrested on the charge of i lling 
liquor illegally. 



DODGING ALIMONY 

Mrs. Harriet Loeffler has brought 
suit against her husband, from whom 
she has; secured a decree of separa- 
tion, asking that he be forced to give 
( security; for the payment of the ali- 
b e found ; mo ly awarded her by the court. She 
nail as in this land, il was further brings suit in the name of her 
considered- a n-nrk of beauty hi the 15-month old son for libel, alleging a 
Orient for the girl to be able tj> en- reflection has been made on his legit i- 
circle her aikle with thn flnsers of one macy by his father. George H. Loeff- 
hand. 'Thiip was no trick for the aver- lerj her ! husband, is 20 years old. He 



lay. is the son of a wealthy builder and 



vogue of the low shoe will be 'given control of a large for- 

different. The ankles are timje when he comes of age. The 

rifle larger, and the girls statement is made in th e suit that hi 

Why not?" They claim has threatened to give all his money 



they to his mother to dodge the payment 



j ! LOVE'S TARGET 
| Because* her husband, Charles E. V. 
iLeiiz, broker and oil promoter of West 
1 1sli'p, Long Island, New York, threw 



Order Limiting Time to File Claims and 
for Hearing: Thereon. 

STATE OP MINNESOTA, COUNTY OP 

Periuington, ss. In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Sanford A. 

Burnham, Decedent. 

Letters of administration this day having 
been granted to George W. Burnham, 

It Is Ordered, That the time within which 
all creditors of the above named decedeut 
may present claims against his estate in 
this' Court, be, and the same hereby is, 
limited to three months from and after 
the date hereof; and : that Saturday, the 
15th day of April, 1922, at ten o'clock A. 
M., in the Probate Court Rooms, at the 
Court House, at Thief River Falls, in said 
County, be, and the same hereby Is, i'.xed 
and appointed as the time and place foi 
hearing upon and the examination, ad- 
justment and allowance of such claims as 
shall be presented within the time iifore- 
Baid. 

Let notice hereof be given by the pub- 
lication of this order in Thief ltiver Kalis 
Tribune, as provided bylaw. 

Dated January 13, 193J. 

LARS BACKE, 
(COURT SEAL) Judge of Probate. 

H. O. CHOMMIE, 

Attorney. J-17-24-31 



BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Special meeting of Board of Education, 
District No. 18, held January 4th, 1922. 

Meeting called to order by President 
Frochlich. 

Members present — Mellby, Mogensen, 
Froehlich, Backe, Rayaon. 

Members abBent — Larsen. ■ 

Moved by Mellby and seconded by Backe. 
tliHt gsneral contract of the new Knox 
building be accepted with the understand- 
ing that the Blight defects' as reported by 
architect be remedied and that $450 be 
deducted from contract price to cover in- 
stallation of sidewalks and finish the out- 
side painting. 

Motion carried. 

Moved by Mogensen, and seconded by 
Bakke, that the. heating and ; plumbing 
contract of the new Knox building be 
accepted with the understanding that the 
alight defects' as reported by the architect 
be taken care. of. 
, Motion carried. 

Moved by Mogensen, seconded by Mellby". 
that tke electrical contract of the new 
Knox building be accepted with the un- 
derstanding that the slight omissions as 
reported by architect be taken care of. 

Motion carried. 

Motion adjourned. 

L. M. RAYSON, 

Clerk Pro Tern. 
Approved : 

DR. H. W. FROEHLICH, 

President. >' 

Regular" meeting of Board of Education, 
held in directors room, . Lincoln High 
School, Monday evening, December 12, 
with following members present; 

Backe, Rayaon, Mogensen, Mellby, Lar- 
sen. 
Absent — Froehlich. 

Moved by Backe, seconded by MogantK-n, 
lint bills be allowed. 
Carried. 

No .further . business being presented, 
meeting adjourned. 
American Book Co., elementary 

texts 519 IS 

F. L. Comstock, banking Knox 

building 20 00 

Andy Craik, repairs on bus 30 25 

Dodd, Mead & Co., encyclopedia for 

hl,gh sch»oI, first payment 30 00 

Pelfner Efteland, sawing and haul- 
ing wood 14 25 

GInn & Co., Normal training library 
bookB, $7.50; high school texts, 
57.82; elementary texts, $187.50... 202 82 
W. K. Hoefer, repair of gymnasium 

floor, high school 5 15 

Klewell Products . Co., drinking 

atraws, etc ; . . 3 20 

LaCoe & Fontaine, drayage 175 

Loken'a Department Store, mate- 
rials e «5 

McFarland Automobile Co., Smith- 

, Hughes supplies 4 15 

Northwestern School Supply Co., ■ 

index cards, trays, etc 10 U0 

Northwestern School Supply Co., 
instructional material and Bup- 

Pl'es ■ 44 05 

Nortz Lumber Co., materials for re- 
pair of gymnasium floor 2 85 

J. W. Pepper Co., orchestra music. 9 59 



CITY DRAY & FUEL COMPANY 
L. MANTHER, Maaacer. 

FUEL OP ALL KINDS 

Phone 176/ Thief River Fall«, Minn. 



Peoples Auto Co., science depart- 
ment (acetylene tank) 3 04 

Dora C. Perry, expenses to confer- 
ence November 2 25 00 

Prichard Company, manual training 
supplies and repair materials 48 53 

Benjamin H. Sanborn Co., high 
school texts 14 74 

Scott, ForeBman & Co., classics, 
$70.95; high school texts, S10.05... 81 00 

Simonson's Grocery Co., home eco- 
nomics supplies 32 00 

Alice Stapleton, expenses to con- 
ference November "2 24 99 

Thief River Clinic, applicators 100 

Times Printing Co., office supplies, 
etc 73 70 

Winton-Nichols Co., manual train- 
ing supplies 20 50 

Zeh & Curran, teachers' reception.. 3 13 

Total ■ 5744 72 

(MRS.) FRANCES R.| LARSEN, 

Clerk. 
Approved : 
DU. H. W. FROEHLICH, 
President. 

NOTICE OF CANCELLATION OF IJ.ND 
CONTRACT. 

TO CARL ARVID CARLSON, TRIUMPH, 

Minnesota. 

Take Notice, That you ore in default, un-; 
der and according to the terms, conditions 
and provisions of - that certain Contract 
dated the 2nd day of April, 1919, whereby 
John Bratrud, of the City of Thief River 
Falls, County of Pennington and State of 
Minnesota, agreed to convey unto you, 
upon full and timely performance by you 
of your part of the terms-, conditions and 
provisions thereof, reference to ;which 
Contract for more particularity is hereby 
made, of the following described real es- 
tate situated in Pennington County, State 
of Minnesota: 

The Southeast Quarter (SE*4) of Section 
Fourteen (14), Township One Hundred 
Fifty-four (154), Range Forty-one (41), 
containing. 100 acres,' more. lor less, accord- 
ing to the Government survey thereof. 

And that according to the terms, condi- 
tions and provisions of sajd Contract there 
became due and payable from you to said 
John Bratrud on the 1st day of July, PI1U, 
the sum' of Seven Hundred and 110-IOO' 
($700.00) Dollars, with interest thereon at 
six (ii) per cent per annum from the 2nd 
dny of April. 1919: and on the 2nd day of 
January, 19^1, the further Bum of One 
Hundred Fifty (?150.00) Dollars, the Bniue. 
being interest on the mortgage assumed 
under the contract, and on the 2nd day 
of January, 1022, the further sum of One 
Hundred Fifty ($150.00) Dollars, being In- 
terest on the mortgages assumed under the 
contract, which payments, at this dale, 
amount to the ■ sum of Eleven Hundred 
Twenty-six and 85-100 ($1,126.85) Dollars, 
Including the Interest and at the date of 
this notice said amount and interest- still 
remains overdue and unpaid, and such de- 
fault as above specified still exists: 

Now, Therefore, You Are Hereby Noti- 
fied, That unless on or before ninety-one 
(91) days after the service of this notice 
upon you, you pay to me at Thief River 
Fulls, Minnesota, the amount of money 
above stated, with interest to the' date of 
payment, and the costs of service of tnis 
notice, nnd perform the terms and condi- 
tions, and comply with the provisions of 
said contract on your part to be performed, 
said contract will be cancelled and termi- 
nated, and oil your right, title nnd interest 
thereunder, and in and to the land and 
property covered thereby, forfeited and an- 
nulled. Said cancellation and termination 
of said Contract to take effect May ldth. 
1922. 

Dated January ]tlth, 1922. 

JOHN BRATRUD. 
J-17-24-31 



Mr,& Mrs, H.M, Hicks 

Licensed Embalmeri 

We table full charge of funer- 
als. Special attention given to 
shipping cases. 



Day' and Night Call, Phone 30 
MODERN AUTO HEARSE 



CASH MARKET 

For your Eggs, Live and Dress- 
ed Poultry, Veal, Hides, Furs, 

Wool and Pelts 
SEE US BEFORE SELLING 

ELSEWHERE! 

Northern Trading Co. 

One Door North of Court House 
J- 13-20 



C. M. ADKINS ■, 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office Over FJrst National Bank 
Thief River Falls, Minn. ' 



LAWS TO BLAME 



ago. 



Paola and Francessa were 
famed, lovers of whom Dante jwrote . enough; money to bring her relatives 
They were made fa- ! QV er from Russia. This did not meet 



| lyn girl, wished to give her family the 

[advantage of living in a free country. 

I Sh > wanted to postpone her marriage 

two to Nathan Slug, until she could earn 



the action of an "in-jlaw"»jwith Slug's desires and he issued an 



to-wit Paula's brother, who happened j ultimatum that she must marry him 
to be the husband of the fair |Fran- a t once. When she refused^ he shot 
cesca. Al I of which leads to the f acf an d killed her and turned thffrevolver 
that Frar ceso Paola Franczelja, of on jhimself ,- inflicting a serious wound, 
-Passaic, II. J., reverses the situation from which the chances are he can- 
a trifle a: id blames "in-laws" for his not recover, 
marital troubles, but the '/in-laws" he 
blames are his wife's sister and her 
mother, ie claims his wife coitinu- 
ally long<d for the presence c 
mother at d her sister, but that 
thev cam? 



quarrels and bickering resulted. 



O PROPER LOVE 

Kribs of Maspeth, 



Y., declared in his will that; life, from her former, experience, but 



his wife cid not show him the proper. that she was willing to take a chance 



ffection and that four 
ere undutiful. As a 



he left his widow $5, and three 



ch as their share of his es- larjd. 
amounts to les4 than 



of his .with ah American. The replies were 
result! not confined to the women of Folk- 
of his stone but came from all parts of Eng- 



WIVES EASY TO GET 
An American mining engineer, visit- 
£ h er 'ing in England, decided he wanted to 
w h en take an English woman as wife. He 
into his' home constant appealed, to the mayor of Folkstone to 



Long 



help him. The mayor published his 
plea and several thousand answers 
were received. One widow wrote that 
she did not think much of married 



.rid. r 
St. Pa 



Paul's cathedral in London was 

begun !and finished withn 40 years, 

workers are said to I enefit ■ unjler one Bishop of London, one ar- 
tarry" smell in whici they chitectiand one master mason, which 
j set? a record for large cathedrals. 




DR. A. SHEDLOV 

Physician and Surgeo» 

In Charge of Dr. A. W. Swedenburi! 
Office Over First National Bank 

Telephone SB0-1 
408 No. Arnold Ave. Phone 278 



MODERN 
HOUSE 

FOR SALE1 

Possesion can be 
given immediately 



Inquire Tribune 



THIEF RIVER CLINIC 

DR. 0. F. MELLBY 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

DR. H. W. FROEHLICH 

Surgery and Obstetrics 

DR. L. F. FISHER j 
Internal Medicine and X-Ray 

OFFICE 
CITIZENS BANK BUILDING 



STATE OP MINNESOTA, COUNTY OP 
Pennington, District Court, Fourteenth 
Judicial DiBtrict. 

WINTON-NICHOLS LUMBER COMPANY, 
a Corporation, Plaintiff, 

vs. 
J. J. Spieler. James Hruby, Henry E. Holt, 
and Lloyd B. George, doing business as 
Holt it George, Plumbing and Heating 
Company, of Thief River Palls, 

Defendants. 

Judgrment Sale on Foreclosure of Mechan- 
ic's Lien. 

Whereas; Judgment was duly entered and 
docketed in the District Court, in nnd for 
the County of Pennington, nud State of 
Minnesota, on the 14th day of January, 
1022, in an action to foreclose a Mechanic's 
Hen wherein Winton-Nichols Lumber 
Company, a corporation, was I'laintiiT. and 
J. J. Spieler, James Hruby, Henry K. 
'Holt, and Lloyd B. George, doing busi- 
ness as Holt & George Fiuiubing nnd Heat- 
ing Company, of Thief River Palls, were 
Defendants, aod. 

Whereas, In Said Judgment it was ad- 
judged and decreed, 

1. ' That the Plaintiff have and recover 
of the Defendant, J. J. Spieler, the Bum 
of $1,111)0.83, with interest, attorney's fees, 
and costs, as in said Judgment specified, 
amounting in all to the Bum of $2,040.55. 

-- Thpt the .defendants, Henry E. Holt 
and Lloyd B. George, doing business as 
Holt & George Plumbing and Heating 
Company, of Thief River Falls, have and 
recover from the defendant, J. J. Spieler, 
the sum of ?715.57, with interest, attor- 
ney s fees, costs, as in said Judgment spec- 
lhed, amounting In all to the sum of 

■i. That the ^defendant, James Hruby, 
have and recover from the defendant, J J. 
Spieler, the sum of $889.55, and interest, 
attorney's fees, and costs, aB In Bald judg- 
ment specified, amounting Id all to the 
sum of .$l,02(T2o. 

Whereas, In and by Bald judgment, it 
was adjudged and decreed that In all of 
Bald sums, are due for work and mute- 
rials performed and furnished in and 
about the construction of a dwelling house 
upon the following described premises 
situate in the County of Pennington and 
State of Minnesota, to-wit: Lots One (1) 
Two (2) and Three (3), in Block One (1), 
in Steine's Addition to Mavie, and that 
aaid premises and all thereof, and defend- 
ant, J. J. Spieler's right, title and Interest 
therein, are subject to the Hens of plain- 
tiff, and of said defendants, James Hruby 
Henry E. Holt, and Lloyd B. George do- 
ing business as Holt & George Plumbing 
& Heating Company of Thief River Falis, 
in the aforesaid amounts, respectively - 
and. 

Whereas, In and by aaid judgment it 
was adjudged and decreed that said prem- 
ises be sold in one parcel to satisfy said 



Judgments nnd liens and each of them, 
including said attorney's fees, costs, and 
disbursements, nnd directing the under- 
signed to make such sale and to give no- 
tice thereof as in said judgment provided. 

Now. Therefore, Notice Is Hereby Given, 
Tl;jit 1. as 'Sheriff of Pennington County, 
will sell at public auction in one parcel, 
to the highest bidder for cash, at the main 
front entrance of the Court House, in the 
City of Thief River Palls, in said Penning- 
ton County, in the State. of Minnesota, on 
Wednesday, the Sth day of March, 1022, 
at. 10 o'clock in the forenoon, on said day, 
the premises hereinbefore described, to- 
wit: Lots One (1), Two (2) and Three 
CI). In Block One (1), in Steine's Addition 
to Mavie, in the County of Pennington 
and State of Minnesota, to satisfy said 
Judgments, and each of them, with Baid 
attorney's feeB, costs, and disbursements, 
together with the costs of these proceed- 
ings, subject to redemption, as provided by- 
law. 

Dated this 14th day of January, 1922. 
W. J. LABREE, 
Sheriff of Pennington County. 
H. O. CHOMMIE, 

Attorney for Plaintiff, 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 
J-17-24-31 F-7-14-21 



THEO- QUALE 

Lawyer 

Ftaetlce in all Conrts and B« 

Core U. 8. Land Office 

McGinn Building 

THIEF BITER FALLS, MINK. ' 



g " ir BT'fc 1!M BIT * U a j H U W V g ' » I) ■ U 

.Z20 -£&x JS<®W 




mentnoi 

coiigii drops 
zTJce £&$ 

' straight 

GIVE QUICK (RELIEF 

Pairuu* Yeliow Pjlkd£t— 
53 Sold th* world ottr 

."■••AVoV.VdVAV.W.V.W. 



WtHIMHIllHH II IH IIi m ii mHHHHUHII I MI * 

Your Wife and Children I 




rightly look to you to pro- 
vide a home for them. It is 
* your duty to see that they 
are placed beyond the dang^ 
er of being made homeless. 
Fire insurance is the only 
thing that will supply this 
protection. If you have' so 
far neglected to be insured, 
neglect it no longer. Have 
us issue you a policy to-day 
against the fire which may 
come to-night. v 



Lawrence Mortgage Co 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 



t.tt Hf .ttt m . mMfMMMMMMM I MMMMM t M * 




AN ORGANIZATION OF 300,000 
PEOPLE AT YOUR COMMAND 

A vast army of 300,000 people is at your 
service, night and day— all the time. You 
are one of the 110,000,000 patrons of the 

greatest organization of its kind in the world — The 
United States Post Office Department. The many 
interesting and ■ instructire activities of this depart- 
ment are vividly shown in the fourth of a series of 
handsomely illustrated folders about Our Govern- 
ment which this Institution is now distributing to all 
who send us their names. 

Without placing yourself under any obligation let us 
send you thAe articles and also those previously 
issued. 

First & Peoples State Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minn.Y 




-U 





T. M. KOLBERG, D. C. 

Doctor of Chiropractic 

Palmer (graduate 
"The Sure %oad to Health Is Through the Nerves" 

Office Over 

First National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minnesota 



-V 



Phone 107 



/ 



J- 



..j* 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1922 



RECORD FEES PAID LAWYERS 



Skillful Leaders of the Bar Have Been 

Rewarded ror Their Service! With 

Snail Fortunes. 



Barrlngton 



receive a fie of 10,000 guineas tor 



undertaking 



the defense In Egypt 



tempting to 
by no means 



Ward, K. 0., who la 



a wealthy Albanian charged with 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Page Three 



murder Lord Allenby, Is 
the only English lawyer 
whose forensic skill has been reward- 
ed by a fe< In flye figures, usually 
abroad, remarks London Answers, J51r 
Ronndell Primer's services at 
Geneva convention were rewarded 

fee of fi 5,000. Mr. Petersen, 
English barrister, when practicing 
Calcutta, bJd a retainer of 100,000 
rupees and i dally refresher of 10,000 
rupees for lis defense of Totes Per. 
sand, an Inilan contractor. 

A fee, of 10,000 guineas was offered 
to Sergeant Ballantyne to defend the 
gaekwar of ] Jaroda on a charge of [at- 
tempting to dU Mr. Phayre, the Brit- 
ish resident, by mixing diamond dust 
with his food. j 

For negotiating a treaty of peace 
with Japan ; ohn W. Foster received a 
fee of £40,000 from the Chinese gov- 
ernment, and Chauncey Depew, the 
American lawyer and wit, was (re- 
warded by a fee of £40,000 for saying 
an estate frcm bankruptcy. J 

Some enorrious fees have been paid 
to eminent counsel for defending 
wealthy prisoners. [ 

Francis W ellman was paid £8,000 for 
'his successful defense of the Hyams 
twins of Ccnada, who were charged 
with murder. Colonel James got a 
fee of £5,00 ) . (the annual income] of 
an English liigh court Judge) for his 
defense of Inspector McLaughlin, who 
was acousea of bribery some time tgo. 
Two other .American counsel, Austin 
Fox and I aniel Rollins, each [re- 
ceived a £6,( 00 fee for prosecutln;! In 



CANNIBALS IN BELGIAN CONGO 



certain polic 
Doctor De 



court trials, 
mas was retained foi the 
defense of .Ifarry Thaw at a fee! of 
£20,000, whlJh, after all, was but half 
the sum paid ex-President Grevj 'for 
hi3 services In the great Dreyfuss 
guano lawsvlt, 



DEMAND l : 0R FURTHER LIGHT 



Connecticut 



Know Mo ■« About Buying Wom- 



en's S 



A Bridgep 



loas for $2 a Pair. 
Jrt '(Conn.) paper tells 



readers tha : a large manufacturing 
establishment In its city is aldtag Its 
employees t y selling shoes and coal 
to the oper itlves at a reduced rate. 
Listen to this, for example: 
Yemen's shoes', durable, stylish and 
, are being distributed to 



cheap witha 
workers wh< 



The slgniflcince of the $2 price 



seen In a comparison with orllnary | 
shoe price schedules. The shoes ire 
sold on two days each week and sev- 
eral hundrec pairs still remain. 

As to the coal, it is sufficient to fcay 
that the corporation Is furnishing 
three carloa Is a week to its employees 
at $12.50 a :on. which does not strike 
us as such a marvel as the sale of 
shoes nt $2 a pair, but aB to this we 
should wel< ome further information, 
says the H 



possible to 
and stylish 



irtford . Courant. If Itj Is 
my shoes at once durable 
at 52, the fact has gained 



precious little* publicity in the last 



* four years, 



we should suppose that the women of 



Bridgeport 
the fact to 



would be apt to mention 
:he dealers In the city. 



Surely thfjre must be men employed 
Dration who would be glad 



mere man will need sh^oes 
ith or so at the best. Vfby 
em durable and ' sty ish 
the 



sweet potat 
peanut, yle 



tie 

southern so 
Is a bottle i 
bottle of rt 



cereal coffe 
ucts numbe 
not finished 



are not so 
would thlnll, 



"It's all. 



me, sub. 
fo' dat offl 



Cottoi 



In a recent 



Newspaper Wants 



Its 



want them for $2 a pair. 



Government Has Not Yet Fully Suc- 
ceeded In Stamping Out 
the Practice. ■ 

This particular section of the Bel- 
gian lOongb through which we were 
passing had been closed to white trav- 
elers 'for {many years because of the. 
rampant cannlbaliam of the natives. 
I Wej have been unable to detect any 
»ign«|Of pannlballatlc practice In the 
nmwatte ruled by Kabongo or Mutom- 
bo Makulu, although trusCta carriers 
still often] disappeared overnight from 
caravans iln these regions and feasts 
always took place with suspicious se- 
quence in some village near by. Fur- 
ther on to the north, where the strong 
arm of the white man's law has not 
yet reached, cannibalism Is itlU In its 
palmy days, and slaves are fattened 
for the regular feasts of the year. 
Here, the j government has not yet al- 
lowed white men te penetrate. 

Even In the district through which 
we were how passing a Belgian trader 
had beenj attacked only a few months 
before. Shortly after leaving the vil- 
lage of a chief— Mpereta — who had 
received jus with extreme cordiality, 
we came upon a relic of the recent 
history of the chief and his village. 
It was a phallic emblem post decor- 
ated with the bleached skulls of small 
children. : It had escaped the notice of 
government troops who have orders 
to destroy them. 

At several villages we found the old 
sort of Bachokwe natives still avowed- 
ly hostile to all white people, who had 
given up: open cannibalism only when 
they had to. The people and their 
chiefs refused to have anything to do 
with us, { although they did not open 
hostilities. On such occasions we 
quickly changed our plans as to set- 
ting up camp for the night The trail 
ahead seemed strangely attractive just 
then, even to our tired carriers. — Helen 
E. Springer in Scribner's Magaslne. 

HUNGRY MICE SAVED COYOTES 



Commissioners' Proceedings 



REPORT OF COUNTY BOARD &F AUDIT 

To the Honorable County Board, Pennington County, Minnesota: 
Gentlemen: ! - .* 

. The undersigned Board of Audit of said Pennington County, met at the office of 
the County Treasurer of| said County, on the 20th day of December, A. D. 1921, for 
the purpose of examining and auditing the Accounts, Books and Vouchers of John 
Gullingsrud, Treasurer of said County, and to count and ascertain the kind and 
description and amount of funds in the County Treasury and belonging thereto' 
We respectfully make |the following report thereon: 

Balance in the Treasury. June 1, 1921, date of last report ___$:251,039.22 

Treasurer's receipts from June 1, 1921, to November 1, 1921: 

From Tax Collections _.; : : — ™4129,"486.'75 



From Collections on Public Lands 

From Collections on Private Redemptions 

From Collections on Interest on County Funds . 

From Collections of Fines and Licenses — 

From Collections, Ditch] Assessments , 

From Collections, Mortgage Registration Tax _ 
From Teachers' Insurance and Retirement — — 
From Drainage Ditch Bonds 



From State and Federal Aid for Roads , 

From Hunters' Licenses' 

From Refundments on Taxes — _ 

From Sale of Gravel Loaded 

From Inheritance Tax Collected 

From Collections on Road Lien — 

Total Balance and Receipts 



225.84 

5,624.57 

1,537.04 

548.10 

4.25 

413.15 

295.00 

40.00 

36,465.52 

402.00 

81.12 

972.00 

151.87 

8.75 



By Disbursements from June L 1921, to November 1, 
Paid Orders on Revenue Fund 



Paid Warrants on Private Redemption Fund . 
Paid Warrants on Road and Bridge Fund — 
Paid Wa'rrants on Bond and Interest Fund — 

Paid Warrants on General Ditch Fund 

Paid Warrants on Incidental Fund 

Paid Warrants on Town Funds 



Paid Warrants on School District Fund 
Paid Warrants on State Taxes . 



Paid Warrants on Public Land Fund __. 

Paid Warrants on Sanitorlum Fund ™ ; 

Paid Warrants on Teachers* Insurance and Retirement Fund 

Paid Warrants on County Attorney's Contingent Fund „ 

Paid Warrants on Inheritance Tax Fund . „ 

Total Disbursements 



as follows: 
— .$ 14,830.68 

— 6,028.30 
~ 37,280.38 

— 4,052.00 

— 91,119.33 

— 565.43 

— 42,312.22 
~ 00,858.71 

— 13,081.75 
1.941.27 
1,204.14 

442.50 
103.50 
145.87 



-$427,295.18 



Balance in Treasury at close of business October 31, 
from books of said County Treasurer 



1921, as appears 



-$281,220.14 
~'.?146,069.04 



We find the Treasurer In possession of funds covering said balance in kind and 
amounts as follows: ; 
Cash Jn Safe and Drawer : , 5 315 35 



Is 



FUfetvU : Interfere* With War on 

PttU In Wytmlnt by Eating 

*1m P*U»n«4 Bait 

Hnnffry mice in Wyoming b*T« re- 
cently become iuch frequent Tleltors 
te poisoned bait ■pread for coyotes 
that the' work of the poison squad 
seeking to kill coyotes has been seri- 
ously Interfered with, according to a 
report to the biological survey, United 
States /Department of Agriculture, 

"Owing to the extremely warm 
weather,!' reads the report, "coyotes 
stayed In the rough and brushy places, 
which made it necessary to put the 
poison bait In and around these places. 
It was noted that mice interfered ma- 
terially by carrying away and eating 
the poison baits before the coyotes 
could get to them. 
: "Poisoned grain was used In an ef- 
fort to kill off the coyotes, but In many 
-cases there was no end to mice coming 
Into poison stations." 

Notwithstanding these difficulties, 
the five men assigned to poison work 
made a [satisfactory record, says the 
Weekly News Teller. The total num- 
ber of animals killed during one month 
by government hunters In the district 
is reported at 542. 



Cash Items, Checks, Money Orders 

Deposited in First National Bank, Thief River Falls , . 

Deposited In Farmers and Merchants State Bank, Thief River 

Falls -: , : „_. 

Deposited, in Citizens State Bank, Thief River Falls „ 

Deposited in First and Peoples State Bank, Thief River Falls 

Deposited in Merchants I State Bank, St. Hilaire -_ „__ 

Deposited in Farmers State Bank, Goodridge .. 

Deposited in Goodridge ■ State Bank, Goodridge .. . 

Deposited In Farmers State Bank, Mavle . 

Deposited in Citizens State Bank, HaiPl 

Deposited in Farmers State Bank, St. Hilaire . 

Total Funds 



1,087.20 
24*780.96 

20,909.07 
24,547.46 
32,810.28 
5,949.42 
5.38S.77 
5,932.23 
5,757.00 
5.447.88 
6,242.92 



-$146,069.04 



Respectfully submitted this 3rd day of January, * 1922. 

. OSCAR J. PETERSON, 
j Chairman County Board and "Board of Audit. 

[ . ■ T. P. ANDERSON,. 

County Auditor. 
I - ADOLF EKLUND. 

Clerk District Court and Clerk of Board of Audit. 



given by a two weeks published notice 
thereof, and posting a notice of such 
hearing in three public places in each of 
the School Districts to be affected by said 
petition and by serving upon the clerk 
of each of said- School Districts by mail, 
a copy of said notice of hearing, at least 
ten days before the time appointed for 
such hearing. 

OSCAR J. PETERSON, 
Chairman of County Board, 
Pennington County, Minn. 
Attest : 

T. P. ANDERSON, 
County Auditor, and Ex- 
Officlo Clerk of Board. 
(Seal) 



The following resolution waa offered by 
Commissioner Naplln, who moved its 
adoption, duly seconded by Commissioner 
Roy: 

'.'Be it Resolved, : That the County Aud- 
itor be and hereby is authorised and in- 
structed to advertise for the sale of 
$50,000*00 of Pennington County Drainage 
Bonds on account] of Judicial Ditch No. 
30, Pennington and Marshall Counties." 

All members present voted for the re- 
solution and it was so duly declared ap- 
proved by the Chairman. 

Application of the Goodridge Mercan- 
tile Co. for reduction of their personal 
property assessment hi the village of 
Goodridge was approved by the County 
Board, subject to the approval of the 
Minnesota Tax Commission. 

On motion duly carried the Counts 
Board adjourned until Wednesday morn- 
ing .at 9 o'clock. 

OSCAR J. PETERSON. 
Chairman. 
T. P. ANDERSON, 
County Auditor. 

Thief River Falls, Minn., Jan. 4. 1922. 

Pursuant to adjournment, the County 
Board reconvened at 9 o'clock A. M. 
All members present. 

The Highway Engineer presented his 
report for the year 1 to the County Board. 
The same duly read and approved. 

Pursuant to Chapter 433 of the Revised 
Laws of 1905, the' County Board did ex- 
amine the accounts and vouchers of the 
Auditor and Treasurer and all funds in 
the county treasury, and filed their cer- 
tified statement of the same with the 
County Auditor, of which the following 
is a copy: n 

State of Minnesota, County of Pen- 
nington, ss. 

A ^statement of the exact amount of 
money in the treasury of Pennington 
County, State of Minnesota, on the 31st 
day of December, 1921: _ 

Currency — _ _ S °;-.00 

Silver _ -. — — 38.25 

Pennies ; *— _„T # r5 

Checks and cash items , _— i04.07 



Township of Wyandotte, small pox 

Quarantine 

Township of Wyandotte, same 

Madeline Thill, assisting superin- 

. tendent of schools .„ „ 

B. F. L : inland, expense as highway 

engine er ... 

The Times. Co., receipt books for 

treasurer for 1922 . ; 

O. A. Naplin, attorney's fee on 

County Ditch No. 1 

Larson Furniture Co., supplies for ' 

jail ^ . 

Oklee Lumber Co., lumber for 

bridges. Judicial Ditch No. 1 

E.: O. Mogensen, blankets for jail 
W.'. J: LaBree, expense. State vs.- 

Hanson and Swenson 

W. J. LaBree, expense. State vs. 

Nellie Reagen . , , 

Free Press Pub. Co., supplies 

Roy Sumpter, work on Ditch No. 

68 



I 



Thief River Falls, Minn., 
Pursuant to law, the 



Jan. 3, 1922.of the County Superintendent endorsed 

— _ County Board thereon, representing that he is the 

for Pennington county met in the office owner of the following described IandB 

of the County Auditor In the City of situate in said District, to-wlt: 

Thief River-Falls, at; 10 o'clock in the Southeast Quarter of Section Three, 



forenoon. 



Township 153, Range 41, which land ad- 



Meetlng was called'to' order by the J^ns School District No. 68. J and asking 



even among women, and 



by this corp 

to find It deniln'g In footwear for them, 

Inasmuch as 

within a mo 

not sell tl 

shoes at, say. $4? We shall watch 

further development of this plan with 

some Interest. 



»es for Sweet Potato! 



Many 'U 

A negro scientist of Tuskegee, Ala., 
the 
the 
Ice 



has dlscove-ed manifold uses for 



that near relation of 
ding everything from 
cream to Ins.- Mr. Carver enlightened 
the ways ard means committee of con- 
gress and incidentally asked for a] Ut- 
proteci ton" on the products] of 
1. Said Mr. Carver: "Here 
f mock' oysters. Here is a 
lish for the oysters, made 



from peanuts. Peanuts make fine 



The sweet potato p'rod- 
r 107 up to date. I have 



working with them." 



after all, s:>me of the tariff hearings 



dull and humdrum as 
. — Scientific American. 



So, 



one 



Kir dly Commissioner. 

Uncle Ik; aspired to the elective 
office of jistlce of the peace in J the 
"black bottom" part of town. Oneibar 
th^re was to his preferment — he could 
neither rea 1 nor write. His employer 
advised him to go to the commissioner 
of election! and ask whether he jwas 
eligible. lie went and returned. | 

"What di 1 he tell you, Iker inquired 
his employer. 



One Casa Lest, 

A taxpayer, whose income arose 
from his vocation as a lawyer, made 
a trip to Canada in line with his pro- 
fession, jand had "gotten through with 
the case — and half another one (which 
Mr. Volstead would not have ap- 
proved); His wife, however, was nerv- 
ous oyer Its presence In the house.' 
Being a conscientious person, she 
could only conclude that he was a law- 
breaker :and her mind wag uneasy. In 
proportion as the case dwindled, /her 
hopes rose. 

Her Worst fears were confirmed 
when one day ( the bell rang and the 
maid announced that a revenue agent 
was at \ the door. With presence of 
mind, she and the maid hastened to 
dispose ;of the forbidden stuff. When 
the remaining bottle bad been emptied 
down the drain, she proceeded to con- 
front the menace at the door- — cool, 
calm and defiant. 

"I'm a revenue agent," he Informed 
her, "arid I've called to see your hus- 
band about a matter In connection 
with his 1916 i Income tax return. Is 
be In?* — Waif Street Joiirnal. 



right, suh," answered 



Ike. 



"Dat gennv lman suttlnly was kind to New York Sun. 



jpe tole me I was Illegible 
suh." 



Cultivation in Syria. 



Higher Education for Dogs. 
A. college for dogs has been opened 
up In Westchester. It Is a place 
where dogs are taught to live in a 
crowded city. They are taught the 
art of ;"heeling, H which is to follow 
closely at the master's heels. They are 
also taught to eat from only one hand 
— the hand of the master. Then they 
learn how to sit In the corner quietly 
when company cornea, how to cross; the 
streets at the proper signal and hdw 
net to growl when they see seme ether 
dog. The colleBe course lasts fer three 
months land the proprietor guarantees 
a perfectly trained dog in that time or 
mertey-rthe fee Is $100 — returned. — 



has 
ex- 



The Freich high commissioner 
decided to establish In Syria &n — 
periment station for cotton cultuije in. 
the Akkar plain, east of Tripoli (Tara-^. 
bulus). Tils station will deal espe-'i 
daily with questions concerning cot- 
ton cultivation, but It will also |con- 
. itself with matters affecting agri- 
culture in general and cattle breeding. 
The const ■•action of the necessary 
buildings and the Installation of 
station wlfr be begun at once, 



British Boe rd of Trade Journal states 



issue. 




; Walking to Walk. 
For a long* time In this country 
walking attracted less attention than 
any other outdoor -pastime on the 
calendar. Indeed, once upon a time 
a man; who felt like going for a 
tramp simply put on his hat and started 
off. He carried no advertisement of 
his game such as Englishmen did with 
their ''knickers, heavy shoes, distinc- 
tive hats and stout walking sticks. The 
American simply went walking to, 
walk. Those times are passing. Walk- 
ing Is coming into the recognition It 
deserves. Hiking Is fashionable. Clubs 
are formed to promote It — New York 
Har&lclj 



"I 



County Auditor. Members of the County 
Board present: Commissioners Hanson, 
McGinn, Naplin, Roy and Peterson. 
Members absent: None. 
The board proceeded to ballot for 
chairman for the ensuing year. Commis- 
sioner Peterson received four votes and 
Commissioner Naplin received one vote. 
Commissioner Peterson! was so declared 
duly elected as chairman for the ensuing 
year. 

The next ballot was for vice chairman 
for the ensuing year. Commissioner Roy 
received three votes and Commissioner 
Naplin received two votes. Commissioner 
Roy was so declared duly elected vice 
chairman for the ensuing year. 

The chairman appointed standing com- 
mittees for the ensuing year as follows: 
Committee on Finance: McGinn, Nap- 
lin and Roy. 

Committee on Court! House and Jail: 
Hanson, McGinn and „Laplin. 

Committee on Ditches: Hanson and 
Naplin. 

Committee on Roads and Bridges: 
Naplin, Hanson, Roy, McGinn and Peter- 
son, and T. P. Andersbn. 

Purchasing Committee: Peterson, Mc- 
Ginn, and T. P. Anderson. 

County Board of Health: Dr. A. W. 
Swedenburg, J. S. Roy and A. W. Han- 
son. I 

A letter from the chairman of the Min- 
nesota Tax Conference calling- attention 
of the. Board to the meeting to be held 
in the city of Minneapolis on January 
IS and 19 and asking the County Board 
to appoint delegates to attend the said 
convention. On motion the following 
were duly appointed OS delegates: O. A. 
Naplin, Peter Hedeenland Ole L. Ihle. 
Motion carried. j 

Depository bonds of the following 
banks were approved i by the County 
Board : t 

The First National Bank, Thief River 
Falls. j 

The Farmers and 1 Merchants State 
Bank, Thief River Fails. 

The Citizens ' State Bank, Thief River 
Falls. I 

The Merchants State iBank, St. Hilaire. 
The Citizens State Bank, Hazel. - 
The Farmers State iBank, Mayie. 
The Farmers State Bank, Goodridge. 
The following resolution was offered 
by Commissioner McGinn, who moved its 
adoption, duly seconded by Commissioner 
Naplin : 1 

Whereas, the County Board of Pen- 
nington County, Minnesota, at its first 
meeting in January, 1813, did by resolu- 
tion create a -sinking fund for the pur- 
pose of paying off bonded Indebtedness 
of the county as the same becomes due, 
Now, therefore, be it 1 resolved, that the 
sum of Six Thousand dollars be raised 
by taxation for the year 1922, and that 
the County Auditor hereby Is authorized 
to levy said amount in addition to all 
other taxes authorized by law. 

All members voted for the resolution 
and it was so declared approved. 

The matter of receiving and opening 
bfds for the county, printing for the year 
1922 came up before the Board. Only 
one bid, that of The Times Printing and 
Manufacturing Company, as follows, was 
received : • ■ ; 

"To the County Board of the County 
of Pennington. 

"Purusuant to call for bid and offer 
therefor, the undersigned publisher and 
proprietor of the Thief River Fails 
Times, a legal newspaper as defined by 
law, and published In the City of Thief 
River Falls, in said county, hereby offers 
to publish In the said .Thief River Falls 
Times, the notices and: list of delinquent 
taxes to be published In' said county as 
required by law during 1 the year 1922. 
The rate and amount to be paid for such 
publication to be the maximum rate and 
amount therefor allowed by law, and 
further offers and proposes to publish in 
said Thief River Falls /Times as required 
by law during the year 1922, the finan- 
cial statement of said county,' the pro- 
ceedings of the County Board of said 
county, and all other official publications 
of said county as required by law or 
customarily published, the rate and 
amount to be paid therefor and for each 
thereof to be the maximum rate and 
amount therefor allowed by law. Will 
furnlah bond with sufficient sureties for 
such publications and '■ either of them as 
provided by law. 

"If the foregoing bids and offers are 
accepted, the undersigned proposes and 
offers each, and all of. said publications 
to be made once without charge to the 
county in the Tribune,: a newspaper pub- 
lished in the City of Thief River Falls, 
In said county, and without charge to 
furnish legal supplements of such Notice 
and delinqent tax list and such financial 
statement to the Spectator, a newpaper 
published at St. Hilaire, in said county, 
and to the Banner, a newspaper publish- 
ed at Goodrlge, In said county. 
"Dated January 2, 192E. 

"Times Printing \*&. Mfg. Co., 

""By R. H. Ross. President." 
Motion made and seconded that this 
matter be laid on the] table until Wed- 
nesday morning at 10 o'clock, when final 
action would be taken! Motion carried. 
Petition of Ivar Solheim to be set off : 
from School District No. 60 and attached 
to_ School District No. |68 was presented 
to the County Board.! The s.arae was 
found to be in proper form and approved 
by the Superintendent of Schools, and 
the following order was made:- '. 
Order of Hearing on Petition of Free- 
holder to be Set Off. 
Whereas, A petition signed ' by Ivar 
Solheim, a freeholder of School District 
No. 60 in this County, with the approval 



that his said lands may be set off from 
said District No. 60 to said District No. 
68 for the following reasons : 

That the children have to travel fully 
two miles to school In District No. 66, 
and that It is only one and one-half 
miles to school In District No. 68, was 
presented to the County Board of Pen- 
nington County, Minnesota, at a. session 
of said Board held on the 4th day of 
January, A. D. 1922, for the action of 
said Board thereon. 

Now, therefore, it is ordered that said 
petition will be heard by this Board at 
the session thereof commencing on the 
8th day of February, A. D. 1922, at the 
office of the County Auditor, In the City 
of Thief River Falls, in said County,. 

And It is further ordered that notice 
of time and place of such hearing be 
given by a two weeks published notice 
thereof, and ' posting a notice of such 
hearing In three public places in each of 
the School Districts to - be affected by said 
petition and by serving upon the clerk 
of each of said School Districts by mall, 
a copy of said notice of hearing, at least 
ten days before the time appointed "for 
such hearing. 

OSCAR J, PETERSON, 
Chairman 'of County Board, 
Pennington County, Minn. 
Attest : 

T. P. ANDERSON, 
County Auditor, and Ex- 
Officio Clerk of Board. 
(Seal) 



827.57 
10,907.60 



_$61.795.23 



20.00 
4Ao 



80.47 
18.00 



1.00 
27.15 

0.00 
0.50 
15.00 



5S.42 
435.23 



8.40 
5.80 



3.20 
7.60 



Selmer Wahlbeck, same 

Remington Typewriter Co., repairs 
Township of Reiner, small pox 

. quarantine „ 

Claude D. Kimball Co., mortgage 

record ^ . 

Miller-Davis Co., supplies . 

Oscur .'.. Peterson, mileage attend- 
ing regular meetings and signing 

county warrants 

0»car J. Peterson, committee work 

on State Road Xo. 2 . j 

J. S. Roy, commissioner's mileage 

for regular meetings 

Gust Naplln, mileage 

A. W. Hanson, inspecting bridges. 

Judicial Ditch No. 13 . , 4:00 

A.' W. Hanson, committee work. 

State Road No. 7 7.60 

A. W. Hanson, committee work. 

State Road No. 2 , 7.6O 

A. W. Hanson, mileage . 7.20 

On motion duly carried, the County 
Board adjourned until January 30, at 
two o'clock in the afternoon. 

OSCAJt J. PETERSON, 
Chairman County Board. 
Attest: 

T. P. ANDERSON, 
County Auditor and Ex-Officlo 
Clerk of the Board. 



Deposited in banks _ 

Total funds oh hand __ — ^ . . 

We certify that the above is true and 
correct. , „ 

County Board for Pennington County 
Minnesota. , \ 

By Oscar J. Peterson, Chairman. 

Pursuant to law, I present below 
statement showing the amount of taxes 
levied for County purposes for the year 
1B21, the amount collected and appor- 
tioned to date, and the balance uncol- 
lected, together with the actual cosh bal- 
ance remaining in the County treasury 
to the credit of each county fund at the 
close of business on the 31st day of De- 
cember, A. D. 1021. , 

Balance Amount 
uncollected levied 
or unap- for cur- 
Fund— portioned rent year 

County Revenue . $4,442.55 $29,622.45 

Co. Road * Bridge— 4,677.17 30,275.95 

Co. Bond & lnt.__ 576.33 3.960.66 

County Sinking 092.00 3.494.00 

County Sanitorlum — 1.129.2^ 4,018.80 

Balance remaining to the I credit of 
each fund on the 31st day of December, 
A. D. 1921, are as follows: 
Fund- 
County Revenue — *■! ?2,610.93 

County Road and Bridge 3,817.10 



BOARD OF AUDIT. 
Verification of Current Tax Collections. 

To the County Board, Pennington County 

Minnesota: " 

Gentlemen : ^ 

The Board of Audit of Pennington 
County respectfully report to your Hon- 
orable Body that they have examined 
the books, accounts and vouchers of the 
County Treasurer, counted and ascer- 
tained the kind, description and amount 
of funds in the treasury of said county, 
or belonging thereto, for the period from 
June 1, 1921, to October 31, 1921, both 
days inclusive. 

We find the treasurer charged with the 
Tax Levy for 1920 as follows: 
Tax Levy for 1920 $447,853.08 
Additions to Ievy__ 192.19 

Total Debit ^ S448.046.17 



Taxes collected _. 
Taxes abated — 

Total credit 

November 1, 1921, 

uncollected 



_?352,291.45 
_ 4,374.63 



Balance 



County Bond and Interest 

County Sinking . 

County Sanitorlum 



894. 5ii 

3,630.93 

513.S7 



Petition of Olaf Nelson to be set oft 
from School District No. 3 and attached 
to School District No. 9 was presented 
to the. County Board for approval. The 
same was found in proper form and 
having the endorsement of the Superin- 
tendent of Schools, the following order 
was made: 

Order of Hearing of Petition of Free- 
holder to be Set Off. 
' Whereas, A petition signed by Olof 
Nllson, a freeholder of School District 
No. 3 in this County, with the 'approval 
of the County Superintendent endorsed 
thereon, representing that he Is the own- 
er of the following described lands sit- 
uate In said District, to-wlt: 

Southwest Quarter of Section Twenty- 
two, Township 152, Range 39, which land 
adjoins School District No. 9. and asking 
that his said lands may be set off from 
said District No. 3 to said District No. 
9 for the following reasons: 

That the school house in District No. 
3 is situated, four and one-half miles 
from where he lives and that the' school 
house in District No. 9 is situated .only 
two miles from his home and that his 
land adjoins District No. 9, .was pre- 
sented to the County Board of" Penning- 
ton County, Minnesota, at a session of 
said Board held on the 4th day of Jan- 
uary, A. D. 1922, for the action of said 
Board thereon. 

Now, therefore, it is ordered that said 
petition will be heard by this Board at 
the session thereof commencing on the 
8th day of February, A. D. 1922, at the 
office of the County Auditor, - In the City 
of Thief River Falls, in said County. 

And It is further ordered that notice 
of time and place of such hearing be 
given by a two weeks published notice 
thereof, and posting a police of such 
hearing in three public places in each of 
the School Districts to be affected by said 
petition and by serving upon the clerk 
of each of said School Districts by mail, 
a copy of said notice of hearing, at least 
ten days before the time appointed for 
such hearing. 

OSCAR J. PETERSON, 
Chairman of County Board, 
Pennington County, Minn. 
Attest : 

T. P. ANDERSON, 

- County Auditor, and Ex- 
Officio Clerk of Board. 
(Seal) 



Petition of Richard Halls to be set off 
from School District No. 54 and attached 
to School District No. 102 was presented 
to the Board for their approval, and the 
following order was made: 
Order of Hearing of Petition of Free- 
holder to be Set Off. 

Whereas, A petition signed by Richard 
Hall, a freeholder of School District No. 
54 in this County, with the approval of 
the County Superintendent endorsed 
thereon, representing that he is the own- 
er of the following, described lands sit- 
uate in said District, to-wlt: 

Lots 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24, in Block 7, 
of Crocker, Cundy and Nelson's First 
Addition to the Village of St. Hilaire, 
according to plat thereof, which land ad- 
joins School District No. 102, and asking 
that his said lands may be set off from 
said District No. 54 to sold District No. 
102 for the following reasons: 

The house on the above described land 
Is about a mile and one-half from school 
house in District No. 54, thus making it 
very inconvenient for the children to at- 
tend school, while the school house in 
District No,, 1 102 Is only about twenty 
rods from the dwelling house on the 
above described real estate, was pre- 
sented to the County Board of Penning- 
ton County, Minnesota, at a session of 
said Board held on the 4th day of Jan- 
uary, A. D. 1922, for the action of said 
Board thereon. 

Now, therefore. It Is ordered that said 
petition will be heard by this Board at 
the session thereof commencing on the 
8th day of February, A. D. 1922, at the 
office of the County Auditor, in the City 
of Thief River Falls, in said County. 

And It is further ordered that notice 
of tim* and place of such hearing be 



Respectfully submitted, 
\ T. P. ANDERSON, 

County Auditor. 

The following resolution was offered by 
Commissioner Hanson, who moved its 
adoption, duly seconded by Commissioner 
Naplin : 

"Be it Resolved, That the salary of 
the Superintendent of Schools be set at 
$1,440 for die year 1922, and the County 
Auditor hereby is authorized to issue his 
warrant to the Superintendent of Schools 
based on monthly payments." 

Resolution duly approved. 

The following resolution was offered 
by Commissioner Roy, who moved its 
adoption, duly seconded by Commissioner 
Hanson : 

Be it Resolved, That the salary of 
the Sherift be set at $1,320 for the year 
1922." 

Resolution duly approved. 

The following resolution was offered 

by Commissioner aplin, who moved its 

adoption, duly seconded by Commissioner 
McGinn : 

"Be it Resolved, That the salary of the 
County Attorney be set at $L200 for the 
year 1922." 

Resolution was so duly approved. 

Motion made and seconded that the 
salary of the Janitor be set at $60 'per 
month for the year 1922. Motion cajv 
ried. 

The matter of' the bid for the county 
printing was again taken up by the 
County Board. 

The bid of the Times Printing and 
Manufacturing Company being the only 
bid received. Mr. McGinn moved that the 
bid of the Times Printing and Manufac- 
turing Company for publishing the De- 
linquent Tax List and other proceedings 
be accepted and contract entered into ac- 
cording to law, such publication to be at 
the maximum legal rate according to 
such bid, and bond executed at $2,000 
on conditions according to law. The 
above was seconded by Commissioner 
Hanson, was voted on by the BoaVd and 
duly carried. 

The following resolution was offered 
by Commissioner McGinn, who moved its 
adoption,' duly seconded by Commissioner 
Roy: 

"Resolved, That the Thief River Falls 
Times, published at Thief River Falls, 
Minnesota, be and the Same is hereby 
designated by the County Board of the 
County of Pennington as the newspaper 
In which the Notice and List of Real 
Estate remaining delinquent on the first 
Monday In January, 1922, shall be pub- 
lished." 

All members present voted for the re- 
solution and It was so duly declared ap- 
proved. 

The following resolution was offered 
by Commissioner Hanson, who moved its 
adoption, duly seconded by Commissioner 
Naplin : 

"Be it Resolved, That the sum of Two 
Hundred Fifty Dollars be transferred 
from the General Revenue Fund of the 
County to the County Attorneys Contin- 
gent Fund, and that the sum of Three 
Hundred Dollars be transferred from 
the General Revenue Fund of the County 
to the Incidental Fund, and that the 
County Auditor and the County Treas- 
urer hereby are authorised to moke the 
proper transfers on the books in their 
respective offices." 

All members present voted for the re- 
solution and It was so , declared ap- 
proved. . ■ 

A statement of the financial condition 
of Pennington County at the close of 
business of the post year and the be- 
ginning of the present year, with a re- 
port showing in detail -the - transactions 
of the Auditor's office, was submitted to 
the County Board by the Auditor, and 
on motion duly carried was so approved. 

A bond presented by the Pennington 
Abstract Company was submitted to the 
Board for consideration. The same was 
found in proper form - and with the 
proper sureties and was duly approved. 

On motion duly carried the following 
bills were audited and ordered paid 
Thief River Construction Co., work 

on flume. County Ditch No. 68 5724.04 
Dr. H. W. Froehlich, viewing body 

of Calhoun : 5.45 



Oscar J. Peterson, member board 

of audit : — 

T. P. Anderson, same _™_„ 

Adolf Eklund, same 



Walter Smith, drawing jury 

W. J. LaBree, expense State vs. 

Omlid, et al 

Hans Johnson, hauling gravel for 

Ditch No. 35 „ u__ 

Irving E. Quist, engineer County 

Ditch No. 68 

Geo. M; Gunderson, expense as 

superintendent of schools : 



23.80 
21.00 
21.00 
5.01 

10.00 



91.380.04 
We hereby certify that we have veri- 
fied the correctness of the foregoing 
statement by checking the duplicate re- 
ceipts with the tax books for the period 
above named. 

OSCAR J. PETERSON, 

Chairman County Board. 
T. P. ANDERSON, 

County Auditor. 
ADOLF EKLUND, 

Clerk of District Court. 
Board of Audit, Pennington County. 



Able to crack a Brazil nut between 
his still strong teeth, Sir. Lamb, of 
Ash, Surrey, England, is 103 years of 
age. 

COALr— Order your hard 
and soft coal from the Chris- 
tenson & Voelz Hardware 
Co. Phone 23. " tf 



CARL B. LARSON 



LICENSED EMBALM ER 
"AND UNDERTAKER 



Larson Furniture Company 



Phone 61 



Night Call I48 



X 



Wood 

I am prepared to deliver : . 
promptly to any part of : : 
the city, any kind of '.'■ 
wood. Telephone 449- W '■'■ 



T. FR01SNESS 

323 3rd Street W, 

■ H t H l timHU I IHHtMK 




Brotherhood of 

AMERICAN YEOMEN 

Tionesta Homested No. 2006. 
Regular meetings every second and 
fourth Fridays of each month at 
Masonic HalL Visiting Yeomen 
welcome. 



HtHtltM I MmMHt i mt 



EmpireFarms 
Company 

Capital $25,000 

LANDS, LOANS 

CITY PROPERTY 

INSURANCE 

; ; Bring Your Business to Us. We ■ • 
Promise Courtesy and Efficiency '. '. 

215 Main Ave. North | 

Phone 443 

: : Thief River Falls, Minnesota : : 

:. v . : 

t tt i tt i mni i Miii ii im 



! I 



L s 




Page Ifour 



AW, WHAT'S THE USE 



THE T|HIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1922 




ROSEWOOD 



Mr. and Mrs 
home in tuwn 
nntly enter. ;ii: 
nt a combinat 
taiument. . C;.r 
bles ami the i> 



Delma Dols, 
a hi Sli tie in v 



U/HEM;TrtE KlDDlES OOME ROtfPlNG 
IN , HAVINC3 TrtE TfME OF THEIR LIVES 



QUIT THAT RACKET! 
QUIT IT 38 

— pf 



3 




-s — : — : — 

Tugs tease you ib come and 

PUV WITH THEM — Vou GET PEEVISH 
AT BEING INTERRUPTED 



ByL.?.VanZelm 

O Wertem Newspaper Union 





This World Is to o Small for Grouches 



IVHEM TOEN'ME GONE ,VOU RECALL 
HOW ,YOU L<NET> Tti HAVE YOUR 
|DA1> PLAV WITH YOU 




SO VOL! 051SCOVER A REMEDY 
FOR VOUR GROUCH 




SHOBEItG, Reporter. 
Thbmps&n Family Er.'.crtolnB. 



Tn mi's Thompson, at their 
titt Saturday evening, pleas- 
ed sixteen of their friends 
n whist and rummy enter- 
Is were at play at four ta 
'izes distributed as follows 



Head prize "of whist, a ba,g of whole wheat 
Hour, F. O. Bo s; whist booby prize, pack 
age of cherry highballs, Chester Dols, ana 
first prize at n uimy. a box of candy, Miss 
1 ols and L. L. Furan scored 
hist, which was determined 
In a three-handed rummy game, and cap- 
tured by the former. The play ended! at 
midnight and vas followed by a delicious 
luncheon serve I by the hostess. Tfie fol 
lowing. were gieats: Mr. and Mrs. John 
Sagmuen, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard ltanum, 
Mr. and .Mrs. ]\ G. Dols, Miss Gena Acs, 
L. L. Furan, , oel Shoberg, Thor Sevajd- 
son, Fred Stafford, Olof Opseth, Benny 
and John Ramnii, Chester and Delma Dols. 

lloln h Are Surprised. 
| Cashier and Urs. A. S. Holm were ten, 
red a surpiise last Monday evening, 
before their de inrture next week for theii 
former home tcwn qf Twin Valley. About 
00 persons wen: present. The evening waB 
ry pleasantly passed at various social 

*--*-■ -~' and at midnight a dainty 

eil. A drinking Bet • of cut 

purchased by the partak- 

resentcd to Mr. and Mrs. 

Holm as a remembrance from their frieiids 



entertainments 
lunch was serv 
glass bad been 
era and was l 



at Ilosewood. 
■words thanking 
merclal connec 
t that they had 
years' at Hose 



elated, :'could 

' and ended by 

O. S. Hellerud, 

pressed It as h 



machinery som 
will contain, 
necessary pui 
bored jost 
will be a miicli 
during the bit 
Block shipped 
- venieiir.j and 

"' iikuipil fcy leftii^ 

Miss tHudyn 



fehipl'iyyd ut tin; Herbert Ca 
lii^t live mont; '"'* '' - 

gone to'Thief 
work : at the ht 



Bon. returning 



Spent Saturday 
friends and re 



Falls wan a g 



family laBt Saturday 



Mrs. Per P 
with !the Ben 



Mr. Kununi spoke a few 
the departees for all com- 
:ions and social pleasures 
shared during their .two 
wood, and was responded 
by a Bhort ta k by Mr. . Holm, who ex- 
pressed his rej;ret at leaving ills friends 
Just now, and thanked the guests 3or their 
kindness, whici, although greatly appre- 
lot be fully reciprocated, 
introducing his successor, 
and Mrs. Hellerud, and ei- 
bellef that the .HelleruUs 
would ilnd* Ho lewood and its citizens 
highly Interesting;. as he had found them. 
The party was arranged by Mr. and M :s, 
j[ E. Thompsoi . 

>ew IV* II on Hoo Property. 
ISIath Olson, i Soo employe with head 
quarters at Foj dville, N. D», was in town 
last Saturday looking over a suitable site, 
for the erection of a well for the stock- 
yards and oth;r purposes at ■ Rosewood, 
The well will Le drilled by the company'h 



Harness oil, 15 per cent off ; Ingersoll 
watches 25; per cent off. Clocks and rings, 
10 per cent off, and other goods in pro- 
portion. Ij need the cash and will sacri- 
fice on the goods in- order to raise tht 
money. John Remniein— Adv. 

P. Sorenson left Wednesday evening for 
a business: trip to Thief River Falls, re- 
turning Friday morning. 

William ;Rud and Ingvid Lundgren ol 
Vikingf were in town on a brief call on 
their way to Thief River Falls. 

E. J. Backlund of Thief River Falls, 
agent of the Natham M. Strom Calendar 
company of Chicago, was in town Thurs- 
day on business with the local merchants. 

A carload of wheat was shipped from 
the H. and B. elevator last Monday. 

ANCIENT POSTAL SERVICE 

Most people regard the postal ser- 
vice as a |modern institution; yet this 
is not so, for regular postal .services 
have existed for more than two thou- 
sand years. 

One of the earliest systems for the 
delivery of letters was established by 
Persia mor« than five centuries before 
th e Christian era. 

In those days letters were not writ- 
ten on paper. They took the form of 
short sticks, on which a message was 
inscribed either by means of paints, 
or by burning it on with a kind of- 
primitive ; poker-work outfit. These 
letters were delivered by regular re- 
lays of postment over thousands of 
miles of country. 

Even; the telegraph was in use in a 
crude form. Messages could be sent in 
an hour or two over distances of hun- 
dreds of miles by rrwr. <vf a system 
of shouters, who passed them on from 
one to the 1 other. 



time in the spring and 
four-inch casing and the 
ing apparatus. It will be 
side the stockyards. It 
needed accessory here, us 
year . the .watering or tbt 
bus bruught much incon- 
uiany jnsiaijvtj has been 



KOTitfull, 



been 

._ urlsiiii store the 

nas left her position afid 
tiver Falls, wnere sne.wil' 
her aunt, M.S. Stv 
eiru. Kranden, as the latter 1b ill 
peels to leave Cor the twin cities for nod- 
ical treatment. There will be no new 
clerk at Carlso i's for the present. 
' Annie Blombi rg, Esther Thoreaon, How 
ard Carlson ai d Henry CarlBon left Sat 
urday .evening to spend Sunday with 
iuls and rel itives at Thief River Fulls, 
" Rev. George .arson of Thief River Fall: 
and Rev. l'ede son of Fosston spent Sat 
day day in tuivu and vicinity togatiid 
funds for a yoi ng woman s nome that will 
be erected by 
. Misses .ludi 
Sk 



heir church denominations. 
Misses Judith Landro and Corr ne 
kramstad of 'J hief River Falls epent Mon- 
day here as greets of Miss Gladys Swiii- 



home in the evening. 



Miss Clara Sorenson of Thief River Falls 



at Rosewood visiting with 
atives, 



Budapest embraces the historic town 
of Ofen, once a Ruman colony. 

Islands of the Ccrsican coast were 
recently offered for sale at $6,000 
each. 



State High School 
Athletic League 



Effort to Be Made to Secure 

Weekly Standing of 

Clubs in Circuit 



Eight High Teams' Engage 
Final Tournament 1 
Here or Crookston 



in 



in this district tournament will par- 
ticipate in the state tournament to 
be held later, on in March. 

Effort is being made to have infor- 
mation as to all games played in our 
division of the league sent to the dif- 
ferent schools so that the league 
standings may be published from week 
to week and in this way the people 
may be kept informed as to th e stand- 
ing of the different teams. Watch for 
this information, see to it that our 
boys get the moral and financial 
backing that they, need if they are to 
make the best possible showing. 



A 



Sheldon Speaks 
' to Club Members 



Two hundred forty-one out of the 
two hundred forty-four high schools 
in the state are members of the Min 
nesota State High School Athletic as- 
sociation. These high' schools have 
been grouped in sixteen tuff erent dis- 
tricts. Thief Eiver Falls belongs to 
the first district in which are included 
the following high schools: Ada, Ar- 
gyle, Bagley, Baudette, Crookston! 
East Grand Forks, Fertile, Fosston, 
Hallock, Mahnomen, [Mcintosh, Red 
Lake Falls, Roseau, j Stephen, Tbief 
River Falls, Warren and Warroad. All 
these schools^ have basketball team: 
that are now playing their regular 
league schedule. Each has its league, 
standing and it is a race between all 
these schools to determine' which one^ 
will participate in a final tournament 
which is to be held March 2 and. 3. 
This tournament will! in all probabil- 
ity be- held either in Crookston or 
right here in Thief River Falls. The 
eight schools making the best record 
out of the group will; participate in 
this final tournament and the winner; 




Fail 






Miss Mildrei Remmem of Thief River 



iesf of Anton (iuilseth ami 



: son, who haB been visiting 
Peterson family tor the lasi 



three months, lift lust Saturday for Fergi^* 
Falls, where s le will visit with a brother 
for some time before returning to her home 
at Hardin, Mont, 

Miss Ellen 1 
dale, went to 
evening to spe 



ellman, teacher at Willow- 
Thief River Falls Friday 
„ .. ... d Sunday with her folks'. 
Miss Lyda Batten, teacher at the Cen- 



tral school at 



tu her duties Friday eveniug after a brief 



visit with her 
. Mrs. L. H. 
Gully Friday 
brother, J nine 
.Mrs. T. Mell 
week visiting 



■ :olks north of town. 
Jos returned to ner nome| n* 
i fter a week's visit with her 
iei Thompson, and family 1 , 
"l;m, who has spent the last 
with her daughter, Mrs. | S. 
S. Nordguard Bjt Viking, came home Friday 
eveniug, 

Miss Tena "WeBthy left Monday evening 
'for Duluth, wl ere Bhe win take the place 



of her Bister, > 
there since lai 
Thursday, 

MeBdauies E, 
Sylvia, and 



J. Backlund and daughter, 
B. Remmem, spent Weduea-' 
day in town a \ guests 'of the latter'a sis- 
ter, Mrs. Antoi Gullseth aud family. 

Miss Cora t>evaldson went to Warren 
Weduesday im miug where she will visit 
with her sister^ Mrs. O. Johnson, for soiut 
time, 

Sigrud Rufteketh spent Friday on busi- 
ness at Warren to purchase n small en 
gine for sawing wood and similar purposes 



I wish to a 
1922, I will lie 
Fashion Trim 



Thief River Falls, returned 



iua," who has been employed 
summer and came ho! 



lOpie 



nounce that aitcr ruarcn 
the authorized ugent of {he 
ued Umc Company of, 



Louis, Mo., am} will carry a very flue li 
of the best in 
for spring and 
new hat here 
Item munis' Bai 

A cash sale 
Bargain Store 
and February 
store. will be *i 
iiiir- from 2 to 
Red" Label «'i: 
■Hewed all da 
some of th> 
era and me'n'B 



ne, 
ladies ready- trimmed hats 

immer. I'ian to buy y 
ml I will save you money 
ain Store. — Adv 
rill be staged at Remmems' 
n Wednesdays. Janu; 

when everything in (he 

Id at reduced prices rai g- 

ii) per cent. Free Caldwell 

be 



■i fee and cookies will 

January 25. Not ce 

iluctionsi Children's sweat 

caps at 25 per . cent" off. 



Has life to you become a 
burden and suffering, a 
hideous nightmare of tor- 
ture. Try 




Thousands of once hopeless and 
suffering loved ones praise the 
advent of this wonderful science. 
It will cost you nothing to inves- 
tigate. 



DR. J. CARLSON 

Chiropractic Office I 

First and People's State Bank, front roorti back 
I of stairway, second floor.- I 

j EXPERIENCED PRACTITIONER! 

! Office'thours, 10-12 A. M., 2-5, 7-8 P. M. 



A LEARNED MAN 
"His mother tells me that young 

Follinsbee can speak seven language? 

fluently," said Mrs. Newlywed. • 
"Does that include the one he uses 

at golf?" asked her husband. 



"Cough as silently as you can, gar- 
gle as much as you like, and always 
smile when you sniff," says Sir James 
Dundas Grant, the famous specialist. 



Stretching the spine for a few min- 
utes each day is the latest recipe for 
prolonged youth. 



Former Head of Minne- 
apolis Civic Bodv Dis- 
cusses Farm Relief 



Too Much Promise and Lit- 
tle Performance is 
Present Dav Evil 



At last Thursday's . noon luncheon 
ofthe Commercial club, A. M. Sheldon, 
president of the First ' and Peoples 
bank, addres'sed the club members 
along agricultural lines, suggesting 
that one great trouble in the present 
farm~crisis is the disposition of peo- 
ple to deal entirely with conditions, 
making destructive criticism without 
offering any tangible method, of relief. 
With this in mind, he came to the 



club with the announcement which 
appeared in last Friday's issue of The- 
Tribune, that the directors of the First 
and Peoples bank had set aside a def- 
inite sum to be offered farmers for 
the purchase of dairy cows. He 
praised the city and surrounding coun- 
try, recounting vividly the many ad- 
vantages to be found here, and in line 
with the action of the bank directors, 
gave it as his opinion»tha't a 'change 
from small grain farming to the "dairy 
industry would prove immensely ben- 
eficial to the community. Mr. Shel- 
don, who served two years as presi- 
dent of the Minneapolis Civic and 
Commerce association, .impressed the 
club members with his sincerity and 
showed in his discussion an intimate 
knowledge of the affairs of the entire 
northwest. 

Brief remarks were made by Rev. 
Sweger and by the coach of the visit- 
ing Two Harbors basket ball team. . 

At the suggestion of G. C. Streeter 
th e club gave its endorsement to 
changes in the routing of the Chip- 
pewa Trail, which now is to be ex- 
tended and marked through Thief 
River Falls to Grafton, N.*D. 



V 



JmsL cSLm^ xmttoi ikUjz 



for Highest Possible Quality 
at Lowest Possible Price 




After smokingjj'our first Spur, you might 
say "just rigKt," : "immeiise" or "great"— 
means the same' thing. Means: "There was 
room at the top for a cigarette that can refresh 
a tired and much tried taste. And Spur's that 
cigarette." 

In the new Spur blend you find : 

The richness of the full-bodied Oriental leaf 
tempered by the mildness and fragrance of 
Burley and other choice home-grown tobaccos. 
It's a happy blend that brings out to' the full 
that good tobacco taste. 

And what's more ! . Satiny imported paper, 
crimped, not pasted — makes an easier-drawing, 
slower-burning cigarette. A mighty neat "brown 
and silver" package, with triple wrapping, 
keeps Spurs fresh and fragrant. Just smoke a 
Spur and see. 



1 ^ your dealer cannot supply you r 
* send us $5.00, and we shall be 
pleased to send you, by prepaid parcel 
post, a carton of 200 Spur Cigarettes: 
(10 packages). Address: 

C\*Mt'jeiVt^^A^%/o^oc*Co2 

tu nrxa AYBirox, hew tobk crxr 




X* 



>■ 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1922 



Bowlers Hit Wood 
for High Scores' 



: Victors 
; From 
; of 



■■^' 



W 
Hair 



Xmas 



Carl Olson, 
as Teau 



and T. W. George 
"Win Highest j 
Galsh Prize 



N ! ' The bowling 



won as a prize 



that the eggs 
fresh variety, 
chose Walter J 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



in Everything 
Cuts to Strip ,; 
Bacon 



a 516 total {added to Carl's 589 took 
second place. 



Henry Ebbighausen and Bill Pyer 
were in first place for two days with 
1050 and oh the final evening all rec- 
ords were broken. 



Jens Erickson gav e Bill Kline a 
close run for the booby with 353. Out- 
side of the above two there was little 
competition., 



Lyle Manther secured two cash 
prizes but failed to land one of the 
others. ' 



tournament recently | 



inaugurated b;' the management of 
the Citizens biwling alleys came to 
a' close Saturday night and the var- 
ious scores mi de by two-man teams 
and individuals indicate that Thief 

. River Falls has its crop of bowlers as 
well as every other brand of sports- 
man and athlete. 

That competition in the various 
events was kee h may b e judged from 
a look at the si :ore and that the going 

[ was fast in e< ch' event is shown by 
the score rolled by Carl Olson, super- 
bowler, who spilled the' pins for a 
total of 589 pins in three games and 



for his marksmanship 
a perfectly pi re strip of Christmas 
I bacon. That 1 e will have bacon and 
eggs for break Past for at least a fort- 
night is now assured. ' In order that 
r 11 not fry alone, Mr. 
Olson, along with 1\ W. George, trot- 
ted off with thj ?9 cash prize offered 
i in the doubles ivents. As a guarantee 
shall be of the strictly 
Olson, who this tim. 
Jonas, as his aide, gath- 
ered 1,105 pit s for themselves an 1 
thereby easily ,von second prize in the 
same class. 

Lyle Manthir and' Harold Olson 
gathered 1,0066 pins and won the third 
prize of ?6. Mr. Manther, along with 
T. W. George, also won fourth prize, 
?4.50, when they rolled a score of 
1,054. Williai l Pyer and Henry El - 
bighausen tooc the fifth cash prize, 
S3.00, with a i core of 1,050. 

Following a-e some of the individ- 
ual scores" nude during the tourna- 
ment: 

High total pons: C. "Olson, 589, strip 
of 'bacon; L. Finsand, 555, cigarette 
holder; P. Mcjrse, 546, 200 Luciy 
Strike; O. Herron, 518, one pair ladies' 
silk hose. 

High single game: .1. W. Georre, 
235, one-half nord/of wood; H. Ols.n, 
234, auto gauMltts; Wm. Pyer, 213, 
3 pounds coffee; D. Stanton, 210,' two 
hair cuts. ; 

Booby prize: Wm. Kline, 329, me 
pound of candy. 

NOTES 

je. had a high total pf 
nildhave but. one pnze 
oil the -wood. 



Harold Olson got the driving gloves. 
Auto agencies take notice. He says 
he is now going to '.buy a car. A 
couple more tournaments with him 
hitting the pins as he did in this one 
and the rest of us will be paying for 
it 



Keen Interest in Interesting 
Subject Evoked by Riv- 
alry of Students " 



Orval- Herron was enteredbut once 
and received a pair of ladies' hose, 
Orval is single. What is to become 
of the hose ? 



High Schools to 
Debate Here Jan. 27 



| TKief River Falls Headquar- 
ters for District No. 2 
in 1 Big Contest 



T. W. Geor 
612 pins but c 
so he decided 

! 

Carl Olson i 
winner, gettin 
of bacon. 

Walter Jon; 
only throwing 
with him anc 



as the most prominent 
$8.25 cash and a strip 



Winner of Auditorium De- 
bate to Represent Dist. 
at Crookston Show 



5 told C. Olson it Vas 
money away to enter 
then hit; the pins for 



In connection with the Red River 
Valley Annual Winter shows which 
are to be held in Crookston there is 
to be held on Monday, February 6, a 
declamatory contest. All territory af- 
fected has fieen divided into five dis- 
tricts. Thief River Falls is head- 
quarters for district No. 2. In this 
district have Seen placed the follow- 
ing schools: Red LaEe Falls, Thief 
River Falls,' Warroad, Roseau, Bran- 
son, Middle '. River, Newf olden, St. Hi- 
laire, Strandquist, Holt, Greenbush, 
Badger, Karlstad; Lancaster. These 
schools are j entitled to send a repr- 
sentative to a preliminary declamatory 
contest that is to be held in the high 
school auditorium .on the evening of 
January 27. [ 

Not all the schools have as yet 
signified their intention of participat- 
ing in this! tournament. The follow 
ing schools; however, have promised 
to have a representative in the con- 
test: Lancaster, Greenbush, Red Lake 
Fa'Ks, Holt and Thief River Falls: The 
winner in this. contest will represent 
the entire group at the Crookston 
meeting. The, first prize is a silver 
loving cup iwhich becomes the prop- 
erty of the school winning it three 
times. Thete are second, third, fourth 
and fifth prizes, ?10, $7.50, $5.00 and 
§2.50 respectively. 

Periscopes are to be tried experi- 
mentally by British police to increase 
their range of vision. 



Highway Essay 
Contest blosed 



Composition of Mary Alex- 
ander Submitted in Na- 
tional Contest 



REBEKAH INSTALLATION 

HELD AT I. O. O. F. HALL 



The Central school pupils have par- 
ticipated in tire National essay con- 
test on "How I Can Make the High- 
ways More Safe." Some very excel- 
lent compositions have been written. 
That of Mary Alexander _has been 
awarded first place locally and is the 
composition sent in from our city 
schools to compete for state and na- 
tional honors. The national prizes are 
three and consist of the following: 
First, a gold watch and trip to Wash- 
ington with all expenses paid; sec- 
ond, a gold loving cup, j and third, a 
silver loving cup. Besides the nation- 
al ^prizes, there is also j a state first 
prize of a gold medal and $15.00 in 
cash, £ne second prize! °* a silver 
medal and $10,000 in cash, and nine 
third prizes, each a bronze medal and 

i.00 in' cash. • j . 

Naturally the competition in this 
contest has been very I keen and a 
great many very excellent composi- 
tions have been submitted. It will, 
therefore, be a great honor to win one 
of the Minnesota prizes| to say noth- 
ing of one of the national prizes. Even 
though no prize is won it is never- 
theless a signal honor to have writ- 
ten the best composition to be sub- 
mitted from Thief River Falls, and 
Mary is to be congratulated on her 
achievement. 

Honorable mention should also be 
made of the compositions submitted 
in our school by Frances Conklin, Lois 
Nicholson, and Frances Shanahan. In 
the preparation of these compositions 
a great many facts have been assim- 
ilated and much interest has been 
aroused in this very important topic 
of public highways. Even though no 
other importance attached to the 
working out of this theme, the fact 
that they actually have become in- 
terested and have given serious thot 
to thei question is of itself worth all 
the time and energy put on it. 



The officers of the Thief River Falls 
lodge, No. 69, of the Rebekah order 
for the ensuing year were installed 
Thursday evening, January 12, at the 
I. 0. O. F. hall. About 65 were pres- 
ent at the beautiful and impressive 
installation ceremonies, which were 
conducted by Installing Officer Mrs. 
Mathilda Norquist, who was assisted 
by Mrs. Laura Gasow, Mrs. Cora Mor- 
gan, warden, Mrs. Maiy Farr, district 
deputy, assisted by Sisters Esther 
Rdlland, Martha Larson, Lillian Whit- 
ing and Eva Angell. 

The new officers of the Thief River 
lodge are: Past grand, Sister Anna 
Robinson; noble grand, Sister Clara 
Johnson; vice grand, Sister Myrtle 
Blair; recording secretary, Sister Nel- 
lie Cronstrom; financial secretary, Sis- 
ster Clara Gullingsrud; treasurer, Sis- 
ter Kittie Anderson. 

Appointive offices: Chaplain, Sister 
Clara Bloomquist; right support to 
noble grand, Sister Laura Gasow; left 
support to noble grand, Sister Jose- 
phine Clausen; right support to vice 
grand, Sister Mae Stenberg; left sup- 
port to vice grand, Sister Lylabelle 
Schuster; outer guardian, Sister Lil- 
lian Holden; inner guardian, Sister 
Lena Lonson. 

A social hour of dancing and cards 
was then enjoyed, which included the 
service of dainty refreshments. 



Page Five 



Thief River High 
Vs. Mahnomen 



High SchoolBasket Bal] 
Teams In Contest at Au- 
ditorium • Thursday 



Much Interest ' Shown in 
Coming Battle With Res- 
ervation Challengers ' 



MAKING SURE 

Fencing Master: "Now, «nademoi 
selle, how would you, use your foil if 
your opponent feinted?" 

Demure Damsel: "I think I'd just 
tickle her with the point of it to see 
if she was faking." 



The heap big Indians from the 
White Earth reservation are coming 
here Thursday evening to scalp the 
local aggregation of basket ball play- 
ers, representing the high school, in 
a contest to be staged at the Audi- 
torium that evening. The high school 
boys went to Argyle and Stephen 
last week and fared badly in western 
Marshall county, being defeated at 
Argyle Friday evening by a score ot 
15 to 13 and at Stephen Saturday eve- 
ning 21 to 12. The boys were a little 
out of form and all the breaks went 
against them, but they are willing 
to bet altj their loose wampum that 
they will redeem themselves Thurs- 



day evening against the Mahnomen 
quint. 

The game will begin promptly at 8 
bells: and the Tribune has a tip that 
the locals will commit anything short 
of homicide in order to be in the run- 
ning for the finals next March— and 
in order to do so they must show 
form in their contest Thursday night. 
She promises to be a bearcat. 



n 



"SWEDE" CARLSON, INJURED 
FRIDAY, STEADILY IMPROVES 



"Swede" Carlson, stellar forward of 
the Thief River Falls basket ball 
team, who was seriously injured -last 
Friday night in the game with Two 
Harbors, is steadily improving. He 
has been about town continually ever 
since he suffered a severe bruise of his 
left knee when he was thrown violent- 
ly to the floor when a Two Harbors 
man tackled him in struggling for 
the ball during the course of the game. 
It is now thought that he will be in 
th e lineup for the next game. 



FAIRY TALES 

'About the time a girl loses her 
faith in fairy tales," said the cynic, 
"she begins to believe in love." 

"Yes," replied the optimist, "and 
although her lover whispers .sweet 
nothings in her ear, she has great 
hopes that eventually they' wil^ mean 
a great deal." 



BASKET BALL TEAMS GUESTS ' 
OF ELKS CLUB AT PARTY 



The victors and the vanquished in 
Thursday and Friday night's basket 
ball games were guests of honor at 
a dancing party Friday evening of the 
Elks club. 

During the evening the captain of 
the visitors in behalf of the team 
thanked the local people for the splen- 
did treatment extended them during 
their stay in the city. 

An excellent program of dance 
music was furnished by Miss Theone 
Walker, -pianist, Alfred Dybvik, durms 
and Clarence Andrews, banjo. 




A pipe won't 



ue it yop s: 




Prince All erf is 
mold in top iy red 
. bags, tidy rid tint, 
handsome pound 
and. hali'poirnd tin 
fnanhiors ana inthe 
pound crystal glass 
h u mid o r[ with 
sponge ' motttener 
top.] 




Getj that pipe-party-bee buzzing in your smoke- 
section! Know for a fact what a joy'us jimmy pipa 
can and will doff or your peace and content! Just : 
check |up the men in all walks of life you meet daily 
Who certainly get top sport out of their pipes— all 
*glow| with-. Cfragrant, delightful, friendly Prince 

Albert! 

i ■: 

And, you can' wager- your week's- wad that Prince 
Albert's quality; and flavor and coolness — and its 
freedom from bite and parch (cut out by our exclu- 
sive patented process) — will ring up records in your 
little old smokemeter the likes of .which you never 
before could believe possible! 

You don't get tired of a pipe when it's packed With 
Prince Albert! paste that in your hat! 

And, just between ourselves! Ever dip into the 
sport of rolling j' em? ~ Get some Prince Albert and 
the making papers — quick— and cash in on a ciga- 
rette that will prove a revelation! 



' Copyright io21 
by R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco 
Wlnston-SjOemv 

N. cjT 




the national joy smoke * nas 

i • *• \ 



Lincoln National 
»« Life Ins. Co. 

January 17h to 23rd has been 
■designated as THRIFT WEEK. 
'.Thursday, January 19th is the 
., National LIFE INSURANCE 

■: .-.''- DAY. 

'$75,000,000 of Life Insurance 
'was applied for by the Ameri- 
frah people during THRIFT 
WEEK 1921. 

I Am At Your Service 

E. M. BENNES 

General Agent 
THE LIFE INSURANCE MAX. 

90-4t 



Interest From January 1st 



OPEN your Savings Ac- 
count with this Bank on 
any of the Market Days, 
January 23rd, 24th and 25th, 
or if you already have a Sav- 
ings Account prepare to 
make additional Deposits 
during that time. 

E will allow 5 per cent in- 
terest, compounded quar- 
terly, from January 1st on 
all deposits made in our Sav- 
ings Department during the, 
January Market Days. 



The Firs! National Bank 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 

DOUBLE your savings— It CAN be done 






OVERCOATS 

Buy "I) ATPJrif" HIGH GRADE PURE 
a r/lll\lvlY wnni nvFRfiuT 



While 
They Last 



$55, $60, $6 

Overc oats, Your Choice 

$37.50 




THIEF RIVER FALLS 

MINNESOTA. 
comes from Mogensen's HmusiiegoodT. 



u ili 'iif! 

meat 






■ « .'-_.!: ' :i'.£.^w 



Page Six 



dian, 



) Aborigine Would 
Go to Hoosegow 



Joe Butterfly, Cass Lake "ln- 



Says Law Can't 



Stop Hunting Rights 



Cass Lake Kedman Declares 

He Can't Reconcile Hiiri- 

seli to New Order 



Joseph 
dian, whc 



■I 



: Butterfly, Cass Lake In- 
c se name is connected with 
. the famois Indian hunting case in that 
city last fall, paid a visit to Cass Lake 
last week, and reiterated his former 
position h which he announced that he 
did not irtend to surrender hisjrights 
to hunt any time, any place and ani- 
mal tnat le desired and that hel would 
go to ! jarl rather than have his in- 
herent privileges taken from him. 

Butterf y, according to his latest an- 
nounceme it, is one Indian in the Cass 
Lake sect on that feels his aboriginal 
rights^anc who has not reconciled him- 
self to th ; conquering palefaces. 

The case is pending in the district 
court at Oass Lake, where it lias re- 
ceived muzh attention and speculation 
on the pai t of the people there. Some 
contend that he no doubt has certain 
rights the white man has not. Oh 



hand, the majority are of 
o 1 that any man, he he white 
or red, mist alike submit to the letter 
of the la-jv. 

', however, says law or no 
11 take a shot at anything 
and at any time that he 
Dtwithstanding the fact that 
various times been caution- 
ed by- offi< ers that he will have to suf- 
fer the usual penalties for infractions 
of the lav and that a jail sentence 
awaits hin for its violation, j 



the other 
the opinio 



Butterf] 
law, he \\ 
he please 
pleases, n 
he has at 



SUPERSTITIOUS CLAIM j 

ALMONDS BRING LUCK 



for 




Unusual ly 
the gambl 
Monte Ca - 

Not the 
strange ft 
a Russiar 
almonds 
good luck 

At Mbn 
and woma 
every nigff 
ed the woi 
ing a blac 
coriskleraljl; 
ed v 

\methy 

eauville 
luckbringi 

To play 
fingers 
another d 
man. Shi 
her faith, 
tion of th4 



rich in superstitions are 

ng resorts of Deauville and 

■lo. j 

least inexplicable of] these 

iths is the belief voiced by 

at Deauville that eating 

dinner is the secret of 

at {he tables. 

e Carlo this season a man 

y{ appeared at the tablep 

t, and while the man play^ 

■: nan remained seating nurs- 

cat. The man at first won' 

y; but later his luck chang- 



We, tl« 
Trained 
the small 
the public 
pocketboo 
creased 
strike." 
■ In 
reached, 
pockets 
expected 
that part 
themselve 
Recentl; 
Cairo repbr 



America 
lut 
o: 



-t ti-pins are popular at 

because of ' their alleged 

ig virtues. j 

with the third and fourth 

the left hand crossed is 

;vice practiced by one wo- 

■ could give no reason for 

except that such manipuia- 

fingers brought luckl . 



PICKPOCKETS UNION ■ j 

ENTERS ITS PROTEST 



Intel-national Union of 

pickpockets, protest against 

amounts which members of 

carry in their purses and 

s. Unless they are in- 

shall tleclare a general 

i 

this crisis has not been 
if the idea of the, pick- 
Egypt spread it may be 
soon. The pickpockets of 
of the world have formed 
; into a union. j 

a prominent Armenian in 
ted to the police that his 



x 



sg'3g««JW8ws5n j &EJ auSl j ranCiD i 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1922 



liocketbook, containing a considerable 
sura, had been stolen. The secretary 
remarkable union thereupon 
to one of the papers, alleging 
that the Sum stated by the Armenian 
to haye been in the pocketbook was 
greatly in excess of the actual amount. 

; Pocket-picking not providing enough 
profit] members of the union have ex- 
tended their operations to" railway pil- 
fering. They made investigations con- 
cernin'g the most valuable goods usu- 
ally transported. Classifying the re- 
sults, |they proceeded to manufacture 
imitations of the packages, boxes, tins 
and so on. 

: The] State Railways in Egypt are 
never ;in a hurry to deliver goods, and 
loaded trucks are left frequently on 
the sidings overnight. This was put- 
ting temptation in the path of the un- 
ion, and under cover of darkness the 
men abstracted their requirments arid 
enclosed dummies. 



TAKE INSECT POWDER 

! WHEN THEY TRAVEL 



! A traveler on an Italian railway, 
after he had passed an uncomfortable 
night .due to the rnany insects in the 
coach.j complained to a high railway 
official about the condition of the 
train, j The official answered him as 
follows: * - 

"The Italian public expects too much 
of the government. Every traveler 
should take some insect powder with 
him and squirt it over the seats be- 
fore he sits down. But there are 
other reasons why we can't get our! 
trains 1 clean. 

"The men whose business it is to 
do so say they won't clean out first 
and second class railway coaches be- 
cause the middle, classes travel in 
them. A political question, my dear 
friend.' The other day some cleaners 
left a first-classe carriage dirty and 
the Inspector, disgusted, fined , the- 
guilty men, three days' pay. What 
happened ? All the cleaners Irickdd up 
uch a fuss that we had no choice 
except! to remit the fines; otherwise 
there ! would have been a general 
strike on the railway. 

"The best thing for you to do is not 
to travel." 



Judge Baekjj Will 
Serve Till 1925 



Supreme Court jSives Pro- 
bate Judges 
Years in 



r 



Another Two 
Decision 



Judge Mathews vs. County 
Auditor of Lyon Coun- 
ty Was Test Case 



Probate judges electejd in Minnesota 
in 1920 hold over until Jan. 1, 1925, 
according to a decisioi of the state 
supreme court in ja ci.se brought to 
test this question. I The people voted 
for a constitutional ammdment at. the 
1920 election, extending probate 
judges' terms to four years, and the 
court holds that this applied to the 
judges chosen at jthe same election. 
There will be no election of probate 
judges this year. I 

The point was settled by a three to 
two vote, Chief Justice C. L. Brown 
and Justice H. B.j Dibell dissenting. 
Commissioner Edward Lees wrote the 
opinion. Construing the amendment 
adopted in 1920, the court says, "it is 
held that the amenomeit enlarged the 
terms of judges chosen 
election in 1920, and 
office in January, 1921 
four years." 

The case came up on a writ of cer- 
tiorari. J. V. Mathews, 
of Lyon county, asked that R. R. 
Houdersheldt, county auditor, be re- 
quired to accept his filing as a candi- 
date for re-election in 
is discharged, and the decision acts as 
a precedent for all other counties in 
the state. 



UNPUBLISHED PRAYER 

1 BY STEVENSON 



An unpublished prayer by Robert 
Louis JStevenson has been discovered 
oh the fly-leaf of a dictionary that 
belonged to the celebrated author. The 
dictionary was presented to the Stev- 
enson Society of America. The pray- 
er, written by Stevenson on the fly- 
leaf of the book, is as follows: 

"Lord, behold us come before Thee 
this night, once more assembled. Help 
us in our troubles, correct us in our 
faults, give us to see so far as may 
be needful, help us to see as far as 
may be right, and yet not further, 
n all vicissitudes of our career. For 
them that are absent, we offer Thee 
our supplications. Be good to the 
green and to the ripe. Prepare the 
child for the arena. To our absent 
mother, give my armfuls, the last 
gleanings of the harvest of her life, 
so that sh e may go down there where 
she must go in the beauty of a serene 
evening, not without its songs. Help 
us one and all to hear and to forbear, 
for Thy name's sake, and let this home 
of ours endure all strokes of enemies 
from without and of enemies from 
within; until we shall be_gathered, one 
by one into Thy garner of the dead 
and resting, nevertheless not as we 
\Vill but as we shall serve in the un- 
known. design." 



; In China all land belongs to the 
state, I and a trifling sum' per acre, 
scarcely altered through long centu- 
ries, is paid as rent. 



Can You Solve This Puzzle? 



Here 

wanted to 
actresses 
of hin fig iring 
If you cai . 



CAN YOU NAME THEM ? 

!®IARD0D0THYTOH ©CUSSKTCBHiraffi 
^© BUERaflSHEifkHI® lAfflnEHASAHIJT 

1® maclqah otsleab © ink mi hod 

KDfifiXBuTSQKEEH ©HffiEPETlAV 



is ;& puzzle that everybody should try. The other night at'th* "Movies" the operator 
try a new "stunt," so he rearranged the names of some of the famous actors and 
»nd threw them on the screen like yon see in' the picture. Everybody had "loads" 
ring out the correct names. See if you can do it yourself. No. 1 U Dorothy Dalton. 
solve theui all you can win $1,000 or a Hupmbbile. 
Thouth you probably know the names of alt the popular actors. and actresies we'll Dams 
a few of •■ hem just to refresh your memory: 

Mary I litea Mirrttr. Ooutfai-Eatrbanka, Mary Piekford, Jtuntta «f anaan, Burtar Kaaton, William S. Hart, 
ra Kim all Young, Tom^Mix, Mabel Nermand, Thomas Mciflhan, DouoUa MaaLaan, Bryant Waahbtffl% 
Dorothy D. Hon, Harold Lloyd, Paarl Whlia, Jackie Coogan, Otoria Swenaon. 

HO Points Will- Win First Prize 



For aach] nama you can fcrronto corract'y you will 
fivi point* or fifty points if you «oiva thtm alL 
Von can • ; rn S5 mora pcinta fcy 'qualifying your an- 
■. Tha ; It, fcy pro vino that yoti havo ahown ■ copy 
of Tha 8L Paul Daily Ntwi to fiva paopla. Tha Anal 
S pdinxt ■> ill ba awardad by tha judo**, wt* will b* 
thrw m«ll-|tnown SL Paul buili 



Tha bast oorraet antwtr will bo iwtnM Flrat Prix* 
and tha aacond bait comet anewae Oaoend Priso, and 
io forth. : In eaaa of a tla both winnara will ba award. 
id full amount of tha prixa. Band In yeiir anawar 
TODAY and a aarnpfa of tha papal- wtU to e*nt yow 
1 at onaa to tialp you qualify. 



it costs you nothing to try 

not hava to oubaariba to Tha 8*. Paul Dally H««* nor apand • cant of your own manay te> win • 



at the general 
;hat they took 
for a term of 



Yow 

prill. Wl 

wrur aolul . _ 

and den't orort— YOU CAN WIN. 

R.C 



hava olvan away a graat many jwondarful ^hinga and you can ba tha n«xt wtnnar if you aand la 
>n lo thia pwxla at onca. Ba awra your own, nama aftd addraaa la on Jrcur solution to tha puzzls 
,rort— YOU CAN WIN. Oat tha family toflathar, a«l«a tha puzxla and mall yeur anawar HOW. 

WILLS, 94 E. Fourth St ST. PAUt, MINN. 



CRIME'S LURE AND 

DESIRE FOR THRILLS 



Despite the fact that in most in- 
stances "honesty is the best policy" 
there is- a decided lure to a career of 
crime, that is not du e to inherited 
wickedness, moral perversity or force 
of dircumstances due to our social 
system. Scientists now recognize it 
is due to a pathological craving for 
excitement, and is indirectly caused 
by a weakened nervous system. 

The rich, society woman has the 
means of satisfying her craving for 
excitement in other fashion, but she 
sometimes joins the criminal class. To 
the poor the craving for excitement 
cannot be gratified without money and 
sometimes crime is deemed the easiest 
way for this, plus the added induce- 
ment of material gain. 

It is claimed that late dances, jazz 
and a score or more of different fads 
leave in their wake diseased nervous 
systems that are susceptible/to the 
craving for excitement and foV crime. 

The new science of psycho-analysis 
is also being used in the detection of 
crime. A suspected man is asked a 
considerable number of questions, 
most of which have nothing to do 
with the crime. The time which he 
takes to reply to each is carefully 
measured by means of a stop-watch. 
If he°shows marked hesitation when- 
ever questions of a certain kind are 
put, the investigator knows that he 
is on the right track, and follows up 
his advantage. 

Sometimes use is made of an ex- 
tremely ingenious little machine, 
which measures'' variations in the 
pressure of the blood. The stop-watch 
may show nothing at all, for a hard- 
ened criminal on his guard is very 
difficult to catch; he will answer all 
questions with equal readiness. But 
his pulse gives him away. 

^Everyone knows what an effect any 
form of excitement or of nervousness 
has upon the heart. Under their in- 



fluence the heart beats — only for a 
moment perhaps — more rapidly, and 
the blood-pressure rises. 

The sphygmomanometer, as the in- 
strument is called, registers even the 
tiniest variation, enabling the inves- 
tigator to see- just which questions 
or suggestions produce nervousness. 
It is claimed that by its aid a skilled 
operator can always tell whether his 
subject is lying or telling the truth! 
j And so by making every use of the 
cervices of the branches of science, 
the forces of law and order maintain 
an ever-tightening grip upon the ene- 
mies of society, i A small proportion 
may escape the consequences of their 
wrong-doing, but on the , whole the 
number of untraced criminals is a 
small one. It is continually growing 
less. 



•TOR THE WIFE AND KIDS.f 

"The wife and kiddies" *plea has 
crept into the courts, trying bootleg- 
gers. The excuse offered by a boot- 
legger in a New York court, when he 
was answering the charge of having 
violated the law by disposing of alco- 
hol, was that he could not find work. 
As his wife was sick and his young- 
sters needed food, he turned to liquor 
dispensing as an easy and quick way 
of securing money. The judge, be- 
fore whom he was tried, withdrew the 
fine that had been imposed and of- 
fered his services in finding a legiti- 
mate job. 



$48 PER, LOVE'S STIPEND 
A class referendum taken at Gou- 
cher college, Baltimore, shows the 
girl seniors of that institution think 
a young couple can safely wed if the 
man is assured an income of ?48 a 
week. Few of them thought it nec- 
essary to have an income of more 
than $4,000, and only one insisted the 
man of her choice should show earn- 
ings, of $8,000 a year. One young 
miss set her limit at $850, without a 
child, and at $1,000, with one child. ; 



TEN REASONS FOR 

WIFE'S UNHAPPINESS 

That wealth is not everything in 
married life and that the mere pos- 
session of it does not bring happiness 
is demonstrated by the separation suit 
brought by Mrs. Grace P. Van Ider- 
stine against her husband, William P. 
Van Iderstine, member of a wealthy 
Brooklyn family. Among other things 
she lists the following ten reasons why 
she should be granted a'separation: 

1. Never used endearing terms. 

2. Did not speak to. her for days if 
she left the house without his permis- 
sion. 

3. Always abusive when friends 
were present.. 

4. Insisted on attending afternoon 
dansants. ■ 

5. Created a scene if she ever 
danced with a male -friend he intro- 
duced her to. 

6. Usually created a scene when 
they took dinner out with friends. 

7. insisted she spend her time, 
even during the hottest days of sum- 
mer, in the big living room of their 
Huntington country estate, where 
there was always a wood fire in the 
open fireplace. 

8. Created more than on e scene at 
the Huntington Country club where 
she refused to .dance when she was 
tired. 

9. Accused her of using "dope." 

10. Accused her of carrying on an 
affair with her brother-in-law. 

AFTER "BOOZE LUBS." - 

A special drive has begun against 
"booze clubs" that have sprung up in 
many cities since prohibition. Thesa " 
clubs are organized to make an oasis 
in the desert of business. The busi- 
ness men drop into them on their way 
home at night to have a friendly drink 
before dinner. 



Domestic life and affection is very | 
highly developed among wild ducks. 



£%&&££&^aB£5^£l'r5- 



%e 



Popular 




3ox3*/2 




THE American public knows 
that United States Tires are 
never marketed on "price." 

People look to the makers of 
U. S. Tires for quality traditions. 
They do not want to see a policy 
of superiority nibbled away for 
the sake of a mere price appeal. 

So we say this to all those loyal 

followers of U. S. Tires- 
Do not buy the 

30 x 3% "Usco" 

Tread because of 

its new price of 

$10.90. 

Buy it because it 




Prices on all U. S. Tires 
and Tubes Reduced Nov. 
10th. Ask your dealer. 



is the greatest money's worth on 
earth today. 

Buy it because of honest quality 
as against "bargain offers", "inside 
discounts" and "special trades." 
An outstanding product- 
marked with the maker's name 
—the retail price quoted in plain 
figures. 

A challenge to the tire-trader 
who would rather sell you an 
unknown tire on 
the . basis of "so 
much off list"— ' 
and let you find 
out its real value 
afterward. 




States Tim i 

United States ||) Rubber Compaq 



JIfty-three 
factories 



The Oldest and Ldra^t 
flubber Organisation in the World. 



Tivo hundred em t 1 
thirty-jive br^nuies 




r 



\ 



/ 



■v.: 



' TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 19?2 



Indian Pay Day 
Lacked "Spuzz' ! 



War 



THE TmEF JRIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Redman Nea:- Cass Lake Re- 
ceive Payment of $100 
From Government 



Gone Are Msccasins, Trap- 
j pings, Scab; locks and Old 



Paint 



That the American Indian has 
^caught on with his white neighbors 
in the matter of e conomy in living and 
th e saving of his money, has become 
noticeable, it is said, where Indians 
live in numbers, as for instance, at 
Cass Lake, where the Chippewas last 
week . received tl mir allotment from 
Uncle Sam in the form of a $100 
check. 

As announced r i The Tribune a short 
time ago that Northern Minnesota In 
dians would recei' e $100 from the gov- 
ernment to tide t icm over the depres 
sion and until a new crop is harvested, 
; the Cass Lake Times prints a lengthy 
article, relating he manner in whicli 
the Indians behived themselves now 
ithat their money will not buy the 
: "stuff" that put so. much "pep" into 
them in former c ays. 

Prohibition has- had its effect upon 
these former devotees, according to 
the Times article, and, instead of 
"shooting their dough" on booze, they 
have supplied tlemselves with cloth 
ing, food, etc., ne cessary to their well 
being. Others b >ught Vagons, horses 
and cattle, ppolir g their resources and 
have determined that they will reap 
the benefits of tjheir lands and prop 
erty. 

According to the Cass Lake news- 
paper, the Indiar s in that section have 
forsaken their old habits of frivolity, 
drinks, pow-wov s and poker, and are 
getting into the harness out there in 
good shape. 

Says the Cass Lake Times: "Every- 
one in town rem irked about the quiet- 
ness with which, the largest payment 



but there wasja lack of the pageantry 
ivhich marked* th4 payments in the old 
days when the ojd bucks would come 
to town' dolled ap in war paint and 
feathers and days would be consumed 
playing the moccasin game or Chip- 
pewa poker and pow-wows would be 
held for weelts. Everything went off 
so quietly, and without display that if 
it had !not been for the crowds of 
Chippewas on the streets, it might 
have been any other day of the year. 
The Indian has become a substantial 
citizen, has forsaken his pagan ways ; 
except at certain times and except for 
national dress which they still cling 
to they couldn't be told from any 
other citizen. | It is pleasing in one 
way but lamentable in another, for if 
anyone was fond of the romantic side 
jof '.ife, ithe Indian of the old days in 
for the payment, could furnish it with 



was spent in 



Creamery Gain 
MadeatKarldtad 



Record of Last Year 
ceeded Previous Season 
bv 55 Per cent 



125,000 Pounds of Butter Is 



Manufactured as Agi 



82,000 Pounds in 1921 



scalplock and 



war paint and tom-tom." 



ANOTHER ONE "STUNG" 

BY THE BOOTLEGGERS 



ihe Heathen Chinee, of Bret 

irte's ; poemi was not in it with the 
present day bootlegger The Heathen 
Chinee had an ace or two up his 
sleeve, but |he bootleggers have a 
trick or two in the barrel that heats 
the sleeve all hollow. One of their 
tricks was shown in a recent case in 
New York City where a wealthy im- 
porter paid $16,000 for 35 barrels of 
water. | [ 

Of course,! it sounds unreasonable 
b think that anyone would accept a 
I arrel of 'whiskey without testing it. 
This is what the importer did. He 
rampled whiskey from every one of 
the 35 | barrels and found it good 
'.'hereupon he turned over the check 
'o the sellers. 

Later when he wished to decant the 
whiskey he found the flow stopped 
when less tjian a ballon had been 
drawn off. Investigation showed that 
a container! had been arranged • to 
cover the bunghole of the barrel' and 
had been filled with a gallon of whis- 
key. Every other barrel had been pre- 
pared the same way. Instead of 35 
barrels; of whiskey the purchaser se- 
cured 35 gallons for his $16,000, and 
several! hundred gallons of wateer. 

The sellers of the water were ar- 
rested ilater,! as they were about to 



Page Seven 



UNEVENNESS CATTLE MARKET 



Ex- 



ihst 



as fol- 

cream- 
Monday 



| ever made to th£ Indians of the Chip- Renter a motor car the purchaser of 
! pewa nation of Minnesota was carried the. whiskey- recognized. A dozen 



Last week's issue of the Karlstad 
Advocate .contains a statement of the 
business done by the Co-o] lerative 
creamery of that village, a mo st cred 
itable showing, which reads 
lows: 

"The Karlstad Co-operative 
ery held its annual meeting 
afternoon. About 25 shareholders 
were in attendance at the meeting. 

'The creamery has done a | record 
business the past year. In 1920, a 
total of 82,000 pounds of butter was 
made and during the past year 125,- 
000 pounds were manufactured! at the 
local plant, an increase of 55 per cent 
and Manager Fred Johnson says he 
expects that the 1922 output will ex- 
ceed that of the past year. Approxi- 
mately $38,447.73 was paid to patrons. 
The books show a loss of $600: jfor the 
year. This loss was all suffered dur- 
ing the first few months of tlie year 
when the production was low and the 
market off. The creamery has been 
running on a very close price margin, 
paying up to New York extras prices 
and down to only 1 cent under. 

"It was decided at the board meet- 
ing to pay for the coming year J2 cents 
under New York extras and more if 
the market . warranted. The local 
creamery has been paying a great deal 
more for cream and as a result has 
enjoyed a steadily growing patronage 

'The following officers were elected 
at the meeting: William Stein, pres- 
ident; C. F. Johnson, vice president; 
Fred A. Johnson, secretary-treasurer; 
M. O. Germundson, C. A. Warnes, 
Hans Bogestad and Gunwall Tqrkel 
son, directors 



i out. The town was. filled with In- 
dians, but they 'rere not the same In- 
dians w T ho recehed their checks in the 
days gone by. They seemed to be a 
' different race cf people. Provisions 
[ were purchased, loaded into new wag- 
' ons, new stqves and furniture were 
| purchased .for tl e home, new blankets 
in the flashy colors of the tribe, and. 
calico for dresses. The Indians are 
good buyers ani most of the mone; 



3 



ie Cass Lake country.! 



cases 1 (if chianti were found in the 
"car and the [owner of the car said it 
had been put: there by an enemy in his 
absence. ? 



The Severn tunnel, the longest rail- 
road tunnel in England, is to have a 
new system j of ventilation, one fea- 
ture of; which is a fan 27 feet in dia- 
meter and nine feet in width, which 
will revolve one hundred times a min- 
ute. 



Fat Cattle Sell on Weak to Lower 

Basis — Stockers and Feeders 

Show Gains. 

South St. Paul, Minn* January 14., 
1922.— Consumption of dressed beef 
continues below normal and with the 
dressed beef market in a sluggish con- 
dition fat cattle trade this week has 
been on a steady to 26c lower basis. 
Country demand for stockers and 
feeders, on the other hand, continues 
to abosrb a larger percentage of re- 
ceipts than normally at this season 
of the year and cattle: prices in this 
division have advanced 25 per cent or 
more. 

Outside of one smaU lot of seven 
yearling beef steers of a choice grade 
that sold to city butchers at $9.50, all 
beef steer offerings this week have 
been common and medium grade short 
feds. Better offerings of these have 
sold from §6.25 ' to $7.00, with the 
bulk at the close selling from ?5.25 
to $6.25. 

Best offerings of butcher she stock 
sell at present from $5.50 to around 
$6.50, with bulk of butcher cows and 
heifers going from $3.25 to $5.00. Can- 
ners and cutters .have held steady, go- 
ing largely at $2.25 to $3,000. Bologna 
bulls continue strong, showing ad- 
vances of $25 or more, prices ranging 
from $3.25 to $4.25. Practical packer 
top on best light veals at the close 
$7.50, a few extra choice vealers up to 
$8.00. 

Best stockers and feeders on the 
fat cattle order are selling from $5.75 
to around $6.25, with the bulk going 
from $4.50 to $5.50. 

Hog receipts locally this week of 
about 74,000 have been heaviest in 
over a year and the market is closing 
about 15 to 25c lower. Good butchers 
at the close $7.25. to $7.50, light sorts 
$7.75 to $7.85, good pigs $8.50. 

Lambs are closing about 25c higher 
and sheep 25c to 50c higher for the 
week. Best fed lambs this week $11.50 
to $11.75, natives $10.50 to $11.00, bulk 
good fat ewes $5.50 ,to $6.00. 

COAL — Order your hard and soft 
coal from the Christenson & Voelz 
Hardware Co. Phone 23. tf 



That by virtue' of the power of Bale con- 
tained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute in Buch case made and pro* 
vided, the 6afd Mortgage will be fore- 
closed by a sale of the premises described 
in. and conveyed by said Mortgage, viz: 

The Southwest Quarter (SW»4J of Sec- 
tion Thirteen (13), and the Northeast Quar- 
ter of the Southeast ^Quarter (NB% of 
SE&) of Section Fourteen (14), all in 
Township One Hundred Fifty-three (153) 
North, of Range Forty-three (43) West of 
the Fifth Principal Meridian, containing 
Two Hundred (200) acres, more or less, ac- 
cording to the United States Government 
Burvey thereof. In Pennington County and 
State of Minnesota, with the hereditaments 
and appurtenances; which sale will be 
made by the Sheriff of said Pennington 
County at the front door of the Court 
House, In the City of Thief River FallB, 
In said County and State, on the 2nd day 
of February, 1022, at J0:00 o'clock A. M., 
of that day, at public yendue, to the highest 
bidder for cbbo, to pay Bald debt of 
$1070.80, and Interest, and the taxes, if any, 
on said premises, and Fifty Dollars, At- 
torney's fees, as stipulated In and by'said 
Mortgage in ca9e of foreclosure, and tht 
disbursements allowed by law; subject to 
redemption at any time within one year 
from the day of Bale, as provided by law. 

Dated December 16th, A. D„ 1021. 

FIRST AND PEOPLES STATE BANK, 
-> Mortgagee. 
PERL W. MABEY, 

Attorney for Mortgagee, 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota, 
D-20-27 J-3-10-17-24 



CITATION FOR HEARING ON PETI- 
TION FOR ADMINISTRATION. 



Estate of Ole H. Field. 



OF 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY 

Pennington, In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Ole H. Field, 
Decedent. 9 

The State of Minnesota to Thora Field, 
Agnes Field, Hilmar Field, William Field, 
Howard Field and Eddie Field, and all 
persons, interested in the granting of ad- 
ministration of the estate of said deced- 
ent: The petition of Thora Field having 
been filed In this Court, representing that 
Ole H. Field, then a resident of the County 
of Pennington, State of Minnesota, died 
intestate ou the- 10th day of December, 
1021, and praying that letters of adminis- 
tration of his estate be granted to Thora- 
Field, and the Court, having fixed, the time 
and place for hearing said petition; 

Therefore, You, And Each of You, Aru 
hereby cited and required to show cause, 
If any you have, beforo this Court at th* 
Probate Court Rooms in the Court House, 
In the City of Thief River FallB, in the 
County of Pennington, State of Minnesota, 
on the 2nd day of February, 1922, at 10 
o'clock A. M., why said petition should 
not be granted. 

Witness, the Judge of said Court, and 
the seat of said Court, thiB 7tii day of 
January, 1022. 

LARS BACKE, 
(SEAL) Probate Judge. 

THEO. QUALE, 
Attorney for Petitioner. Jan-10-17-24 



terest thereon at the rate of six per cent 
per annum from the IDtb day of Decem- 
ber, 1021, and. whereas tlie said power of 
sale has become operative, and no action 
or proceeding- having been instituted, at 
law or otherwise, to recover the debt se- 
cured by said Mortgage, or any part there- 
of; 

Now, Therefore, Notice Is Hereby Given, 
That by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute in such ease made and pro- 
vided, the said Mortgage will be foreclosed 
by a sale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said Mortgage, viz: 

The Southeast Quarter (SE&) of Sec- 
tion numbered Two (2), in Township num- 
bered One Hundred Fifty-three (153) North 
of Range numbered Forty (40) West of 
the Fifth P. M., containing 100 acres, more 
or less, according to the United States 
survey thereof, in Pennington County and 
State of Minnesota, with the hereditaments 
and appurtenances; which sale will be 
made by the Sheriff of said Pennington 
County, at the front door of the Court 
House, In^the City of Thief River Falls, 
in said County nnd State, on the 11th day 
of February, 1022, at ten o'clock A. M., 
of that day, at public vendue, to the high- 
est bidder for cash, to pay said debt of 
Twenty-four Hundred Eighty-nine and 7S- 
100 Dollars, nnd interest, and the taxes, if 
any, on said premises, and Seventy-five 
Dollars Attorney's fees, as stipulated in 
and by said Mortgage in case of foreclos- 
ure, and the disbursements allowed by law; 
subject to redemption at any time within 
one year from the day of sale, as provided 
by law. 

Dated December Iflth, A. D., 1021. 
THERESA STUCY, 
Mortgagee. 
J. M. BISHOP, 
Attorney, 

Thief River Falls, Minn. 

D-20-27 J -3 -10 -17-24 



A GOQD REASON 

Nell: "That man certainly gets on 
people's nerves." l . ; 

Belle: "To bad; and he's such a 
nice looking chap. Why does he? 

Nell: "Because he's a dentist." 

"Because, in their wives' estima- 
tion, knickerbocker suits mate men 
look younger, they are in demand in 
clothing stores," is the reason given 
by one salesman for the run on this 
type of suits. 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. 

Default having been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of One Thousand Seventy- 
six and 89-100 Dollars, which Is claimed 
to be due and is due at the date of this 
notice upon a certain Mortgage, duly exe- 
cuted and delivered by Martha Ingram, a 
widow, Mortgagor, to First nnd Peoples 
State Bank (a corporation under the laws 
of the State of Minnesota), Mortgagee, 
bearing date the 2nd day of February, 
1920, and with a power of Bale therein con- 
tained, duly recorded in the office of the 
Register of Deeds in and for the County 
of Pennington and state of Minnesota, on 
trie 25tb day of February, 1920, at 1:00 
o'clock P. M., in Book 54-of Mortgages, on 
page 012, and no action or proceeding hav- 
ing been instituted, at law or otherwise, 
to recover the debt secured by Bald Mort- 
gage or any part thereof, 
Now, Therefore, Notice Is Hereby Given, 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE 
Default having been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of Two Hundred Eighty- 
nine and 78-100 ($280.78) Dollars, which 
Is claimed to be due and Is due at the date 
of this notice upon a certain Mortgage, 
duly executed and delivered by Arthur J. 
Balrd, a single man, Mortgagor, to Mort- 
gagee, bearing date the third day of No- 
vember, 1919, and with a power of sale 
therein contained, duly recorded in the 
office of the Register of Deeds In and for 
the County of Pennington and State of 
Minnesota, on the fourth day of November, 
1919, nt 8 o'clock A. M., in Book 57 oi 
Mortgages, on page 350, 

And, Whereas, The said Theresa Stucy, 
the Mortgagee and Holder of said Mort- 
gage, has duly elected and does hereby 
elect to declare the whole principal sum 
of said Mortgage due and payable at the 
date of thiB notice, under the terms and 
conditions of said Mortgage and the power 
of sale therein contained ; and whereas 
there is actually due and claimed to be 
due and payable at the date of this notice 
'the sum of Twenty-four Hundred Eighty- 
nine and 78-100 (?24S9.7S) Dollars, with in- 



SHERIFF'S RALE. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF 
Pennington, ss. 

In District Court, 
Fourteenth Judicial- District. 

Citizens State Bank of Tyler, a corpora- 
tion. Plaintiff, vs. Emil O. Green, De- 
fendant. 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That by 
virtue of an Execution to me directed nnd 
delivered, and now in my hands, issued* 
out of the District Court ot the Fourteenth 
Judicial District, State of Minnesota, in 
and for the County of Pennington, upon a 
judgment therein rendered in Bald Court in 
favor of the Citizens State Bank of Tyler, 
Plaintiff, and against Emil O. Green, De- 
fendant. I have levied upon the following 
described real propertv of said Defendant, 
to-wlt: The Northwest Quarter (NW^4) 
and the West one-half of the Northeast 
Quarter (W% of NE^i) of Section Twenty 
(20); the Southeast Quarter of the North- 
east Quarter (SE% of NE%) of Section 
Nineteen (19) ; East one-hnlf of the South- 
east Quarter (E% of SE#) of Section 
Eighteen (18), nnd the West one-half of 
the Southwest Quarter (W% of SW>4) of 
Section Seventeen (17), all In Township 
One Hundred Fifty-four (154) North of 
Range Forty-three (-13) West of the Fifth 
Principal Meridian, containing 440 acres 
of land according to the Government Sur- 
vey thereof. 

And that I shall, on the 8th day of 
February, 1922, at toe hour of 10 o'clock 
A. M., of said day, at the front door ol 
the Pennington County Court HouBe in 
the City of Thief River Falls, ^in said 
County and State, proceed to sell all the . 
right, title nnd interest of the above nam- 
ed Emil O. Green in and to the above 
described property, to satisfy said judg- 
ment and costs,' amounting to Fifteen 
Hundred Ninety-two and 10-100 ($1502.10) 
Dollars, together with all accruing coBts 
rf sal", nnd interest on the same from 
ihe intli day of November, 1021, nt the 
rate of fi pi;r cent per annum, nt Public 
Auction, to the highest bidder for cash. 
Dated December 17th, . 1021. 

W. J. LaBREE, 
Sheriff of Pennington county, Minnesota. 
A. K. STAUNING, 

Tylej,' Minnesota. Plaintiff's Attorney. 
Dec. 27-J-3-10-17-24-31. 




THIEF RIVER 



You should not; fail t6 have ally oar tickets in the box by that time. The drawing of the winners of the three grand prizes will commence promptly at 
above hour. Iri accordance with former advertisements, we are giving away one ticket entitling the holder to one chance on the prizes offered for every 

spent in this l store and also one ticket with every dollar received oh account. 
BUY YOUR MUSIC | SUPPLIES NOW and receive your tickets, as you hold the lucky number and carry off one of the three prizes, 
prizes are offered absolutely FREE. 



dollar 



MUSIC COMPANY'S 



Prize Contest Ends Saturday 



JANUARY 21st at 3 P. M. 




$150 CABINET 
: BRUNSWICK 

FIRST PRIZE 

This beautiful $150 Cab- 
inet Brunswick Phono- 
graph will be given away 
Saturday as first prize in 
this great contest, which 
has proven one of the 
most interesting contests 
ever held in Thief Eiver 
Palls or surrounding coun- 
try. The Brunswick's fame 
has been well established 
in Thief Eiver Falls and 
vicinity during the com- 
paratively short -time that 
it has been 'sold here and 
the winner will indeed 
have reason to feel proud 
of this remarkable phono- 
■ graph. 



Remember these 



$40 HIGH GRADE VIOLIN 

SECOND IURIZE 

The violin whic i will be given away free as 
the second prize in this contest is on display 
in our windows and you are welcome to 
come in and examine it 'and determine its 



quality. 



CHOICE 



i 



OF TEN 10-INCH 



COLUMBIA RECORDS 

THIRD PRIZE 

J -. . ■ . 

The, holder of the third lucky number- will 
be given his or her choice of any ten 10-inch 
Columbia Records in this store. ■ . 



BE THERE SATURDAY AFTERNOON 

THIEF RIVER MUSIC COMPANY 



THE ONE PRICE HOUSE 




SELECT YOUR RECORDS 

AND SHEET MUSIC 

THIS WEEK 

from our most complete stock and in that 
way have your tickets entered before the 
close of this contest. You have more than 
3,000 records from which to select of every 
known record — instrumental,; song, band 
and orchestra, direct from eastern produc- 
ers. Our sheet music department, too, has 
all the latest popular and classical pieces 
and we know that you will find the very 
selection that you have been .looking for. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 





Miss 
evening 
will 

Mrs. 
day ,at 
turning 

Olaf B|. 
afternoor 
spent sev 

R. Oer. 
Warren 
tending 

Charle. 
morning 
spent the 

Arthur 
Friday 
where ho 
guest of 

Miss 

J. m..t; 

week' in 
friends. 



Mrs. 
day ev 
she spent 
1 sister. 

Mrs. J. 
and Miss 
laire wer 
Saturday. 



'or Minneapolis where . 
ten days visiting fi lends, 

Karwand spent Satur- 
arren visiting relatives, re- 
'e in the evening. 

Hanson returned Sijturday 
from Badger where 
eral days visiting his 

returned last evening from 

■vhere he spent the (ay at- 

various business natters. 

Munn returned Monday 
from Crookston where he 
week end with his folks. 

L. Auringer returned here 
vening from Minot, jN. D., 
pent the past*. week; as. the 
his sister. 

lorence Thorstad and Mrs. 

rstad of Lockhart spent last 

city visiting relatives and 



'hor 

the 



Hjalvor Loken returned Satur- 
lg from Plummer where 
the day as a guest of her 

A. Hed and daughter, Louise 
Huldah Gigstad of St. Hi- 
s shoppers between trains on 



Severe of Goodridge was a 
caller in the city Thursday 
to his home Friday mom- 



Albert 
business 
returning 
ing. 

W. A. Holmstrom returned Satur- 
day afternoon to his home at St. Hi 
, laire after spending a day here tran- 
sacting business. 

E. L. Hjelgeland returned this morn- 
Neilsville, Minn., where he 
week end visiting his aged 



ing from 
spent the 
mother. 



E. L. :ielgeland left Saturday af- 
ternoon fur Neilsville, Minn., where he 
is spending several days visiting his 
mother. 



AJnn; 



for 



Mrs. 
ternoon 
spent the 
returning 

Mrs. >-. 
Reynolds 
at four tables 
of the fo 



K. Harris and Mrs. Ila 

are entertaining this evening 

of bridge at the home 

mer on Conley Ave., jSouth. 



Miss I -ma Johnson left Saturday 
afternoon for Crookston where she 
was the week end guest at the 1 home 
of Mr. ai d Mrs. B. 0. Sampson. 



f ) om 
t\v 



Miss M/rtle 
local higl 
"evening 
the past 

Mrs. A 
Booren 
from Plu^nm 
day a 
home. 



R ib. 



Miss 
Falls spe 
the city 
her brother 
Mrs. F. Ed\v 



week for 
spend an 



a Dock left Saturday af- 
Crookston where she 
week end visiting relatives, 
her e yesterday morning. 



Hanson, student at the 

school returned Saturday 

Stephen where she spent 

o weeks with her parents. 



S. Sapero and Miss 
(jturned Thursday 
er where they 
at the H. F. 



guests 



Olive 

rening 

the 

Booren 



spept 



Red 



Lake 



ecca Hunt of 
it 'Friday, and Saturday in 
as a guest at the h 
and sister-in-law, 
ard Hunt. 



i m. 



R ith Sandstrom returned last 



of 
and 



spent 



Miss 
week froip 
the past 
post office: 

Mrs. V, 
Wesloh 
to St. Hil 
in the cit 
ping. 

C. B. Goodrich, editor of the Co 
operative, a newspaper published at 
Greenbusl , was a Thief River Falls 
visitor yesterday. He reports that ef- 
forts are being made to establish 
potato we rehouse at Greenbushl 

Sir. ant] Mrs. T. P. Hamre left last 



Plummer where she 
en days helping out in the 
of that place. 

Hatcher and Mrs. Fred 

■ jturned Saturday afternoon 

aire after spending- tre day 

visiting friends and shop- 



Minneapolis where they will 
ndefinite period before con 



tinuing to the western coast [where 
they will spend the remainder of the 
winter. 



Mrs. J 
guest at i 
"law and 
^rlogensen 
turned Sq 1 
.home at 



C. Kelly who has been a 
ie home of her brother-in- 

;ister, Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. 
for the past two weeks, re- 

turday afternoon to her 

devils Lake, N. D. 



rown 



n, Raymond KilandJ Har- 
>n, Orville Herron and My- 
Plumpier returned Sunday morn- 
Crookston where they wit- 
Two Harbors- Crookston 
game, which resulted in 
'ors winning by a score of 



' Roy B: 
•old Ames 
ron 

ing from 
"nessed th^ 
basket 
Two Harb'i 
26 to 27. 



-■ Monday 
M. H. 
Warner 
ber of 
latter, tht 
day anniv 
forming 
■ at three 
by Miss 
Kolation 
Florence 
an elabor: 
following 
Esther Sf 
Miss Aim 
jeres, 'Mif 
Archie 
(i. Peter 
Miss EfTie 
Sv/anson. 



the r 



Dail 



A. F. LaBudde of ' Gonvick sp'^nt 
.Friday evening in the city with 
friends, leaving Saturday for Crooks- 
ton where he was a .week end guest 
at the George T. Hamery home. 

Mrs. A. Stokke arrived Sunday eve 
ning from Newfolden and spent Mon- 
day as a guest at the E. Aspelund 
home before leaving for Grand Forks 
\\*here; she will spend a short time 
visiting friends. ® 

! The. U. C. T.'s held their regular 
meeting Saturday evening at the Ma- 
sonic hall, initiation taking place, 
which | was followed by a smoker. The 
traveler's are making plans for a mas- 
querade dance which will be given 
sometime next month. 

jOn ;Sunday afternoon James 
Setiier was tendered a very pleasant 
surprise by the [members of his Sun- 
day school class. The afternoon was 
spent in playing .games and music and 
delicious refreshments. were served at 
fijve o'clock. In appreciation of the 
efficient .work rendered by their teach- 
er, the class presented Mr. Sether 
with a beautiful fountain pen. 



AT THE CHURCHES 



Ziori Lutheran Church — Services by 
the pastor 11 A. M. Afternoon- serv- 
ices at Rindal 3 p. m. Evening services 
city by Rev. August Bredeson at 7:45 
pj m. .; Prayer meeting Wednesday 
evening at the residence W Anton 
Stenelat 7:45. Continuants meet at 
parsonage Saturday at 2 p. m. Zion 
Ladies' Aid meets Thursday, January 
26th at 2 p. m. and Mrs. Hans Ped- 
erson and Mrs. Sorum Bergland enter- 
tain. : Zion Young People's meeting 
Thursday evening January 26th, at 8 
p.| m. I and Miss Anna and George 
Afepelund will entertain. — George 'Lar- 
sdn, pastor.^ 



^Evangelistic Meetings — The meet- 
ings in the Swedish Baptist church 
will continue every evening this week 
at 7:30, except Saturday. Invitations 
extended to all. 



i St. ^John's Lutheran Church — The 
Ladies' Aid -meets Wednesday after- 
noon in the church basement. Mrs. 
Fi-oehiich will entertain. German serv- 
ices' Sunday morning 10:30. Sunday 
school at 11:30. 



utheran Church, Goodridge — Sunday, 
January 22. German services nt Esplee at 
10' A. 
Pi M. 
in both services. H. Lutz, pastor. 



KOBWEGIAX BOOKS AT I.IBRABY. 



.The 
list of 
lie bad 



English services at Grygla at 
Holy Communion will be celebrated 



Librarian Announces ' New 1.1st or Books 
by Norwegian Authors, 
city librarian tills week Issues a 
the Norwegian literature that may 
at the library : 
'Aiuerika's Forenede Staters Historle." 
."William McKinley I.iv og Vlrksomhed.'- 
"Thelina," Mnrie Corelli. 
."Kabriknrbeldersken's Dotter," Julius. 
j"Skronebog," Forskjellige Forfnttere. 
("Novelette," Alexander Klelland. 
f'Vakre Kari, Vesle Karl," Ellse' Aubert, 
.-'Blanda eller Snurrige Grier," Lasse 
Grundeland. 
f'Den YanBknbte," Paul Bourget. 
"Fabrikpigen," Julius. 
"Opet-ationsprnt," Irvln S7 Cobb. 
"Vesterlandiaua," Ohlson. 
"Signe, Praesten's Forlovede," Jon Flat- 
abo. ' ; 
"Julogave," ltasmus Anderson. 
"Min Hustru -op; Jeg," Nicoiay., 
"Damring og Dag," Olaf Sanning. 
"En Hansom Cab's Hemmeligbed," Fer- 
gi s Hume. 

'Dronningen's Vagtmaster," Carit Etlar. 
'Sorn'meren in Christiania," T. Storm 
A\ nng. 

'Glade SJale." Erling. 
'Hvem er Mr. Sabln " Phillip Oppen- 
heim, ! „ 

'En | Gnmmel Soidate's JErindringer," 
K appenberg. 



evening, January i6, Mrs. 
„„.inelly and Miss Esther 
ir formally entertained a'num- 
: friends at the home of the 
occasion being their birth- 
■^rsaries. Progressive; whist 
he diversion, was in play 
.ibles. High score was won 
ICsther Soards and the con- 
I rize was carried by! Miss 
lychard. . At eleven o'clock 
te spread was. served. The 
guests were present: Miss 
ards, Miss Eose Scverson, 
Thune, Miss Louise Ma- 
Florence Rychard, Mrs. 
I, Mrs. Rupprecht, Mrs. P. 
n, Miss Isabelle Richter, 
Christenson and Mrs; S. J. 



i OH BO! A WHISKY WELL. 

jSome people are born lucky and 
othersj merely live in Knoxville, Tenn. 
The prohibition enforcement officers 
in! their search around that city found 
a J "well" of whisky in a* residential 
section. The "well" was a copper con- 
tamer, which held 300 to 400 gallons 
of whisky, and was buried 10 feet un- 
der ground. A pump brought it to 
the surface and the owner of the well 
supplied his customers at all hours 
for as; large a quantity of moonshine 
as they wished. The., outfit was con- 
fiscated and many would-be purchas- 
ers of | whisky were forced to explain 
the object of their visit to the prem- 
ises, before the news of the confisca- 
tion became public property. 



O TEMPORA! O MORES! 

"Girls have changed a whole lot 
since the time they used to retire' to 
put powder on their noses," exclaimed 
Johnson. 

I "They sure have!" agreed Thomp- 
son. "I called on Miss Sallie last 
nightj and she sent word down by her 
maid Oiat. she wasn't painted yet, but 
would ;be right down." 



HOW THEY GET THAT WAY 

What's the connection between long 
hair on a. man and eccentricity?" 
asked Williams. 

I don't know," said Jackson, Vbut 
I've often wondered if they wore long 
hair because they are eccentric or 
whether they get eccentric by wear- 
ing their hair long." 



Sixteen Join 
1 Milk 



o^ 



In 

Testing 



Farm Management Schools 
Here and Goodridge At- 
tract Many Farmers 



Committee of T 
\ pointed to Procure 
petent Milk 



hree Ap- 

Com- 
Tester 



Hay devoted 
a talk on co- 
success which 



In spite of the incljment weather 

great many farmers attended the 
Farm Management school at the Com- 
mercial club rooms Friday afternoon, 
and listened with interest to the var- 
ious speakers. Prof, 
himself principally to 
operation, reciting the 
has been attained in various sections 
pf the state. G. Halvorson addressed 
the farmers on his proposed resolu- 
tion stabilizing the price of wheat by 
action of congress. It developed that 
several farmers were npt in sympathy 
with the idea, contending that *the 
solution to present farm ills lay in 
other_ directions. ■ Hans Anton made 

clear cut talk in which he asserted 
that the disasters attending sroall 
grain farming was notJ an unmixed 
blessing-— every new country has tine 
sam e experience, he stated, an8 the 
sooner farmers diversify to the end 
that something is put back in the soil, 
instead of taking everything out — 
the sooner will the farmers be on a 
sure road to prosperity. He said he 
would favor government fixing of 
grain prices if it could be demonstrat- 
ed that the burden would not be too 
great on the tax payers of the, na- 
tion. .... 

W. J. Brown attacked the resolution 
as ill advised, but gave it as his opin- 
ion that credit requirements which 
would enable the faTmur to- distribute 
his product according to the public 



A county Milk Testing association 
was started with 16 members on the 
roll, and many others stated their 
intention to join as . soon ,as the work 
was under way. A committee con- 
sisting of M. T. McFarland, Albert 
Johnson and Frank Hardisty was ap- 
pointed to complete arrangements and 
secure a competent tester. 



COAL — Order your- hard and soft 
coal from the Christenson & Yoelz 
Hardware Co. Phone 23. tf 



CAMBRIDGE FOR TWO GAMES 



needs, would come rearer 



solving 



some of th e present troubles of agri 
culture. He made a vicious attack 
on the federal reserve system, which 
he said was fundamentally sound, but 
improperly administere 1. He charged 
that funds intended to relieve agri- 
culture had been diverted to the uses 
of stock gamblers through the chan- 
nels of Wall Street banks, where six- 
ty per cent of the funds were con- 
trolled. | 

C. L. Hansen, of the First National 
bank, briefly explained the workings 
of the War Finance Corporation, and 
made a plea for the country bank- 
ers whose woes he assen«d (were man- 
ifold and little understoi d by the man 
on the outside. 

It_Js not unlikely that a series of 
debates may. be arrange! between Mr. 
Halvorson and Mr. Brown as a re- 
sult of Friday's meeting, since Mr. 
Halvorson is confident public senti- 
ment will sustain his sabilizing res- 
olution when they fully understand it. 



jTigers are to have a close season in 
future. 1 




WOOD 



Sawed and Delivered 

$8.25 

Per Conl 
Also Have Poplar, 
Jack Pine and Oak 

Phone 15 

Hall Brothers Co. 

"A Good Place to Trade" 
Hardware — Farm Machinery 



:.uiu:dli 



Fast Down-State Five to Perform 
Here Friday and Saturday 

The Cambridge basket ball team 
will arrive Friday for a two-game 
series with Coach Connell's aggrega- 
tion in the evening and on Saturday 
evening, January 20 and 21, at the 
Auditorium. N 

Cambridge is represented by a 
strong five this year, they having on 
their team Martin Norton, a star of 
quite some "rep," who has been cred- 
ited by Chicago experts with being 
the fastest high school basketeer in 
the country. They will also have in 
their lineup the Louden brothers, who 
appeared on the same team here 
about three weeks ago when they 
played with Excelsior. The senior 
Louden played with Thief River Falls 
in their two games with Two Harbors 
last week. 

It is not yet known whether Carl- 
son, injured in last Saturday's tilt 
with the Two Harbors quint, will ap- 
pear with th e ! local men for the two 
games with Cambridge. The "Swede" 
has shown great improvement since 
his injury and it would not be at 
all surprising if he is out fighting 
for the team Friday and Saturday. 
Hpltzknecht, who was also hurt, is 
again out for practice each evening, 
and will be in the lineup against 
Cambridge, it is thought. 



REASON WHY j 

"Don't you always clean up. on Sat 

urday night for 'Sunday?" asked the 

unmarried man. \ 

"No; my- wife saves me the troutle 

and cleans me out every Saturday," 

answered the married man. 



MUFFLERSTS 
"The modern girl muffles and hides 
her ears in her hair," says Uncle Jed, 
"but from my observation she still 
contrives to hear when a man pro- 
poses to her." ' ' ! 



Call A. n. 
- 91-34 



PIANOS TUNED. 
Card. Phone 24. 



AMON RESIGNS 

-Announcment is made by* Philip 
Amon that h e has resigned as clerk 
of the Woodmen of the Wbrld. The 
vacancy will be filled at the next 
meeting of the lodge. 



How much easier it is to buy things 
on the installment plan than it ;is to 
pay for them that way! 



KDCAL MARKETS 

Hanson & Bamm. j 

Wheat, No. 1 northern, per bu ?l.lj& 

Wheat, No. 2 northern, per bu 1.04 

Wheat, No. 3 nortnern, per bu .Ob 

Durum "wheat. No. 1, per bu '■ -74 

Durum wheat, No. 2, per bu .72 

Durum wheat. No. 3, per bu 6T 

Oats, per bu 22 

Rye, per bu 60 

Barley, per bu .33 

Flax, No. .1, per bu 1.81 

Flax, No. 2, per bu...*.... ; 1.70 

Bran, per cwt. ...'... 1.20 

Shorts, per cwt 1.20 

Thief River Produce Co. 

Spring chickens, per lb...- 15 

Old RooBterH, per lb JO 

Hens, light, per lb .10 

Hens, heavy, per lb 15 

Geese; per lb.. ' JO 

Ducks, per lb 12 

Cow Hides, per lb v . .04 

Milk, per quart .09 

Cream, per quart - .35 

Butter, per lb 37 

Eggs, per dozen ■. 30 



A woman never forgives a man for . 
forgiving her for not forgiving him. 



CLASSIFIED COLUMN 



WANTED— COMPETENT MAID, LIGHT 

fiousework; good home; .small family. 

410 Duluth Ave. N. 02-lt 



FOB HENT— KOOMS, ALL MODEliN AND 

nicely furnished. 116 St. Paul Ave. H. 

Phone 332-J. 92-lt 



FOR RENT— FULLY MODERN, 

well furnished rooms. Phone 2'80, 

8237 Knight Ave. N. 13-20-27 



ROOM— MODERN ROOM FOR RENT AT 
002 Main are. Mrs. O. H. OIsoA. OOtf 



HEMSTITCHING — SELMA AND IDA 
Johnson. 31S Horace ave. 00-97p 



FOR RENT— MODERN 4-ROOM APART- 
ment, kitchenette and hath ; may be had 
after Feb. 15. PieaBe phone for appoint- 
ment. Mrs. A. W. Swedenburff. S9tf 



FOR SALE, TRADE OR RENT— CITY 

property and farms. See Andrew Ness 

and make a deal. Fl-22 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM FURNISHED 
house on Conley ave. Immediate pos- 
session. Lawrence Mtg. Co. , 70-tf 



FOR RENT— A MODERN/FURNISHED 
rooms. SOI Main ave. N. Phone 309. S3tl 



■FARM WANTED— WANTED TO HEAR 
from owner of a farm or good land for 
sale, price reasonable. L. JoneB, Box 551, 
Olney, 111. 



CARLOAD OF 

Corn 



<JWill.have a carload of 
corn in Thief River Falls 
about t h e middle of 
next week. 

Get Your Order In Now! 

Prices Will Be 
Right 



^-INQUIRE- 



Red Lake Falls Milling 

Company 
125 South LaBree 



Leaves of trees, shrubs, etc., are 
perhaps the most vital factor in the 
world of living things, as every ele- 
ment of food, save salt and water, 
comes to mankind through leVves. 




_. * c *' BHA1M 
'"^-rrf -UVEA 




CMiROPRACTIC 
w;ll give you health 



Jennie M. 

EASTAMN 

Pioneer Chiropr act c 

Hour3 10-12 a. m., 2-5 p. m. 

Evenings by appointment. 

Phones: 213-1. Ees. 213-2. 

Offices over First and Peoples' 
Bank Bldg. 



FREE 

Coffee and Cake 

We wish to announce that we have moved our stock of groceries, fruits, etc., 
next door to our old location, 301 Main Avenue North, and oh Saturday, by 
Tvay of introducing our new and more spacious quarters to all our old custo- 
mers, we will serve free coffee and cake all day Saturday. 

Come In the Morning and Come In The Afternoon 
and Make Yourself at Home. "• 

We have recently added to our line a new and fresh assortment of the best- 
known brands of groceries and when you want the best you will make your 
purchases here. I- ' 

WE DELIVER 



■H 



BREDESON & CO. 

THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINN. 




\> 



j?- 



'^k 



A 



i \ 



Call The T 
You iV 




Creamefy'Shows ; 
Wonderful Growth 



Nearly Twc Million Pounds 



of Cream 



Received Here 



During Year 



Figures Prcve Bevond Ques- 
tion Wherein Revenue 
of FErraer Lies 



about a million 
one unfamiliar 
handling cream 
to wondering 
amounts to. 
But when yt 



' <t by Phone If 
^, .ewe Your 
.ce a Week. 





TW 



When anybody gets to talking about 
millions they aire getting way up in 
figures, no ma iter whether it is doll 
lars, pennies 01 units, but when peo^ 
pie gather aroind and get to talking 
pounds of cream any4 
with the business of 
and its products, get 
ow much it Really 



u calculate in almost 



two millions, especially where it con: 
cerns cream, tha figures become pow} 
■erful, indeed. 

There was received at the Fanners 
Co-operative creamery in Thief River 
Falls during tie past year in plain 
figures 1,794,4£ 5 pound of cream, 
from which . 625,335 pounds of butter 
was made, ■■ of i rtiich citizens of .Thief 
River Falls consumed 123,925 pounds. 
Farmers of Pennington county who 
furnished this almost staggering 
amount of dair y products received as 
their share ar proximately $275,000. 
Many of the patrons received individ- 
ual checks of r lore than $3,500, there 
being several £core who reached the 
$1,000 mark. 

Figures presented to The Tribune 
yesterday by I. Englestad, secretary 
;ociatron, indicate thaj; 

„ __. „ J jsed has been the most 

successful in the history of the local 
association by nore than' 26 per cen 
and that next ,'ear promises an evei 
larger increase. There has been an ad 
dition in the lumber of patrons o; 
more than 15 per cent and many o: 
the individual ;>atrons have increase' 
the number of pounds of cream mar| 
keted by about the same percentage 

Starting in 1907 with a total 
89,017 pounds of butterfat receivei 
it has steadily mounted down througl 
the years unti 1921 shcjws a grant 
total of 531,828 pounds' of butterfat 
received. In 1908 there was 106,795 
pounds of.but;erfat; 1910,. 160,048 
pounds; 1911, 182,270 pounds. Thp 
year 1912, how sver, showed a decrease 
when 128,483 p rands of butterfat were 
received, which is the only year in 
the history of 1 he association that has 
failed to show \ marked increase out 
side of 1917, w len receipts fell a little 
more than 5,000 pounds. Figures for 
1913, 1914 and 1915 are not available, 
but 1916 shows that 309,058 pounds 
were received; 1917 fell a trifle when 
302,646 pounds were received. In 1918 
there was 363,106 pounds; 1919, 427;- 
' 690; 1920, 416,680. Last year the rec- 
ord shows that 531,828 pounds of but- 
terfat was extracted from the 1,- 
794,495 pounds of cream handled by 
the association 

Figures presented by the associa- 
tion secretary present an interesting 
study from an economic standpoint in 
that it appear; the amount received 
per pound for butter serves as a 
barometer to tie consumption of but- 
ter. The yeais prior to 1918, when 
butter retailed at from 23 cents to 
about 30 cents per pound were time's 
that the consi mption of butter was 
the highest, comparatively. The war, 
with its high prices and conservation 
of food, apparently cut down on but- 
ter consumpticn, as creamery butter 
then retailed for upwards from 45 
cents-per pounl and its high cost pre- 
vented many f :om enjoying its pleas- 
ant flavor. "When the downward trend 
came in the price of creamery pro- 
ducts, the am rant of consumption 
steadily rose. Butter prices were at 
peak in 1919 and 1920, when good 
creamery butte r retailed at an average 



leave it to you to figure out the per- 
centage of increase. 

"Butter, butter, who's got the but- 
ter?" | 

Thief River Falls has, and oodles of 
it. When a creamery gets to doing 
business on ithe million and two mil- 
lion pounds of cream basis, somebody 
has got to step aside and let us pass. 
The reason for the phenomenal growth 
in cream receipts in Thief River Falls 
is the most obvious thing in the world. 
There is no speculation on the part of 
the farmer fiiat feeds dairy cattle, and 
the progressive farmer needs no in- 
struction from outside sources when 
it comes to pointing out how best to 
overcome the disastrous effects of low 
grain prices and the present almost 
stagnant market. Whether relief will 
come to he who "sticks to the ship' 
of small graining farming, this news- 
paper is unable to say — we hope so — 
but present ^conditions do not indicate 
that such will be the case for at least 
a year or two. The grain market, as 
everyone knows, is controlled -largely 
by the world market, Liverpool, and 
when there; is no demand from this 
source there can be no certainty as 
to prices, demand or anything else. 
Besides the! income from products of 
the field is. but an annual event at 
best in this part of the United. States, 
whereas dairying, whether it be on a 
large or small scale is an all-year 
proposition with the farmer that real- 
ly goes into; it on a businesslike basis, 
determined that therein lies his salva- 
tion and the only method by which he 
can rise supreme above his present 
difficulties. : 

That business jn general recognizes 
this paramount fact, has culminated, 
as told of in last Tuesday's issue of 
The Tribune, in a Thief River Falls 
banking institution announcing that 
they have placed at the disposal of a 
disbursing committee the sum of $10,- 
000, which is to be parcelled out to 
farmers in need of funds with which 
to purchase dairy, cattle, the only 
stipulation being that cows of the 
blooded variety be bought. 

Assuredly the farmers of Penning- 
ton county and northwestern Minne- 
sota are coming to realize that dairy- 
ing is the business best suited to this 
section and' as the industry of the 
permanent variety. 

DAUGHTER OF MR. AND 

MRS. RUDOLPH JENSEN DIES 



More Than Eightv Witness- 
es to Testify at Trikl of 
Prescott Hotel Clerk 



Gummer Trial 
on at Valley 



ICE- A- WEEK 



— t 



The Tribun, by Carrier, Twice 

a Week at Two Dollars a 

Year; Subscribe for It 



$2 A YEAR IN ADVANCE 



Is 
City 



Hans Wick, Father of Mur- 
dered Girl, Witness in 
Murder Trial 



m tttt mn t t it "* 



THE JURY. 



t 

♦ 
♦ 

♦ Fred Ladbury, Dazey; Ered H. ♦. 

♦ Gretchell, Valley City; Chris 01- ♦ 

♦ son, Ypsilanti; R". R. Kane 1 , Spir- ♦ 

♦ itwood; William Flach, Sanborn; ♦ 

♦ Lloyd Samson, Valley City; Peter ♦ 

♦ Rumer, Wimbledon; L. A. Sunde, ♦ 

♦ Valley City; George Ohm, Lucca; ♦ 

♦ Chris Minch, Dazey; Thee. Thil- ♦ 

♦ money, Pillsbury, and Henry ♦ 

♦ Helmers, Wimbledon. ♦ 
MMMMMMMMMMlMMM 



Red Lake Report 
Goes to Burke 



♦ 
♦ 



Voluminous Report Submit- 
ted Yesterday to Indian 
Bureau Heads 



Early Decision in This Im- 
portant Project Hoped 
For by Officials 



♦ Tonight and tomorrow night, # 

♦ at the Auditorium, the city team ♦ 

♦ will clash with the Cambridge, ♦ 

♦ Minn., five. They are a mighty ♦ 

♦ fine bunch of athletes, have a ♦ 

♦ formidable string of victories to ♦ 

♦ their credit, and may be expected ♦ 

♦ to put up a strong defense ♦ 

♦ against the locals. Cambridge^ 

♦ has both the Louden brothers and ♦ 

♦ Norton, the All-American High ♦ 

♦ school forward, in their lineup. ♦ 

♦ ' ♦ 
' "IMHIIIMI t tH I IIHH t 



The trial of William Gummer, Far- 
go hotel clerk, for the mi rder of 
Marie Wick, 18-year-old Gr;'gla girl, 
at the Prescott hotel last Jur e, oj 
Tuesday at Valley City, N. D., before 
Judge Cooley of Grand Fores. Sev- 
eral days were consumed in selecting 
a jury, and the examination of wit- 
nesses began yesterday morcing when 
Hans Wick, father of the murdered 
girlj was placed on the stand. The self and the run-off area, George W. 



According to C. G. Selvig, presi- 
dent of the Red Lake Drainage and 
Conservancy board, Mr. Reed, drain- 
age engineer of U. S. Indian Bureau 
expects to send Red Lake Drainage 
report recently submitted by Red Lake 
Drainage and Conservancy board to 
Commissioner of Indian Bureau, C. H, 
Burke yesterday with his recommend- 
ations. Early action by Commission- 
er . Burke is hoped for. Viewers on 
Red Lake project will be appointed 
when final plans are approved by the 
Interior and War departments. Ever 
since February 21, 1921, when con- 
gress passed the Red \ Lake bill ac- 
tive work has been put on Red Lake 
project. It was materially expedited 
when the legislature on April 19 last 
appropriated funds for (the surveys. 

On October 28 a preliminary hear- 
ing was held at Bemidji and on No- 
vember 22 and 23 a conference with 
the Indian Bureau officials was held 
at Washington. On account of the 
meager data regarding Red Lake it 



aged man choked with emot on as he 
answered questions of the attorneys 
relating to his daughter. 

Something more than 80 witnesses 
will be examined by the stat ; and the 
trial is expected to take at least two 
weeks. 

The state is weaving a chain of cir- 
cumstantial evidence about the move- 
ments of Gummer the night of the 
murder, expecting to convince the jury 
of his guilt. I 



Lorinda Ardith Jensen, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Jensen, who 
reside at 615 Duluth Ave., North, died 
Tuesday morning after a few days 
illness of appendicitis. The deceased 
was six years of age at the time of 
her death. j Funeral . services will be 
held Friday afternoon, at two o'clock 
at the Trinity Lutheran church, Rev. 
T. E. Sweger officiating. The re- 
mains will ! be laid to rest at Green- 
wood cemetery. 



Walker, chief engineer and Adolph F. 
Meyer, consulting engineer, have had 
to go forward very carefully in order 
to be sure of their ground. 

Following the Washington confer- 
ence, Mr. Meyer prepared his report 
^hich was submitted on Dec. 31, 1921. 
It is a lengthy one including over 16 
pages with 16 maps and diagrams. 

Without doubt the Washington/of- 
ficials will submit their decision as 
soon as it is possible for them to do so. 



♦ BASKET BALL TONIGHT. 



LIBRARY IS HEADQUARTERS. 



Drive for Russian Relief is Opened 
This Morning. 

The committee in charge of Rus- 
sian relief measures met this morning 
at the Commercial club rooms to per- 
fect final plans for the drive, which 
opened today. Twenty solicitors be- 
gan a canvass of the city and sub- 
scription blanks were sent to all out- 
lying districts. 

The basement of the library will be 
headquarters for Russian relief. Wil- 
liam Quist has been placed in charge 
and persons desiring to make, dona- 
tions of articles which, may be con- 
verted into cash- are requested to 
bring them to him. 

The drive will end next Friday with 
a monster ball at the Auditorium, the 
committee in - charge promising to 
have the best of music. The public is 
invited to make the drive a success by 
purchasing tickets-to the ball. 

WOMAN'S CLUB MEETING AT 
COMMERCIAL CLUB MONDAY 



Potato Men Will 
Be Here Jan. 25th 



R. C. Rose, University Spe- 
• cialist, and Potato Ex- 
change Mjm to Speak 



Topics Will Be Seed Treat- 
ing, Spraying, Storage 
Troubles, Handling 



A meeting of all farmers in this vi- 
cinity interested in potato growing is 
to be held at the Commercial club 
rooms on th e afternoon of January 24, 
when R. C. Rose, specialist of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota extension divi- 
sion, and a representative of the Min- 
nesota Potato Exchange will address 
those present. Similar meetings will 
be held at St. Hilaire January 25 and 
at Goodridge January 26. The pro- 
gram in each place will start at 1:30 
P. ,'M. and close in time for farmers to 
go home early. 

Plans will be made to have a potato 
exhibit at the Crookston crop show 
February 6-10. The topics to be dis- 
cussed by Mr. Rose are of utmost im- 
portance to potato growers of the vi- 
cinity, including such subjects as seed 
treating, spraying, seed plots, storage 
troubles and means of avoiding same 
by proper handling. 

Olaf Neset Heads 
Poultry Ass'n. 



Bankers to Cash 
Road Warrants 



Gravel Hauling Bet 
This City and Hoi 



ween 
.t to. 



Bring Ready Money 



Engineer Sewell, of High- 
way Departmnet, Talks 
to Commercial Club - 



HIGH SCHOOL WINS. 



J 



Locals Defeat Mahnomen at Basket- 
\ balll by 19 to 6 Score. 

In a game quite devoid of snappy 
action but ' in which the local high 
school team outplayed the visiting five, 
Mahnpmen was swamped las night at 
the Auditorium by a score of 19 to 6. 

"Buster" Ralston played a star 
game; for Thief River Falls. "Kip" 
LaBree sustained an injury to his an- 
kle in the early stages of the game 
and had toJetire. The first half ended 
10 to [4 in favor of the local high team. 

The attendance was very poor — 
mighty slim — in fact, too tiny to be of 
any encouragement to the warriors 
who go forth to battle for the honor of 
Thief River. The lineup: 



price of abou 



ward trend it 
noticeable, the 



64 cents per pound. 



Last year, however, when the down- 



prices became more 
amount of butter con- 
sumed in Thii if River Falls showed 
an increase over the preceding year 
of almost 30,000 pounds. j 

Of the 625,335 pounds of butter 
manufactured \t the local creamery 
during the year just passed, 398,652 
pounds were si ipped to outside points, 
considered by officials of the local 
association a lighly satisfactory rec- 
ord. As above stated, 123,925 pounds 
went to local consumption and 3,758 
pounds were purchased by . farmer 
patrons of the creamery. 

Either residents of Thief River 
Falls are extrc vagant users of butter 
and smear it on mighty thick, or else 
folks in 1907 lid not consider butter 
so. essential to their well-being. The 
amount of butter consumed by local 
residents jumj ed from 3,078 pounds 
in 1907 to 123,1125 pounds in 192L We 



Mahnomen: 

. F Rumriech 

F Rumreich 

C ;. Hukee 

. G Rumreich 

. G .Weirauch 

Subs — Thief River Falls, Keene, Mc- 
Ginn,; Halv'erson, Sether. Mahnomen, 
De vV/>ody;and Trysa. 

SALVATION ARMY CAPTAIN 

ENTERTAINED BY FRIENDS 



T. R.: 
Sorenson.; 

Ralston 

LaBree 

Bischoff.... 
Arnold >. 



In compliment to Captain Florence 
Petrie of the Salvation Army, who is 
leaving Thief River Falls shortly for 
another field, 30 people gathered at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Murphy to; spend an evening of music 
and games, a delicious lunch conclud- 
ing the evening. 

Those present were: Captain Flor- 
ence Petrie, Lieutenant E. Hobson, 
Morland Strum, Olga Strum, Miss 
Evelyn Saugen, Miss Celestine Strum, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. M\ Strum, Miss Agnes 
Koglin, Miss Laura Strum, Miss Thea 
Saugen, Miss Linda Koglin, Miss Edna 
Northrup, Emil Koglin, Harry Paul- 
son, Mr. and Mrs. William Comstock, 
G. Gustuy Miss Florence Murphy, 
Miss Mabel Olson, Mrs. Lampher, 
Miss Kathleen Strum, Mr. and Mrs. 
Northrup, Melvina Comstock and E. 
M. Bfittenj 



Anyway ;none df the men of Thief 
River. Falls has got into trouble at the 
evening parties lately as the result of 
stepping on the trailing skirts of the 
women. 



If there has been any misunder- 
standing about the cashing of certifi- 
cates issued by the highway depart- 
ment to men hauling grave! on the 
Babcock.road between this city and 
Holt, the matter I was fully! cleared 
up yesterday at a conference between 
local bankers and Engineer Sewell, of 
the maintenance division of t|he high- 
way department, .with headquarters 
at Crookston. The banks of Thief 
River have never: been unwilling to* 
cash such certificates or warrant?, 
but it seems there has beenl a slight 
misunderstanding concerning |the tiint 
these warrants were required to /run 
and this was fully made clear yester- 
day by Mr. Sewell. I 

Mr. Sewell made a brief talk to 
the Commercial club membe:B at the 
noon luncheon, explaining /road ac- 
tivities in general and' endei by in- 
viting the local populace /to journey 
to Crookston in large numbers when 
the forthcoming basket bail game 
takes place between the locals and 
that city, then and there to witness 
the defeat of our favorites. Nay, nay, 
Bro. Sewell, it can't be done! You're 
a nice man, and we like you, but we 
simply must disappoint you this time. 



Auto Club Elects 

1922 Officers 

■ : / • 



The regular . meeting of the Wo- 
man's club will be held Monday after- 
noon, January 23, at the Commercial 
club rooms. Mrs. J." M. Bishop, coun- 
ty chairman of the Child Welfare 
board, will deliver a speech on "The 
Child Labor Question", Herbert Hoov- 
er having asked that three days be 
set aside for the solution of this prob- 
lem and the local club have designat- 
ed the last meeting in January for 
this work. Current Events will be 
led by Mrs. W. J. LaBree. A short 
program on "Modern Photography" 
will be in charge of Mrs. A. N. Heg- 
gan. Mrs. Q. F. Mellby will play 
a piano solo. 



Annual Dues Fixed at $2— 

Membership Drive to Be 

Held This Spring 



Stebbins Elected Delegate to 
State Meeting at Min- 
neapolis Feb. 7 



Froeh- 



W. O. W. OFFICERS INSTALLED. 



Party on 



Uniform Rank to Give Card 
February 1st. 

The local Woodmen of the World 
held a public installation last Friday, 
the following officers for the ensuing 
year being installed: ! 

Past Counsel Commander — P. J. 
Keating. ] 

Counsel Commander — A. O. Naplin. 

Advisory Lieutenant — W. H. Quist. 

Banker — Charles Vorachek, 

Clerk — Philip Amon. 

Eseort— W. E. Warner. j 

Watchman — Yustine Yustaf. 

Sentry— John HaveL ! 

Installing Officer— Geo. L. Sterns. 

A big card party is scheduled to 
take place on the evening of February 
1st, under the auspices of Company F, 
17th Regiment, Uniform Rank, W. 
O. W. 



The Pennington County Automo- 
bile association held its annual meet- 
ing Tuesday evening at the Com- 
mercial club rooms and elected of- 
ficers/for 1922 as follows: 

President— F. J. Stebbins. 

Vice-president>-Dr. H. W. 
lich. 

/Secretary — E M. Bennes. 
/ Treasurer — Nels Christianson. 

The annual dues were fixed at $2.00. 
and the club determined to conduct 
a membership drive in the near fu- 
ture. Car owners will also be -asked 
to join the Chippewa Trail associa- 
tion, the fee for which is $1.00. v 

F. J. Stebbins' was elected delegate 
to the state meeting to be held in 
Minneapolis February 7, and George 
C. Streeter was elected alternate. Mr, 
Stebbins favors a change in the pres- 
ent laws governing automobile licens- 
ing. He favors a tax on gasoline, and 
a reduction of the auto tax to an 
average of $5 upon each car, regard- 
less of the original purchase value of 
the machine. By placing the tax on 
gas, Mr. Stebbins asserts no hard- 
ship will fall upon the owner who 
seldom uses his car, but will more 
evenly distribute the tax upon those 
who make the greatest use of our 
highways. It is a proposition which 
has many supporters in the state, and 
Mr. Stebbins states that he intends to 
place the matter before the state as 
sociation for action at the February 
meeting. 

OLD-TIME HOLT RESIDENT 

ANSWERS FINAL SUMMONS 



The use of cosmetics is 



gomg a 



Frank Tabor, sixty-one years old, 
passed away Monday morning, Janu- 
ary 16, in this city. The deceased 
was a resident of Holt, where he was 
an old-time' resident. Burial took place 
here yesterday. 

SOCIAL WELFARE MEETING 



The social welfare section of the 
Woman's club met Monday afternoon 
at the former Red Cross room. A 
large number of the women were pres- 
ent to assist in sewing. A lunch was 
served in the Commercial club rooms 
by Mrs. Willis Akre and Mrs. H. O. 



good deal too far, with all these folks 'Chommie. The next meeting of the 
putting on coats of tar and feathers. I welfare section will be January 30. 



Outside Attendance Indi- 
cates Increasing Inter- 
est in Association 



LEGION AND AUXILIARY HOLD 
JOINT SOCIAL GATHERING 



A joint social meeting of the Wom- 
an's Auxiliary and the American 
Legion was held Tuesday evening at 
the Masonic hall. A delightful time 
was enjoyed by all present, dancing 
and cards furnishing entertainment 
for the guests until midnight when a 
delicious lunch was served by the la- 
dies of the auxiliary. The music for 
the occasion was furnished by Miss 
Theone Walker and Alfred Dybvik. 



Committee Appointed to In- 
vestigate Inequalities in 
Retail Prices 



PAT KEATING ASSESSOR. 



O. O. Hon" Retains Position as Street 
Commissioner. . ' 

At an adjourned meeting of the 
council Tuesday evening, Pat Keating 
was named assessor for the ensuing 
year over G. H. Sandum. The present 
commissioner, O. O. Hoff, was uani- 
mously re-elected. 

The matter of official salaries, 
printing, etc., will be taken up by the 
council at the January 24th meeting. 

MINNEAPOLIS DAILY TELLS OF 
MARRIAGE SOON OF LOCAL MAN 



The Pennington County Poultry as- 
sociation held its annual meeting 
Monday evening at the offices of the 
Farm Bureau at the Auditorium, and 
elected officers for next year as fol- 
lows: 

President— Olaf Neset. 

Vice-president — C. M. Buoen. 

Secretary — J. J. McCann. 

Treasurer — H. L. Schuster. 

Directors — Mrs. William Vaughn, 
Highlanding; C. Kellar, Hazel; L. A. 
Westphal, St. Hilaire; F. B. Conklin, 
Thief River Falls; Mrs, Rachel Alex- 
ander, Lancaster; B. N. Thorstad ami 
Ed. Battenfield, Thief River Falls. 

Committee to investigate marketing 
—Dave Gustafson, Leste<] H. Lawrence 
and J. J. McCann. v 

An exhibit of fifty birds will be 
sent to the Cropkston Live Stock 
show February 6-10. 

The poultry men figure there is too 
much disparity between the prices 
paid to producers and th e quoted 
prices in eastern markets and the 
.marketing committee was appointed 
with the s idea of investigating this 
condition " and reporting the findings 
at a future meeting of the association. 



The following items, which will be 
of interest locally ,were taken from 
the Minneapolis Tribune. Mr. Gamble, 
of the local Gamble-Robinson fupn, is 
to be married to Miss Edith Schibsby 
of Minneapolis Monday, January 23, 
and they will make their home at 721 
Main avenue North: ' 

"Messrs. Herbert Bruce Puffer and 
Silas Bryan, brothers-in-law of Miss 
Edith Schibsby, and Ralph Sheldon of 
Thief River Falls, Norman Bradish of 
St. Paul, Vincent McLane, John W. 
Gregg and Robert Gamble, cousin of 
Mr. Donald Phelps Gamble, will act 
as ushers at the marriage of Miss 
Schibsby and Mr. Gamble, which will 
be solemnized Monday evening at 8:30 
o'clock at St. Mark's Episcopal church. 

"This evening Mr. and Mrs. David 
F. Gamble will give the bridal dinner 
at their home on > Nicollet avenue for 
their son and his fiancee. Covers will 
be placed for 18 guests. Tomorrow 
evening Mr. Donald Phelps Gamble 
will entertain the men attendants at 
a bachelor dinner. 

"Mr. Robert Gamble entertained at 
a dinner dance last evening at the 
Minikahda club in honor of Miss 
Schibsby and Mr. Gamble. Thirty 
young people were guests." ; 

The annual migration of spiders 
during the autumn months has re- 
sulted in aeroplanes, which crossed 
the channel between France and Eng- 
land, arriving silvered from end to end 
with gossamer webs collected from the 
air. 



RECITAL OF MUSIC PUPILS 



Students of Mrs. Clarence Erickson 
Will Render Program 

The last recital of the first series 
of three, of the intermediate music 
students of Mrs. Clarence Erickson, is 
being given this afternoon at her 
home, '914 Duluth Ave., ^N.,. at 4:30 
p. m. The following program will be 

irendered: 

The Ambitious Pianist" (Spauld- 

ling), Mildred Remmen; "On Patrol" 
(Loeb-Evans), Lena Amon; "The Wat- 

jer Sprites" (Keller), Herbert Keene; 
"The Swallows" (Noelo'ck), Lucille 
Larson; "May Night" (Ward), Eliza- 
beth DeCremer; "Dancing Days" 
(Schick), Phyllis nock; "Jack and 
Jill" (Spaulding), Rose Sheedy;- "Off 
to the Country" (Felton), Edward Ki- 
land; "The Grasshopper" (Richards), 
Florence Fox; "Touch-Me-Not" (Bug- 
bee), Luellen Baton; "Southern Mel- 
ody'*(Gaeth), Katherine Bakke; "Ma- 
jestic March" (Goldele'e), Irene Han- 
sbn and Helen Griebstein. 



MARRIED WOMEN ELIGIBLE 



May Seek Eraploymenb in Postal 
Service 

The rule prohibiting the employ- 
ment of married women in the postal 
service has been revoked by an order 
of the Postmaster General, made ef- 
fective in December. They may now 
be admitted to examinations without 
restriction in any branch of the ser- 
vice. ) 



"When the swallows homeward fiy," 
was: a favorite old song. What some 
people want to sing now is, "When the 
swallows downward flow." 






Page Twjo, 



The Tribune 



1BMI-WBBKLT. 



TAB LI SHED 1901. 



J. S. ARNJCSON - - Editor 

S. V. ARN3SON - Associate Editor 



Published ei ery Tuesday and Friday at 
Thiek River FaUB, Minn. ! 



Entered ai 
post office. 



■6der the'Ait of March 3, 187B. 



SUBSCRIPHON $2.00 PER TEAR. 



that there 
local roads 
Also, it is 



direction of 



\ 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1922 



second class matter at the 
Thief River. Falls, Minn., 



BETTER LOCAL ROADS. 

The Babe 3ck good roads plan is 'gen- 
erally credted throughout Minnesota 
with bringing remarkable results oil 
the state t: unit highway system,! and 
now Commissioner Babcock announces 
an makes ample provision 
for equal results on the local roads 
and points the way to accomplish 
them. 

The Trib ine believes that Penning- 
ton county ind township road officials, 
appreciatin; f their responsibilities; will 
act favoratly and promptly upon the 
;r's suggestion. 
According to official figures, Min- 
nesota funds for local road purposes 
xeeded by some four ! mil 
lions of dollars the total for use on 
the state t-uhk highways. It is true 
are many more miles of 
than of trunk highways, 
true that the trunk high- 
ways carry about four-fifths of the 
traffic, and engineers assert: that the 
highway w;ar is an important factor 



in determir ing the cost of improve- 
ment and i laintenance. 
. Commissi aner Babcock declares (that 
under his flan more liberal provision 
is made fo:' the local roads than for 
the trunk routes, especially now 'that 
the authority for issuing bonds! for 
trunk work has expired. His organi- 
■ zation havir g demonstrated during the 
last eight 01 nine months the big bene- 
fits attainalle on the trunk highways, 
the public i ; inclined to accept at full 
face value! the proposal by Commis- 
sioner Babock to get a like measure 
of results on the remaining roads. 

The supplementary plan, or more 
correctly, tie follow-up proposal, is 
briefly this: 

A county 
which counly 
pervisors of 
consultation 



roads convention at 
imissioners andj su- 
the 7 various townships in 
with the county engineer, 
and after public hearings, if desired, 
will definitdy agree to carry out a 
systematic plan of development: ac- 
cording to ;he needs and importance 
of each road, and regardless of town- 
ship or othe - imaginary lines. County 
and townsh p road and bridge funds 
shall be pooled and used under ; the 



the engineer in the busi- 



nesslike building of more permanent 



roads, to 
and otherwi 



ve farmers winter work, 
:e to best serve the inter- 
ests of the public paying for them. 
Pennington county has-" more than 
y ;ar to use y on local roads. 
$75,000 of local 
this year. Let's 
atchwork and j get 
somewhere and I get 



Every da ryman in the vicinity of 
FallS'has a bank account. 




WILD, WILD EAST 

/ 



(Nekv York Tribune)' 
Future dijne novelists — if there ever 
to/follow! the 
'vice of a 'orraer editor of this news- 
go West. Right here in 
ew York hey will find material for 
raising thrillers they have 
te. Nothing but Indians 
.ml the armed ruffians are 
was the* wildest Indian in 
moods/ ! 

es loaded with bandits 
dash through crowded streets, their 
occupants exchanging shots with; the 
squads of pursuing police as they go. 
A young \vc man is waylaid and robbed 
at the entiance to the Pennsylvania 






stabulary 
able to put 



than they 
in the '50 
stca 
lence are 



ELLIS ISLAND REFORMS 

Despite vigorous official denial of 
recent charges made by Miss Gene- 
vieve Forbes with respect to deplor- 
able conditions at Ellis island it now 
develops ! that radical changes have 
been made as a result of the expose. 

Miss Forbes went abroad and came 
back as an alien for the purpose of 
investigating at first hand the alleged 
abuses at the island and her stories 
we're replete with human interest. 

Whether federal officials were cog- 
nizant of these conditions or not, the 
fact remains that following publica- 
tion of :Miss Forbes' charges steps 
were taken to correct the abuses. It 
is* to be : hoped ' that prospective citi- 
zens now will leave Ellis island with 
a kindly feeling toward our govern- 
ment and toward the American people 
instead of with a+feeling of horror 
and resentment, as oftentimes was the 
case before these reforms were made. 



. It Will; be noticed that every farmer 
who is a bank director, made his 
money milking cows. Think that over 
too 1 . 



Station, with hundreds of. people with- 
nd traffic policemen calmly 

otor cars a block distant 
direction. Across the street 

)f a giant hotel could have] 
on the scene. If they 

it was being enacted at is 
extremely likely that they wouldj 

Two or tiree highwaymen walk in- 
to a grocer ,' store and rob the cashier 
while scort s of persons are buying 
their house lold supplies at the count- 
ers. Hardly does a cigar store open 
in the morr ing before a couple of gun- 
men stroll in and demand the jcash 
that is in 1he safe. ! 

It is not surprising that groups of 
business n en, like the . fur dealers, 
have decid ;d to organize their ; own 
police force s: New York has a large 
force of pc lice, most of whose mem- 
bers are br ive and heroic men, as was 
lately provad in the case of the ! two 
victims of the assassin Boddy. , -But 
the epidemic of crime is plainly too 
much for a ly efforts that the city con- 



I THE NEWBERRY CASE 

Senator Newberry has been given a 
vote of confidence in the senate by a 
majority: of fiv e votes. The Demo- 
crats voted solidly against him. Sena- 
tori Watson of Georgia announced his 
intention; of voting for Senator New- 
berry, but he was persuaded not to 
be | present. The Democrats made 
the^r objection to Senator Newberry 
on political grounds, which was proven 
by Ithe frequent use of "Administra- 
tion" in debate, rather than making it 
straight i argument, as . did i Senator 
Borah, \yhq voted against Mr.: New- 
berry. 

Of the few Republicans who voted 
against -Senator Newberry, we would 
not] trust j the judgment of Senator La- 
Follette, j Norris, Kenyon or Capper, 
as against the judgment of Senators 
Nelson and Kellogg of Minnesota, 
Lenroot ; of Wisconsin, Stirling of 
South Dakota and McCumber of North 
Dakota, i All of the latter senators 
represent purely agricultural states. 
They heard the evidence and, if they 
say that; Senator Newberry did not 
violate the law, The Journal accepts 
thai; statement, regardless of the 
amount of money expended. 

The state primary law in Michigan 
does not: limit the amount of money 
that the state committee may expend. 
The United States court reversed he 
state decision holding Mr. Newberry 
responsible. ' 

l^ow, as t-- h h e ameunt of money it- 
self* At the first announcement, 
$190,000 seems to be an enormous sum 
to spend in a senatorial campaign, and 
it is. However, it costs a great deal 
of money under the primary law to 
educate the voters, if it is well done. 
All lone has to do is to take a lead 
pencil and cover the state of Minne- 
sota with the proper printing and the 
proper amount lof speaking, the get- 
ting out of the vote, and th e total will 
be Startling. 

The trouble with Michigan was that 
the partisans of Henry Ford and Sen- 
ator Newberry were both anxious to 
win! and both factions had money. It 
was'easy' to get money for either can- 
didate, and in the interest of both 
there was spent a large sum of money. 

When we reflect back to Senator 
Stephenson's campaign in Wisconsin, 
and recall the part Senator LaFoI- 
lette played in it, his objection tn 
spending \ money does not go far with 
Senator Capper is one of those 
who advised the farmers ,through his 
farm papers, to hold wheat for three 
dollirs, and his judgment in the case 
does not go far with us. Senator Nor- 
ms s not dependable in his judgment 
and some embarrassing questions 
might be put to Senator Kenyon. 
. Senator Borah made a straight ad- 
dress against the seating of Newber- 
ry. I He did not base it on the theory 
thati Mr. jNewberry himself was guilty 
but jthat -after an expenditure of such 
a sum of money, no senator should be 
permitted to sit in the chamber. He 
made this argument, submitted with- 
outlpartisan bias. The' single trouble 
witti his; argument was that Senator 
Newberry was found not guilty by 
everybody, even Senator Borah, and 
the iaw applies to this point. Another 
interesting phase of the incident is 
that air the Republicans denounced 



the amount of money expended, so 
that the iopinion that the amount was 
excessive was . unanimous in the sen- 
ate in both parties— but with agree- 
ment on that point, no proof lay 
nst Senator Newberry. — Minneap- 
Jourhal. 

-♦ 

Over three tons of butter a day was 



aga 
olis 



is at" present "directed, are 
forth. Life and property 



are more insecure in New York today 



were in the mining camps 
Burglary insurance is 



adily soaring and crimes of! vio- 



sq 



common as hardly to 



command More than passing attention. 
Clearly i : is high time for unusual 
measures, < ven if they involve the in- 
voking of lational aid, as West| Vir- 
ginia was compelled to do to put down 
Yiolence in Mingo county. 



the 
Fall: 
lot 
and 

PA! 



state will lose this distinction unless 
som e measures are taken to protect 
the largest of the big game family 
remaining in North Amrica, sports- 
men assert. 

Forest rangers and timber cruisers 
who frequent the dense, sections of 
the north woods have noticed the 
rapidly diminishing herds of moose. 
In this connection it has been said 
that settlers^and shackers probably 
are responsible for the slaughter of 
large numbers of moose, especially 
during the present winter, because of 
the alleged, "hard times." 

Because of the advance of settle- 
ment and construction of good roads, 
the moose have been driven further 
back into the swamps and impassable 
jungles until it has become very dif- 
ficult to hunt them, and wheii one is 
shot it is almost impossible to get it 
out. 



Cows and clover. Clover and cows. 
Any way you say it, it sounds like 
ready money. Think it over. 



DEALING WITH DEFECTIVES 

In his talk before the Open Forum 
last Sunday, Judge Orr brought out 
the unpleasant fact that there are in 
this state some thirty thousand 
feeble-minded, of whom only three 
thousand are in institutions. All the 
rest, so far they are of marriage 
able age and so far as they are noc 
inhibited by special circumstances, 
are, under our laws, free to marry 
and to perpetuate their taint in the! 
offspring. That the issue of parents 
who are buth feeble-minded are all 
feeble-minded, and that two out of 
three children of a union in which one 
parent is defective are feeble-minded 
is a recognized fact. Yet so far 
Minnesota has, done practically noth- 
ing to regulate or to discourage the 
multiplication of defectives, who will 
feed, in constantly increasing num- 
bers, the jails, reformatories and asy- 
lums of. the commonwealth and who 
always will constitute an increasing 
moral and social menace. 

The problem is by no means a sim- 
ple one. How to prevent effectually 
the marriage of the mentally lefec- 
tive without subjecting the normal to 
humiliating examinations; where" to 
draw the line between the normal 
and the subnormal; whether the prin- 
ciple of exclusion should also be ex- 
tended to those suffering from trans- 
missible disease are only a few of the 
practical questions involved — ques- 
tions that account, in large .measure, 
for the failure of this and of most of 
the other states to take steps lo put 
end to an obvious and incontro- 
vertible evil of constantly growing 
proportions. 

But because the problem is difficult 
constitutes no reason for neglecting 
it. Its very difficulties suggest the 
desirability of careful and painSak- 
ing effort at a solution. In snort, 
because of its complications and be- 
cause of its financial, social and mor- 
al consequences, it ought not to be 
dealt with by the usual legislative 
methods. It is important enough to 
call for the creation of a special :om- 
mission to give careful study to the 
problem and to recommend proper 
measures of procedure— Pioneer Press. 



Take care of a few cows now and 
the cows will take care of you later 
on — a fair prop'bsition, isn't it ? Think 
it over. 



record made by the Thief River 
s creamery last year. That's a 
of butter.but it can be doubled 
trebled. Think it over. 



^SING OF "DEER AND MOOSK 
Reports gathered since the recent 
bigl game hunting season ^ closed in 
Minnesota show that moose and deer 
in the Gopher state are on the road 
to extinction, according to the Duluth 
Sportsmen's club, one of the promin- 
ent organizations of its kind in the 
state, which has begun an' active 
campaign to devise plans to protect 
large members of the wild forest 
family. - 

With the passing of the big game, 
Minnesota will lose one of its attrac- 
tive 1 features which is known through- 
out the United States, members of this 
club maintain. Minnesota is said to 
be the only state where hunters are 
allowed to shoot moose. Soon 



FARMERS ASK CREDIT AID 

A meeting of farmers and business- 
men of western Minnesota took place 
at Ortonville ■ Saturday for the pur- 
pose of obtaining direct aid for the 
farmers through the .War Finance 
corporation, and with that in view 
the following telegram was sent to 
President Harding: 

We believe that official circles at 
Washington and the businessmen of 
the large cities ar e not fully aware of 
the dire calamity that has befallen the 
agricultural interests of the nation, 
and especially the grain growing dis- 
tricts of the northwest, and of the 
great need for immediate and direct 
relief by the government through the 
War Finance corporation. This cor- 
poration has helped directly only the 
large banks in the cities and has not 
afforded relief to the farmers and but 
little to the country banks. 

"We believe the government should 
extend direct relief to the farmers be- 
cause of the emergency' that exists, 
due largely to government control of 
the price of farm products during the 
war. 

"We believe farmers and business 
men of each county who personally 
know the character ,and standing of 
the farmers are better able to p#ss 
upon the security offered by the farm- 
er than agricultural or other commit- 
tees in distant . cities who have nc 
knowledge of these things, and there- 
fore believe such co-operative agricul- 
tural corporations should be permitted 
to deal directly with the War Finance 
corporation, and that the approval and 
guarantee of securities offered by such 
county units should be accepted by the 
War Finance corporation." 
♦ 

Suppose you think "Bill" Wrigley 
spent more than a million dollars last 
year to say: "Five cents before the 
war, five cents during the war, and 
five cents after the war" just because 
he thought the newspapermen of the 
United States would appreciate his 
generosity. Well, you guessed wrong. 
— Wadena Pioneer Journal. 



The Field of Politics 



The political ant hill is showing un- 
usual activity within the week, and 
it does not appear that hard times 
is going to have any depressing ef- 
fect upon those afflicted with the itch 
for office. In other words, the dear 
public may calmly settle.down to the 
conviction that a man will be ,f ound 
for every position of honor and trust. 
» * * 

The important announcement of the 
week came from Crookston, when C. 
G. Selvig was entered as a candidate 
for congress. That Mr. Selvig had 
designs on the congressional seat 
held by Steenerson has been a mat- 
ter of common knowledge for some 
time. Ole Sageng, of Dalton, threw 
his, hat in the ring two weeks ago, 
so the congressional race may now 
be said to be on. Otter Tail has 21 
votes in the district conventipri, which 
gives Old quite a hand hold to start 
with. He has always been popular 
with the voters, and is one of the 
most aggressive campaigners in the 

state. 

* * * 

Present indications are that Mr. 
Steenerson will have nothing to do 
with the convention, inasmuch as a 
convention campaign involves a great 
deal of expense and does not settle 
the nomination. If the Nonpartisan 
League should put up a candidate, the 
nominee of the convention, whoever 
he is, will have two fights to make, 
and Steenerson's friends prefer to 
make theirs in the June primary 
squarely upon the issues. 

* * . * 

In this neck of the woods people are 
hot very keen about the convention 
anyway. Pennington county, for in- 
stance, has three votes, under the rule 
which eliminated the delegates at 
jarge. It has been the practice to al- 
low each county from three to five 
delegates at large, which gave the 
smaller counties in the state a slight 
voice in the deliberations of the con- 
ention. If this rule is to be aband- 
oned, as has now been done- in the 
congressional districts, a few of the 
larger counties will be in absolute con- 
trol and hence there will h e a steadily 
decreasing interest in party politics 
in the smaller counties. 

* »' # 

The demand for five delegates at 
large has always been pressed in the 
country, to hold in check Hennepin, 
Ramsey and St. Louis. With this 
barrier apparently about to be scrap- 
ped, we move to strike out the names 
of 83 counties in future convention 
calls. 

* * * 

The new convention system has 
added a 'great deal of expense to the 
election system without any corre- 
sponding benefit. It will cost Pen- 
nington county $1000, and isn't worth 
a nickel so far as anyone .can notice. 

* * * 

Legislative politics are warming 
up, and if dame rumor is to be relied 
upon, Pennington county will probably 
be the battle ground of one of the 
fiercest engagements of the present 
war. Watch future issue of the Tri- 
bune for reliable news from the west- 
ern front. 



NOTICE FOR BIDS. 
City Printing, 

Notice Is Hereby Give*. That sealed 
bids will be received by the city coun- 
cil of the City of Thief River Falls, 
Minnesota, for the publishing of the 
ordinances and proceedings of the 
council and other public notices re- 
quired by law, and the financial state- 
ment of the cityj for th e year ensu- 
ing after January 31st, 1922, and that 
such bids must be filed with the 
city clerk of said city prior to eight 
o'clock P. M., January 31st, 1922, at 
which time all bids received will be 
j opened and read and contract let for 
such publishing. 

j Dated at Thief River Falls, Minne- 
sota, this 12th day of January, 1922. 

By order of the city council. 

A. H. AKRE, 
Jan. 13-20 ■ City Clerk. 



COAL — Order your kard and soft 
eoal from the Christenson & Votli 
Hardware Co. Phone 23. tf 



NOTICE FOR BIDS. 
City Depository. 

Notice Is Hereby Given, That sealed 
bids will be received by the City Coun- 
cil of the City of Thief River Falls, 
Minn., for depositories of the moneys 
in the city treasury during the year 
ensuing after January 31st, 1922, and 
that such bids must be filed with the 
City Clerk of said city prior to 8:00 
o'clock P. M.,- January 31st, 1922, at 
which time all bids received will be 
opened and read and contract let for 
such depositories. 

Dated at Thief River Falls, Minne- 
sota, this 12th day of January, 1922. 

By Order of the City Council. 
A. H. AKRE, 
J-13-20 / City Clerk. 



DR. A. SHEDLOV 

Physician and Sorgeos 

In Charge j of Dr. A W. Swedenburg 
Office Over First National Bank 

Telephone 360-1 
403 No. Arnold Ave. Phone 278 



NOTICE FOR BIDS. 

Notice Is Hereby Given, That the 
undersigned will receive sealed bids 
for two buildings owned by Independ- 
ent School District No. 18, as follows: 
The old Knox school building, and the 
frame building located on the grounds 
back of the Washington school, such 
buildings to . be. removed from the 
premises within a reasonable space of 
time. Bids will be opened on Monday, 
January 30, 1922, at 7:30 P. M., at 
the Lincoln high school, and the board 
reserves the right to reject any or all 
bids. -. 

By order of the Board of Educa- 
tion, this 11th day of January, 1922. 
MRS. L. G. LARSEN, 
J-13-20-27 " Clerk. 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. 

Default having been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of Twenty-eignt Hundred 
Dollars, which Is claimed to be due and .is 
due at the date of this notice upon a cer- 
tain Mortgage, duly executed and delivered 
by John W. Mich and Mury Gertrude 
Mich, his wife, Mortgagors, to P. It. Ja- 
cobson and A. T.'Brlckson, Administrators 
of the estate of O. J. Dolen, deceased. 
Mortgagors, bearing date the 12th day of 
October, 1910, and with a power of sale 
herein contained, duly recorded in the 
office of the Register 1 of Deeds In and for 
the County of Pennington and State of 
Minnesota, on the 30th day of October, 
1016, at 0:30 o'clock A. M., in Book 4 of 
Mortgages, on page 305, and no action or 
proceeding, having been instituted, at law 
or otherwise, to recover the debt 'secured 
by said Mortgage or any part thereof. 

Now, Therefore, Notice Is Hereby Given, 
That by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to 
the statute in such case made and pro- 
vided, the Bald Mortgage will be foreclosed 
by a sale of the premises described in and 
conveyed by said Mortgage, vis: 

Lots Three (3) and Four (4) and the 
South Half of the Northwest Quarter (S% 
of NW%) of Section One (1), in Township 
One Hundred Fifty-three (153) North of 
Range Forty-four (44), in Pennington 
County, Minnesota, with the hereditaments 
and appurtenances ; which Bale will be 
made by the Sheriff of said. Pennington 
County at the front door of thi Court 
House, in the City of Thief River Falls, 
in said County and State, on the 0th day 
of March, 1022, nt 10 o'clock A. M. of that 
day, at public vendue, to the highest bid- 
der for caBh, to pay Bald debt of Twenty- 
eight Hundred Dollars', and 'interest, and 
the taxes, if any, on said premises, and 
seventy-five DollarB Attorney's fees, as 
stipulated in and by said Mortgage in 



THEa QUALE . 

Lcwyw 

Practice ii all Courts aid Mo 

fore U. 8. Land Offlco 

McOiaa BaiUlaf 

THIEF BIW FALL*. HTjTN. 



CITY DRAY & FUEL COMPANY 
L.MANTHXR. Maaifr. 

FUEL OP ALL DND3 

Phone 17S. Tkief Mtot Falls, Mima. 



£%® fSI HOW 



menthol 



cough 

prJce £jjFp 



QTOps 




straight 



GIVE QUICK- R.ELIEF 

53 Soil lie mulj a:tr 



CARL B. LARSON 



LICENSED EMBALMER 
AND UNDERTAKER 



Larson Furniture Company 

Phone 61 Night Call I48 



Mr.&Mrs.H.M.Hicks 

Licensed Embalmori 

We table full charge of funer- 
als. Special attention given to 
shipping cases. 

Day and Night Call, Phone 39 
MODERN JAUTO HEARSE 



A lot of people who don't advertise 
tne think business is dead. 



CASH MARKET 

I ! 

For your Eggs, Live and Dress- 
ed Poultry, t Veal,' Hides, Furs, 
Wcsol and Pelts 
SEE US BEFORE SELLING 
ELSEWHERE! 
' V 

N^hera Trading Co. 

One Door Nprta of Court/House 
J-13-20 



- M M M «»»« M ♦♦♦» H ♦«»»♦♦ H 

j Wood 

f I am prepared to deliver t 
promptly to any part of '< '■ 
the city, any kind of '■'■ 
wood. Telephone 449- W '■ '■ 

T. FR0JSNESS 

323 3rd Btre.t W. 
♦ MM ♦ »♦♦ . ♦♦♦♦ 4 ♦ M M * * . Mr ' 




case of foreclosure, and the disbursements 
allowed by law; subject to redemption at 
any time within one yearfrom the day__of 
Bale, as provided by law. 
Dated January 17th, A. D., 1022. 

P. U. JACOBSON AND A. T. BRICK- 
SON. ADMINISTRATORS OP THE 
ESTATE OF O. J. DOLEN, DB- 
CEASED, Mortgagees. 

H. N. JENSON, ESQ., 
Attorney for Mortgagees, ' 

Detroit, Minn., J-20-27 F3-10-17-24 



NOTICE . 

State of Minnesota, County of Pennington, 
Dlatrlet Court Fourteenth Judicial Dis- 
trict. 
In the Matter of the Dissolution of Thief 

River Music Company. 
To Whom It May Concern: - 

Notice Is Hereby Given, That all the 
stockholders of the Thief River Music 
Company, a corporation, created, organiz- 
ed and existing under nnd bv virtue of 
the laws of the State of Minnesota, and 
having its principal office and place of 
business in the City of Thief River Falls, 
irf the County of Pennington, and State 
of Minnesota, have presented their Petition 
to the District Court, of Pennington 
County, Minnesota, praying that said Thief 
River Music Company be dissolved and 
ItB affairB wound up and closed. 

Notice Ib Hereby Further Given, That 
a hearing on said Petition will be had 
before said Court, at the Opening day 
of the next General Term of Bnid Court 
to be held in and for the County ofPenn- 
ington, and State of Minnesota, in the- 
Court House In the City of Thief River 
FnllB. in said County and State on the- 
7th day of February, 1922, at 10 o'clock 
A. M., or as soon thereafter as may suit 
the convenience of the Court, at which 
time and place all pnrtieB interested in 
Bnid matter will be heard. 

Date& ; this 31st day of December 192U 
ANDREW GRINDELAND, 
Judge of the District Court 
- Fourteenth Judicial District, 
Pennington County, Minnesota. 
H. O. CHOMMIE, 
Attorney for Petitioner, 
Thief River Falls, Minnesota. 

Jan. G-13-20 



Brotherhood of 

AMERICAN YEOMEN 

Tionesta Homcsted No. 2006. 
Regular meetings every lecond and 
fourth Fridays of each month at 
Masonic HalL Visiting Yeomen 
welcome. 



thief river; clinic 

DR. O. F. MELLBY 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 

DR. H. W. FROEHLICH 

Surgery and Obstetrics 

DR. L. F. FISHER 

Internal Medicine and X-Ray 

OFFICE 
CITIZENS BANK BUILDING 



MODERN 
HOUSE 

FOR SALE! 

Possesion can be 
given immediately 

Inquire Tribune 




Tomorrow Alright 

Night's Tonic* — fresh air, a good 
■leep and an N? Tablet to males your 
days better. , 

Nature'* Remedy (N2 Tablets) exerti 
a beneficial Influence on the digestive 
and ellmlnative system— tha Stomach, 
Liver and Bow el a. 

Tonlzht-take an K) Tablet-lta action 
Is so different you will be delightfully 
surprised. ^J&fc-^TJj^rf for QVCT 

'^'^Tj Tfi years 




LAMBEBT'6 DRUG STOKE 



MMMMM t M MMMMM M * 



i EmpireFarms ;; 
Company 

Capital $25,000 

LANDS, LOANS 

CITY PROPERTY 

INSURANCE 

; ; Bring Your Business to Us. We ' 
• ■ Promise Courtesy and Efficiency '. 

:: 215 Main Ave. North : 

■ Phone 443 
: : Thief River Falls, Minnesota . : 



MI I DIHIH I IIlHIIIIIDt 




y 



V 



."V 



/ 






FRIDAY, JJlNUARY 20. 1922 



Livestock Agency 
Vo ;es Dividenct 



' Profit of 
Amounting 
$19,1 



1,00) 



Farmers' 
tion to 
of 



4-bout 25 Per Cent, 
to More Than 
for the Year ! 



Central Associa- 
tive Back Fourth 
Commissions 



THE THIEF RIVER FAXES TRIBUNE 



Page Three 



South St. 5 aul, Jan. 19.— The cen- 
tralized livestock marketing agency, 
established srx months ago by Minne- 
sota farmers today announced a j 25 
per cent patronage dividend, amount- 
ing to more than all the money paid 
into its treasury by its member asso- 
ciations. It also announced an 8 per 
cent stock diridend. j 

The issuing; of the dividend, officers 
said, means that the Central Co-op- 
erative Commission association has 
handled the largest volume of busi- 
ness on the South St. Paul livestock 
market at onj-half the cost of market- 
ing through non-competitive agencies. 
The total cividend to be paid by the 
association, o i business done from Au- 
gust 8 to De cember 31, 1921, amounts 
to 519,124.22 

Its total- receipts in commissions 
amount to (nly ?73,360.85, according 
to state auditors. The payment of ! the 
dividend coi stitutes . a return to j the 
farmers of one-fourth of all the nion 
ey they have paid to their central sell 
ing organiz ition • for handling their 
livestock. 1 he actual saving to farm 
ers is twice the amount of the divi 
" dend. officers said, because the farm- 
ers' associat ion has handled the f £ rm 
ers'. livestock at commission rates ap- 
proximately 25 per cent lower than 
the prevailing charges. 

After pajing the dividend anc all 
expenses, the marketing agency will 
have a surplus of several thousand 
dollars. 



to 



„. „. The dividend amounts 

52,349 more than the total paid in to 
the capital of the association. 

if the state railroad 



Records 
warehouse 
August 8 



commission show that from 
the 



. 1 , B ... _, tj December 31, 1921, 
farmers' ag jncy handled 4,424 cars of 
stock. No other firm on the market 
handled as large a volume of business 
in the whoh 12 months of 1921. j 

The sam,: records show that in its 
first five months of operation, the! cen- 
tral agency handled 35,715 cattle; 29,- 
450 calves, 193,845 hogs and 36,902 
sheep. The total business for the five 
months amounted to 295,912 head of 
livestock, v. ith a. gross value of more 
than $5,000,000. , I 

The dire:tors of the farmers'- 



Lindquist, Gundard 




and 



;ral ko-operativelivestock agency also 
has innounced that J. S. (Joe) Mont- 
gomery has been selected to succeed 
W. i£. McKerrow as general manager. 
Mr. Montgomery was closely asso'ciat- 
edwilh Mr. McKerrow until his death, 
having served with him in livestock 
extension work for years, and as field 
representative and assistant in the or- 
ganization and operation of the Cen- 
tral [Co-operative Commission associ- 
ation. 

4 MATCH-MAKING SOLDIER 
When Annetta Morandi, twenty- 
two, from Naples, received a proposal 
of marriage from Sergt. Joseph Fos- 
ter, late veteran of the A. E. F., but 
now on recruiting duty in Pittsburg, 
she wrote answering that she would 
jbe happy to marry her dear American 
j friend, whom she had met during the 
iwarj— but — she had two sisters, Julia, 
nineteen, and Francisca, seventeen,, 
iwhom she could not elave alone in 
; Naples. ^ 

The sergeant had solved knottier/ 
! problems during the war and since 
■■ he was in the recruiting service /he 
' decided it was up to him to 1, recruit 
husbands for his girl's sisters.' 

His brother was the first/ recruit. 

To him he sang the praises' of Julia. 

: Since this brother, Henry,' had been 

■ a sailor during the war/the romance 

of the thing appealed ,t'o him. When 

\ Julia had been written to and had- 

i accepted the proposal of Henry the 

i question came up of how to secure 

: a husband for Francisca. He knew 

the' Morandi girls were peaches and 

i decided that since they were, such 

!- a good thing he wanted to keep them 

: in [his family. 

Not having another brother to sac- 
i rifice on the altar of matrimony he 
sought out his cousin, ; Fred Martin, 
: and told of the charms of Francisca. 
: Martin was a trifle harder to land— , 
I but when he did fall— he fell hard. 

- the result was that the three girls 

; with flashing smiles landed in New 

; York City recently and were met at 

; the dock by the three Pittsburg boys.. 

; The sergeant acted as the guide and 

introducer and the three couples,. 

properly sorted out, advanced on the 

license department of th e New York 

they departed for a honeymoon in 

City hall. After a- triple ceremony 

Pittsburgh: . . 

Being informed in the schools of the 
dangers of lack of nutrition, the chil- 
dren of Thief River Falls on arriving 
home immediately make a grand rush 
for the doughnut jar. 



Name of Person, Value Money 

Firm or £ en > !£* J™?,. 

Corporation — Property Credits 

Anderson. C. A. & F J5B7 

Akeriund Bros. 4 Helder- 627 

Adolphson. Clus 278 

Appelhan. M. ■ — J-4 .— — 

Ault. Kike 189 



Belmke. John T. 

Bovy, R. R. 

Cork, Dell 

Dahlln Gust 



. 21S 



. 112 



Personal Property 
Ta^ List for 1921 

TOWN OF BB1T, PENNTUGTON COUNTT, 
MINN. 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State. Connty, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 
School District No. 7, Mills 38.4. 
School District No. 69. Mills 32.9. 
School District No. 99, Mills 30.5. 
School District No. 149, Mills 34.S. 
School District No. ISO. Mills 31.3. • 

(Bates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per flOO.) 

Assessed 

Amt. 

of 

Tax 

I 18.21 

19.63 

9.1S 

10.63 

7.84 

7.21 

4.41 

3.00 

14.92 

20.03 

5.82 

11.24 

7.35 

12.20 

10.30 

11.43 

7.04 

10.69 

1.06 

28.20 

32.14 

10.73 

27.41 

19.07 

13.14 

2.56 

10.55 

9.20 

23.70 

14.34 

20.80 

17.00 

4.19 

11.45 

7.21 

11.33 

12.26 

. 11.11 

12.37 

■10.03 

21.00 

1.50 



Lorentson, Richard 
Dorentson, Victor - 
Lorentson, Fred — 
Lundherg, Peter „_ 
McKercher, R. J. .- 

Miller, Mrs. M. 

Moreen, Chas. 

Moreen, Edward — 

Novak, Win. 

Raustng. Emil. 

Rotzler, Chas. 

Schneider, Ernst _ 
Shannon, Wm: __ 
Shannon. Earnest - 
Schneider, Chas. _ 
Simonson, Henry _. 

Swanson, Alex 

Swanson. Mons — 
Wahlbeck, Selmer . 
Westphal, L. A. - 

Weyker, Frank 

• Winge, Ole 

Erlckson. Axel ™ 



.531 
. 187 
. 203 



. 080 
. 050 
. 491 
. 144 
_150 
_ 708 
. 25S 
. 038 



300 
800 



.405 
. 133 



. 131 
. 244 
. 618 



. 120 
. 250 



20.60 

7.26 

7:88 

06.91 

64.55 

10.17 

0.49 

£45 

30.72 

10.01 

24.75 

7.15 

15.59 

5.12 

14.28 

12.26 

5.08 

24.01 

23.79 

20.80 

4.66 

24.60 

2.40 



Gesselquist, Ole _ 
Gustafson, Pete _ 
Gunderson, John 

Helle, Daniel 

Hanson, Ole 

Holm. L. S. : 

Hofstad, Gunder 
HaatveC Varl — 
Johnson, Anton 



. 344 

. 040 

. 186 

. 359 

241 



. 335 



Hanson. Halvor — 

' Hanson, Henry 

Hawkenson, Harry 

Hackett, Paul 

Helgslrom. A. P. --- 

Johnson, Iver A. H. 331 

Langellet, A. D. 290 

Larson. Emil est. l^> 

Larson. Emil est. 029 

Lindblom. . Henry 34 

Lindblom. . Peter — 901 

Llndqulst, C. A. 9 m 

Llndqulst, G. A 310 

Luttmer, Henry . 833 

Nelson, C. A. — _ 484 

NybonT. J. O. 423 

Odelln, Halvor — 
Olson, Selmer N. 

Osgood, Ed. 

: Person. Christ — 

Rux Bros. 

Sander, Hoy 

Chraz, John „ — 

Scholin, Swan — 

Scholin. August _ 

Scholin. Victor _ 

Swanson, John O. 

Storaberg, John - 

Wood, Melvin H. 

Wood, Mervih __ 

Scholin, John 



J1300 



000 



TOWN OF CLOVEB LEAF 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State. County. Town or Village ana 
School District Levies. 

School District No. 8, Mills 95.7. 

School District No. 15,. Mills 07.0. 

School District No. 44, Mills 38. 

School District No.- 40, Mills 35.8. 

School District No. 60, Mills 42.8. 
- (Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) 

Assessed 
Name of Person, Value Money Amt. 

Firm or Personal and of 

Corporation— Property Credits Tax 



Jeppson, Martin — 

Johnson. Martin 

Karzmarck, Max 

'Lande. Edwin 

Lindtvet, Knut 

Legvold. Ole . — 

Langllas, S. Annahd 

Lofthus, Torgie 

Lunde, Leves 

Lundeen, Frank 

Lande. Ole 

Lofthus, Tom 

Lindtvet, Tallak 

Mandt, Osmund . 

Myrum, Halvor 

Nesland, Ole . 

Nessen, Chris — -. 

Nerreson, George — 

Olson. John 

Olson, Knut 



. 338 
. 504 
. 293 
. 190 
. 43 
. 49 

- 261 

- 170 
-' 107 

. 207" 
. 140 
_ 131 
_ 121 



. 246 
. 219 
. 133 
. 120 
. 122 
. 4211 
. 04 
. 24 
. 153 
. 420 
. 335 



1000 
100 



. 146 
. 100 
. 100 
. 234 



Aarness. Nils — _ 
Aarness, Gaylord 
Barrett. C. J. 



. 337 
. 235 
. 403 
_ 458 



Akeriund, Ernest J. . 
Swanson, Mrs. C. P. 



_ 30 
_ 100 • 
_ 210 
_ 362 
_ 392 
_ 355 . 
_ 314 
_i 323 



3500 



1000 



DuChamp, Fred 

DuChamp, Mrs. J. A. 

Fuller. C. N. : 

Drahelm, Aron H. — 
Farneen, John 



Farmers State Bank 
Hennlmj, O. J. ■. — -__ 

Haugen, Knut 

Hruby, Francisca — 
Hruby Bros. 



_S359 
. 200 
. 278 
. 170 
. 100 
. 327 
. 447 
. 151 
.1494 
. 89 
_ 58 
- 37 
. 294 



Hanson-Barzen Mlg. Co._1800 627 

(Grain Tax) 

Holmen, Ole 210 

Harten. N. K. 256 —— 

Krataclvll, Frank 245 

Kotlan. Ed. 116 _ — 

Kotlan Bros. — . — 210 



S 15.37 

8.50 

10.50 

10.27 

0.70 

11.71 

16.00 

14.45 

100.99 

3.81 

5.55 

1.32 

8.91 

127.95 



Pederson. Mrs. Inga 46 

Paibrook, John 162 

Peterson, John 371 

Rodman, Wilson 338 

RuBtan. Ed. : - 97 

Rome, Tom 124 

RodmeloBke, John 335 

Rensia. Peder 297 

Syrtveit, Ole 395 

Sznmanske, Ben _ . 386 

Syversrud, Elizabeth — _ 295 

Stolaas. Slier 397 

Swenson, Wlel _ 325 

Singer, George _: 816 

Szymamske, Floryan 258 

Swanson, Mrs. Carry 159 

Skreland. Ole 130 

Swanson, Halvor 122 

Stucy, Otto 218 

Suble, Frank _ 1 

Gesselquist, Ernest 



^ 



19.47 

29.03 

10.S8 
S.51 
2.14 
2.44 

15.03 
9.79 
S.02 

11.02 
S.41 
7.53 
6.97 

14.17 

12.61 
.7.00 
0.91 
7.03 

24.54 
7.30 
4.38 
9.11 

20.02 
19.30 
6.54 
7.97 
5.70 
10.48 
11.01 
3.79 
8.07 
21.37 
15.14 
4.72 
6.18 
19.30 
18.31 
17.69 
19.22 
14.09 
19.77 
16.18. 
40.04 
12.85 

, 7.92 

\ 0.47 
7.03 

. 12.56 
.08 
.60 



• 7000 
500 



C M. ADHN9 

Fhyneiu and Sugeoa 

Office Over First National Bank 
Thief River Palls, Minn. 



TOWN OF BLACK BIVEB, PENNINGTON 
COUNTY, MINN. 

Total Tax Bate By School' Districts. 

Including State. County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 

School District No. 1. Mills 50.3. 

School District No. 43. Mills 38.5. 

School District No. 04, Mills 38.8. 

School District No. 102, Mills 98.4. 

School District No. 108, Mills 37.5. 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) ■ ■ & ' 

Name of Person, Value Money Amt. 

Firm or Personal and of 

Corporation— ' Property Credits Tax 

- ' " __$424 • 5 21.33 

. 119 4.62 

. 145 5.63 

500 10.81 

1000 8.55 

' 8.84 

i 18.58 

__ 33.70 

7.53 

19.05 

5.82 
39.83 



Kotlan, Ed. 

Levos,, Berner 

Mavie Trading Co. _ 

McLeod. Stuart 

Oski, IJoe 

Pomrenke," E. H. 

Ptacek, Joseph i.. 

Peterson, Elmer S. _ 

Reeves, Carl 

Sanders. Sigrid 

Swensgaard, Karen 

Sabo, Peder 

Skaar. T. J. 

Spieler, J. J. — 

Schmltz.r.D. L. ___ 

Sandum, ^Gilbert 

Saby, Andrew 

SHen, G. C. 

Thorson, Henry 

Thompson, C. T. — . 

Talley. C. M. 

Toomey,, C. H. . 

Urschltz, Lovlse 

Urschltz, HIcbert _ 
Votava, Frank 



00- 
. 144 
. 334 
. 434 
. 321 
. 200 
. 310 
. 205 
1 174 
. 144 
. 231 
. 572 
. 217 
_ 889 



. 339 
. 266 
. 166 
. 187 
.289 
153 
. 212 



Anderson, Matt — 
Anderson, Adolph 
Anderson, Albert - 
Anderson. Felx — 

Brandt. Wm. ; 

Brink. Hawitz — 
Carlson. Oscar — 
Dreelan, James — 
Elkstrom, Mary 



Erlckson, Andrew — 
Erickson, Edward A. 
Erlckson Bros. 



Gigstad. Oscar A. 
Glgstad. K. O. — 
Hackett E. E. — 
Hallstrom. A. G. . 

Harbott, Dan 

Holmes. Edith 

Jacobson. Henry . 
Johnson, C. W. — 
Johnson, Johanna 
Johnson, Chas. — 
Kitzrow. Wm. — 
Landman, Fred 



. 240 
. 143 
_ 100 
_ 199- 
_ 070 

- 194 
_ 491 
_ 150 
_ 872 
_ 205 
_ 236 
_ 364 
_ 128 
_420 t 

- 5.18 
_ 375 
_ 482 
_ 54 
_. 19 
_114 



. 200 

.400 

Winton'-Nichols Lbr. Co. 1944 

Wahlberg; Olof 244 • 

Smith. Walter E. 

Smlt, Thos. H. : 

Schle, J. M. —1 , 



7.52 
'9.73 
16.50 
7.84 
14.20 
3.42 
5.10 
22.58 
41.53 
21.70 
13.52 
11.10 
19.62 
6.61 
9.T3 
8.27 
24.48 
7.77 
66.80 
5.34 
102.08 
12.88 
25.40 
7.10 
17.00 
19.54 
14.64 
9.07 
8.56 
15.43 
144.71 
10.44 
.15 
.26 
.30 



TOWN OF GOODRIDGE. 
Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State, County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 
School District No. 8, Mills 04.7. 

School District No. 60, Mills 41.8.. 
School District No. 228. Mills 0S.4. 
(Rates of Taxation on Money .and Credita 
30 cents per $100.) 

Assessed 

Value Money Amt. 
Personal and of 

Property Credits Tax 

129 12.22 ! 

2.64 



Name of Person, 
Firm or 
Corporation— 
Besancon, E. H. . 
Erickson. Gunder 



Gunderson, G. 

Hegestrom, Wielard ._ 

Hans. Tom 

Hanson, Edwin — — — 

Hay. J. H. _ 

Iverson, Casper 

Iverson. Ellen 

Kusmak. John _ 

Lovley. Peter , — ^~ 

Lien. Henry 



. 160 
. 205 
.354 
. 305 
_ 55 
_ 243 
. 190 
- 4 1§ 

I 242 
_ 378 



2000 



000 



350 
3500 



100 
350 



23.22 
35.82 

4.97 
16.17 
50.07 
38.70 
18.70 

3.15 
11.24 

4.30 
27.00 
31.51 ' 



TOWN OF DEEB PABK 

T otal Tax Bote By School Districts. 

Including State. County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 

School District No. 10, Mills 77.7. 

School District No. 34, Mills 40.8. 

School District No. 52. Mills 57.6. 

School District No. 58. Mills 44.8. 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) 

Assessed 
Name of Person. Value Money Amt. 

Firm or Personal and of 

Corporation— Property Credits Tax 



Markuson. John 

• Mutnansky, Matthew -io 

McCabe, Joseph .. 208 

Nelson. Theo. — . 101 

Nelson, Caetren . 18- 

Olson, Sygurd — 148 

Stomlien. Lars 299 

San. Ole. O. _ — 113 

SUen, Chas. 38 

Urdahl. O. N. __ .358 



Urdahl! C. N. 
Urdahl, Nlcoly 
Vaughan. M. 



271 
362 

. „.„„..„ 358 

Vaughan. Sarah E. 50 

Besancon, Victor M. — - 



9.47 , 
11.08 \ 
33.02 > 
2S.S8 : 
5.21 
23.01 
17.99 
39.58 
26.04 
U1.55' 
35.S0 
20.36 
28.22 
9.56 
17.24 
14.02 
2S.32 
10.Y0 
3.60 
33.90 
25.08 
34.28 
33.90 
4.74 
.91' 



Anderson, Gunder 
Bolstad, Jens 
'Bakken, Mat 



Costella, B. Hanny 
Dahle. Ole 




$ 12.50 
16.40 
9.50 
10.83 
3.85 
11.20 



TOWN OF HIGHLANDINO , 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts, 

Including State, County, Town or Village ana 
School District Levies. 
' School District No. 37. Mills 51.5. 
School District No. 3S. Mills 46.4. 
School District'No. 47. Mills 49.0. 
School District No. 50. Mills 51.1. 
(Rates of Taxation" on Money and Credita 
30 cents per ?100.) 

Assessed 

Value Money Amt* 
Personal and of 

Property Credits Tax 

_S337 $ 450 5 1S.17 

154 7.93 

2"7 11.60 



Name of Person, 
Firm or 
Corporation — 
Aubal. A. O. - 

Boat, Abel 

Baird, Arthur 



(Continued on Page Six) 



THIEF RIVER MUSIC COMPANY'S 



$200 Prize Contest Ends Tomorrow 



JANUARY 21st at 3 P. M. 



Yoa shoald not fid to have all your tickets in the hpx by that time. The drawing of the winners of the three grand prizes will commence promptly^ at 
the above /WrJ in accordance with former advertisements, we are giving away one ticket entitling the holder to one chance on the prizes offered for every 
dollar spent in \this store and also one ticket with every dollar received on account. p amM „,u ar r i *, 

BUY YOUR MUSIC\ SUPPLIES NOW and receive your tickets, as you hold the luck/ number and carry off one of the three prizes. Remember these 

prizes are offered absolutely FREE. j ^ 




$150 CABINET 
BRUNSWICK 

FIRST PRIZE 

This beautiful ?150 Cab- 
inet Brunswick' Phono- 
graph will be given away 
Saturday as first prize in 
this great contest, which 
has proven " one of the 
most interesting contests 
ever held in Thief River 
Falls or surrounding coun- 
try. The Brunswick's fame 
ljas been well established 
in Thief River Falls and 
.vicinity during the com- 
paratively short time tha.t 
it has been sold here and 
the winner will indeed 
have reason to feel proud 
of this remarkable phono- 
graph. 



$40 HIGH GRADE VIOLIN 

SECOND PRIZE 

The violin which will be given away free as 
the second prize in this contest is on display 
in our windows and you are welcome to 
comr in and examine it and determine its 
quality. 

CHOICE OF TEN 10-INCH 
COLUMBIA RECORDS 

THIRD rRIZE 

The holder of the third lucky number will 
be given his or her choice of any ten 10-inch 
Columbia Records in this store. 



SELECT YOUR RECORDS 
AND SHEET MUSIC 
■ THIS WEEK 

from our most complete stock and in that 
way have your tickets entered before the 
close of this contest. You have more than 
3,000 records from which to select of every 
known record — instrumental, song, band 
and orchestra, direct from eastern produc- 
ers. Our sheet music department, too, has 
all the latest popular and classical pieces 
and we know that you will find the very 
selection that you have been looking for. 



BE THERE SATURDAY AFTERNOON 

THIEF RIVER MUSIC COMPANY 



THE ONE PRICE HOUSE 




Starring Millions 



in .Russia f 
ished of 
during the 



Phillip Gibbs, the wreat war! 
corre^p^nde it, returning from a\ 
tour of ;m drought regions 6i 
liussia has written for the press, 
of Europe a id America a series of 
articles. It took a man like Gibbs 
to stir the var-hardened world "to 
a realization of the fact that more 
people are in the verge of death 



om famine than per-: 

nations combined 

terrible years of the 



war. So well has Mr. Gibbs per-: 
formed his ;ask and so forcefully 
has he calbd upon the civilized 
world to realize its responsibility 
that even ; governments are now, 
■ being stirred to action. Mr. Gibbs 
in his article, has set down facts 
about Russi.i which all of us need 
to know. \'e reprint it below in 
full. 



It is unlucky for 25,000,000 ' peas- 
ants in southern Russia that they 
have no food to eat at a time when 
the world is ;ired of tales of human 
misery, sick cf its own troubles, and 
busy, with passionate selfishness, in 
trying to cure its own maladies. Those 
Russian peasants have been very un- 
/ lucky! ^ 

First the war came and their sons 
were taken from plows and fields to 
fight the Germans. They obeyed be- 
cause they/ \*ere Russian peasants, 
even when thoy had to advance upon 
German, artillery and machine guns 



.without rifles 



or without- ammunition, 



and were slaughtered in droves like 
silly sheep. bTears later, after long 
slaughter — an I the harvests were not 
so- rich down on the Volga and the 
Don because young labor was scarce 
—some of t lem murmured, "Why 
should w e figH men against whom we 
have no hatred? Why should we fight 
endlessly at tl.e command of men who 
grow rich out of war, who do nothing 



of Russia 



one by one, little skeletons j before 
deat i and burial. 

Wamen weep in the villages about 
Sam ira and Saratoff when they show 
their, empty cupboards, and theityphu. 
stricken children lying under bundles 
of rags, too weak to walk. But that 
weeping is only when strangers come 
The | Russian peasants who have no 
with; promise of help or worus of pity, 
luck,; and not much hope, 'now, do not 
weep many tears. 

They stare out with dull eyes, upon 
their misery and wait patiently for 
some poor chance of rescue or death. 
It is difficult to get about in those 
famine districts. Few men who have 
come back with personal evidence of 
this human tragedy have touched more 
than; the fringe of it, the outer edge 
beyond the railheads. But those who 
havel gone deepest into the famine 
districts say that it is worse as the 
villages are more remote, most fright- 
ful v/here ^communication is most dif- 
ficult;. At the railway, stations the 
pictures are always the same, crowds 
of quiet peasant folk with skin drawn 
tight about their facial bones, and 
sunken eyes which lock up pleadingly, 
while the children who cling to gaunt 
men and shrunken women cry but in- 
cessantly words tha ! : -"?-.n. "A bit of 
bread, little uncle, a bit of bread!" 

It is monotonous, miserable, dreary, 
and these I Russian peasants are un- 
lucky as usual because all who try 
to tell the tale of their suffering to 
the outside world find a bleak indif- 
ference, even a hoj-tile spirit in their 
audience, j The world's imagination 
has been deadened by three years of 
appeal for, starving people. 

; "LeUThem-Die" Attitude. 

Yes, the Russian peasants are as 
much responsible for their soviet reg- 



for our comfirt, who rob us of ourlime as caged animals at the zoo for 
very boots ? ... It is better to make | the psychology of the keepers, know- 
peace." But it was not a good peace, ling as much about Karl Marx as a 
and the Russian peasants were, again i Devonshire laborer about Herbert 
unlucky. | Spencer, liking communism as much 

Revolution jroke out in the cities,! as hares like th e harrow, and so in- 
the old regin e was overthrown, the; trenched in individualism that they 
Bolshevism was pro-, say the whole theory and practice of 
hope of humanity. And I communism has been abandoned by 
:asant hoped for a little! Lenin himself because of the passive 



new gospel < 
claimed as tb 
the Russian p 
while. 

He hoped iul ycax.^, ..v> ....4.*.*. — , ; 
get back to the land— now free—and I "V"*?" °} 
his little honJe where all the memo- 1 cnar l ty m 



resistance 



peace, he hoped to!P e °» le 1 h »ve no luck at all, because 



of peasant Russia-}— these 



bolshevism kills all human 



dreds of thousands fled like that in 
search of food and many of these were 
Letts and Poles who had retreated 
into Russia before advancing tides of 
war, when German armies and after- 
wards. White armies wer e on the 
move. When famine came they strug- 
gled back to their own countries, 
swarming along roads afloVrailways, 
starving and dying frorn disease. The 
survivors were helped on their way 
by the Russians, and towns like Riga 
are now feeding them in camps. .' 
New Horrors in Winter 

But now that winter is upon them 
the horror deepens. For millions there 
can be no chance of rescue, and for 
the others only the chance that the 
charity of the world will be quick and 
generous, not held back by political 
hatred or cold distrust. Russia can- 
not save her own people. Without 
outside help they will be lost. 

Even the tides of private charity 
flowing into British and American re- 
lief missions do but touch the frontiers 
of the famine stricken land. 



Vigorous Demand 
Boosts Hog Prices 



Shipping Outlet Broad, Pro- 
ducers Find Corn, Mar- ,^ 
ket via Hog Route 



Light Supply of Cattle. Good 

Supply of Stackers 

and Feeders 



Tuesday's closing — Cattle 1,8Q0? 

Closing strong to 25c higher. Calv &s „ 

2,000, closing steady best lights mosti: [Manther 
ly $7.50. Hogs 11,000, market 50 to, 
75c ■ higher. Sheep 500. Steady tqf 
strong. 



Bowling League 
In Close Race 



Three Teams Are in and Out 

of First Place tf or the 

Past Week 



Postponed Tiger Game is 

Scheduled at Citizens 

Alleys Tonight 



The city bowling league race is as 
close as ever, .three teams being in 
and out of first place this week. There 
were not many high totals for the 
week but the individuals were con- 
sistent throughout. On Monday the 
Cubs trimmed the Highrollers twice. 
Tuesday the Invincibles took two from 
the Hawks and Wednesday the Tigers 
took two from the Giants. The post- 
poned Tiger-Cub game will be played 
off tonight. 

CLUB STANDING 

Pl'd W'n L't P'ct 



Invincibles 30 19 11 

Tigers 27 17 10 

Highrollers _.......30 18 12 

Cubs. 27 16 11 

Hawks .: 30 16 14 

Giants : 27 14 13 

Highrollers — 

Byer 172 183 171 

Grendahl 105 158 138 

Herron 152 il33 117 

C. Olson 171 131 194 

Blind 120' 120 120 



633 
629 
600 
592 
533 
615 

526 
401 
402 
496 
360 



Totals ...720 

Cubs 

160 

'Stanton ........! 156 

Westerline 168 

Ebbigfiausen 168 

Blind 120 

Handicap : 38 



725 740 2185 



Totals 

Hawks — 



South St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 17, 1922 f 
Shipping demand for hogs continue! 
broad and active here and elsewhere 1 
and the market is carrying a strong 

and healthy undertone, with hog prices Pawling 140 

averaging §1.00 or mor e higher than Jonas 119 

most tradesmen thought would pre-d.Stebbihs _160 

vail during the winter packing sea-J3imonsbn 177 

son. With hogs at present prices they 
are affording producers a much better 



147 
137 
129 
168 
120 
38 



156 
133 
121 
139 
120 



463 
426 
418 
475 
360 



...„...810 739 707 2142 



ins ..".<= i.u...= «""= = - ■••-■■- i i. the hearts of ™ ahy !P eo l> le ' market, than they would otherwise 

ries of war would b e blotted out by(*> t j at , 1 tl l ey prefer !" es *.<> t! i uth ' u have for their surplus corn. Today's 



peace and happiness. But he was un- 1 
lucky again.]) The red armies called 
for recruits and took the last reserves 



of grain to ft 
In vain the 
will be famin 
emptied." 
■ RUSSIA W 



ed them. 

old peasant said, "There 

; again if our barns are 



AS INVADED BY THE 
WHITE AEMIES, PAID FOR BY 
FRENCH AND BRITISH MONEY. 
These white armies destroyed many 

things along their line of march- with . thfi .^ ^ . tV - 

houses and barns and railways , and s, TOsted because Red armies ^ d 
bridges and he very standing gram.| st . peasants 
The Russian peasants were ™l uc] <y | sen t for rescue 
— the old pe< pie' and the women and] 



the truth is ever so little in favor of 
a single soviet official, and will let 
millions of peasants die lest one bol- 
shevik get political advantage] 

In; Rega and Helsingfors and other 
places near the Russian frontier there 
are factories of lies, and the liars are 
so busy wSth the cables accusing the 
soviet government of seizing food that 
is sent, for the relief of famine, in- 
venting lies about food ships razed at 
Petrogradj poisoning public [opinion 



get the food 



ht Tn ose a /e the lies of political prop- 



he little ones They were cau^, adists j id b Russia f h , d 
between he tides of the Red aim e jme I, ^ e 

am \Vh.te : i-m.es and fied if they, trutl is exactly opposite 
could from dVlvancmg tenor on h.s whatever •„„ the t and 

side or that>-refugees without refuge. | t • r ■ * 



. . , t i v , , , , T , .„ i •—• crimes of the soviet government— 
At last, wien Kolchak and Juden-i ,1, , i ... • . „ ,. i . . 
.. , , ™ -i i I,, i .,„..„ ana that is outside of my line of in- 

itsch and Dejiiken and Wrangel were, . T have abso , y , 

finished, tlWe was peace ,n K"^- j all flod s^nt for famine relief , both by 

^.^.f ?fe e ^^?L!S British arid American societies, has 

reached the famine areas intact, with- 



it seemed now that God had declared 
war upon thi|m after all the' cruelties 
of .men. 



No rain fell to swell their 
seed grain in the soil and give it life. 
Nati re Is Merciless. 
Month af t« r month no rain 
Even from tl e black earth of the Vol- 
ga, so rich ind fruitful as a great, 
granary of the world, came up only 



thin crop. A 



pitiless and tie Russian peasant pray- 
ing for rain, weeping for rain, had no 
luck. Natun was merciless, it seem 
ed, as man had been without mercy. 

For hundr 

west, north 

Novgorod to 

baker - hard 

ruthless sun, 



mil 



Many have 



nd^the sun was fierce and 



out any robbery, and with th e zealous- 
assistancej of soviet authorities. ;Tfie. 
American j relief people are pending 
1.500J tons' a week, which is/sufficient 
le "- to feed nearly 1,000,000 children, and 
they havej no kind of tKeft or outrage 
to report.: >// | 

Th; truth is/that Russians,! wha 
ever their political position oil creed, 
are lesperately fighting thexfamine 
down south, and^welcome/every' ton 
of f o >d that comes in. /For only they 

.... t j, know the; depth anjKbreath of the 

ids of miles, east and| tra J dy that . has ,.^ falUn those mil . 
and south, from N.m.| Hong of j, easant &lk wh() n ^ find 
Astrakhan, the soil was ^1 c „ epmg upon them _ ^ ^ 

it foi many of them — for at least 3,- 
000,000 of; them— inevitable death. 

There has been exaggeration, it- is 
true, by journalists writing froin'Rus-, 



mder a blinding, cruel 
and 25,000,000 Russian 
peasants whc had not luck, no luck 
at all, groaned over their pitiful har- 
vesting and pad no bread for their 
children. 

They had leen eating grass mixed 
with earth, tjhe bark of trees, fje(d 



ice, locust, any kind of filth. \ 



lain down and died, and 



glad to die, ihey said, because they 
hated to hear the wailing of children 
and to see so many of tnem °*' e ' to0 ' 



184 
130 
138 
121 



164 
136 
146 
159 



488 
385 
444 
457 



Totals 731 

Invincibles — 

Erickson 113 

trade was active and 50 to 75c high- jHolden ." 121 

er, good butcher hogs selling from Williamson 168 

$7.50 to 4800, light sorts up to ?8-25. j! ostean 185 

Heavy packing sows cashed from 

?5.50 to ?6.50, good pigs mostly ?8.50. Totals 

A light supply of cattle locally this 
week and a goo(Jp demand from the 
country for stockers and feeders have 



715 801 2247 



130 
131 
158' 
138 



153 
137 
170 
167 



396 
389 
496 
490 



746 

Tigers— / 

Sorenson .\I32 

J. Olson /138 



739 771 2255 



132 
141 
142 
157 



resulted in strong to 25c higher cat- ^ ^ "2 138 

tie prices. No good or choiM bed H ■ , 

steers have been here, best being a „ / ,„ ,, 

few of medium grade selling at $6.75 morse '~ lss < 144 

to $7.00 or slightly above, with the 
bulk of common and medium shortfed 
beef steers selling from $5.50 to $6.50. 
Best young cows and heifers aire sel- 
ling on an active market from $5.50 S""°j°"' 
to around $6.50, with the bulk of the^, 
butcher she stock going.- at strong j n of-^j.™' 
prices from $3.25 to $5T25. Canners'^' acanlon 
and cutters range largely from $2.25 
to $3.25. Bologna bulls sell largely, 
at $3.50 to/$C25. Prices for veal 
calves hayeneld steady, most>f the 
best lights selling at $7.50^yvtth some 
selected vealers on up toJ$8T00. Coun- 
try buyers are often outbidding pack 



141 
137 
138 
187 
179 



405 



I CAN MAKE 
HIGHWAYS MORE SAFE" 



Totals L..723 

Giants — / 

Sundahl ! 125 

Anderson _ 146 

..141 

,.144 

,'.121 

Handicap .....!. 10 



716 782 2221 



138 
183 
147 
159 
159 
10 



122 
166 
138 
135 
130 
10 



Following essay submitted by Lois 
Nicholson, in state and national "Good 
Roads Essay Contest," received hon- 
orable mention by local judges. 

All roads, whether federal, state or 
county highways, should be built with 
the idea of safety. 

Good roads not only mean a saving 
of gasoline, motor tires and farm pro- 
duce, but a saving of human lives as 
well. Good roads cost money, but 
they save more than they cost. 1 

Grown people as well as children 
must be educated to realize the im- 
portance of good roads and how to 
make them safe for traffic. 

When the country was new, the 
roads consisted of only a trail, but it 
was then comparatively safe as the 
traffic was light. Where those old 
trail roads are used, ' they should be 
straightened where it is necessary to 
cross a stretch of low ground, a suit- 
able grade not less than 20 feet wide 
should be constructed. Provision 
should be made for a water course 
where necessary. This should be a 
good bridge or a large concrete pipe, 
which once installed, requires no ex 
pense for upkeep. 

There is a variety of materials that 
may be used for the roadbed. It may 
be made of sand-clay, burned clay, 
madacadm, concrete, asphalt, granite, 
gravel, wood blocks or bricks, but it 
should be free from any vegetable 
matter, which might decay and cause 
holes in the roadJ In the south, brok- 
en sea shells are used instead of 
gravel. 

It is very important to have the 
roadbed properly drained so that cars 
will not skid and tip over on the slip 
pery grade. 

Suitable signs or markers should be 
placed at all turns in the road so as 
to prevent drivers from making the 
turns too fast. All railroad crossings 
should be well marked and the high- 
way should be level with the railroad 
track or bridge over or run under it. 

Where two highways meet, the road 
should not be obstructed by buildings 
or trees, so the driver may be able to 
see if he is about to meet another ve- 
hicle, i 

The road should not have sharp 
turns and it should be laid along the 
shortest route between centers of dis- 
tribution and not through all of the 
towns along the way. 

There are a number of things that 
cause accidents, all of which could be 
lessened if people were educated along 
the right lines. 

The highway should not ruri'through 
main streets of towns, by schools or 
churches, or children's playgrounds. 
Drivers of vehicles should turn to the 
right to allow another driver to pass 
and the driver passing another car 
416 -should drive to the left. , 

418 j Careless :driving and cars driven by 
504 intoxicated persons are the cause of 
4 78 hundreds of accidents. Dimmers 
should be used on cars at night, and 
people should never be allowed to run 
a car with only one light., 

Children should not be allowed to 
run cars; in fact no one who does not 
426 know and obey the traffic rules should 
438 he permitted to run cars. 



385 
495 



Farm Bureau Calls 
for Machinery jCut 



Lower Prices Is Public Ne- 
cessity, Farme rDele'ga- 
tion Tells Board 



Eeduction in Prices of Pris- 
on Made Machinerv May 
Show Good Results 



Prices of farm machinery manufac- 
tured at the | state penitentiary must, 
be drastically reduced, representatives 
of the Minnesota Farm Bureau feder- 
ation told the state board of control 
at a conference last week. 

The demand for reductions in farm 
machinery prices was one of the first 
acts of the new farm bureau adminis- 
tration. The delegation representing 
the farmers was headed by J. F. Reed, 
new president of the state federation, 
and includd F. E. Lammers, vice pres- 
ident, and J. J. Jacobson, George Free- 
man, Thomas E. Cashman arid J. D. 
'Pyle, directors. I 

The farmer's dollar is worth only 
61 cents in comparison with the price- 
of products he has to buy, tile farm, 
bureau representatives said Prosper- 
ity cannot be restored until the cost 
of machinery and other commodities 
the farmer must purchase is brought 
down somewhere near the value of the 
things he' has to sell, they declared. 
The penitentiary, a public institution, 
serving the whole state, is now sup- 
ported entirely by the/ farmers, Mr. 
Reed said. He argued that machinery 
prices should be cut and all citizens, 
if necessary, share the expense of 
maintaining the prison. The machiiir 
ery plant was- established originally 
to compete with private manufactur- 
ers and compel them to charge rea- 
sonable prices, the farmers jpointed 
out. A drastic price cut is necessary r 
they said, to make the prison machin- 
ery plant a real competitor with prU 
vate firms and carry out the intent of 
the law. 



410 



Totals 687 796 701 2154 

NOTES 
Wm. Ryer of the Highrollers was 
high man for his team and also the 



Drivers should blow their horn o>- 
whistle when about 400 feet behind 
another car, "or when about 400 feet 
from a steep grade or hill. 

When a driver climbs along a steep 
hill he should keep to the right of the 
road and blow his horn frequently. 
When roads are' blocked by people 



^i„ „f ti,„ lTotto^'easne for the week with 526. His^xjng punctures and blowouts, acci- 

^jome oi me uenei.^ ^ ^ rt1 . ^ „.:«, _,„,._ „,i )„ „-u„„i,j 

:ers and feeders on| 



ers for supplies, 

offerings of stj 

the fat cattle'order selling from $5.75 

up to i6M/ori opening days, with bulk 

of sales from $5.00 to $5.75, only a 

limited number of commonest off-col- 

pred steers as low as $4.50. 

The sheep market is strong, better 
grade native and western fed lambs 
being quotable from $11.00 to $11.75, 
desirable grade ewes $5.50 to $6.25. 



sia bt t not from first hand knowledge. 
That ,vas inevitable owin~ to the vast 
size (f Russia, and to the habits of 
Russi; m peasants, to whom ' rumor 
from far jvillages comes with - panic 
tonguis. ' I , .. . 

It ii not! true that 25,000,000 people 
began the; move in mad plight from 



their unfruitful lands;'. only sorqe hun- 1 ed to be present, 



496. 



teammate, C. Olson, was next with dents may occur. The roads should 

therefore be kept free from tacks and 
glass or other sharp articles. One 
Captain Erickson of the Cubs is | good way to cure the speeder would 

back on the job after a week's illness.:^ t t a k" e his license away from him. 



PARENT^ EATING CHILDREN 

Horrible Reports from Famine Dis- 
tricts Are Received. 

The following gruesome details of. 
famine conditions in Russia was taken 
from a recent report to the Associated- 
Press; ! ■ ■ . 

"Cannibalism, reported as existing, 
in Samara province by a delegate to 
the ninth congress of the soviet three: 
weeks ago, has become general in the 
Volga region, according to Rosta re- 
ports. Reviewing the latest jreports 
from the famine districts, the Russian 
wireless news service states that 
cases of parents going insane and eat- 
ing their children are frequently men- 
tioned. I 

It does not matter how sopn help 
comes, it will fail to save hundreds of 
thousands of peasants," one statement 
said. "The horses have'all been eaten- 
and the trees for the coming year will 
be leafless, for the buds have been 
eaten. 

"All food substitutes are gone and 
famine and disease rule supreme." 

MUSIC STUDENTS ARE 

ENTERTAINED BY TEACHER 



Henry Ebbighausen was high man of 
the Cubs with 475. 



The advanced music students of Mrs. 
Clarence Erickson .were guests at an 
informal party given it her home- 
Tuesday evening. Progressive whist 
formed the diversion of the forepart 
of the evening, high score being won 
by Miss Doris Richter and the con- 
solation prize going to Miss Palma 
Langseth. . During th e evening, Mrs. 



ROGNE FUNERAL SATURDAY 

The funeral services of Ole Rogne, 
will be conducted, Saturday afternoon, 

instead ofjmday.as was formally an-! high total for them with 496, 
nounced^The services will be held out George by 12 pins, 
at Larson's undertaking parlors, at 
2^9. m., and Rev. T. E. Sweger will 
officiate. 



The /highways could be made safer 
by .installing numerous traffic police- 

mefrr"stationed two or three miles. _ _ _ = , 

The Hawks had the only 800 game apart; ^th traffic stations that would jrrma Mallory Fisher and S. Carl Sun 
of the week in their last game with, enable the po ii ceme n to bring violators dahl favored the guests with several 
the^Invincible^s. ^Bud Pawling had to j ustic e, [solos which were greatly appreciated. 

^ k t . me legislation is enacted thatjThe remainder of the time was spent 

would provide the proper punishment i dancing, and at eleven o'clock a two 

for the speeder and careless driver. I course luncheon was served by the 

— Contributed. |hostess who was assisted in .serving 

| by Miss Myrtle Erickson and Miss 



highl total with 488. 

Williamson appeared with the In- 
vincibles again and turned 



the 
oseing 



GIRLS' COMMUNITY CLUB 
The Girls' Community club will hold 
their regular meeting, Monday eve- 
ning January 23, at the Commercial 
club rooms. The usual business ;ses- 
sion will be held and a social hour 
will-follow. 



The \Tigers were lucky to win with 
723 and 716. Harold Olson w^as high 
man with 504, one of (two above 500 
this week. 



The • Qjiahts were handicapped b; 
the absense of three of their heavy 
hitters, namely, Captain .Gamble, Dr. 
Booren arid Ralph Sheldon, and came 
All members are request- ! near the 80^0 mark in the second game 
'.with 796. 



HANSON-THORESON NUPTIALS 
The marriage of Miss Selma Thore- 
son and Justine Hanson was solemn- 
ized Wednesday afternoon, January 



Edith Skdglin. The guests included./ 
Miss Lucile Bums, Miss Lois Well, 
Miss Dagny Tharaldson, Miss Gladys 
Anderson, Miss Palma Langseth, M'."=i 



18, at two o'clock, at the Trinity iRuby Bennes, Miss Adlynn LaBree, 
Lutheran parsonage, Rev. T. E. Sweg-JMiss Eileen Herron, Miss Ruth Kilm- 
er officiating in the presence of Miss: son, Miss Doris Richter, Miss R ■:••.- 
Olga Vad and Gilbert Thoreson. The mond Nordvei, Mrs. Irma Mall •- .• 



young couple will make their home on 
the groom's farm near Erie. 



There's pleasure in being cranky 
that only a crank can- know. 



Fisher and S. Carl Sundahl. 



The young men are interested in ' ' - 
ucation to the extent of investigating 
j which is the prettiest school teacher. 







Page Four I - 

AW, Whapsthe use 




THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1922 



ByL.F.VanZelm 

© Western Newspaper Union 



H 




Star 



coiTe.,;-K.nde 

tuUl* of Vili 

Ku. 

of Europe a 
articles. It 
to stir the \ 
a reaiizatior 
peupie are 
in .Russia f 
ishud of 
during the 
war. 



formed his 
has he call 
world to re; 
that even j 



e at Least Handed it to You With a Smile 



ing Millions of Russia 



Phillip Gibbs, the wreat war! 



eturning from 
drought regions of! 
written for the press 
d America a series of j 
took a man like Gibbs! 
:ar-hardened world "to! 
of the fact that more 
cjn the verge of death! 
om famine than per-! 
11 nations combined ; 
terrible years of the; 



So well has Mr. Gibbs per- 



ask and so forcefully 
:d upon the civilized; 
lize its responsibility 
overnments are now 



being stirred to action. Mr. Gibbs! 
in his artich, has set down facts 
ibout Russia which all of us need 



to know, 
full. 



'e reprint it below in; 



one by one, Jittle skeletons ibefore 
death and burial. ' 

Women. weep 1 in the villages about 
Samara and Saratoff when they show 
their empty cupboards, and the typhus 
stricken children lying under bundles 
of rags, too weak to walk. But that 
weeping is only when strangers come 
The Russian peasants who have no 
with promise of help or worus of pity, 
luck, and not much hope, now, do not 
weep many tears. 

They stare out with dull eyes, upon 
their misery ■ and wait patiently for 
some floor chance of rescue or death. 
It is difficult to get about in those 
famine' districts. Few men who have 
come back: with personal evidence of 
this human! tragedy have touched more 
than the fringe of it, the outer edge 
beyond the, railheads. But those who 
have gone deepest into the famine 
districts, say that it is worse as the 
villages are moire remote, most fright- 
ful where communication is most dif- 
ficult. ] At ; the railway, stations the 
pictures are always the same, crowds 
of quiet peasant folk with skin drawn 
tight about their facial bones, and 
sunken; eyes which lock up pleadingly, 
while the children who cling to gaunt 
men and shrunken women cry out in- 
cessantly words tha' "^.n. "A bit of 
bread, little uncle, a bit of bread!" 

It is monotonous, miserable, dreary, 
and these Russian peasants" are un- 
lucky as us-.:al because all who try 
to tell the! tale of their suffering to 
the outside world find a bleak : indif- 
on the Volga and the f e r ™ce, even a hostile spirit in their 
oung labor was scarce 'audience. ' The world's imagination 
,em murmured, "Why!* 188 been deadened by thre e years of 



It is unlucky for 25,000,000 peas- 
ants 'in southern Russia that they 
have no food to eat at a time when 
the world is i ired of tales of human' 
misery, sick cf its own troubles, and 
busy, with p; ssionate selfishness, in 
trying to cure its own maladies. Those 
Russian peasa its have been very un 
lucky! i 

First tfcp whr came and their sons 
wece taken fram plows and fields to 
fight the Gerrians. They obeyed be- 
cause they v ere Russian peasants, 
even when tht y had to advance upon 
German artill :ry and machine guns 
without rifles or without ammunition. 



while. 



bis little horn 
ries of war v . 
peace and hapjpi 



and were slai ghtered in droves like 
silly sheep. fears later, after long 
slaughter — anc the harvests were not 
so rich down 
Don because 
— some of tl 
should we'figh 
have no hatred 



; men against whom we, 
Why should we figlit j 
endlessly at tWe command of men who I 



'Let-Them-Die" Attitude. 
Yes, the Russian peasants are as 



grow rich out of war, who do nothing much responsible for their soviet reg- 
for our comfirt, who rob us of ouriime as caged animals at the zoo for 
boots'; ... It is better to make -the psychology! of the keepers, know- 
peace." Hut i. was not a good peace, :jng. as much about Karl Marx as a 
and the Russi in peasants wer again Devonshire laborer about Herbert 
unlucky. : Spencer, liking communism as ! much 

Revolution broke out in the cities,' as hares like the harrow, and so in- 
the old i-egiire was overthrown, the trenched in individualism that they 
iiou.he\ism was pro- say the whole theory and practice of 
claimed as the hope of humanity. And communism has been abandoned by 
the Russian peasant hoped for a little; Lenin himself because of the passive 

: j resistance of peasant Russia— these 

ie hoped dor peace, he hoped t„:Peoi.le J have no luck at all, because 

get back to the land-now free-and! h , atre '' ]"} Bolshevism kills all human 

i where all. the memo- 1 charity; in the hearts of many people, 

ould b e blotted out by if" tlla t they prefer lies to truth, if 

iness. But he was un-! che tluth ls ever s ° m ^ i" favor of 



dreds of thousands fled like that in 
search of food and many of these were 
Letts and Poles who had retreated 
into Russia before advancing tides of 
war, when German armies and after- 
wards. White armies wer e on the 
move. When famine came. they strug- 
gled back to their own countries, 
swarming along roads and railways, 
starving and dying from disease. The 
survivors were helped on their way 
by the Russians, and towns like Riga 
are now feeding them in camps. 
New Horrors in Winter 

But now that winter is upon them 
the horror deepens. For millions there 
can be no chance of rescue, and for 
the others only the chance that the 
charity of the world will be quick and 
generous, not held back by political 
hatred or cold distrust. Russia can- 
not save her own people. Without 
outside help they will be lost. 

Even the tides Qf private charity 
flowing into British and American re- 
lief missions do but touch the frontiers 
of the famine stricken land. 



Bowling League 
In Close Race 



Three Teams Are in and Out 

of First Place for the 

Past Week 



Vigorous Demand 
Boosts Hog Prices 



Shipping Outlet Broad, Pro r 
ducers Find Corn Mar- ,;. 
ket via Hog Route 



Light Supply of Cattle. Good 
Supply of Stockers 
- and Feeders 



Tuesday's closing — Cattle 1,800. 
Closing strong to 25c higher. Calves 



2,000, closing steady best lights most^ .Manther 160 



ly ?7.50. Hogs 11,000, market 50 to 
75C higher. ' Sheep 500. Steady to' 
strong. 



Postponed Tiger Game 
Scheduled at- Citizens 
Alleys Tonight 



is 



The city bowling league race is as 
close as ever, three teams being in 
and out of first place this week. There 
were not many high totals for the 
week but the individuals were con- 
sistent throughout. On Monday the 
Cubs trimmed the Highrollers twice. 
Tuesday the Invincibles took two from 
the Hawks and Wednesday the Tigers 
took two from the Giants. The post- 
poned Tiger-Cub game will be played 
off tonight. 

CLUB STANDING 

PPd W'ri L't P'ct 

Invincibles 30 19 11 633 

Tigers 27 17 10 629 

Highrollers 30 18 12 600 

Cubs 27 16 11 592 

Hawks ...: 30 16 14 533 

Giants 27 14 13 515 

Highrollers— 

Byer 172 183 171 526 

Grendahl 105 158 138 401 

Herron 152 133 117 402 

C. Olson 171 131 194 496 

Blind 120' 120 120 36o 



'HOW I CAN MAKE 

HIGHWAYS MORE SAFE" 



Totals 720 

- Cubs— 



725 740 2185 



Stanton 156 

Westerline 168 

Ebbighausen :168 

Blind 120 

Handicap 38 



147 
137 
129 
168 
120 
38 



Totals 810 739 707 2142 

Hawks — 
Pawling 140 



lucky ■ again. 



for recruits ai d took the last reserves 
of grain to fc id them. 

In vain the }ld peasant said, "There 
will be famine again if our barns are 



emptied." 

RUSSIA W 
"WHITE AR 
FRENCH AND 
These white 
things along 
houses ami t 
bridges and t 
Th e -Russian 
— the old pet 



.c TXTvjinrn nv tov s0 busv witn tlle rabies accusing the 
VS INVADED BY THlii sm . iot ir , >v ^„,„„„ f „ f „„:„•„„ ,„J ^„» 

"*^S, PA! 

BRITISH MONEY. 



The red armies ' called 



a single soviet official, and will let 
millions of peasants die lest one bol- 
shevik j get. political advantage. 

In Rega and Helsingfors and other 
places near the Russian frontier there 
are factories of lies, and the liars are 



J WES, SOD FOR BY ; ^f™ n 'r n , t n £ ef i2 f i 'V Sf ° 0dthat 
4d BRITISH MONEY, '"""f; f" ^,, '} , v, V"; 

, L . ■ ! ^ online lies about food ships razed at 

;; rm,es destroyed many; petl . ogt . adi . 

the.r line of march,- ' wlth ^ beUef that .£ £ 

arns and railways and M !,_, because Re( , & > 

,e very standing grain ,.j starvi I : easants w .„ 
peasants were unlucky , sentfo e reBcue . , 
ble and the women am, 4 a[ ; , 

the little onis. They were caught' i,.|, _ . , ■ „ . . ,, , , 

Sides of the Red armies £f3 tS . P , Ul . bS . . Ru . ss,a . n ? of thc _° ld 
mies and fled if th«>y | truth ; 
Ivancing terror on this 1 



The 



and by their friends. 

5 exactly opposite. 

1 •« „f ,.„<■„,;„ ! Whatever may be the past and pres- 

'efujrees without reiuge. :„ , .: c .. . .^ ^ , 

,- 1 \ , 1 i„,.„;, ont crimes of the soviet government- 
al kolchak and Juden- - - ■ b 



between the 
and White a 
could from 
side or that — 

At last 
itsch and Dei 

finished, theri was peace in -"---all foojl sent for famine relief, both bv 
Hut the peasants ^were unlucky ^»j : British' and American so ^ has 
that God had declared, ,i, ,, ■ . . t .*i 

.» after all the cruelties i ^^ Iw r^'l ' '7 

fell to swell theirl 0ut . an ?' robber >'' and Wlth th e salons 



iken and Wrangel we've 
Russia. 



and that is outside of my line of : 
quiry-j-I have absolute evidence that 



It seemed no\y 

. war upon the 

of- men. No 

seed grain in 

, Natu 



pitiless and th 
ing for rain, i 
luck. Nature 
ed, as man ha 

For hundred; 
west, north 
Novgorod to 
baker hard- u^der 
ruthless sun, 
peasants who 
at all, groanet 



assistance of soviet authorities. The 



tthe so. and g^e it hfe. Ameri i an relief pebp , e are sending 

, t „ ft i » lerclless - . ' ! 1,500 tonsj a week, which is sufficient 

Month aftej month no la n fe| 1. to fee( j 

Even irom thj black earth of the Vol- «, h ^. e nQ K fl ^ 

ga, sir rich End fruitful as a g^'at'to report ! 

granary of tl e world, came up onlyj The j truth is ^ Eussi awhat . 

th.ncrop. And the sun was fierce and ;cver their ■ , itical ition „; m ^ 

= Russ.an peasant pray- !are ^ erate , 

•eepingforra,n,hadno ;down ^^ and ^^ ^ ^ 

, , .,, , ,°f food that comes in. For only they 

1 been without mercy.. , know the depth and breath J ^ 



184 
130 
138 
121 



South St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 17, 1922: 
Shipping demand for hogs continues 
broad and active here and elsewhere 
and the market is carrying a strong 
and healthy undertone, with hog prices 

averaging $1.00 or mor e higher than Jonas 119 

most tradesmen thought would pre-, j Stebbins 160 

vail during the winter packing sea-,Simonson :..177 

son. With hogs at present prices they 
are affording producers a much better 
market, than they would otherwise 
have for their surplus corn. Today's 
trade was active and 50 to 75c high- 
er, good butcher hogs selling from 
$7.50 to $8.00, light sorts- up to $8.25. 
Heavy packing sows cashed from 
$5.50 to $6.50, good pigs mostly $8.50. 

A light supply of cattle locally this 
week and a gooch> demand from the 
country for stockers and feeders have|^'-'=^ -— ■ 

resulted in strong to 25c higher cat-;^. 

tie prices. No good or _ choice beef | ^ 

steers have been here, best being a!jj ors 
few of medium grade selling at $6.75 e 

to $7.00 or slightly above, with the 
bulk of common and medium shortfed 
beef steers selling from $5.50 to $6.50. 
Best young cows and heifers are sel- 
ling on an aptive market from $5.50 ^ J,uc ^ flu ' 
to around $6.50, with the bulk of the g™" aon 



156 
133 
121 
139 
120 
38 



463 
°426 
418 
475 
360 



164 
136 
146 
159 



488 
385 
444 
457 



Totals 731 

Invincibles — 

Erickson 113 

Holden 121 

Williamson v 168 

Mostean 185 

Totals 746 

Tigers — • 
Sorenson 132 



715 801 2247 



130 
131 
158' 
138 



153 
137 
170 
167 



396 
389 
496 
490 



739 771 225 



Following essay submitted by Lois 
Nicholson in state and national "Good 
Roads Essay Contest," received hon- 
orable mention by local judges. 

All roads, whether federal, state or 
county highways, should be built with | 
the idea of safety. 

Good roads not only mean a saving 
of gasoline, motor tires and farm pro 
duce, but a saving of human lives a: 
well. Good roads cost money, but 
they save more than they cost. 

Grown people as well as children 
must be educated to realize the im- 
portance of- good roads and how to 
make them safe for traffic. 

When the country was new, the 
roads consisted of only a trail, but it 
was then comparatively safe as the 
traffic was light. Where those old 
trail roads are used, they should be 
straightened where it is necessary to 
cross a stretch of low ground, a suit 
able grade not less than 20 feet wide 
should be constructed. Provision 
should be made for a water course 
where necessary. This should be a 
good bridge or a large concrete pipe, 
which once installed, requires no ex- 
pense for upkeep. 

There is a variety of materials that 
may be used for th e roadbed. It may 
be made of sand-clay, burned clay, 
madacadm, concrete, asphalt, granite, 
gravel, wood blocks or bricks, but it 
should be free from any vegetable 
matter, which might decay and cause 
holes in the road. In the south, brok- 
en sea shells are used instead of 
gravel. 

It is very important to have the 
roadbed properly drained so that c£rs 
jwill not skid and tip over on the slip- 
pery grade. 

' Suitable signs or markers should be 
placed at all turns in the road so as 
to prevent drivers -from making the 
turns too fast. All railroad crossings 
should be well marked and the high- 
way should be leveLwith the railroad 
track or bridge over or run under it. 

Where two highways meet, the road 
should not be obstructed by buildings 
or trees, so the driver may be able to 
see if he is about to meet another ve- 
hicle. 

The road should not have' sharp 
turns and it should be laid along the 
shortest route between centers of dis- 
tribution and not through all of the 
towns along the way. 

There are 3 number of things that 
cause accidentsj all of which could be 
lessened if people were educated along 
the right lines. 

The highway should not run through 
main streets of towns, by schools or 
churches, or children's playgrounds. 
Drivers of vehicles should turn to the 



Farm Bureau Calls 
for Machinery Cut 



132 
141 
142 



144 



141 
137 
138 
187 
179 



Lower Prices Is Public Ne- 
cessity, Farme rDelega- 
tion Tells Board / 



Reduction in Prices-df Pris- 
on Made Machinery May 
Show Good Results 



Prices of farm machinery manufac- 
tured at the state penitentiary must 
be drastically reduced, representatives 
of the Minnesota Farm Bureau feder- 
ation told the state board of control., 
at a conference last week. 

The demand for reductions in farm 
machinery prices was one of the first 
acts of the new farm bureau adminis- 
tration. The delegation representing 
the farmers was headed by J. F. Reed., 
new president of the state federation, 
and includd F. E. Lammers, vice pres- 
ident, and J. J. Jacobson, George Free- 
man, Thomas E. Cashman and J. D. 
Pyle, directors. 

The farmer's dollar is worth only 
61'cents in comparison with the'.price- 
of products he has to buy, the farm, 
bureau representatives said Prosper- 
ity cannot be restored until the cost, 
of machinery and other commodities 
the farmer must purchase ' s brought 
down somewhere near the value of the 
things he has to sell, they declared. 
The "penitentiary, a public institution, 
serving the whole state, is now sup- 
ported entirely by the farmers, Mr. 
Reed said. He argued that machinery 
prices should be cut and all citizens, 
if necessary, share the expense of ' 
maintaining the prison. The machin- 
ery plant was established originally 
to compete with private manufactur- 
ers and compel them to charge rea- 
sonable prices, the farmers pointed 
out,' A drastic price cut is necessary,, 
they said, to make the prison machin- 
ery plant a real competitor with pri- 
vate firms and carry out the intent of. 
the law. 



PARENTS EATING CHILDREN' 



Horrible Reports from Famine Dis- 
tricts Are Received. 

• The following gruesome details of 
famine conditions in Russia was taken 
from a recent report to the Associated 
Press; "— • 

"Cannibalism, reported as existing, 
in Samara province by a delegate to 
the ninth congress of the soviet three 
weeks ago, has become general in the 
Volga region, according to Rosta re- 
ports. Reviewing the latest reports 
from the famine districts, the Russian. 



butcher she stock 

prices from $3.25 to $5.25. 



Totals ..; 723 

Giants — 

Sundahl J.25 

Anderson 146 

141 

144 



16 782 2221 



g ° ing ^ rfnne n rs iD - Canton 121 

Canners __ ,. 

and cutters range largely from $2.25 an lpap 



to $3.?5. Bologna bulls sell largely 
at $3.5.0 to $4.25. Prices for veal 
calves have held steady, most of the 
best lights selling at $7.50, with some 
selected vealers on up' to $8.00. Coun 



138 
183 
147 
159 
159 
10 



122 
166 ' 
138 
135 
130 
10 



right to allow -another driver to pass 
405 an d the driver passing another <$r 
416jshould drive to the left. 
41S j Careless driving and cars driven by 

504 intoxicated persons are the cause of I wireless news service states that 
478, nun( i r eds of accidents. Dimmers leases of parents going insane and eat- 
should be used on cars ay night, and ing their children are frequently men- 
people should never be allowed to run.tioned. 

a car with only one light. j "It does not matter how soon, help 

385 Children. should not be allowed to. comes, itiwill fail to save hundreds of 
495 run cars; in fact no, one w'ho does rioi| thousands of peasants," one statement 
426 know and obey the traffic rules shmild said. "The horses have all been eaten 



438: be permitted to run cars. 



410 



Drivers should blow their horn oi- 



whistle when about 400 feet behind ; eaten. 



and the trees for the coming year will ' 
be leafless, for the buds have been 



Totals 687 796 701 



another car, or when about 400 feet 
2154|from a steep grade or hill. 

When a driver climbs along a steep 
'hill he should keep to the right of the 



' "Ail food substitutes are gone and. 
famine and disease rule supreme." 



MUSIC STUDENTS ARE 

ENTERTAINED BY TEACHER 



NOTES 

Wm. Ryer of the Highrollers was! road and blow his horn frequently, 
try buyers are oftenVutbTdding pa*- -W -man for hb torn and also the; Wh m roads are blocked by people 
ers for supplies, some of 'the better; ea S ue f r *e week with 526 His tog punctures and blowouts, acc.- 
offerings of stockers and feeders on!^ ammate ' C ' OIson . was next wlth dents may occur, 
the fat cattle order selling from $5.7.5 1 
up to $6.40 on opening days, with hulk 

of sales from $5 00 to $5.75, only a jback on the job after a week's illness.: be To take his license away from him. | of the evening, high score being "woi 
limited number of commonest off-col- i H enry Ebbighausen was high man ofj The highways 'could be made saferiby Miss Doris Richter andthe con 



Captain Erickson of the 



The advanced music students of Mrs. 
The roads should J Clarence Erickson were guests at an 
therefore be kept free from tacks and informal party given at her' home- 
glass or other sharp articles. One; Tuesday evening. Progressive whist 
Cubs isijjuod wav to cure the Speeder would j formed the diversion of the forepart 



ored steers as low as $4.50. 

The sheep market is strong, better 
grade native and western fed lambs 



the Cubs with 475. 



by installing numerous traffic police- solation prize going to Miss Palma 
I men, stationed two or three miles I Langseth. During th e evening, Mrs. 



of miles, east and 



tragedy that has befallen those mil- 



nd south, from- Nijhi [Iions ^ f peasant folk who find 

Astrakhan, the sod ™s\vi n ter! creeping upon them, and with 



nd 2i 



a blinding, cruel, 



it for nianj- of them — for at least 3,- 



had not luck, no luck 
over their pitiful har- 
vesting and hjad no bread for their 
children 

They had bi en eating -grass mixed 
with earth, tl e bark of trees, field 
locust, a ly kind of filth. 
Many have 1 lin down and. died, and 
glad 10. die, they said, because they 
hated to hear ;he wailing of childrep 
and to see so many of them die, too. 



:5,000,000 Russian onoooo f Vm-inevitable- death. 



There has been exaggeration, it is 
true, by journalists writing from Rus- 
sia but not |f rom first hand knowledge. 
That was inevitable owin" to the vast 
size of Russia, and to the habits of 
Russian peasants, to whom rumor 
from far villages comes with panic 
tongues. 

It is hot true that 25,000,000 people 
began the move in mad plight from 
their unfruitful lauds; only some hun- 



, . ... . „,., nn . „„ „,- : , T he Hawks had the only 800 game A with traffic stat i on s that wouldjlrma Mallory Fisher and S. Carl Su„- 

being quotable from $11 .00 to $11.75, ; of th wee k in their last game with, enaM ; the policemen to bring violators dahl favored the guests with several 
desirable g rade ewes $5.50 to $6.25. | the i nv i nc ibles. Bud Pawling had to justice ! S olos which were greatly appreciated. 

|high total with 488. I it i s time legislation is enacted that j The remainder of the time was spent 

ROGNE FUNERAL SATURDAY] w-ould provide the proper punishment 1 dancing, and at eleven o'clock .a two 

The funeral services of Ole Rogne.j Williamson appeared with the In- for t h e speeder and careless driver. Icourse luncheon was served by the- 

will be conducted, 1 Saturday afternoon, 'vincibles again and turned in the] . Contributed, ihostess who was assisted in serving 

instead of Friday- as was formally an-: high total for them with 496, noseing j' ^ "by Miss Myrtle Erickson. and Mi-s 

nounced. The services will be held out George by 12 pins. HANSON-THORESON NUPTIALS j Edith Skoglin. The guests included. 

at Larson's undertaking parlors, at| : _ - The marriage of Miss Selma Thore-|jiiss Lucile Bums, Miss Lois W- ! 1, 

2 p. m., and Rev. T. E. Sweger will | The Tigers were lucky to win with 'son and Justine Hanson was solemn-! Hiss Dagny Tharaldson Miss Gla.-lvs 
officiate. 723 and 716. Harold Olson was high|j z ed Wednesday afternoon, January [Anderson, Miss Palma Langseth, J'i- - 

man with 504, one of (two above 500; 18, at two o'clock, at the Trinity I Ruby Ben'nes, Miss Adlynn LaB-Vo' 
thrs week. iLutheran parsonage, Rev. T. E. Sweg-Miss Eileen Herron, Miss" Ruth Kir.:--' 

mL '„. ,. ■ T , , I er officiating in the presence of Mission, Miss Doris Richter,. Miss R -- 

. T „„ t „. „ . , The/ Giants were handicapped b: ; lg a Vad and Gilbert Thoveson. Thej n ,ond Nordvei, Mrs. Irma Mai! .- 

mng January 23, at the Commercial , the absense of three of their heavy j young couple will make their home on Fisher and S Carl Sundahl 

club rooms. The usual business ses-| hitters, namely, Captain Gamble, Dr. j the groom's farm near Erie. - ' 

sion will be held and a social houriBooren and Ralph Sheldon, and came] | Th e young men are interested in ' '- 

will follow. All members are request- ' near the 800 mark in the second game; There's pleasure in .being cranky ucation to the extent of investigating 
ed to be, present. • ■ • 'with 796. 'that only a crank can know. j which, is the prettiest school teacher. 



GIRLS' COMMUNITY CLUB 

The Girls' Community club will hold 
their regular meeting, Monday eve 



mtimsmaam 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



•s 



L 



y 



% 



.-/• 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1922 



Formed 



T 



THE THffiFRIVEJfc FALLS TRIBUNE 



Howard Explains 
Farmers "Bloc" 



Tells How £ nd Where it Was 



VIKING 



■+- 



and What It 



Has Accomplished 



Shows Exactly 
Operate s 
ingt 



How "Bloc? 

At Wash- i 

on, D. C. ! 




))H) lt (ttM I HI I MtH l iM 

♦ ■ ♦ 

♦ THE SAD SIDE ♦ 

♦ ♦ 



HON. J. 

(By Hon. J. 
American Farn 



the situation in 
industry of the 



R. HOWARD. 

R. Howard, president 
Bureau Federation)! 



When congreis convened last April 



the farming-livestock 
nation had .become so 



tense that a nvmber of Congressmen 
who knew the actual condition con^ 
fronting agriculture resolved it was 
time for sometl ing to be done for del 
flated agriculture in order to save 
not only the ftrmer, but the indust- 
ries of the nat ion. They recognized 
the key to the situation lay' [largely 
in assisting the agriculture to "come 
back." They seised also the changed 

j conditions. Thdy realized a new era 
had come and with it a turn in the 

j tide of basic pr aductioris. i 

This resulted in the formation oi 

that much disc issed group in con- 

j gress, the agri :ultural bloc, which 

: has to its cred t more agricultural 
legislation in tjhe extraordinary ses-j 
sion than ever before was passed in a 
single sitting of congress. Let me 
mention among them the aid to the 
Federal Land_b:mks, the War Finance 
relief measure, the Packer control 
bill, the Grain Exchange control bill; 
and the Farm- to-Market road lawi 
Each measure passed however, al-j 
though classed as agricultural, has 
gTeat value to he nation as a wholeJ 
The first meeting of the senate 1 
agricultural "bl >c" was held in the of-; 
fice of the Arierican Farm Bureau 
federation in Washington, D. C. The 
senators, know:i to be interested in 
the agricultural situation, were called 
by Senator William S. Kenyon of 
Iowa and Graj Silver, . Washington 
Representative of the American Farm 
Bureau federat on. Senator Kenyon 
told his colleagues that it was his' 
idea that by Wringing together sen 
ators from the middle west and the 
south, the principal agricultural sec-j 
tions, it would lie possible to bring to; 
bear sufficient 20-operative action in 
the senate to e lact legislation meas- 
ures which wovld relieve agriculture. 
He also told tie futility of his and 
other senators' endeavors to pass any 
kind of remedial or constructive agri- 
cultural legislation during the prev- 
ious short sessii in of congress. 

Thus the agri ;ultural "bloc" had its' 
origin. It transcends party lines. It; 
has its own cai cus and is not amen 
able to the party whip or party disci 
pline. Heretofor ! many bills have been 
sidetracked simply because of policy 
and the domination of leaders who, 
would hold up the bills rather than' 
risk a division s ilit in the party ranks.! 
The "bloc" has thus not only kept 1 
new and constitutive measures from' 

> the cold storage warehouses of spe-j 
cially appointed congressional com-] 
mittees; it has also taken measures 
out of cold storige and passed them. I 
The agricultural "bloc" in the sen- 
ate is not sufficiently strong numer- 
ically to pass le rislation. Its strength 1 
lies in voting ;s a block' and adding 1 
that strength to one party of the 1 
other according to the way these 
parties favor or oppose a measure, id 
is the principle of independent vot-| 
ing applied to national legislation. 

The more tha 1 twenty members are 
divided about equally between Demo-j 
crats and Republicans, so it is truly 
a bi-partisan organization. Most of 
the westerners are Republicans and 
most of the southerners Democrats! 
In the senate "bloc" the western mem-- 
bers all come from state west or 

. Ohio. These men are entitled to com- 
mendation, not mly from the farmers' 
but from the { eneral public. ' I 

The House "Hoc" contains members 
from as far east as Pennsylvania and 
is also bi-partis an in make-up. 



Albert Tarnell's entertained a 
ber of relatives last Sunday after- 
noon. \ 

Rev. Rraits conducted services in 
the Mission| cnurcn Sunday forenoon 
and eveningl I 

Miss Myrtle Anderson, who has 
been employed at Winnipeg, some| time 
returned -to her; home Wednesday eve- 
ning last week.! I 

The Swedish Ladies' Aid met at the 
church Thursday afternoon. A jlarge 
crowd attended. 1 j 

A "number of relatives were enter- 
tairied at, Gust Anderson's Tuesday 
evening of this week. i 

The Young People's society met at 
C- Tangquist's ilast Wednesday! eve- 
ning. C. F.j Philstrom of Warren at- 
tended the] meeting. ! 

Miss Mina Skonood of Comstock 
spent the past week at the William 
Anderson home. ! 

Mrs. Knutson and children left for 
their home 'in Dakota after having 
spent some ! time at Mrs. Knutson's 
father's home. ■ \ ■ 

Next Thursday afternoon, February 
26, the Ladies' Aid of the Swedish 
Mission church will meet at Albert 
Styrlund's. ;You are invited. 

Rev. and Mrs. Drotts called at W. 
Lindquist's one afternoon of- i last 
week! , ! ■ ! 



Defends National 
Rail Agreement 



Walker D. Hines, former 

Railroad Administrator, 

Supports Contract 



In Address at Pittsburgh, 
Former Rail Chief Dis- 
cusses Situation 



I M M M t . t M M H M M M «♦+*+ 

(From j'Notes of Interest.") 
Gleaned , on trip of the northern 
woods, and as it happened; this is 
no "spin up." 



It was one of the coldest and ugli- 
est winter days. By the way, :there 
was a young man, returned soldier, 
employed in! the camp and who had 
recently married a girl— a few years 
younger than he. A bright and beau- 
tiful baby girl had already come to 
them. The young husband had short- 
ly before, arranged with a concern for 
"living quarters" in a small room, an 
adjunct to th e camp's office. But this 
was available no longer and the "acT- 
venturers" were obliged to seek 1 some 
other abode. All the places were 
filled, so the young lady had not suc- 
ceeded in obtaining work in the camp 
kitchen, as j had been part of their 
little plan. \ 

"I .don't see what that man is think- 
ing about-f-taking his wife and: baby 
to a place like ;that," remarked Jim, 
the barn boss, disapprovingly, to his 
fellow lumberjacks, when they had ga- 
thered around the huge mmkhouse 
stove in the evening. Jim just re- 
turned from' the trip, then further re- 
lated his taking the young couple, 
with their two-year-old chiid, also ac- 
companied'by the bride's young broth- 
er, to a place about three miles out 
from camp, i Their "household- outfit" 
consisted of'a'few blankets and other 
items of the !most needed kitchen uten- 
sils and which were packed down in a 
drygoods box. 

Here at their hew location, they had 
planned to make their home pending 
the time daddy was to work in the 
woods. The shack had no. door, ex- 
cept some boards placed up against 
the door opening. The windows- were 
broken; there was np floor. When the 
barn boss left the party, the girl-wife 
was sitting on the trunk, in the shack, 
with her iittle one huddled up in a 
blanket. i ■ ■ 

And it is] hardly necessary to add 
that she was crying. 

;— H. C. I. SUBURBAN. 

Erie, Minn. 

HAVE YOU CONTRACTED 

THE LATEST DISEASE? 



It is frequen 
you are right tljan it i; 



tly easier to be sure! 
it is to go ahead. 



Is there 1 a new disease among us 
since prohibition and the vogue of 
eating for health? "An apple a day 
keeps the doctor away" is a slogan 
popularized ] by : national advertising. 
Following close : on its heels was the 
drive made -by the raisin growers of 
the Pacific coast, who have been edu- 
cating the public up to eating raisins, 
for what ailed them and , didn't ail 
them. The :more recent campaign to 
make yeast ;in edible form popular is 
still with us. 

It ' was a J combination of the , two- 
latter that has ■ been responsible for 
the coining of a; name for a new dis- 
ease. -A .young lady of Stillwater, 
Minn., has been a consistent consumer 
of raisin since her childhood. : Re- 
cently, to improve her complexion, 
she began eating yeast in cak e form. 
When the yeast diet reached the stage 
o| three cakes a: day it conflicted with 
her raisin diet and th e combination 
caused her to visit the family physi- 
cian, j j 

The symptoms complained of were 
a slight feeling of elation that was 
becoming more pronounced eacW mo- 
ment. The 'doctor diagnosed the! case 
as intoxication, but on inquiry found 
that no liquor had been consumed 
Further inquiry and diagnosis brought 
Out the fact that fermentation! had 
begun inside the young lady from 
Stillwater and. going on -in the way it 
I did, alcohol j of sufficient quantity to 
! intoxicate her was the result, "she 
j is continuing her diet but does not 
!eat .raisins jand yeast at the same 
time. ; 

Here is a|good chance for the writ- 
ers of limericks to tell what happened. 
The first line is furnished freii, as 
follows: "There was a young lady 
from Stillwater." Fill it out to 'suit 



Because of the many misunder- 
standings prevalent throughout the 
United States regarding the agree- 
ment and contract under which the 
various railway brotherhoods are em- 
ployed and in the face of arguments 
pro and con being put forth by both 
the railroads and the men, The Tri- 
bune comes upon the following article 
taken from the official organ of the 
14 brotherhoods employed on the 
great rail systems of the country, 
which contains a statement by Walter 
D. Hines, former railroad administra- 
tor, wherein he presents numerous 
facts and figures regarding the rail- 
road situation. In an article headed, 
"Hines Defends National Agreement," 
Labor says: 

No feature of the railroad problem 
has been so persistently misrepresent- 
ed by the railroad propagandist's as 
the "National Agreement" entered in- 
to between the Federal Railroad ad- 
ministration and certain organizations 
of railroad workers. 

Speaking before some commercial 
association, "General" Atterbury said 
the agreement was costing the roads 
$500,000,000 a year. Other railroad 
executives made equally extreme 
statements, which were quoted and 
requoted by newspapers from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific. The public was 
assured that all that was necessary 
to make private operation a glitter- 
ing success was to wipe out the "Na- 
tional Agreement." 

The Labor Board yielded to the 
clamor, and the agreement was radic- 
ally revised. 

Now comes Walker D. Hines, form- 
er Federal railroad administrator, and 
one of the most capable railroad ex- 
ecutives in this country, with the 
true story of the agreement. He dis- 
cussed the subject in an address be- 
fore the American Economic associa- 
tion in Pittsburgh. He pointed out 
that "one of the most costly branches 
of railroad operation is the mainten- 
ance of equipment." 

Its - cost in. 1919— -the last year of 
Federal control— was $1,230,000,000. 

Its cosf; in 1920 — the first year of 
private control— -was $1,575,000,000, 
or an increase of $345,000,000. 

The railroad managers have told 
the people that this increase was due 
to the "iniquitous provisions" of .the 
National Agreement. Hines exposed 
the falsehood. 

"Practically all the basic rules" of 
the National Agreement, he said, were 
"in effect on numerous roads prior to 
the war" and had been applied "to 
all the roads by the experienced rail- 
road men who were connected with 
the Federal railroad ' administration," 
before the national agreement was 
drafted. • 

The increase of $345,000,000 'in the 
cost of maintaining equipment <:ould 
not be charged "to the national agree- 
ment, because practically all the rules 
in th.at document had been in force 
in 1920, under private control. 

.Mr. Hines called attention to the 
fact that the "examples" of the prac- 
tical workings of the national agree- 
ment which were spread over the 
country by the railroads' press agents 
were of no real value. 

"They were of extreme cases," he 
said, "which represented a very small 
percentage of the operating cost." 

Mr. Hines' statements will not be 
ne,ws to the railroad workers. They 
knew that the roads' propaganda was 
false and misleading, and they did 



what they could tojget the truth to the 
Railroad Labor Board and to 1 the pub- 
lic, i ' ! 

Witness after witness told the La- 
bor Board exactly what Mr. Hines told 
the members of the American Eco- 
nomic association, but the newspapers, 
as a rule, refused! to print the' testi- 
mony, and undoubtedly millions of in- 
telligent citizens believe that the rail- 
roads' troubles are traceable to the 
pernicious agreement "forced" on Mc- 
Adoo and Hines by militant labor or- 
ganizations. These victimsj of rail- 
road propaganda would be amazed to 
hear that the rules denounced by At- 
terbury had been adopted by |"the ex- 
perienced railroad men connected with 
the Federal administration." '; 

The truth is, as! Mr. Hines! has so 
clearly pointed out, that the roads in 
1920 took advantage of the' govern- 
ment guaranty to expend unprecedent- 
ed 'sums on maintenance of i equip- 
ment, j 1 j- 

Much of the money— tens of mil- 
lions— was thrown; away. The Inter, 
state Commerce commission has prov- 
en that through its inquiry into the 
contracts between the roads and such 
favored concerns as Baldwin's. 

Unfortunately, the railroads have 
succeeded in keeping the facts from 
the people, but gradually the truth 
is leaking through: 



THE BRIDE IS SURVIVED BY HER 

PARENTS AND' ONE BROTHER 

WHO LIVES AT HOME. 




Lincoln National 
Life Ins. Co. 

January 17h to 23rd' has been 
designated as THRIFT WEEK. 
Thursday, January 19th is the 
National LIFE INSURANCE 
DAY. 

$75,000,000 of Life Insurance 
was applied for by the Ameri- 
can people during THRIFT 
• WEEK 1921. 

I Am At Your Service 

E. MiBENNES 

General Agent 
THE LIFE INSURANCE MAN. 

90-4t 



She was married today, and the wed- 
ding is o'er, 

We can all settle down to a sane life 
once more;- 

We are fed up with parties, with 
showers' and gush, 

And we'd like to sit down to a dish 
of cold mush.i 

Of course, she looked pretty— brides 

always do; • 
Jove, that was some bunch that helped 

her "go" through. 
They know how to dance, flirt, ;alk 

with their eyes; 
But not one of the sextette knew how 
,,to make pies.! 

Seems sorta nice not to listen to chat- 
ter, ! 

Awfully, quiet, no pounding, no clatter, 

They have gone ; honeymooning far 

oyer the hills; ' 

Lord pity poor Dad when he gets the 
bills. ! 

— Yellow Dog, Des Moines Register. 



Pastor Walks 54 
Miles to Preach 



Rev. Albin Larson, Thief 
River Falls "Minister, Re- 
turns From Visit 



Tells Interesting Story of 

Work Done by Student 

Ministers in North 



Many men who; are physically -un- 
able! to saw any firewood can yet de- 
liver a heavy bowling alley ball with 
terrific speed. I 



Rev. Albin Larson, pastor of the 
Augustana church of Thief River 
Falls, returned yesterday from War- 
road and Spooner, Minn., where he 
has spent several days in religious 
work in the vicinity of the two cities 
mentioned. 

Rev. Larson officiated at the annual 
meeting of the congregations there 
and also delivered several sermons at 
various churches in the surrounding 
country. He told a representative of 
[The Tribune last night of the fearless- 
ness and aggressive spirit shown by 
two student ministers, who are in 
charge of churches at Warroad and 
Spooner, Rev. Samuel Johnson at the 
first-mentioned village, and Rev. 
Andy M. Swanson at Spooner. The 
latter, while in charge of the church 
work at Spooner, has three outlying 
towns to serve as well, and generally 
makes his way to the various meeting 
houses by walking each Sunday the 
distances lying between the various 
villages. It is not uncommon for Rev. 
Swanson to preach at the morning 
services in Spooner, walk to Graceton, 
a distance of 12 miles — and the go- 
ing is none too easy through the 
snow fields — for the afternoon meet- 
ing, and return ' to Spooner for his 
regular Sunday evening services. 

Rev. Larson, however, was not com- 
pletely outdone by his brother min- 
ister on his recent visit to Spooner, 
for he walked from Roosevelt, where 
he preached Wednesday, to I Willow 
Creek, where he also spoke, and back 
to a little hamlet known as Swift, 
where he addressed a congregation in 
the evening. The distance covered for 
the day was a little more than 20 
miles, but Rev. Larson said he rather 
enjoyed the long trudge through the 
snow. 

"The fearless and spirited aggres- 
siveness of the two ministers to me 
was a revelation," said Rev. Larson. 
"These two young men who - have 
chosen preaching of the gospel as 
their life's work are doing a noble 
service out there in their territory. 



Page Five. 



They are natural-born pioneers and to 
blaze the trail is quite the usual 
thing with -them. They have but to 
hear of duty and they go— no need 
to tell them. I enjoyed immensely 
my. visit to the congregations and 
would go there more often in the fu- 
ture had I th e opportunity and time. 
Folks generally in the vicinity of 
Spooner seem to be getting along as 
well as any other place that I have 
visited in these northern sections. 
| They have plenty to eat, warm cloth- 
ing, their children attend school every 
day, and what more can one expect ' 
in these rather difficult times. I speak 
of; the fanners, of course, living in 
the outermost regions, who have long 
hauls to market." 



EVER HEAR OF A FISH 

MINE?. MAKE EASY MONEY 



In certain parts of the world min- 
ing for fish is a very profitable occu- 
pation. 

Many thousands of years ago the 
oceans covered large portions of the 
world which now are dry land. The 
whole fade of the globe has altered, 
for you may now find high mountains 
in. places where formerly there were 
plains or even great seas. 

As the mountains were heaved up , 
by subterranean explosions, the wa- '. 
ters receded, leaving behind 'the re- 
mains of countless millions of their 
inhabitants. That is why we find, in 
Switzerland enormous deposits of fos- 
sil seafish hundreds of miles away 
from the sea. 

These fossils retain the oil that was 
present in the bodies of living fish 
thousands of years ago. Matured by 
its immense age, this oil has extraor- 
dinary curative properties Avhen used 
in the treatment of chilblafns and cer- 
tain forms of skin disease. 

The fossils are dug out, often from 
and the oil known as i'chthyol is dis- 
considerable distances /beneath the soil 
tilled from them. It is extremely val- 
uable, for a great quantity of fossil 
fish is ndeded before a pint of oil can 
be produced. 



Wood 

Dry Poplar Cordwood, Sawed 

and Delivered, $6.50 Per Cord. 

Dry Pole Wood, $4 Per Load, 

Delivered. 

PHONE 8-F-210 

NESS BROS. 



SALE ON 

UNDERWEAR 






Saturday, January 21st 

— -f— ONLY ONE DAY — 

ANOTHER BIG DAY AT 
OEN'S; there is no need of 
telling you what was going 
<m here last Saturday, for you 
^11 know. We are going to 
give you prices oh ladies and 
children's under garments 
that you can not afford to 
miss. So be here and help 
crowd the aisIesJ Our entire 
stock of underwear will be 
piled out at prices that will 

move it quickly. 

Come Early 

0EN MERCANTILE CO. 




t - 








J 



u 



/dir 



Page S:x 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1922 



*m 



Personal Property 
_ Tax List foi- 1921 

(Ci iitimiLMl from Page Three) 



1.. 



Brallund, 

Baird, Gee 

Cranum, 

Davis, Edc 

Donn, Jac 

Dale, Ti 

Dahle, 1 

Erick.on, 

Eliaton, 

Eliat-m, C 

Ellingson, 

Ewent, 

Finstad, 

Foi.t, Joh 

Gals. W. 

Giving, . 

Giving, Ol 

Hanson, 

liomnie, 

Halvorson, 

Howard, 

i_amin, Tl 

Heggesuen 

Hyland, 1 

Hunt, 'Mr; 

Hedeen, H 

Halvorson, 

Horachek, 

Halverson, 

Halverson, 

Hjclle, 

Hammerst 

Hruby. r 

Jensen, 

Johnson, 

Johnson, 

Johnson, 

KJos. Car 

Kvlste, B 

Kolsirand, 

Krbechek, 

Korslad, 

Korslad, 

Klenunetst 

Lee. Ole 

Larson, ] 

Matson, 

Nelson, 

Nelson, 

Kelson, 

Nelteland, 

Kelson, O 

Olson, A 

Overvold, 

Overom, 

Peterson, 

Palmer, 

Rustad, 

Kuslad, 

Haniesey, 

Kafsnes, 

Rouerg, S 

Rune, E. 

Sygersrud. 

Sund, Eve 

Sabarek, 

Svanejord, 

Skatberg, 

Sanders, 

Sundsdahl 

Shirley. K 

Swanson, 

Srnsky, _' 

Singer Br 

Tenner, E : 

Tharoldsor , 

Tharoldsor}, 

Tollefson, 

Thorson, 

Thorson, 

Vad; Ch 

Vaughan, 

Wolu, Pet};: 

Zavoral, 

Zavoral, 

Rustad, 

Saltvedt, 

Buskernge 



:.Irs. Tilda 
Ige . 



Henry 



;n, 



ner — 

. M. _ 

Vnton _ 

. tndrew 

A. 



135. 

201 

____ 690 

242 

Mrs. Karen 19 
__ 330 

ldvlg 344 

r - ___ 228 



John 
; Carl _ 
U'm, 



M's. 



ver 



Tobias — 
Ole O. ___ 
Mrs. Barbara 

.larens 

C harley — __ 

_ eney _ 

_il rs. Julia . 



K. 



John N. 
lois 



rist 



Including 

School 
School 
School 
School 
School 
(Kates 
30 cents 



.'on, 



Name of I 

Firm 

Corporati»i 

Aaluii, H 

Arveson, 

Arveson, 

Arveson. 

Bae, Lidv 

Bjornaraa, 

Hjerklic, 

I.ok!v,*in, 

lialtken, 

Clemenso 

Christian^ 

Christ.! 

Dahl. Jo.' 

Erickson, 

Florence, 

Fore, Ma 

Hanson. 

Hanson. 

llenili inn 

lialvorsot 

Hanson. 

llylan.l, 

liaimi-. 

Hainan. 

Hanson. 

J.linsdii, 

.lorfii-ri:-u!: 

Jozi:zyk, 

Josefson. 

Kvale. T 

Kolsluis. 

l.,:ifal!om 

I.il-.on 1 

l.i-.-. Lai-.- 

Lui..lbl.nl 

Larson. 

Man-!,.! ur 

Mostmni. 

MoMntni. 

M-istr.il:.. 

Maitinso! 

Milhi.i 

>.VI. <m 

Nib on 

Nilx.-.l.ki 

Ol>->ti . 

I'lk.-. I. 

j:ln.!.,l. 

Km-. O.-l i 

Skiblcki 

Swanson. 

Solberg. 

Savage, 

Stucy,- 

Skomeda 

Sannes, 

Sordal. 

Tuff, B 

Tuff. Ji 

Tuff. 

Thimpson, 

Torgersop, 

Tvelten, 

Teigen. 

TveitbnkJ., 

Wojnarc 

Amtson, 



Alfred 
ncl 



. 200 
. 223 



S00 
000 



Lawrence . 

drew . 

Albert 



William 
r C. 



andrup _ 
Herman 



3.88 

10.37 

18.18 

14.57 

7.75 

4.04 

13.52 

4.08 

18.8U 

.40 

28.87 

14.10 

7.83 

12.01 

9.U8 

9.28 

14.01 

17.03 

43.80 

11.15 

20.21' 

13.29 

5.41 

3.01 

1.39 

7.57 

7.07 

10.83 

9.23 

9.28 

28.49 

14.52 

10.07 

8.23 

0.19 

17.82 

5.94 

11.03 

10.38 

0.74 

12.07 

37.04 

12.46 

.88 

10.77 

17.17 

10.58 

10.02 

11.53 

35.08 

4.90 

11.70 

12.02 

9.42 

12.22 

5.99 

3.14 

25.10 

.80 

13.44 

5.15 

12.02 

14.91 

5.94 

0.70 

1.89 

8.33 

8.93 

14.15 

15.89 

10.39 

19.37 

22.48 

55.32 

0.09 

1.10 

9.38 

12.05 

1L97 

17.b3 

12.02 

12.30 

28.10 

11.80 

8.28 

2.70 

3.00 

1.50 



TOWN OF HICKOBY 
Tax Kate By School District!}. 



State, County, -Town or Village and 
school District Levies. 



district No. 3. 

district No. 9, 

district No. 10. 

district No. 00. 

district No. 07, 

of Taxation on Money 
>er $100.) 



Mills 05.4. 

Mills 77.3. 

Mills 70.5. 

Mills 78.9. 

Mills 75.1. 



erson, 



Albert 
thur 
Alhin . 
r . 



. 875 
. 150 
. 171 
. 83 

Bjorgulf 524 

l J eder 241 

William F. 105 

ciler O. 23 

. Carl 301 

in. Lourtz 582 

Olive :_ 283 

■oh 2U 

Peter 320 

Thomas 38 

14 



Value Money 
Personal 
Property Credits 
$ 00 



and Credits 



under G. 
i. T. 

Ole 

KUck ... 

ennie A. 
.ars _ 



lialvor 

lt'hner .... 

John O. 

George 

John 

.-.rno ....- 

T. ..- 

Gum- 11. 
Syverl 



97 

_.. 374 

354 

412 

._ 227 

340 

.. 471 

Ml 

40 

71 

1111 

121 

317 

187 

50 
39 



441 

3 

John J 324 

John 111) 



Cilbert 
Ji.hn 



. 114 
. 091 
. 82 



Hasinus 
Cumler .. 



ih 



Ed. 



235 
1011 

:. 87 

.... 188 

a 301 

100 

84 

,205 

108 

ey 212 

- 74 

— 287 

: 74 

. 218 
. 114 
. 142 



me 
M- ilv 



Thore - 

Sarah 

ohn Olson ... 330 

05 

, 18 

in 150 , 

Chris 305 

Theodor 58 

Staale 340 



Carl 

BJorn 

:ski, P. L. ... 
Mrs, ThiUta 



_ 294 
.... 503 



Amt. 

of 

Tax 
? 5.10 
57.23 
11.53 
12.04 

0.80 
40.50 
18.03 
10.79 

1.70 
22.00 
44.09 
20.91 

1.70 
25.20 

2.81 
.92 

7.28 
28.92 
27.30 
20.04 
14.80 
22.24 
30.80 

0.08 

3.52 

4.04 



24.51 

14.04 

3.83 

2.98 

33.74 

.22 

23.94 

0.S9 

8.50 

38.05 

5.30 

2.88 

17.37 

11.93 

6.(10 

12.30 

22.47 

11.48 

5.49 

15.15 

14.87 

15.92 

5.50- 

21.55 

5.50 

10.37 

7.40 

10.98 

25.23 

7.27 

1.38 

11.48 

23.33 

4.35 

20.01 

.60 

19.23 

42.28 

25.50 



TOWN OF KBATKV 



Total Tax Bato By School! Districts. 

Includin ; State. County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 



Heimdahl, Halvor _____ 178 
Hemmestvedt, Sidney — 105 
Hemmestvedt, Torjeis _- 171 

Henrlkson, Henry _i 202 

Hesby, Jacob — ; 220 

Hbidal, Olof , ,,.' 407 

Holdabl, Ole 



School 
-Schooi 
School 
School 
School 
School 
School 
School 
(Rata 
30 cents 



Name ol 
Firm oi 
-Corpora ion- 
Anenson^ 
Ausen. 
Austen, 
, Bretland, 
Breilanq, 
Brevick, 
Brekke, 
Carlson, 
Causin, 



Person, 



Value 
Persona' 
Property 

Andrew _$236 

Knut 329 

Milan 22 

Andrew , 183 

. Ole S. 401 

Olof . 212 



Christofl erson, 



Elefson, 

Engquis 

Evenson 

Evenson 

G 

Gjervolc 

Graettinker, 

Gullings -ud, 



Gunderspn, 

Hanson. 

Hanson, 

Hedcn. 

Hedeen, 



District No. It, Mill- 
District No. 35, Mills 
District No. 41. Mills 
District No. 44, Mills 
District No. 
District No. 
District No. 
District No. 



49.8. 
52.1. 
40.9. 
M. 
58.3. 
42.9. 



Mills 

00, Mills 

08, Mills 

13. Mills 53.1. 

of -Taxation on Money and Credits : 
per MOO.) 



Kettel 
Sven . 



107 
140 

i 272 

Ole - 304 

107 
42 
335 

Mrs. Slgrle 193 

■ Christ - 271 

Sven . 204 

M. J. -. 259 

Andrew _: — 107 
Arne . 105 



Clcas 
Aanun 



Albert 
Julius 
Olof 



. 172 
. 124 
. 359 



Johnson, Grace 
Johnson, Hans . 
Johnson, John _ 
Johnson, N. Q. - 
Johnson, R. M. 



. 24 
. 105 
. 23U 
. 192 
. 557 



Johnson, R. M. _ Co 300 

Kllen, Joe ! 334 

Klemmetson, Elllng : ____ 370 

Khutson, Anna 1 18 

Knutson, Mrs. Sarah ___ 210 

Larson, Olof ■ 217 

Larson, Torgus . 108 



Lindoboja, Peter 
Norby, A^nes _— 
Nordgaard, Knut . 
O'Brien. James 
Olson, Gunder — 
Qyerson, Olof __ 
PSmow, WlllUun 
PedersbrvChas. _ 
Peerson, ?*-|ter 



. 953 
. 24 
. 170 
. 131 
. 287 
. 33 
. 40 
. 197 
. 230 
. 220 
. 220 



Prestby, AntoiL i 

Prestby, Carl _____ 

Quirk. WMlam'r__I 600 

Rebm, Otto _; L_ 544 

Robinson, P. B. ; 180 

Hoisland, Theo. _ 
Rolsland, Ole O. 
Rolfson, Gilber 



Rennestrand, Henry 

Singer, Stephen 

Skiblcki, 3. J. 

Rolsland. D. O. 303 

Solheim, Iver . 288 

Thompson, Thorn 
Tleman, Barney 
Waale, Halvor — 

Waale, Ole 1 100 

Wilson, James 328 

Wright, P. H. ______ 150 

Wright, H. P. & Co. 150 

Austen, Mrs. K. K_ ; 

Hanson, Emma : 

Homme, Halvor , 

Johnson, Mary _____ 

Johnson, Stener — . — . — - 
Hoven, Carl 




Anderson, Dan _ 
Brieland, Simon 



9.45 

7.08 

7.34 

10.00 

11.25 

20.37 

18.42 

.02 

6.75 

13.24 

10.00 

27.33 

11.49 

12.79 

19.04 

.09 

8.04 

10.81 

6.87 



B.4T. 

6.90 

10.92 

1.26 

1.53 

10.40 

11.75 

10.90 

11.68 

35.87 

37.09 

6.89 

5.19 

8.90 

13.02 

8.07 

11.46 

10.55 

17.66 

12.30 

13.26 

7.73 

32.02 

3.83 

13.42 

6.38 

0,14 

3.00 

7.50 

2.40 

3.00 

6.70 

5.40 

.45 

1.50 



TOWN OF MA-FIELD 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State, County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 

School District No. 13, Mills 50.5. 

School District No. 10, Mills 85.1. 

School District No. 33, Mills 40.3! 

School District No. 35, Mills 55.5. 

School District No. 39. Mills 62.2. 

School District No. 00. Mills 01.7. 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per ?100.) 



Name of Person, 
Firm or 
Corporation — 
Askeland, Nils - 
Austad, Grunde 
Asp, J. P. 



Value Money 
Personal and 
Property Credits 
1283 



Asbjornson, Gunder: 

Berg, Nels L, 

Bakke, E. A. _____ 

Borgeld, W. — : 

Carlson, John ' 

Culklns, Parick W. _ 
Copper, H. _______ 

Dahle, Theo. — __L 
Erlandson, J.' W. __. 
Gabrlelson, Thorn _i_ 
Gunderson, Gunder '_ 

Hegland. Olof _. 

Hoaas, Martin _____ 
Jarr, H. C. 



. 442 
.494 
. 299 
. 135 
. 210 
.378 
. 204 
. 207 
. 544 
. 190 
. 15 
. 4 
. 201 
. 309 
. 130 
. 129 
.489 



Johnson, J. P. 

Johnson, J. P. & Bakke 
E. A. ' 24 

Jesperson, Hans C. 407 

Jensen. S. C. : 346 

Johnson, C. W. __J 134 

Klove, Lars _________ 223 ' 

- . 202 

. 50 
. 253 
. 72 
. 203 
. 302 
. 95 
. 143 
. 402 
. 75 
. 202 



Kiel, J. F. 

Larson, John .& Heil , 

Larson, John L. 

Leilibo. Adolph 

Langie, T. O. 

Myrum, Ole 



Myrum, Salve T. 

Myrum, Sam 

Nelson, Sever 

Naper, K. K. 

Olson, Carl G. _ 
O'Learey, M. 



Omedahi. Arthur & Jes- 
person, Wm. 



Otndahl, Ole, estate of 
Peterson, Andrew . — __ 

Peterson, O. C. 

Rewerts, Ewert . - 

Raisland, Bert ______ 

Solberg, Adolph 

Solem, Martin ________ 

Solberg, John 

Stennes, A. J. 

Skalet, Arthur .___ 

Teigen, Tans H. _____ 
Tveit, G. B. ______ 

Tvedten, Steen S. 

Wilde. W. H. 

Wedul, Ole 



100 

207 
. 305 
20 
1 
. 170 
. 130 
. 303 
. 200 
.417 

231 
. 160 

223 



. 273 
. 184 
. 178 



Amt 
of 

Tax 

f 17.60 

27.49 

30.48 

18.00 

5.44 

7.37 

20.98 

11.32 

14.82 

33.56 

11.82 

.53 

.25 

12.50 

19.22 

5.24 

4.53 

17.16 

.84 
22.59 
13.90 

8.33 
13.70 
14.54 

2.78 
14.04 

4.47 
16.37- 
18.78. 

5.01 

8.80 
25.00 

2.63 
12.56 

3.63 

5.55 
17.04 
18.97- 
.70 
.00 
10.95 

8.30 
19.10 
18.20 
23.14 

8.11 
- 9.87 : 
13.70 
11.00 
11.44 
10.08 



TOWN OF NORTH 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State, County, Town or Village and 
School 'District Levies. 

School District No. 18, Mills 78.9. 

School District No. 25, Mills 47.7. 

School District No. 20, Mills 37.4. 

School District No. 29, Mills 33. 

School District No. 42, Mills' 43.5. 

School District No. 135, Mills 39.5. 

School District No. 219, Mills 40.5. 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.); 

Assessed 
Name of Person, I Value ' Money Amt. 

Firm or Personal and of 

Corporation— [ Property Credits Tax 



Anderson, Peter _____ 

Adolphs. G. - 

Anderson, Cora _____ 

Ainundson. Adolph i 

Amren, Carl 

Amren, Mrs. Anna' _ 
Bamford, J. L. _____ 
Bergen, C. C. ' 

Broetn, Ole 



400 



Bugge, Iver T. L_ 

Ballangrud, M. H. 1 . 

Bartlett. C. H. L 

Bally, Adolph _____ 

BJerke, T. H. !_ 

Bothun, M. 



Bartelson & Sodeberg . 

Conklin, F. B. .__: 

Carlson, C. M. ._. , 

Christenson, Waldie _ 
Carnlen, J. E. _____ 

Douglas, Delos ' 
DeVelllng, Earl Pj „ 
Dokken, Otis J. _____ 

Elofson, Robert ____ 

Engen, Gunda ______ 

Engen, Christ ; 

Erickson, H. F. J 

Eide, Jorgen ' 

Favrow, P. ' 

Flattum, Alfred 

Fevig, Ole 



Germant, Theo. 

Gllbertson, Oscar T. 
Gran, O. C. _______ 

Green, E. O. ■ 
Gobler, Fred A. _™ 

Hovland. Capt. A.; 

Haavi, G. K. 

Holmes, J. H. 

Hillard, C. H. 

Houfek, J. F. 

Hovland, Mrs. A. 

Holden, A. C. ___ 

Hoium. Iver _____ 

Hoverstad, C. M. . 

Hermanson, L. I. 

Hoverstad, Andrea _ 
Hanson, Maret ' 

Hayes. R. F. 

Isaacson, Ole C. _- 
Johnson, Fred W. _ 

Johnson, Mina 

Jorde, Andrew 

Johnson, Renold 

Jorde, K. M. __. 

Jacobson. Thomas __ 

Jacobson, Pete 

Jorde, Mlkkel 

Klrby, Gust ■ 

Keller. Louis 



Knutson, Julius 

Kaushagen, Henry 
Klnsela, Theo. G. _ 

Landen, A. J. 

Lohgren, Alfred _ 

Loyland, K. O. 

Lawson, Lewis O. . 
Lawson, Nels O. _. 

Long, Earl E. 

Murphy, Wm. _____ 

Mulhall, James L_ 

Maland, H. J. !_ 

Meyer, John _____ 
McAndress, P. H. - 
Miller. S. E. - < 

Norqulst, Emll L. 

Nelson. Nels A. _L_ 
Nelson. Tora ' 



Noper, V. C. 

Olson, Albert £ 

Ostvolden, Nels _ — 

Poston, S. M. 

Penaluna, Chas; P. 

Rustad, H. J. 

Rynestad, T. K. _ 

Rustad, Christ 

Stromberg, Pete 

Stenerson, G. L. 

-Smith, James 

Schantzen, Clifford 

Slems, Herbert - 

Sorlum, P. O. __ 
Stone. S. C. 



_1124 



4.01 

40.78 

9.75 

7.14 

3.79 

23.67 

5.08 

15.23 

1.31 

7.26 

65.57 

1.74 

1.74 

11.05 

4.25 

13.24 

2.76 

.95 

2.37 

3.63 

74.20 

13.36 

18.32 

11.52 

11.K 

10.71 

7.99 

62.90 

11.58 

12.11 

10.89 

15.74 

8.94 

12.15 

17.36 

6.4T 

2.92 

10.40 

3.93 

1.26 

55.07 

15.74 

4.00 

L60 

14.20 

5.94 

4.42 

T.56 

11.99 

3.29 

14.52 

1L95 

31.01 

6.34 



. 207 
_ 54 
_ 40 
... 058 
_ 90 
_1157 . 
_ 301 
_ 2 
_ 300 
_ 20 
_ 200 
_ 128 



Sande, Hans L. . 

Schantzen, F. J. 

Smith Bros. 

Steen, Christ 

Stanton, E. M. Jr. 

Thorson, Lars ^ 

Torreson, George — 
Thompson, Theo. __ 

Vraa, John E. 

Vevea, Louis 

Wlkel, W. H. 

Williamson. W. W. - 
Wold, M. T. 



. 139 
. 705 
. 302 
. 223 



. 982 
. 675 
. 129 
. 71 
. 200 
. 270 
. 33 
. 25 
. 37 
. 217 
. 372 



Willardson, Willie P. Jr. 291 
Berndt, Herman _ 

Eeklund, Anton 

Bggrud, Ole __ 

Hoverstad, Christ 
Holte, Syvert T. _ 
Knutson. Knut — 
Lund, Ole O. 
Lamb, Percy 



11.30 

0.00 

3.80 

51.02 

7.10 

38.48 

9.94 

.10 

20.11 

1.95 

15.78 

10.70 

13.07 

55.02 

28.50 

17.60 

46.84 

22.2(1 

10.18 

2.60 

8.10 

21.30 

2.00 

1.97 

2.92 

8.79 

29.35 

13.88 



Monson, Mrs. Anna 

Olson, Isaac 

Reed, John H. 

Sanden, A. J. 

Smith, Oscar 

Smith. W. E. 



Stromberg, Carl 

Stems, Hannah 

Weirus, Joseph, Jr. 
Williamson, A. 



1325 


3.98 


800 


2.40 


1377 


4.13 


1180 


3.54 


900 


2.70 


275 


.83 


100 


.30 


450 


1.35 


1000 


3.00 


300 


.90 


100 


.30 


4000 


12.00 


1300 


3.60 


90 


' .27 


200 


.00 


200 


.60 


500 


1.50 


1000 


3.00 



TOWN OF NOBDEN 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State, County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 

School District No. 2, Mills 08.7. . 

School District No. 25, Mills 45.7. 

School District No. 127, Mills 38. : I 

School District No. 135, Mills 37.5. 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) I 

Assessed 
Name of Person, Value Money Amt. 

Firm or Personal and of 

Corporation— Property Credits Tax 



Aaseby, Louis 

Aas, C. E. 

Ayers, D. W. 

Bergqulst, John A. 

Blom, John 

Bratlng, John ___ 
Borgen. A. O. _ — _ 

Berg, Helmer 

Dlmmen, Severt — 

Dlmmen, Louis 

Dols, Fred G. ___ 

Feragen, A. _ 

'Feragen, Ida . — -v_ 
Funnesdahl, A. J. . 

Grahlman, Art 

Hall, R. 



Hallander, Fred 
Hanson, Gerard 
Hasby, Sam ____ 
Hltterdai, L. K. 
Howlck, I. G. 



_$435 
_ 101 
_ 241 
_ 353 
_ 414 
_ 230 
_ 203 

_ 91 
_ 39 
_ 308 
_ 253 
_ 51 
_ 505 
_ 266. 
_ 300 
_ 170 
_ 101 
_ 458 
_ S3 
_ 220 
. 211 
. 283' 



Iverson, Knut P.- 

Johnson. Augus 

Johnson, Mrs. Andrew __ 107 

Johnson, Charlie 171 

Klerk, Jens 511 

Klerk, Krist ..- 
Knutseth, Knut - 
Lappegaard, Ole 
Mead, F. N. 



_ 275 
_ 176 
L. 552 

McFa'rland, Mrs. ,M. T 415 

Mossestad, Julius - 

Mossestad, Peder 

Myrum, Hans 

Myrum, Harry _ 

Ness, Emll 

Nora, Nels O. 

Nordhagen, G. J. . 



Nordhagen, Olof 
Olson, Mrs. Marie 
Olson, Gordon ___ 

Ordal, O. __- 

Peterson, P. M. __ 

Peterson, Ben '. 

Rodegaard, Nils . — 
Rogne, Ole 



Rust, Martinus _____ 
Sagmoen, Charlie _ 
Samuelson, Theodor 

Sevre, Ed. . — . , — 

Shejhard, Geo. 

SJolsvold, John ____ 

Skaar, Ole 

Slinger, C. T. _ 

Snyder, C. C. -: 

Sorenson, S. L. _ — 
Sorcnson, S. 



. 199 
. 58 
9 
. 340 
. 117 . 
. 34 
. 180 
. 00 

! 333 
. 276 
.171. 
. 252 
. 185 
. 247 
. 181 



. 108 
. 298 
. 154 
. 94 
. 309 
. 440 
. 230 
. 100 
215 



Strandvold, Halvor 
Swanson, Nils B. — 
Tessum, A. B. . — _- 
Voldness, P. A. _____ 
Borgen, A. O. ___ — 
Kron, Axel — _____ 
Funnesdahl, Mary _ 
Ordahl, Andrew — _ 

Rust Martinus 

Schnubel, Charles _ 
Wiken. Hans , 



. 482 
. 115 
. 320 
. 139 
.442 
. 203 
. 180 



$ 16.53 
6.12 
0.04 
13.41 
29.34 
8.74 
13.94 
1.80 
4.00 
1.48 
21.10 
9.49 
1.91 
33.19 
12.16 

21.U-T 

6.00 

0.12 

31.40 

5.30 

8.25 

8.02 

12.93 

10.55 

.6.50 

19.10 

3.30 

10.45 

12.09 

20.98 

18.97 

7.56 

2.21 

.02 

23.30 

4.39 

7.29 

12.78 

3.44 

2.70 

12.49 

11.09 

7.82 

17.31 

7.93 

11.29 

5.88 

11.54 

11.32 

5.85 

3.57 

12.04 

16.84 

8.62 

7.45 

8.00 

18.08 

6.10 

12.23 

0.78 

10.80 

13.94 

12.37 

4.50 

.00 

.90 

2.10 

1.50 



TOWN OF FOIiK CENTEB 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State, County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 
School District No. 1, Mills 47.7. 
School District No. 17, Mills 30.7. 
School District No.' 94, Mills 30.2. 1 
School District No. 09, Mills 34.6.1 
School Distrlc No. 124. Mills 35.7.1 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) ! 

Assessed 
Name of Person, Value Money 
Firm or Personal and 
Corporation— Property Credits 
Bouain, Jacob $191 $5000; 



Boutaln, Albert 
Boutaln, Wm. 
Beisprecker, George 
Domstrand, John 
Erickson^ Martin 
Gahlbeck, Frank L. 
Herron, M. J. 
Hallsrom, P. A. 
Hallsrom, A. G. 
Hardus, Herman 
Hlghberg, N. L. 
Johnson, Harry ' 
Jenson, Jens . 
Johnson, J. E. 
Johnson, Hjalmar 
Kruse, Christ .__ 
Kruse, Christ Jr. 
Kruse, Wm. 
Lindblom, Arthur 

'Molberg, J. 

Molskness, John 
MoseWck, Olof 
Melin, C. A. 
Melin, C. R. 
Naplln, Gust 
Naplln, John 
Naplln. C. E. 
-Olson, John _ 
Olson, Carolina 
Person, Carl 
Person, Emil 
S. John, F. L. 
Stark Bros. 
Swanson Bros. 
Vedum, Alma 
Erickson,- Carl 
Melin, Henry 
Naplln, S. J. 




Amt. 

of 

Tax 

$20.86 

13.00 

5.90 

12.42 

10.07 

9.09 

4.08 

20.90 

17.29 

3.35 

11.35 

4.30 

15.82 

5.47 

3.91 

0.12 

18.57 

2.08 

1.19 

3.29 

2.75 

10.07 

11.70 

24.15 

17.72 

14.54 

1 22.71 

14.30 

3.01 

5.54 

9.52 

5.65 

9.07 

3.87 

15.89 

2.80 

.60 

1.80 

LOO 



TOWN OF NTJMEDAL ! 

Total fax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State, County, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 

School District No. 7, Mills 44.2. 

School District No. 64. Mills 87.2; 

School District No. 147, Mills 38.4; 

(Rates of Taxation on Honey and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) 

Assessed 
Name of Person, Value Money Amt 

Firm or Personal and of 

Corporation— Property Credits Tax 

Atwood, H. F. $513 $1550 $ 27.32 

Blomberg. J. A. 481 

Bratlng, Carl 



Bugge, Petrina 

Bugge, J. J. 

Christianson, John 
Duls, Carl 



.478 
. 548 
.304 
. 400 



.Forsliind. Albert Co. ___ 897 
Garten, C. G. 420 



Hedrick, Forrest 
Johnson, Chas. — 
Joringdal, Joseph 
Joringdal, Elias _ 
Joringdal Bros. — 
Joringdal, John _ 
Knuson, Soren — -. 
- Larson, Olof 



Luftaas. Clarence _ 
Martinson, Betsey ' . 

Olson, John 

Olson, A. S. 



. 230 
.296 
. 274 
_ 450 
. 100 
. 50 
.498 
.310 
. 154 
. 184 
. 393 
.377 



17.89 

3.30 

18.38 

20.39 

11.67 

14.88 

1.12 

33.38 

10.13 

10.17 

11.37 

10.19 

16.74 

3.72 

1.88 

20.03 

11.75 

5.91 

7.07 

17.37 

14.48 



Olson, Halvor 

Olson, Mrs. Maret 
Osness, Joseph _ 
Pederson, Oscar 



. 130 
. 287 
. 104 



Ronnlng, Mrs. Gertrude ■_ 210 

Roosetveth, William 244 

Roos, Mrs. .Gust A! ___ 290 
Sandborn, P. E. 175 



Sande, Hans O. 

Sande, Ole O. 

Shannan, John __ 
Sumner, Ben ____ 

Swanson, P. p. 

Thompson, Henry 

Wasley, T. J. 

Wasley, John . 
Wlsley, Arthur _ 

Wyker, Frank '. 

Samuelson, David 



. 110 
. 59 
. 394 
.240 
. 90 
. 110 
. 128' 



. 170 
. 302 



0.05 
5.22 

10.08 
7.40 
8.00 
9.08 

11.37 
0.51 
4 22 
2!20 

17.41 

10.87 
3.09 
4.45 
4.92 
4.26 
0.53 

11.23 
1.80 



TOWN OF BOCKSBCBY 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State, Connty. Town or VUlage and 
School District Levies. 

School District No. 12, Mills 48.3. 

School District No. 18, Mills 77.7. 

School District No. 26, Mills 36.2. 

School District No. ,54, MillB 38.7. 

School District No. -&T3, Mills 57.2. 

School District No. 102, Mills 00.4. 

School District No. 154, Mills 40.1. 

School District No. 165, Mills 34.2. 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) 

Assessed 
Name of Person, Valt*e Money 
Firm or Personal and 
Corporation— Property Credits 
Aubol, Ed. A. $387 $ 500 



Anderson, Oscar _ 
Anderson, A. T. _ 

Brown, J. S. 

Berg, Fred . ___ 

Buck, H. B. 

Berg, Mrs. Anna - 
Beebe, N. E. ____ 
Biskey, Geo. W. - 
Blaska, Henry __ 

Crown, Lloyd 

Coyle, Albert . — — 
Clemens, John G. 
Engelstad, Paul — 
Engelstad, Peter _ 
Engelstad, Axel — 
Erickson, Karl J. 
Engelbart John -__ 
FInhart, ■ S. O. -_ 
Finstad, Knut — _ 
Gnnderson, O.IB. _ 
Grundhous, Ed. — 
Geske, Gust — __ 
Gunstad. Arthur 
Gernanut Christian 
Geske, Albert 
Husby, A. — 
Hunt S. E. — 
Hauge, Oscar 
Hanrant C. J. 



. 219 
. 48 
. 118 



Halverson, Halvor 

Harder, Mark 

Holmes, O. A. __— 
Hanson, George — 

Ingrane, H. L. 

Johnson, Alber 

Jaranson, Ole 

Johnson, Sam 

Johnson, Halvor _ 
Johnson, Anton — 
Jenson, Carl 
Johnson, Swan _ 
Johnson, John — 
Johnson, Daniel 
Johnson, Ben _™ 
Kirby, S. R. — 

Kvall, John 

King. Joe 



. 134 
_ 224 
_ 120 
_ 034 
_ 1 
_ 433 
_ 439 
_ 409 
_ 104 
_ 405 
_1195 
_ 62 
_ 261 
_ 80- 
_ 86 
_ 501 
_ 286 
_ 438 
. 149 
. Ill 
. 227 
. 283' 
. 341. 
. 592' 
. 183 
. 193 
. 140 
.373 
. 304 
. 286 
. 132 
. 694 
. 133 
. 161 
. 44 
. 321 
. 118 
. 546 
. 507 
. 10 
. 91 
. 120 
. 213 



Kittelson. Eric — 
Koop, Henry, Sr. 
Knutson, Martin _ 

J_lan, Lars 

Lian, Ole 



Llden. Chas. __ 

Loken, Lars 

Lee, S. O. _ _ 

Loberg, Ole 

Moe, Christ 

Mathson,; Martin _ 
McAndress, Mike — 
McAndress, Martin 
Montague, J. L. — 
Mathews. H. A. — 
Netteland, Lars G. 

Nelson, Nels _ 

Noberg, Bert 

Oen, Edwin 

Oen. Henry -. 

Oen, Rasmus 

Olson, Halvor — . — 

Olson, O. N. 

Olen, C. E. 

Odegaardr'A. B. 

Olson. Paul ^ 

Paulson, Pet 

Plerson, B. H. 

Pope. Henry 



_ 180 
_ 09 
_ 507 
_ 251 

- 121 
_ 39 

- 324 
_ 45 
_ 137 
-143 

- 200 
_405 
_ 471 
_ 100 
--301 
_ 405 
_ 236 
_122 
_ 17 
_ 220 
_ 312 
_ 433 
_ 130 
.. 204 
_ 251 
_ 331 
_ 15 
_ 121 
_ 132 
_ 409 
.. 454 
_ 01 

. 391 



Rosendahl, Ben — 
Rockstad, Martin _ 

llandorf, Henry — 

Satre, Schuyler & Elmer 208 

Randorf. Willie _ _ 148 

Satre, F. T. 300 

Shoopnlan, A. A. — . 353 

Stroberg, Johp P. 398 



Schalz, N. P. 
Kcheaver, G. W. 
Swanson, Rubert 
Tumqulst Fred _ 
Timm, Ed. 



Torstveit, Mrsfi Martha . 

Vinge, Oldue , — 

Weberg, Swan __ 

Wilken, Gus _ 

Ystesund, Knut 

Zinter, Karl 

Aga, Olander . 

Althoff. H. W. 

Anderson, Iver 

Anderson, A, E. 

Asp. C. A. 

Aubol. Mrs. Mary 

Aubol, M. C. 

Aiiu.-i-son, Andrew 

Buck. G. W. 

Elgsten, C. 

Hanson. Hnns ._ 

Nelson, John 



385 

189 
. 124 
. 53 
. 780 
. 4S1 
. 81 
. 513 
. 312 
. 199 i 
. 291 . 
. 295 
. 93 
. 101 
. 412 



. 301 
. 135 



Nelson. Caroline — 



Amt. 

of 

Tax 

$ 16.48 

12.53 

1.78 

4.27- 

5.37 

' 7.66 

' 4.81 

00.04 

.10 

16.70 

25.11 

16.04 

9.38 

16.24 

40.87 

2.40 

11.37 

3.10 

2.04 

23.09 

11.47 

15.86 

8.52 

5.36 

11.79 

16.17 

13.67 

20.25 

.7.08 

6.60 

4.70 

14.44 

11.70 

11.07 

4.51 

23.73 

7.01 

9.21 

1.70 

12.87 

4.57 

. 52.03 

22.03 

1.54 

3.52 

4.50, 

7:71 

6.97 

3.95 

42.63 

10.07 

4.14 

1.33 

11.08 

1.80 

5.59 

5.53 

10.43 

10.24 

18.23 

4.11 

11.65 

23.17 

0.40 

5.89 

.97 

7.52 

10.07 

24.77 

10.75 

.7.38 

13.07 

13.27 

.58 

5.84 

5.11 

23.39 

25.97 

4.63 

15.13 

11.90 

5.73 

20.59 

13.00 

15.06 

14.00 

7.31 

4.80 

1.81 

44.62 

23.23 

3.25 

20.57 

12.07 

' 0.81 

11.26 

10.87 

5.32 

3.45 

23.57 

.91 

13.97 

5.22 

9.37 

1.50 

6.00 

1.00 

7.50 

3.00 



TOWN OF RIVER FAI.I.8 

Total Tax "Rate I_y School Districts. 

Including State, Connty, Town or .Village and 
School District Levies. 

School District No. 0, Mills 50.1. 
School District No. 12. Mills 47.2. 
School District No. 102, Mills 05.3. 
School District No. 133, Mills 33.9. 
School District No. 178, Mills 40.3. 
School District No. 227. Mills 37. 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) 

Assessed 

Value Money Amt 
Personal and of 

Property Credits Tax 



Name of Person, 
Firm or 
Corporation- 
Adams, Washington . 
Anderson, Mrs. A. P. 
Anderson, Anton E. 

Alberg, Carl — : 

Bothman, Frank — _. 
Bothman, Mrs. C. J. 
Burnqulst Andrew _ 

Benson, Alfred 

Bruse, Wm. 



Citizens State Bank 
Dalager, K. T. — -__ 

Dann, E. F. 

Dann, F. E. _j 

Denhart J. W. 

Dobson, Fred 

DammanU, -Fred 

Erickson. Gust 
Ewing, W. D. . — — 
Erickson, A. Aug. 
Gilberaltson, Paul — 
Hallameck, Emery 
Hallemeck. Emll _ 

Houske. Ed. 

Hogquist Oscar — 
Hogqulst Johannes 
H&ugen, Oscar F. 
Hanson, Martin — 

Hanson. H. L. 

Hedlund, John 

Huddleson, J. H. 
Hazel Merc. Co. 



_-,321 
. 159 
_ 300 
. 105 
. 201 
. 524 
. Ill 
_ 403 
. 133 
.3031 
. 376 
. 188 



. 152 



. 464 
. 618 
. 283 
. 338 
_ 304 
.339 
.395 



. 491 
. 215 



. 247 
. 307 
. 98 
.437- 
. 31 
. 217 
. 251; 

. 101 
. 940 



1500 
203 



Hanson-Barxen Mlg. Co. 1010 -.-- 

(Grain Tax) 
Hazel Co-op. Butter and 

Cheese Co. 280 

Johnson, Dan A. 464 

Johnson. Mrs. Ole 116 

Johnson. Peter 229 

Johnson, Otto 217 



$ 30.59 

5.39 

17.28 

9.20 

0.86 

24.20 

5.14 

21.44 

6.28 

143.00 

12.44 

8.70 

7.04 

21.90 

22.87 

13.10 

15.65 

14.08 

11.49 

■ 18.65 

36.17 

7.96 

9.14 

10.41 

3.32 

20.23 

1.44 

10.05 

8.51 

5.46 

48.87 

78.02 



Johnson. Bennie . 
Johnson, Carl O. 
Jepson, Herman _ 

■Knutson, Ed. 

Loken, Hans . 

Maakrud, John _ 

Mattson, Ole 

Norman, John _ 

Nyhagen, A. 

Nohn. O. H. 

Odegaard, Melin 

Oleon, Mike 

Peterson, G. P. 



i 147 
.332 



. 300 
- 97 
. 100 
. 257 
_ 851 
.346 
_ 247 
. 188 



91 
429 

£"0-C14UJi| u. .*. • ' ■ OlAJ 

Petersong Mrs. Peter ___ 26 

Palmquist John 252 

Reierson. P. P. 392 

Roese, C. A. . — \ — 295 

Stephens. E. H. !__ 438 

Swanson, "August ! — 446 



13.22 

21.48 

5.37 

10.00 

10.05 

6.81 

1X26 

10.17 

4.58 

4.72 

24.49 

44.67 

12.80 

0.14 

8.70 

4.30 

14.54 

10.17 

.88 

8.54 

18.13 

13.92 

14.85 

> 20.05 



Sumpter, T. J. 

Sjoberg, John 

Sandberg, A. P. 

Swanson, Carl 

Sumpter, Chas. — 

Vlk, Arne 

Walseth, Bernt __ 
Wilson. W. P. 



. 408 
. 249 
. 497 
. 297 
. 4 
. 701 
_ 344 
. 340 



Winton-Nichols Lbr. Co. 1035 

Boiden, Andrew 

Bodln, Daniel — __ 

Haugen, H. O. 

Odegaard, Ole — 

Peterson, Ole — 



23.45 

11.44 

23.40 

13.07 

' .20 

06.81 

11. d6 

15.74 

94.00 

12.00 

12.00 

3.00 

2.10 

4.50 



TOWN OF BEINEB 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. 

Including State, Connty, Town or Village and 
"School District Levies. 
Cchool District No. 48, Mills 67.9. 
School District No. 57, Mills 71.5. 
School District No. 70, Mills 70.3. 
School District' No. 228, Mills 82.7. 
School District No. Ung., Mills 00.5. 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) 

Assessed 

Value Money Amt 
• Personal and of 

Property Credits Tax 



Name of Person, 
Firm or 
Corporation— 
Arntz, Albert _ 
Aakre, Elev . 
Blrkeness, Gustav 
Brekken, E. H. — 

Belland, Tom 

Berg, T. O. . 

Dahlen, John _ — . — 
Feragen, Andrew _ 

Grinley, Even 

Grande, Iars 



-$ 74 
. 310 
. 91 
. 162 



Hermanson, Soren — 
Holen, Holvor M. _ 
Htilvorsoni, Horjles . 
Halvorson, Ellef — 
Helle. T. G. 



Iverson, .Andreas _ 
Johnson, Severt — 
Johnson, Theodore 
Johnsrud, Renhart 

Kassa, George 

Lien, Anton 



. 219 
. 240 
. 176 
. 201 
. 227 
. 91 
. 197 
. 124 
. 242 
. 59 
. 233 
. 85 
. 103 
. 32 
. 104 
. 444 



Millnder, Vlcor 

Mlllander, Wilhelm 
McEnelly, J. A. _. 

Miller, John S. 

Moon, Martin O. 
Olson, Alfred — _ 

Olson, Peder 

Olson, Ole A. — _ 
Quam, Elenor — 
Rye, Henry 

Race. Jerry 

Race, Frank 

Race, Jerry . — 

Simonson, H. . 

Srnsky, Frank . — , 
Stenvick, John J. 
Slgrud. Emil 



40 
. 226 
. 240 
. 211 
. 11 
. 187 
. 200 
. 224 



Stenvik, Oscar 
Singer, Stephen __ 

Tanner, G. M. 

Tollefson, Ellof . _ 

Tangen, Christ 

Uglen, Oleander __ 
Udestrand, John E. . 

Vraa, Gilbert 

Vraa. Elmer 

Wahlen. Edwin G. _ 
Wahlen, Carl O. 



. 180 
. 107 
. 8 
. 30 
. 363 
. 253 
. 115 
. 100 
122 



. 130 
. 103 
. 104 
. 127 



. 138 
134 



». 5.02 

22.81 

6.18 

11.00 

14.87 

16.30 

12.53 

16.62 

15.41 

11.28. 

13.38 

8.42 

16.43 

4.01 

15.82 

11.77 

6.99 

2.17 

13.17 

31.75 

5.46 

10.37 

3.S0 

15.35 

10.70 

17.45 

.75 

13.37 

14.30 

16.02 

7.60 

4.03 

13.51 

7.05 

.01 

2.15 

25.95 

17.18 

8.22 

7.15 

S.28 

10.01 

11.66 

6.92 

9.08 

5.15 

19.62 

11.41 

9.58 



TOWN OF SMILEY 

Tetal Tax Bate By Bchaol Districts. 

Including State, Connty, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. ! 

School District No. t, Mills 50.6. 

School District No. 26. Mills 38.8. 

School District No. 30, Mills, 57. 

School District No. 31, Mills 43,0. 

School District No. 51, Mills 62.3. 

School District No. 221, Mills. 53. 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) 

Name of Person, Value Money 

Firm or ' Personal and 

Corporation— Property Credits 



Anderson, J. W. — 
Anderson, Oscar N. 

Anflnson, Ole T. 

Austad, T. J. 

Bakke, Jonas 

Barsad, Adolf 

Benson, Carl 

Belswinger, Carl — 

Bell, VV. J. 

Beerbower, Fred — 

BJorge, Slra 

Bjbrge, Theodore — 

BJorge, Alf. — . 

Bolsad, Ole 

Bolsad, Henry 

Bolstad, Olaf _ 

Braaten, Arne 



_$234 
. 270 
. 18S 
. 217 
. 250 
. 123 



$850 
500 



Brekke, Elvert 

Belgian Breeding Assn. 

uBrtness, Nels _ 

McCrum, W. E. . 

McCreary. John 

Dahl. John A. 

Dahlberg, Fred A. — 

Erickson, Tollef 

Franklin, E. T. 

Fredrlckson, Hans 

Glbberson, Carl 

Gustavson. G. O. 

Hammer Bertel B. ._ — 

Hanson. John T. 

Hanson, O. M. 

Hardisty, Frank J. 

Helgeland, Ole 

Helgeson, Martin j 

Iverson, T. S. 

Johnson, Lewis 

Johnson, Nels E. 

Kolp, Elmer E. _ 

Kvalhelm. Iver 

Lane, Floyd __ 

Lendobeja, Walter 

Lien, Tom 



_ 269 
_ 570 
_ 607 

59 

_ 40 
_ 210 
_ 50 
_ 144 
_ 120 
_ 5d 
_ 382 
_ 120 
_ 249 
_ 108 
_ 273 
_ 190 
_ 301 



Lanback, S. W. __ 
Lofhus, Christ S. _ 
Lokken, Martin — 

Larson. Krist _ 

Malmstrom. R. F. 

Nelson, Peter . 

Nelson, S. S. 

Nelson, John S. — 
Nelson, Lewis A. _ 
Nelson & Barstad 
■ Newton, A. B. 



_ 273 
_ 013 
. 203 
. 192 
. 332 
. 311 
. 29S 
. 101 
. 500 
. 503 
. 128 
. 20 
. 106 
. 383 
. 280 
. 2QT' 
. 198 
. 178 
. 157 
. 279 
. 31 
. 129 



. 571 
. 129 
. 200 
. 145 
. 205 
. 102 
. 180 
. 640 

Welwarth, Agnes .'153 

Nordahl, Mrs. Gertrud _ 61 

Pederson, O. M. 

Peerson, Anon — 

Peerson, Oscar 



■ Pederson, Christian _ 
Peterson, Lawrence 
Rcigert W. D. . — _ 

Ramsad, Olaf 

Sanders, Thos. . 

Seeland, Oscar — — 
Sherwood, Wm. H. _ 
Shumway. M. G. 



258 
322 
238 
201 
706 
477 
370 
113 



. 130 

. 374 

Sivertsori, Silas & DanieT 441 

Shjerplng, Tobias 330 

Snettlng, Olof 180 



Snetting, Henry — 
Shjerplng, Peter A. 

Solheim, Knut _ 

Solomonson, J. " E. 

Sterns, Geo. L. 

Stene, Tobias _ 

Stenseth, L. O. 

Thelge, J. M. 

Thune, Peter _____ 

Thune, Emil 

- Torkelson. Anfln _ 
Vlgen, Edward O: . 
Valsvlk, Ole O. _ 
Wekworth, Owen — 

Wlken. H. O. 

Weiner, Casper- 



66 
_ 178 
-J505 
_312 
. 49 
. 210 
. 572 
. 252 
. 139 
. 60 
. 32. 
. 274' 
. 244 
.468 
. 309 
.461 



Amt 
of 
Tax 
$ 14.79 
10.48 
11.46 
12.93 
« 10.98 ' 
7.01 
14.20 
23.02 
38.02 
21.30 
2.28 
j 11.07 
2.85 
' 0.32 
0.74 
2.19 
20.25 
5.66 
13.20 
8.02 
10.27 
11.17 
15.05 
13.18 
14.44 
34.04 
13.94 
10.04 
18.60 
13.05 
15.79 
12.02 
24.85 
31.52 
0.09 
1.05 
9.89 
21.S3 
10.32 
10.72 
S.69 
10.01 
" 8.32 
10.03 
2.82 
C.S4 
20.07 
5.66 
14.03 
7.58 
12.82 
9.00 
9.54 
36.48 
8.00 
2.37 
10.84 
13.49 
10.84 
13.57 
10.65 
37.42 
28.43 
16.24 
7.99 
7.11 
22.29 
25.14 
14.75 
10.02 
' 3.50 
7.81 
28.79 
17.78 
2.79 
8.15 
27.51 
17.36 
13.67 
2.33 
1.70 
16.33 
_ 14.54 . 
27.05 
19.56 
27.48 



TOWN OF BANDERS 

Total Tax Bate By School Districts. - 
Including State, Connty, Town or Village and 

School District Levies. 

School District No. 73, Mills 55.5. 

' School District No. 106, Mills 36.4. 

School District No. 149, Mills 37.6. 

School District J*o. 166. Mills 34. 

School District No. 194, Mills 42.5. 

(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) 

Name of Person, 
Firm or 
Corporation — 
Anderson, George — 
Anderson, Theo. G. . 
Anderson, J. A. __ 
Anderson. H. F. 



. 236 
. 592 

83 

Anderson. Aug. N. K. _ 229 
Althoff, W. H. _____ 416 

Anton, Hans 1255 

Anton, Nls 



Value Money 
Personal and 
Property Credits 
$363 



J 



,s 



Bakke, Gilbert _____ 
Brandvold, John _ — _™ 
Brandvold, Mrs. L. P. . 

Carlson, C. Aug. 

Corbett Walter 

Correll, C t W. 

Car ken & Leaver 

Dahlstrom, Alfred _ 

Ekstrom, C. E. 

Erickson, Richard ___ 
Flnin, Hans O. _____ 
Fromm, John 



. 260 



. 126 
. 354 
. 945 
.493 
. 445 
. 332 
. 368 
. 81 
. 203 
. 320 



(Continued on Page Seven) 



Amt 

of 

Tax 

$ 12.34 

8.59 
21.55 

0.12 

8.64 _ 
23.09 
69.65 

6.41 
ll.(»»_ 

9.83. • 

4.74 " 
16.25 
32.13 
21.08 
16.20 
13.58 
13.40 

3.05 

7.63 
10.88 



V 



% 



-fRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1922 



Persona' 



Tax 



(Continued from Page Six) 



Hasby, . Selmer _ 
Holmor, "VVra. „ 
Jkcobson, A. V. _ 
Johnson, E. Gust 

Johnson, Iver 

Jphnson, Gusjt _ 
Klappenback, Wn 

Kline, P. M. • 

Kruse, Max . - 

Larson, Ole 

Larson, O. L. 

Lever, T. H. — 
Lind.fS. L. , ■ 

Lind Bros. ... 

Lockrem, A. K. - 
Maland, O. O. - 
McCall. A. W. J. 
Meyer, Henry _. 
Meyer, Fred W. 
Martinson, Andre 
Mossbeck, Mrs. J 
Mogen, F. O. _ 

Ness, S. H. 

Ness, Peter H. 
Newman, Nels - 
Olson, Alfred C. 
Olson, Henry A, 
Olson Brothers 
Ortloff, Andrew I}, 
Ortloff, Herman 
Olson, < Arthur _ 
Patton, J. V. _ 
Peterson Bros. 
Peterson, Nils _ 
Peterson, C. H. 
Rlston, Henry _ 
Rux, Fred E. - 
Rux, David D. 
Severson, John 
Sevre, O. K. „ 

Sevre, Albert 

Shannon, G. C. 
Stark, N. G. _ 
Swanson, C. T. 
Swanson, Herman 
Swanson, C. H. 
Swanson, C. S. 
Swanson, Enok 
Thorstad, B. N 
Thorstad, Jesse > 
"Wold, Adolph 
Wiebe. H. A. 
"Welo; Mrs. K: 
Yonke, E. A. 
Yonke, Wm, 
Heeligaas, "Walter 
Anderson, Nels . 
Anderson, Erick 
Garlson, "Waif red 
Erickson. Andrew 
Olson, Alben O. 
Swanson, Nels | 
Avelson, Adolph 



TOWN 



.a: 



£. 



Total Tax I ate By School Districts. 



Including State, 
Schoo 
School District 
School District 
School District 
School District 
School District 
(Rates of 
cents per $100 

Name of Person, 
Firm or 
Corporation— " 
Anderson, Anton 
Anderson, Arthur 

Baner, John 

Berggren, Gust 
Boerger, August 
Bratlng, Bert - 
Breznay, Andro 
Breznay, John . 
Burdick. Fred- _ 
Buringrud, Nels 
Carlson. Andrew 
Christofferson, N 
Danda, Anton F 
Evenson, Oscar 
Fodstad, Halvor 
Forthun, Anton 
'Forthun, Ole _ 
Gauson, R. A. 
Grlhde, Ole E. 
Hanson-Barzen 



13g. 



Hanson, Henry - 
Hanson, H. G. . 
Hanson, Lars _ 
Hanson, Severt . 
Hegrenes, John 
Hieren, Edw. O, 
Holmen, Oliver 

Homme, Ole . 

Hruby, Ludvik . 

Jan da. "W. J. 

Jensen, Anton M. 
Klungnes, John 
Knadle, L. "W. 
Kozojed. Tony 
Leral. Ole K. - 
Letnes, Jens _. 
Kozojed, Anton 
Macak,' Frank . 
Mayhew, Rolph 
McCormick, Tho£, 
Myrum, Anton 

Neset, Olaf 

North Silverton 
Omundson, Peder 
Oire. Ole- T. __- 

Ottum, Ole 

Panek. Stanley 
Peterson, P. A. 
Philips, Frank 
Relief, J. B. _ 
Rued. H. P. _ 
Senum, Geo. „„ 
Stenberg, -Normal 
Stenberg. S. J. 
Sturre, J. B. „ 
Sundt, John A. 
Svobodny, Frank 
Swanson, "Victor 
Toplnka, Joseph 
Woolson. Harry 



Including State, 
Scht 
School District 
School District 
School District 
School District 
School District 
(Rates of Ta 

30 cents per.?ll 

Name of Person, 
Firm or 
Corporation- 
Anderson, Fred 
Anderson, M. J. 
Bye, John 
Berg, Thompson 
Bakken, Carl „ 
Borstad, Ole P. 
Coan, Johnnie T. 
Coan, John T. 
Danlelson, Knut 
Dahlen. H. A. 
Elg. C. O. — 
Ekwall, Carl J. 
Enebo, Joseph 
Fevlg, L. C. 
Froland, Carl B 
Fjeld, Hans H. 
Folkedabl, Gurirje 
Fort, Anton „ 
Grane, Nels _ 
Grams', Emil _ 
Hahson, Gilber 
Hovet, Tellef „ 
Holmgren, Mrs. 
Hole, S. J. . — 
Hyland, Theo. 
Hoffman, J. V. 
; Iverson, Gust A 
: Iverson, Gustaf 
Johnson, Ludvlg 
Johnsrud, Ole - 
Kolstrand, Pete 
Kompelin, Thon 
Kompen, G. A. 
. Kotrba, Martin 
Kompllen. Olof 
• Larson, N. P. . 
Lokken, Ole S. 
Lien, Ole K. „ 
Loyland, T. O. 
Larson, Mrs. T 
[Lien, Nels S. ... 
i Meyer, Nick 
; Neerhus, Ole 
i Nestebo, Torbjoi 
! Omlid, Salve O. 
I Olson. G. G. _. 
Omlid. Oluf O. 
: Odegaard. Chris 
1 Peterson, Ernesi 
; Prestegaard, Sc 
Parnow, Otto - 
Roysland, Knut 
Ramsey, Elling 
: Raasck, John - 
Roysland. .B. .. 

Skaaien, K. 

Sjulestad, Even 



■ ' , ' : - " ■-. ■ ■■■"!'. 

THE THIEE RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Property 
List for 1921 



Page Sevefl 



. 4Uu" 
. 285 
. 215 
. 243 
. 410 
. 327 
. 338 
. 190 
. 441 
. 294 
. (174 
. 227 
. 584 
. 1119 
. 231 
224 
\ 302 
. 217 
. 137 

- 285 
. 371 
. 140 
. 171 
. 312 

- 313 
. 537 
.353 
. 190 
. 314 
. 155 
_ 5G3 
. 004 

444 



250 

___ 100 

447 

174 

___ 408 

473 

_ 148 
1040 

— .50 
424 

181 

194 

170 

334 

3S5 

288 

228 



. 392 
. 307 
. 307 
. 208 
. 140 



OF SILVERTON. 



8.78 

25.40 

12.09 

8.08 

8.26 

14.92 

13.90 

14.36 

8.08 

14.09 

11.50 

24.53 

7.72 

19.85 

0.30 

7.85 

8.42 

12.84 

9.22 

4.60 

13.31 

12.01 

0.21 

7.27 

11.73 

11.77 

20.19 

15.00 

6.02 

11.43 

5.57 

20.49 

21.09 

15.10 

15.10 

4.25 

10.27 

6.33 

17.00 

17.22 

5.39 

30.33 

1.70 

14.42 

7.09 

8.25 

7.23 

11.3U 

21.37 

12.24 

8.30 

14.74 

17.04 

14,05 

11.39 

4.70 

7.20 

3.00 

.90 

3.87 

.59 



Value Money 
Personal " and 
Property Credits 
$147 



. 397 
. 481 
. 331 
. 33 
. 530 
. 300 
. 169 



250 



357 0100 

Co. 1760 549 

(Grain Tax) 

127 150 



lonnty. Town or Village and 

District Levies. 
No. 28, Mills 43. 
No. 30. Mills 58.0. 
No. 42, Mills 40.0. 
No. 53, Mills 53.0. 
No. 55. Mills 47.9. 
ition on Money and Credits 
) 



Amt. 
of 
Tax 
7.88 
3.72 
21.28 
20.68 
15.30 
1.42 
28.41 
16.08 
8.10 
•13.13 
4.07 
8.79 
14.18 
9.77 
30.01 
8.14 
10.87 
0.35 
33.05 
87.33 

5.91 

7.89 

9.811 

14.75 

14.19 

9.44 

4.82 

10.29 

5.68 

9.68 

1.53 

13.72 

10.09 

6.50 

7.10 

22.88. 

.72 

8.38 

21.28 

8.05 

9.11 

4.31 

8.09' 

20.74 

15.14 

10.10 

.24 

12.50 

7.18 

24.79 

19.03 

7.30 

2.S4 

7.01 

0.38 

14.32 

12.26 

7.10 

5.09 

22.66 



. 212 
. 330 
. 330 
. 203 
. 112 
. 304 
. 100 
1,0 5 

; "33 

. 205 
. 304 

- 137 
. 105 
. 532 

- 15 
. 175 

- 307 
. 180 

- 170 

00 



Horse Co. 202 
354 
310 
235 



. 270 
. 134 
. 423 
. 355 
. 157 

- 53 
. 142 
. 119 
. 308 
. 250 
. 154 

- 95 
. 527 



TC WN OF STAB. 



Bate By School Districts. 



Connty, ' Town or Village and 
1 District Levies. 
No. 5, Mills 59.9. 
No. 14, Mills 57.4. 
No. 50, Mills 53. 
No. 59, Mills 64.4. 
No. 05, Mills 64.2. 
ition on Money and Credits 



Assessed 

Value Money 
Personal and 
Property Credits 

. $438 

010 __ 

294. 

. 100 
. 120 
. 203 



.300 
. 305 



. 100 
. 217 
. 110 



Mary 



. 471 
. 00 

. 207 
. 73 
. 147 
.- 09 
. 113 
. 88 
. 203 
. 203 
. 548 
. 124 
. 44 
. 287 
. 100 
. 190 
. 130 
. 212 
. 05 
. OS 
. 132 
. 224 
225 
_ 07 

- 202 
.. 227 
_ 147 

- 385 . 
_ 190 
_ 147 
_ 101 
_ 210 
_■ 177 
_ 231 

- 142 
__393 
-293 
_ 242 



. Amt. 

or 

Tax 

$ 23.21 

33.23 

17.01 

9.18 

7.70 

13.94 

19.32 

23.51 

2.12 

7.00 

; 33.94 

5.30 

13.97 

0.15 

8.18 

21.32 

8.61 

9.14 

2.49 

: 80.33 

0.09 

15.33 

4.10 

8.44 

0.93 

7.28 

5.05 

-. 30.08 

11.65 

. 20.04 

7.90 

2.83 

18.48 

6.83 

12.24 

8.73 

11.24 

3.45 

' 0.31 

7.91 

14.43 

11.92 

3.S5 

10.71 

l6j>3 

7.79 

20.41 

10.07 

9.44 

10.37 

11.45 

10.60 

14.88 

8.51 

17.55 

30.54 

14.50 



Solberg, Hans ___ 
Stepanek, Charles _ 
Tomiherdahl, Oliver 
Trontveit, Ole N. 
Tharaldson, Ole 
Vetteson, Wellie 
Watrie, Even O. 
Woods, Mrs. 'Sarah 
EHertson, Carl __ 
Larson, .Ole 




j TOWN OF WYANDOTTE 

JTotal Tax Bate By Sohool Districts.' . 

Including State, Connty, Town or Village and 
[ School District Levies. 

School District No. 6, Mills 53.3. 

School District No. 35, Mills 52.9. 

School District No. 125, Mills 41.5. 

School District No. 148, Mills 41.4.' 

(Hates ' of 'taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) -v. 

j Assessed ' 

Name of Person, Value Money Amt. 

Firm' or Personal and of 

Corporation— Property Credits Tax 



Albin, John 
Anderson, Otto . 
Arneson, Clarence _ 

Bei-gj H. Martin 

Uergedahl. Torge O. 
Carlson, Chas. F. — 

Evenson, Ed. _ 

Bergland, John O. _ 
Endorle, Henry J. _ 

Erler, Wm. F. 

Fener, George . — — — 

Gerardx, Jonn 

Gerardy- Hros. — - — . 
Glewe, August H. 
Hoffman, John' — 
Haugen, David — 
Hedeen, Oscar — 

Hanson, Sam 

Hanson, Niels 
Halvorson, Theodore 
Holih, A. D. ______ 

Helgeson, Ole 

Helgeson, Alfred 

Jorgenson, John C. — 
Josperson, Wm, ___ 
Johnson, Arthur ___ 
Jaeger, Jo_epn ___ 
Keller, C. 
—olseth, Peter _ 
±_enuedy, faamuel 
Larson, J. P. __ 
_u»on, lienry 



-$129 
. .20 
. 153 
. 308 
. 20 
. 202 
. 120 
. 128 
. 201 
. 305 
. 403 
. 201 
. 208 
. Ill 
. 591 
. 300 
. 370 
. 158 



_'253 
. 173 
. 137 
. 368 
. 217 



Nelson, Andrew 
-selson, Julius — 
Olson, Theo. __ 
leterson, Martin J. 
Peterson, Anton __.. 
Peterson, John- E. _ 
Peterson, P. W. — _ 
Peterson, Ellas A. - 
Peterson, Julius — 



. 323 
.398 
. 312 
. 83 
. 521 
. 302 
. 217 
. '52 
. 152 
. 641 
. 335 
. 305 
. 620 



304 

134 

Peterson & Samuelson __ 150 

Kolstad. I. A. 298 

Rolstad, Alfred ______ 37 

Hoese, Willis 309 



Schaack, Math J. 

Soderman Bros. 

Samuelson, Charley _ 
Samuelson & Kolseth . 

Schrpeder, Otto 

Swanson, Ole 



Thorvllson, K. 

Wilson, O. E. 

Wilson, Gust 

Wilson, I. E. . 

Vanhull, Paul' ___ 
Evenson, Maria N. 



. 560 
. 224 
. Ill 
. 183 
.158 
. 78 
. 20 
. 442 
. 417 
. 395 
. 103 



I 5.35 

9.13 

8.15 

12.78 

1.08 

13.80 

5.23 

5.31 

8.34 

12.00 

10.73 

8.32 

10.10 

4.61 

24.53 

15.10 

16.86 

6.56 

9.17 

10.50 

7.18 

5.69 

15.27 

11.48 

4.71 

6.02 

13.40 

21.21 

13.17 

3.45 

21.62 

12.50 

15.04 

2.16 

6.31 

28.84 

17.80 

06.20 

33.37 

10.20 

7.14 

8.00 

15.88 

2.08 

15.28 

20.43 

11.94 

4.01 

7.59 

0.54 

3.24 

.83 

23.56 

17.31 

20.80 

4.36 

3.00 



VI— —AG— OF avon— IDG— 

; Total Tar Bate By School Districts. 

Including State, Connty, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 

School District No. 8. Mills 129.1. 

(Bates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) 

■ Assessed , 

Name of Person, Value Money 

Firm or Personal and 

Corporation— Property Credits 

Anderson, Sever ___ — J317 5 375 

Anderson, M. M. 39 

Converse, I. D. 39 __ 

Christlanson, H. ■* 20 

Christianson, Carl ' 16 . 

Christlanson, H. & Son 1723 2934 

Dahl, N. H. 29 

Dahl Bros. : 0561 1028 

Edseth, Carl 052 



Farmers State Bank 1779 ' 

Goodrldge State Bank 5100 

Goodridge .Farmers Ele- 
vator & Milling Co. 2200 



Goodridge Merc. Co. ., , 

Gulrud, G. C. 

Goodridge Co-op. Cream- 
ery Association 

Gunderson, Gilbert _ 

Gilbertson, Theo. _ — — 

Halverson, Albert 

Halverson, H. A. 

Josephson, George . 

Hanson-Barzen Mlg. Co. 



Johnson, Chas. 
Jensen, J. P. ~- 
Hotley, E. L. 



Lindstrom, Carl F. 
McDonald, R. H. _ 

Payne, Jay 

Resan, Oliver 

Seavey, M. O. 



Standard Oil Co. 

Stephenson, Chas. 

Stephenson, M. J. _ 

Tollefson, Henry 

Tvedt, A. C. & Son . 

Tanem, Bert 

Thoreson, M. G. 141 

Tessum Seed, Grain and 

Supply Co. ____' 204 

Winon-Nlchols Lbr. Co 1822 

Tandberg, Theo. : 



(Grain Tax) 

17400 

_ 291 

_ 280 

.. 217 __ 

_ 188 

_' 43 __ 

_: 3 

_' 20 _ 

2024 481 

(Grain Tax) 

_ 81 

_ 49 , 

_ 102 

-.387 __ 

_ 18 1419 

_ 4 

_' 25 ___ 

_ 141 __ 

-.19*- 

-.123 __ 



_ 831 

-1823 
-253 



Amt. 
of 

Tax 

t 42.04 

5.04 

5.04 

2.58 

2.07 

231.24 

3.74 

204.61 

19.02 

229.67 

658.41 

296.33 

2254.80 
37.57 

36.05 
28.01 
24.37 
5.55 
.39 
2.58 
260.11 

10.40 

■ 0.33 

13.10 

49.00 

2.30 

.52 

3.23 

. 18.20 

252.20 

05.88 

34.73 

107.28 

235.35 

32.66 

18.20 

34.08 
247.83 



VILLAGE OF ST. ______ 

■ Total Tax Bate By Sohool District.. 

Including State, Connty, ' Town or Village and 
School District Levies. ' 
Sohool District No. 102, j Mills 101.7. 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per ?100.) 

Assessed 
Name of Person, Value Money 



Finn or 
Corporation— 
Almqulst, J. _ 
Allan, H. R. _ 
Brink, Victor G 
BJerk, M, E. _ 

Benolt, Nels 

Brevlk, T. M. . 
BJerken, F. N. 
Bohlen, J. H. . 
Dahlen, J. ..__ 
Erickson, Ed. 



Personal and 
Property Credits 

.$307 

__:300 __ 
__i381 _ 
L 79 



.: 31 

j 22 
.;381 
.125 
50 



Farmers Co-op. Cry. Co._!567 -1_00 

Fricker, Mike '' 4 400 

Fellman, G. I. __' 88 ' __. 

Fellman, L. Hlgland __i 125 _^ 

N Farmers Co-op. Elev. Co. 1 703 240 
; (Grain Tax $854) 

Farmers State Bank 8320 ' 

Grimsrud, C. M. ! 40 

Glgstad. K. O. ! 71 

Goergen, Henry 1414 ' 



Gunstad, Oscar 
Hahson & Wekasch 

Hovet, T. K. 

Hanson, John A. 

Hanson. H. F. 

Hendrlckson, Lesa _ 

Hed, A. J. 

Hall, A. F. 

Holmes, Mrs. Eda _ 

Hooper, G. W. 

Hage, M. R. 

Jacobson, M. H. 

Johnson, Carl _____ 
Johnson, B. F. _____ 
Kenney, James A. _ 
Kolp, Albert 



Loberg. Lard A. 

Mathson, Ole 

Mart_, Mrs. Anna . 



Merchants State Bank 

Nash, Ole 

Nelson, A. F. 

Nelson Merc. Co. 

Nelson, N. A. - 

Olson, H. A. ________ 

Olson, Mrs. Anna „ 

Olson. Wm. 

Patnode. Ernest 

Patterson, Anna L. 

Person, E. G.' 

Person. Nels 



J 187 
-ilOO 
J 87 
-257 
_ 23 
_ 60 
_' 116 
- 18 
_ : 30 
_ 189 
_ 250' 
_ 550 
_ 77 
_ 88 
_229 
_ .07 
4 56 
_1300 
J 39 
-4360 
_ 233 
_ 88 
-0200 



00000 



. 333 
; 182 



Red River Power Co. 

Red Lake Falls Mlg. Co.; 740 



Roy, J.. S. 

St. Hil. Retail Lbr. 
Standard Oil Co. __ 

Soderberg, Fred 

Stephenson, R. E. . 

Satterberg, A. 

Sundholm, E. 

Severson, I. 



35 

; wi 

. 38 
97 

i 33 
. 4S0 



' (Grain Tax) 
80 8000 



Severson, Albert i 

Singer Sewing Mach. Co. 

WIlBon, Hans 

Wilson, A. S. & Son ! 

Wesierlund, L. A. ^ 

B_kke. Geo. ; 

Burkee, Mrs. B. E. : 



. 180 
. 090 
J 200 
91 
32 
100 
073 
37 
32 
22 



100 
GOO 



Amt. 

of 

Tax 

$ 44.57 

33.51 

42.50 

8.82 

5.58 

3.40 

■ 2.40 

42.50 

13.U0 

0.58 

60.93 

1.05 

9.83 

13.00 

00.17 

370.84 

5.14 

7.93 

187.94 

20.89 

11.17 

9.72 

28.71 

2.57 

0.70 

12.96 

2.01 

3.35 

21.11 

28.00 

62.03 

8.60 

9.83 

25.58 

29.82 

6.20 

148.21 

14.89 

487.01 

26.03 

9.83 

137.04 

47.70 

20.33 

3.90 

15.75 

4.24 

10.83 

8.38 

3.69 

54.14 

84.35 

33.01 
260.87 
7.48 
30.80 
0.48 
21.08 
78.87 
22.34 
10.10 
. 3.57 
01.18 
76.07 
4.13 
3.57 
2.46 



Satterberg, Frank . 
Larson, Mrs. A. J. 
Swanson, Peter __ 



2000 JS.00 

3000 9.00 

3200 • 9.78 

CITY OF THIEF EIVER FAIXS 
Total Tax. Bate By School Districts. 
Including State, Connty, Town or Village and 
School District Levies. 
School District No. 18, Mills 104.1. 
(Rates of Taxation on Money and Credits 
30 cents per $100.) ■ - 

Name of Person, / Value Money Amt 
Firm or Personal and of 

Corporation — Property Credits Tax 

Aanstad, H. L. _l $ 28 $ 500 ? 4.42 

Aaseby & Burstad ____ 540 ■" 

Adkins, Dr. C. M. 525 

Aga, J. J. 506 

Aga, Stewart 1 58 

Aga, Jacob 210 

Akre, A. H. 100 

'Alberg, Mrs. Trine _____ 55 
Amon, Philip ' 87 

American Drainage Co. __1100 



Anderson, Andrew . 
Anderson, N. J. 
Anderson, T. P. 



Arneson, M. Laundry 
Adsero, Jorgen ' 

Arhart, Henry 

Alexander, Chas. 

Akre, W. H. 

Anderson, Carl- 

Angell, Ellas 



Anderson, Gladys G. 
Aaseby, Iver 



90 
. 43 
. 14 
. 251 
. 17 
. 35 
. 41 
. 43 
. 6 
. 71 
. 30 
^35 



Austin & Elchhammer 

Aanstad, Sigurd 33 

Angell, Carl _________ 

Aas, Agnes ' 

Anderson, S. J. ______ 

Bakke, E. B. _______ 53 

Barackman, Rev. R. L._ 100 

Barnett, James — ___: 08 

Barnard, W. A. 40 

Baken & Crown 250 

Backe, Lars __ _ — _ 73 

Barzen, Math, Farm 602 . 

Barzen, Math ' 210 

Bennes, E. M. 170 

Berg, A. J. __ — — — 45 

Beckley, O. J. 35 

Benson, Severt 424 ■ 

Benson, M. N. — _ — __2372 

Backen, M. P. 20 

Becker. Joe . 25 

Blorkman, B. Dan 520 

Blederman, Jacob 221 

Bishop, J. M. 348 

BonDurant, W. H. 75 

Bony, Alf 490 

Bottelson. Andrew ___ — . 811 

Booren, Harry F. 72 

Bridgeman-Russell Co. _ 110 

Brown, Wm. J. 120 

Brokke, T. S. _______ 05 

Brown, C. J. 040 

Bratrud, John ________ 195 

Bredeson & Co. : 1010 

Burns, M. C. . 10 

Bursad, E. P. 64 

Brlnk, Chas. A 133 

Bredeson, Alfred . ___ 10 

Bean. J. L. 500 

Blshdp, W. A. 



45 


56.06 


1500 


59.15 


500 


• 63.54 


. 


0.04 


400 


24.00 




10.41 


700 


7.83 




9.00 


780 


116.87 


953 


12.23 


575 


6.20 


1700 


0.50 


150 


20.58 


10000 


31.77 


. 


3.03 





4.27 




• 4.48 





.62 




7.30 


500 


4.02. 


2800. 


12.04 




63.29 




3.44 


500 


-1.50 


3000 


9.00 


500 


1.50 




5.52 


1800 


15.81 


■ 


7.08 


735 


6.30 




.20.03 


400 


8.80 


... 


08.91 





21.80 




17.70 


300 


5.59 


800 


0.04 


2000 


50.14 


800 


249.33 


800 


4.48 





2.00 


300 


55.03 


200 


23.01 


0437 


55.55 


100 


8.11 


1708 


50.93 


350 


■ 85.47 




7.50 




11.45 


1252 


10.25 




0.77 


1050 


69.77 


211 . 


. 20.93 


3312 


115.08 



Bottem, P. J. . 
Borry, J. 



Booren, Dr. G. W. 

Bessler, Otto 

Brown, F. A. 

Burrlngrud, A. O. _ 
Bradley, Anna — _- 

Bakken, M. O. 

Blddlck, Geo. L. _ 
Brendecke, F. C. _ 

Becken, Gilbert 

Bothun, M. 



. 324 
. 505 



Burns, Evangeline M. ™ 50 

Borgen, Louis 59 

Brandon, Severln , 35 

Bergh, P. E. __ 

Benson, P. N. _ ___ 

Becker, Mrs. Mathilda M. 

Beckman, Erick 

Burtness, Mrs. T. O. 

Borden, O. W. 

Branden, Severn _ 

Bakken, Ole L. : 

Brevlg, Ed. P. _______ 

Burns, Francis 

Borry, Vincent -. — __— — " ' 

Cronkhite, John Q. 95 

Cosgrove, James 380 

Christlanson, Nils. 201 

CurUs. J. P. ______; 2246 

Cerney, L. J. 37 

DeCremer, Louis _: 723 

Cote, P. J. 



Curran, Geo. 

Cralk, Andrew — 

Chrlsto, Geo. 

Chommle, H. O. 

Clinic, The . 

Cohn, L. L. 



_ 270 
_ 881 
-1775 
Clousen, Mrs. Louis J. _ 90 
Christofferson & Co. _ — 1207 
City Dray & Fuel Co. — 355 

Christenson, C. T. , 70 

Cronstrom, O. L. _ 35 

Conner, J. B. _. 145 



. 428 



Case, J. I. Threshing 

Machine Co. 

Crandall, Dr. C. R. 

Cruzan, Chas. E. _____ 20 

Connely, JameB F. 14 

Cook, R. G. ' 19' ■ 

Comstotk. Frank L. 45 

Crown, *Ed. 30 

Citizens State Bank 6358 

Carlson, Carl 26 

Carlson, O. W. . 123 

Connell, G. W. 253 

Clausen, Christine , 115 

Crown, Gust 



Christlanson, L. P. _ 

Carlson, A. H. , 

Christofferson, Carl 

Carlson, August 

Christenson, C. ___ 

Conklin, Hazel 

Chittlck, Thos. H. _ 

Christie. E. S. 

Cady. H. D. ___ 
Chouland, Torkel L. 

Carlson, John 

Clauson, Jens _____ 
Dolan, E. F. 



Dalquist Millinery 247 

Dalquist, B. E. 115 

Dahi, Anton, Bakery 3732 

Dahl, K. E. 127 

Dahlen, H. S. _______ 225 

Dahl, S. K. 425 

Dahl. Erllng . 194 

Dablow, F. C. 68 

Dudley, F. J. __j , 63 

Dillon. L. C. _______ ■ 15 

Dicken, Oscar. : 45 

Dicken, Chas. ________ 20 

Durrin, H. C. 30 

Dahl, John E. 25 

Dybvig Bros. 



334 • 
2000 
2100 

293 
4300 
2O50 

2000 



i4;oo 

20134 

11.97 

3.02 

01131 

3.50 

2.01 

'3.0Q 

24.00 

.40 

.40 

1.50 

2.10 

8.70 

2.40 

.73 

'8.33 

25.71 

12.97 



DuChamp, Leonard ____ 

Douville. Wm. J. 

Evenson, M. V. 85 

Evenson, Chas. & Co. 000 

Eklund. Adolf 24 

Erickson, Ben 05 

Elgseln. Alice 50 

Eagler, F. J 43 



Emei'son-Bi'iintingham 

Implement Co. 

East Side Auto Co. 

Engen, Albert 

Evenson, O. C. 

Eastman. J. M. _____ 
Eagler, Fred G. _____ 

Empire Farms Co. 

Ebbighausen, H. L. 

Eberhart, Peter 

Erickson, L. E. 

Erickson, Andsen H. _ 
Erickson, C. O. _____ 

Erickson, R. L. 

Erickson, E. O. _____ 
. Evenson, C. M. _____ 

Ebert, F. L. 

ErickBOn, Fred 

Erickson, Haldor 

Eklund, Andrew 

Erickson, Leonard __ 
Erickson, Ole . 



2334 
. 101 
. 105 



9930 
475 
100 



Farmers Ex. Elev. Co.__1600 



Fallness, G. A. _- 
Fitennan, Chas. _ 
FItger Co., The _ 
Fisher, Dr. L. F.- 
Fisher, Frank __ 

Field, O. H. 

Fossum, T. A. — 
Fox, Arthur P. _ 

Fry, Harry 

Fresell. G. H. 

Frederick, W. H. . 



(Grain Tax) 
. 113 240 



5.50 
.21. 
1.50 
14140 
2,10 
4.50 
172.50 



.207 



Froehlich, Dr. H. W. A 270 

Froseth. Carl ________2455 

Fuller, W. B. ■ ' 130 

Farr. James , 350 

Furstnau, Wm. 



Fanners & Merchants 
State Bank 



1600 
500 
3000 
1337 

"iio 

300 



Farmers Exchange Ele- 
vator Co. 1600 



First & Peoples State 
Bank 



.11240 



First National Bank 8017 

Froisness, Tallack _____ 166 

Freitag. A. M. 35 

Fontain, Aiphonse 49 

Faley, L. J. . 95 

Foss, R. K. 

Fisher, Charles . 

Flattum, o. 



Gesell/ _ester ^_ 




100.50 

1170.08 
897.04 
17.28 
3.04 
5.10 
. 0.89 
3.00 
18.00. 
9.00 



Gulllngsrud, John _ 
Garvey, Mary C. — 

Gllnes, C. E. 

Goether, Henry 

Greenseth, Arthur G. 
Granum, Gilbert 
Granum, C. O. 
Griebsteln, Emil 
Granum, O. G. 
Gustafson, Chas. 
Gustafson, C. D. 
Gulllngsrud, E. O 
Glefer, Peter 
Gustafson & Son 
Gulrud, C. C, 
Gasow, John L. 
Gabrlelson, Adolph 
Gllhausen, L. E. 
Gusafson, H. A. 
Gustafson, Hannah 
Gravlie, Ellef W. 
Gulrud, Carl G. . 

Green, F. P. 

Granum, Ole C. . 

Hall Brothers 

Hall. W. L. 




Hollen, Carl W 
Hanson-Barzen Mlg. Co. 5141 302309 
(Grain Tax 1252) 

Harris, N. K. . _____ 145 3200 

Halseth, Albert 



Hamm Brewing Co. 
Hanson, S. A. . 

Hanson, O. C. 

Haney, Thos. C. 

Hanson, Amanda 

Hermanson, J. H. _ 

Harlow, M. C. 

Harris, Paul — , 
Heilqulst, C. E. _ 

Helseth, Iaak , 

Helgeland, Erick 

Herrick, F. H. 

Hlllard, Carl 

Hendry, J. W. 

Hicks, H. M. 

Holt & George ___ 

Holt, Henry E. 

Holmberg, Cora _ 

Holzknecht, Fred 

Holt State Bank _ 
Hofseth, John _____ 

Houfek, John . 

Haynes, F. F. 

Hansen, C. _.. 

Herron, Wm. ' 

Hardesty, J. H. 

Halvorson, G. , 

Halseth, Roy 

Hance, Edward 

Hllson, Edward _ 
Hell, Ed. 



_ 015 
_ 63 

- 75 
_ 13 

- 100 
-1252 
_ 58 
_ 60 
_ 78 
_ 100 

- 07 
_ 120 
_ 40 



55- 
70 
42 
40 
41 



Heggen, A. M. 

Hoglin, Peter ____ 

Hoppa, F. A. 

Hager. H. N. ___ 
Hlnrlchs, E. W. ___ 

Hamre, T. P. 

Hamry, Effle D. — 
Hanson, Hogan - .. 

Havel, John E. _ 

Hermanson, Hans _ 

Husby. G. H. 

Husted, Peter C. 

Halvorson, Christ — 

Hostvet, Lina 

Helland, Carl W. __ 
Hendrlckson, Nels _ 

Hjelden, Halvor 

Hanson, Leonard 

Hegtvedt, Slgrld A. 

Holf, H. O. 

Ihle, Ole L. 

Johnson, Emil 



00 
80 
23 
5 
38 
08 
35 
27 
43 
30 
45 



Johnson, Lucille E. 

Johnston, L. R. 

Jung Bros. __ — _ 
Johnson, H. C. 



Johnson, M. M. & Son 

Johnson, M. M. . 

Johnson, Algot ______ 

Johnson, Oscar F. ___ 
Johnson, Gusta ______ 

Johnsrud, A. R, _: 

Jacobson, J. A. _J 

Johnson, Gust ' 

Johnson, O. M. . 

Johnson, Carl E. ___ 
.Jung, C. H. 



_ 145 
_tll5 
_3405 
_ 000 
_ 834 
_ 43 
_ 00 
_ 70 
_ 392 
_ 25 
_ 34 
_ 02 
_ 09 
-. 55 



Johnson, Mrs. Joseph 

Jaranson, Ed. 

Johnson, James 

Johnson, Arhur 

Jensen, O. E. . 

Johnson, Simon 

Johnson, EHn _ — _____ 

Johnson, Hoken 

Johnson, liars 

Johnson, IVma 



Jacobson, Albert F. . 

Jacklln, . Fred ■ 

Kringsberg, Carl H. 

Karwand, E. C. 

Klungness, Elmer 



Knuusen, Bernhard 

Keene, Herbert 

Kruse, Emil 

Kline, Wm. H. 

Knudson, R. A. 

Kinghorn. H. W. 

Kiewel Products Co. 

Klland, T. T. 

Korstad, E. M. 

Kolberg. T. -M. 

Keely, Edward 

Kongelf, L. O. 

Knignt, W. K. 

Kuecks, John H. 

Klelty. John 



Lampert, L. A. 
Lambert, Roy ._ 
Laulin, H. F. _ 
Lawrence, D. H. 
Lee. Ed. 



Lleberman, Chas. ■ 
Llebertnan, Albert 

Leimers, George 

Legvold, Ole _ 

Loken Brothers 

Loken. A. & Co. _ 
Lufkln, Fred 



Landgren, John . 

Lund, John L. 

LaBree, W. J. 

Loken, H. O. . 

Loken, Geo. C. 

Larsen, H. L. . 

LaCoe & Fontain __ 

Larson, D. M. 

LeSage, D. J. 

Lindberg, Hjalmer _ 

Liden, Oscar 

Lonson, Gib 

Lund, H. P. 

Lapp'egaard, Knut 

Lacey, Edw. T. 

Longair, Ralph 



2314 

. 500 

170 . 

484 

2901 

5842 

_ 272 

33 

_10715 

497 

24 

_ 63 

— 73 
107 

— 055 

05 ' 

35 

103 

31 

32 

05 

30 

12 



Lawrence Mortgage Co. _ 

Mabey, Perl W. . 212 

McDanlcl, C. W. 30 



McFarland Auto Co., 

Mellby, O. F. 

McGinn, R. 



__1074 

384 

. 190 



Minneapolis Bridge Co. -2036 

Mathew. Hamilton 23. 

Mlchelet. Wllhelm 68 

Miller, Harry W. . 53 

McGlnnlty. James 75 

Mousley & Gllnes 00 

Moe, H. A. , _. 415 



05 
30 



Moen, Jennie . _ 

Morgan, Roy. , 

Myhrum. P. O. 

Myrom, Sigurd _ — 
— yrom, A. A. — . — 

Mulry, W. H. 

Manhattan Oil Co. 

Manther, L. W. 

'Matson, C. G. 

Majeres, Louise 

Meyers. John H. 

Melby, Oscar 

Mosledi, O. B. 

McWIlIiams, R. B. 
McClelland. J. H. _ 
McAdams, L. D. _ 

McMahon, Sam — , , — 13 

McDaniel & Reamer _ — 35 

Mostue, E. A. 019 

Mdgensen, E. O. - 4531 



-1722 
-2134 
_ 20 
_ 20 
_ 40 
_ 7 
- 18 
_ 20 



2- 

'. 145 



Melgaard, T. L. 

Morgan, John 

Malafa, J. A. 

Manson, O. L. . 

Moen. Frederick . — . 
McCann, Js J. _ — 
Naplin, O. A. — _~ 

Nlelson. N. C. . 

Nelson, O. H. ___ 

Nelson, Nels 

Nelson, C. W. — - 
Nelson, J. E. ... 
Nicholson, Geo. W. 

Nlclal, F: C. . . 

Ness, Edw. H. 

Neset Olaf 

Newell. H. B. ___ 
Nortz Lumber Co. 



. 175 
. 30 



. 240 
. 158 
. 20 
. 100 
. 40 
. 75 
. 33 
. 300 



_1500 
_3202 

Northwestern Auto Co. 823 

Northern Woodwork Co._1644 

Nesse, J. N. 428 

Nason, C. A. 205 



48 



Ness, Andrew — 
Nelson, Chas. A. 





200 



93 
93 
85 



. 50 
. 107 



15 
78 



Kruse, Aug. F. 

Knudson, Dedrlck _ 
Klemmetson. Helge 
Kolstad, Andrew I. _____ 

Larson, Nels 21 

Larson Furniture Co. 7557 

Larson, Carl B. 180 

Larson, Lars H. ______ 150 

Larsen, L. G. 75 

Laird, Scott 590 

Langseth, A. . M. -4315 

Langseth, Anna 38 



2.81 

106.35 

2.71 

4.83 

0.04 

2.30 

10.87 ' 

.12.52 

7.70 

8.85 

10.10 

9.72 

4.10 

497.05 

21.13 

0.25 

7.19 

3.12 

5.21 

3.02 

.00 

.00 

.40 

4.50 

241.38 

15.10 

8.85 

950.72 

18.60 
8.03 
64.02 
5.52 
9.31 
6.75 
15.30 
137.23 
18.94 
8.07 
10.82 
10.41 
6.07 
12.40 
4.10 
9.48 
59.80 
18.09 
5.73 
7.29 
5.27 
4.10 
4.27 
2.00 
22.17 
13.75, 
10.20 ' 
0.25 
8.95 
2.39 
.52 
3.90 
7.08 
3.64 
2.S1 
5.08 
3.12 
4.69 
8.00 
9.00 
0.00 
.30 
.00 
1.50 
.45 
4.50 
0.00 
.90 
4.50 
2.10 
2.59 
4.50 
2.40 
10.87 
33.00 
' 21.30 
11.97 
307.99 
10.81 
80.82 
4.48 
12.99 
9.71 
42.01 
9.20 
3.54 
1.25 
1.07 
5.73 
9.08 
16.14 
. 1.84 
4.80 
.00 
'2.02 
.00 
3.15 
3.00 
7.50 
1.50 
4.23 
.82 
12.10 
9.31 
0.08 
9.08 
8.85 
5.83 
7.28 
0.35 
5.51 
347.70 
1.87 
3.04 
12.51 
1.50 
5.21 
11.59 
7.00 
4.10 
1.50 
8.12 
11.70 
9.00 
8.49 
824.10 
18.74 
15.02 
10.S1 
01.79 
452.79 
9.90 
5.73 
250.49 
53.85 
18.32 
54.13 
300.34 
017.15 
28.52 
4.70 
1U5.43 
53.04 
2.00 
8.00 
7.00 
04.14 
21.54 
0.70 
3.04 
10.81 
3.23 
3.33 
0.77' 
..12 
1.25 
78.00 

■5_0 

0.50 

2.70 

24.54 

4.51 

175.04 

45.07 

25.00 

212.55 

2.39 

7.0S 

O.'.J 

7.81 

0.25 

43.20 

3.12 

0.77 

8.22 

87.80 

5.40 

196.25 

222.15 

2.08 

2.08 

4.10 

.73 

1.87 

2.08 

3.33 

9.91 

15.10 

:f.33 

3.04 

23.22 

477.79 

9.12 

18.87 

.75 

12.00 

4.10 

2.30 

20.7S 

10.45 

5.83 

14.03 

4.10 

7.81 

5.15 

. 44.20 

7.01 

307.33 

159.00 

343.22 

85.07 

180.20 

45.15 

21.35 

3.33 

5.00 



Nelson, P. O. . 

Novak, Joe ™ • 

Nelson, Marie . _. 

Noesen, Rev. M. V J. 

Nygaard, S. O. 

Nesja, Ole O. 

Olson, Ed. 



30 
.14 



1000 
450 
4000 



Oftelien, Ole 

Ostby, O. D. 

Oen, Rasmus 

Oen Mercantile Co. 

Olson, A. E. 

Overland, E. J. 

Olson, Alfred K. _ 
Oden, A. J. 
Olson, E.mil 

Olson, 0. 1 N. 

Olson, Hans 

Olson, Peder E. 
Ove, Nettle ___ 
Owen, Martin _ 
Olson, Jacob. N. 
Olson, Sophia _ 

Oren, H. 

Offerdahl, Ole _ 

Parbst, O. C. 

Park Hotel 



18302 

70 



48 
70 
. 34 
. 150 
. 36 
. 18 
. 25 



Paulson, Dr. A. J. _ 
Physicians Hospital 

Pederson, P. G. 

Peoples Auto Co. 



_ 90 
- 250 
_ 90 
-1000 
_ 105 
_0244 



Pillsbury Flour Mill Co. 1101 

Peterson-Biddick Co. 050 

Penney, J. C. Co. 8035 

Pederson, C. L. ^ . 240 

Polrier, Wm. , 11 

Pratt, H. A. 178 



200 
300 
900 
300 



1592 
0000 



1000 
589 



Provencher, Jullen 
Protzeller, H. W. 



..1530 

. _ _.__ 215 

Prichard, W. W. Sr. ___ 102 

Pilchard, W. W. Jr. 13S 

Pennington Printing Co 854 

Peoples Co-op. Store Co. 1420 



. 545 
23 
34 
30 
38 
32 
31 



Penney, G. A. 

Patten, J. K. . 

Palmer, P. P. _ 

Paulson Bros. 

Porter, C. H. _ 
Protz, Frank A. 

Protz, Fred 

Parbst, Wm. 

Peterson, Joseph _______ 

Queen City Btlng Works 281 

Quale, Theo. 338 

Quindlog. Helga J. . 30 

Quale, F. L. ■ . . 45 

Qulst, Martin 

Quindlog, Paul i — ^ — 

Rambeck-Stone Co. : _1028 

Rasmusson, Alfred , J. _. 117 

Rodegaard, H. _! 150 

Red Lake Ice Co. _1149 

Red Lake Falls Mlg. Co. 0000 

Reierson, T. J. . — 45 

Remmem, A. B. 284 

Richards, E. J. .__: — _ — 115 

Rlndal, A. J. .If ; 33 

Ross. R. H. ' ' 90 

Rolland, Ellas L. 1434 



Roblrte, H. E. 

Rounds, B. G. _ 

Rausch, Emil 

Rowan, Thos. J. 

Rupprecht, Mrs. R. C, 

Ryer, W. M. ~ 

Roark, Pat 



Ramstad, Olaf _ 

Rayson, Louis __ 

Rambeck, O. A. _i__: 
Rossmon, Carl E. 4~ 

Rlchter. J. J. 

Rolland, John L. — _ 
Roemhildt, Henry ; — 

Robarge, V. F. 

Rustad, E. J. . _. 

Risberg, Axel 

Roth, Anna 

Reoella, Engen J. — . 

Salveson, S. 

Samson Tractor Co.: . 

Sandum, G. H. 

Saltvet, Harold 

Sapero, Abe _ 

Sapero Co., The 



13 



3S 
70 
10 
18 
20 
■ 15 



. 163 
. 900 



Sheldon, Ralph M. 

Shirley. Chas. 

Simonson, C. S. — 
SJoberg, Carl 



Singer Sewing Mach. Co. 

Silk. IT. J. - 

Skog. John M. 



Schwartz fc/Tohnson 

Shanahan, F. il. „_ 

Stilt,. J. L. \_ 



Soderberg, August 

Sorenson, Gilbert 43 

Stenberg, Marfe 31 

Stewart, C. W. ■ 23 

Stokke. Ed. 22 

SorenEon. Olaf 15 

Sands'.rom, V, F _ _. 30 

Storhaug, H. O. . 

Stortand, A. O. __ 

Saltvet, Ole 

Shltv.-t, Harold 

Swanson, Oscar 

Schwartz, Chas. ..._. 

Swanson, Berget 

- Stenberg. A. B. 

Schmot-er, Joseph 

Scholz, John B. 

Shetler. Mrs. Minnie 

Sweden, John 

Tandberg. Mrsr Julia „ 43 

Tesruiii, Olaf _ _... _8 

Tessum Seed, Grain and 

Supply Co. : _ 0400 

Tessum Seed, . Grain and 

Supply Co. •.„ 

Thiorson, Theo. M. 104 

Tliune. Peter P 14 

The Prichard Co 5308 

-imos Prig. & Mfg. Co 7340 

Thief River Iron Works....2545 

Thief River Music Co 30S2 

Thief p.iver Grocery Co. 12399 
Thief River B;lg. Works 318 
Thief River Co-operative 

Creamery Association.. 2035, 
Thief River Theatre Co.._ 784 

Traver, C. D. 55 

T. R. Monumental Co. 2572 

Tarrant. N. W. SO 

Tessum,. G. C. 54 

Thill, J. 



Thompson, E. O _ 

Thoreson, Albert W. 
Thompson, Ben 



Tharoldson, Torge 28 

Thief River Dress Club _ 50 

Thief River Adw. Co. 700 

Tveten, Anders ' 

Union Den'ists , 500 

131 



1 nion Plumbing Co. 

Urness, Carrie 

Vorachek. J. J. 

Vigen. Bennie 

Vorachek, C. W. „ 

Vistaunet, P. L. 

Vorseth, Albert- 

Vance, Robert 

Votava, Joe 

Ward, Gaston 

Ward. John 



. 12 
. 341 

'. 158 
. 31 
. 06 
. 36 
. 23 
. 30 



Wcrstleln, Geo. W. 

Weeks, Rosa 70 

Williams, Geo. G. 109 

Wear-U-Well Shoe Co. _„ 200 

Way. Thos. A.. 188 

Wold, Bernt 53 

Wangenstein, A. A_ 5S7 

Winton-Nichols Lbr. Co... 55 
Wlnton-Nlchols Lbr. Co._8424 



Warner. Wm. E. 

Waldorf, Nick B. 

Walker, B. G. 



Wengeler, John J. 

Werner. Esther 

Vussgren, John. A. 

Winger, O. G. 

Wilhams, Oscar 

Wollon, Gust 

Waidstedt, Peter 

Wilson. C. M. 

Westlen, L. 

Wiken, Amund . . 

■Wood, W. E. , 

Yotter. John O. 

Zeh, Emil 

Zeh & Curran 

Zcllmer, A. E. 

Zk!h, Phil 



13 
50 
20 
34 
40 
24 
25 
70 
20 



_ 80 
.- 137 
-1110 
_ 991 
_ 175 



2850 
600 
200 
100 



600 
150 
9700 



1299 
3400 



1110 
S100 



. 250 

. 125 

.3014 

Shanahan & Sheedy __ — _ 504 

Schmltt, M. A. 30 

Setter, J. O. _ — . 39 

Sholes, C. A. |_-_ 10 

Shaw, Daniel - 81 



_. 275 

_ 04 

_1409 

08 

07 



90 



Smlihers, ' Wm. 

Sondreal, C. S. , 

Sorenson & Dalquist 

Soltau. E. A. 

Spencer, Roy F _. 

Streeter, Geo. C. 

Sterns, Geo. L. 

Standard Oil Co. _ 

Standard Oil Co. 

Standard Oil Co. 

Standard Oil Co. 

Strand, H. K. 

Strubeck, Joe 

Stageberg, T. O. .__.. 

Storholm, O. G. 

Storholm, C. 

Sloughton, E. H. _ 

Stageberg, M. G. 1357 

Stanton, E. M. Jr. „ 500 

Swedenburg, Dr. A. W 238 

Sundahl, Carl 20 

Sundahl, K. A. ... 103 

Smith. G. Howard 170 

Sandberg, A. G. Elevator 1000 

Stebblns, F. J. 2523 

Stanton, E. M. Sr. 5S5 

Schutt, E. M. . 75 

Scanlan, T. D. 54 

Schuster, C. C. 



.. 23 
... 337 
... 248 
... 30 
_. 150 
... 03 
_0741 
_ 90 
... 37 
... 37 
_ 791 
._ 700 



20 



2300 
8000 



. 320 
. 125 
28 



500 

100 
1100 

100 
1000 

150 
3000 

200 
1950 

500 

400 
1500 



157 - 

6000 

11000 

12340 

1300 

12405 

59S09 

700 

2000 
3575 



172 
4450 



116S7 
9318 



2900 
750 
, 500 
2000 
1800 
300 
1034 
5204 
. 300 
1000 



3.12 
1.46 
2.13 
4.80 
1.35 
12.00 
11.07 
4.18 
0.03 
21.24 . 
2014.99 
7.29 
0.97 
9.80 
7.29 
3.54 
15.02 
0.75 
. 1.87 
2.60 
.63 
.60 
.90 
2.70 
.00 
9.37 
20.03 
10.20 
104.10 
15.70 
147.50 
120.80 
70.00 
838.20 
25.02 
1.15 
19.43 
100.18 
22.38 
10.02 
14.30 
S0.80 
150.25 
00.23 
2.39 
3.54 
3.12 
3.90 
3.33 
3.23 
S.55 
1.80 
29.85 
35.49 
3.12 
4.08 
1.80 
.45 • 
130.12 
12.18 
15.01 
119.01' 
170.54 
14.70 
29.S0 ' 
12.45 
27.74 
9.37 
153.78 
1.35 
5.73 
5.05 
1.50 
4.10 
3,20 
391.42 
20.55 
3.44 
7.10 
3.90 
7.29 
1.07 
1.87 
5.08 
1.50 
.90 
0.00 
'' '-> 
l5!37 
03.09 
9.S9 
20.03 
13.31 
■379.52 
' 58.71 
3.12 
0.40 
1.04 
. 15.18 
28.92 
0.78 
151.18 
8.5S 
0.97' 
11.77 
9.69 
17.70 
3.S9 
35.38 
20.12 
3.12 
15.02 
9.08 
708.20 
9.09 
3.85 
3.S5 
89.24 
90.87 
8.02 
0.77 
8.03 
2.0S 
141.71 
53.04 
20.20 
2.08 
11.02 
1S.53 
100.50 
203.53; 
05.40- 
" 8.20: 
5.02 
10. 10- 
33.32- 
03.00 
2.01 
12.77 
4.4S 
3.2S 
5.39 
2.20 
1.50 
3.12 
1.50 
.30 
3.30 
.30 
3.00 
.45 
9.00 
.00 
5.S5 
1.50 
1.20 
4.50 
4.J3 
2.02 

000.24 

142.30 

11.30 

21.20 

591.81 

SOI. 70 

209.43 

35S.05 

1470.35 

35.20 

280.30 
, 92.33 
5.73 
270.44 
8.33 
5.02 
6.77 ■ 
1.50 

13.52 
2.29 
2,91 
5)21 

72.87 
1.80 

02.08 

13.95 
5.40 
0.72 

38.50 
1.27 

10.45 
3.23 
6.87 
3.75 
2.30 
3.12 

12.28 
7.29 

24.70 

20.82 

19.57 
5.52 

01.11 

40.79 
900.39 
1.35 
5.21 
2.08 
3.54 
4.10 
5.50 
2.00 
7.29 
2.08 
6.00 
2.25 
1.50 
0.00 
5.40' 
9.23 

17.30 
131.17 
104.06 

21.22 



(-.'■ i 

it'! - ' 



f 

o 



Page Eight 




Sivert Rust 

Born, on 
16, .to Mr. 
boy. 

Mrs. L. F 
ternoon for 
was called 



her grandmother. 



A. S.'Saj 
the week fr 
apolis when 
relatives. 



Miss Alir 
home at \V 
ing; after 
home of M 







THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 1922 



C. L. Hanson left Wednesday eve 
ning on a brief business trip to the 
.Twin Cities. 

Morris -Ba rten of Devihi Lake spent 
Tuesday anl Wednesday in the city 
on business. 

Miss Estier Lilja left Wednesday 
afternoon f >r Fargo, where she ;will 
spent a sho: t time visiting friends. 

Miss Mary Bendle left Thursday af- 
ternoon for Red Lake Falls after hav- 
ing spent tl e past month in this city. 

Miss Sadi i and Miss Lenore Febrow 
of St. Hilaire were Wednesday shop- 
pers in the :ity. 

Miss Rub; • Jensen of Goodridge was 
a week-end guest at the C. E. Andrews 
home. 

Melvin Ristebak returned Wednes- 
day afterno< n to his home of his uncle, 
jbak. 



Uonday morning, January 
ind Mrs. Hans Rustad, a 

Fisher left yesterday af- 
Grand Forks, where she 
by the serious illness of 



ero returned the first of 

om Chisholm and Minne 

he spent a week visiting 



Eiken returned to ' her 
annaska yesterday morn- 
i few days visit at the 
s. John Swedln. 



Miss Elizi beth Harder, an employee 
at the Oaklc nd Park Sanitorium spent 
several day; the first of the week at 
St. Hilaire v ith her parents, 

Mrs. CIar;nce 0. Erickson inform- 
ally enterta; ned a few of her friends 
Tuesday evening at progressive whist 
which .was i i play at three tables. 

. William Meyer, who has, spent a' 
short period here visiting friends, re- 
turned yestejrday morning to his home 
at Steiner. 

Miss Albiia Doucet, ticket cashier 
at the Soo, left Wednesday afternoon 
for Crookston, where she will spend 
a few days dsiting friends. 

Mrs. Loui? Roseland of Holt arrived 
Wednesday 
at the home 
Mrs. 0. Lin 



afternoon and is a guest 

of her parents, Mr. and 

lstad. 

W. W. Prichard, Sr., left! Tuesday 



; Ruth, of Bo\ 
j an iaidefinit 
' the Jwrmer's 



Mrs. A. 



evening for Minneapolis where he is 
in attendanca- at the convention of the 
Northwestern Lumbermen's- associa- 
tion. 

Mrs. B. M. Jacobson and daughter, 



-man N. D., are guests for 
i period at the home of 
son and daughter-in-law, 



Mr. and Mr; '. John E. Nelson. 



3. Sapero entertained a 



small company of friends at dinner on 
Wednesday evening, the occasion be- 
ing the bnthday- anniversary of Mr. 
Sapero. 

Mrs. N. E. , Huzzy and son, Lester, 
returned the first of the week to their 
home at Steiner after a week's visit 
at the home 
Kisch. 



Wayne '. Richardson of Yakima, 
Wash., who has been here to- attend 
the. funeral )f his father, Ira C. Rich- 



to his home 
Mrs. L. L 



Dr. Theodore Bratrud of: Warren 
spent Monday morning in the city en 
route from Minneapolis where he had 
spent an indefinite period. : 

Miss Albina Doucet returned this 
morning 1 from Crookstbn, where she 
has spent several days' visiting with 
friends, i 

» j i 

Lynn Halvorson left the first of the 
week for Duluth, where he will spend 
a month- in the interest of the Thief 
River Monumental company.: 

Edward Fiterman, who'is employed 
at Minneapolis, arrived this: morning 
to -spend! 10 days visiting his parents, 
Mr. and :Mrs. Charles Fiterman. 

The senior music students of Miss 
Doris Halvorson enjoyed a sleighride 
party about the city last evening, after 
which they repaired to the Halvorson 
home for a candy pull. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Smith and lit- 
tle daughter of Rolette, N. P., spent 
Wednesday evening in the city visit- 
ing the I former's niece, Miss Esther 
Smith, member of the Knox school 
faculty, ] before leaving for Minne- 
apolis where they will spend a few 
days before continuing on to Florida 
where they will spend the remainder 
of the winter. 



| AT THE CHURCHES | 

»: : . : — ■- — ^ 

Evangelistic Meetings Continue ev- 
ery evening this week and next week 
7:30, except Saturdays in the Swed- 
ish Baptist church, corner of Mark- 
ley and 'Schumann. Sunday services 
11:00 o'clock a. m. and 7:30 p. m. You 
are cordially invited. 



Evangelical Mission Church — Sun- 
day school Sunday at 10:00 a. m. 
Tuesday 1 8:00 p. m. prayer meeting at 
the home of Mrs. Eric Soderberg, 
Markley': Ave. N. Friday 8:00 p. m. 
young;, people's meeting and" Bible 
study. The young people's covenant 
of the Mission churches of the North 
Red River Valley will hold its mid- 
winter conference here January 28 
and 29. ' Several visiting pastors are 
expected' and a large attendance of 
young people anticipated. — OJ J. Lun- 
dell, pastor. 



St. Hilaire — Services Sunday, Jan. 
22 at Black River at 11 a. m^ At St. 
Hilaire 7:30 p. m. Come and be wel- 
come.. 



of her mother, Mrs." Mary. 



Scandinavian Evangelical Church- 
Services | Sunday the 22nd at: 11:00 a. 
m. and 7:30 p.m. Sunday school 10:00 
■a. m. Next Wednesday Bible study 
meeting at 7:30 p. m. You are cord- 
ially welcome. — Bot. Nyborg, pastor. 

Augustana Church — Services in 
Swedish at 10:30 a. m. Sunday school 
at 11:45! a. m( Services in American 
at 8:00 p. m. Bible class at 7:00 p. 
m. Ladies'' Aid and Luther League 
will be entertained in the church base- 
ment by/Mrs. Frank Carlson: Wednes- 
day, Jan. 25, afternoon and j evening, 
respectively. Willing Workers socie- 
ty wall ibe entertained Friday, Jan- 
uary 20, at the home of R. Knutson, 
723 Duluth Ave. N. j 

/ Presbyterian Church — Rev.' McLeod 
of Duluth will occupy the pulpit at 
the Presbyterian church next Sunday 
forenoon and evening. . Sunday school 



,- . , ; _, - / iorenoon anu evening., ounuay auiuw 

ardson -retvrned- yesterday afternoon t „ 4g eaching service | a f 11:00 

Tn hip linnid / I '. r • f . . . 

/ o'clock. , Junior Endeavor meeting at 

Cohn and little daughter, '3; Christian Endeavor, 7 P. ;M.; eve- 
Betty, who aave spent the past three ; ning service at 8 o'clock. ' 
weeks with 



relatives at Minneapolis' 



and St. Pat 1, returned herj the first Trinity Lutheran Churchj— Trinity 
of the week / (Ladies' Aid met Thursday afternoon, 

Elmer Zeh, who has been employed 'entertained by Mrs. Olaf Ramstad, 
by the CroAkfcton Mercantile Co., as Mrs. James Sether, Mrs. O.: C. Han- 
city salesman, is speeding an indef-json and: Mrs. Severt Benson. ■ Semi- 
inite period in the city as a guest of annual election of officers i of the 
his father, Phil Zen. j Young Peoples' league this ! evening. 

,. , J, /,. „ , , , lilesdames Louis Veven, Adolph Wil- 

.. ...""ir.^ B , m , retu , r , ned damson land T. E. Sweger will enter- 



here the fir 



"st of the week from Ken- 



dall, Wis., vdiere they have been vis-j 10 , cloi . k at the parson age. Divine 
itmg Mrs^IJahl's parents for the past iService j n Norwegian fi A. M. and 

English ;at 7:45 P. M. Graded Sunday 
Miss Irmi Johnson who has been a'school and Bible class at -9:45 A. M. 
uest. at th|e home of Mr. and Mrs. ' Parents without church home are cor- 
on at Crookston over the , dially invited to send their children, 
returned here Tuesday Choir practice' Thursday evening. T. 
E. Sweger, pastor. 



,0. J. J oh ison of Grygla was a cal- , 
ler in the city on Tuesday, leaving! 
in the af te moon for Valley City, N. ( 



D., where h> e will appear as a witness!^ wife, who sold their property in 
in the trial of William Gummer for' Canby and took up their residence 
the murder of Miss Marie Wick. j»n Long Beach, California, about two 

I years ago, recently sold their home 
Miss Pau a Amend, who has finished j on tne p ac ifi c co ast and returned to 
a two years' course of nursing at the' ,3,^, "first love" — Canby— where they 



Physicians' 
Cologne, \A 



tain. Confirmation class Saturday at 



. MINNESOTA GOOD ENOUGH 
The venerable James Franks and 



hospital, left ! Tuesday forj a g ai ' n ^jii'make their homeJ says the 
is., where sh e . will spend Canby jj ews 



a month visiting her parents, before 
going to Minneapolis where! she will 
complete h<r training. 

Mrs. A. booren and daughter, Miss 
Olive Boon n, of Stillwater, who have 
been guest; at the Dr. G. W. Booren 
home, left Wednesday evening for 
Plummer, where they will be guests 
for a short time at the H. F. Booren 
home. 

Mrs. Amjie Mearow was tendered a 
pleasant si rprise by 12 of her lady 
friends Tht 
of her dau 
where they 



rsday evening at the home 
hter, Mrs. Albert Lonson, 
gathered to celebrate her 



Mr. Franks says, after living two 
whole years in the much boosted 
"land of sunshine and flowers," he 
returns !to the old Gopher state mote 
in love witth Minnesota than ever be- 
fore. Mr. Franks said, '^Some of 
the scenery in California is very beau- 
tiful, but one cannot live on scenery." 
He foun'd the summers out there very 
warm; the water was not good and 
he longed for the fine, cool, sparkling 
water of Canby. He was glad to get 
back here, where he will live until 
he takes that long journey, from 
which he will not return. i 



eighty-secojid birthday anniversary.] Women were called in to 1 aid the 
Delicious refreshments concluded an.N a tj ona j Council of EnglandJ the pre- 
enjoyable evening spent at needle- -accessor of the House of Lords, as 
work. pong ago as 670. 



1,000 Minnesota ns 
Join Grain Growers 



Community Meetings Called 
to Prepare for Nation- 
al Convention 



District Meeting to Discuss 

Co-Operation at Hallock 

on February 20th 



More than 1,000 Minnesota farmers 
had joined the U. S. Grain Growers, 
Inc., on January 17, when books of 
the corporation, were closed in prep- 
eration for local and congressional 
district meetings of members and for 
the national convention. 

All members in each community or 
elevator unit will meet on February 7 
to elect a delegate to their congres- 
sional district meeting. These dis- 
trict meetings will be held at Hallock 
on February 20, at Sleepy Eye on 
February 22 and at Marshall on Feb : 
ruary 23, and will name delegates to 
attend the annual national convention 
of the U. S. Grain Growers in Chicago 
March 21. . Delegates from Annandale, 
Wright county, will attend the Sleepy 
Eye meeting. 

The patronage dividend plan of the 
organization will be retained at all 
costs, officers announced. A decision 
of the national board of directors last 
week to open sales agencies in time 
to handle the 1922 crop/ and authoriz- 
ing steps to obtain seats on grain ex- 
changes "where necessary and advis- 
able," had been interpreted in some 
quarters to mean that the patronage 
dividend idea had been discarded, they 
said. 

The Farmers Elevator and Milling 
company at Marshall, Lyon county, 
which handled 415,000 bushels of 
grain last year, has'signed a contract 
with the Grain Growers, it was an- 
nounced this week. 



HERMAN BJSCHOFF RETURNS 

TO SCHOOL AFTER VISIT 



Herman Bischoff returned last Mon- 
day to his studies at Faribault, where 
he is a student at the state school for 
the blind, after a two weeks' visit 
with relatives in this city. This tal- 
ented young man has made a name 
for himself as a musician and stud- 
ent and appeared publicly several 
times during his vacation and in each 
instance proved himself a real artist, 
handling various instruments with re- 
markable skill, Moreover, he is a cul- 
tured, likeable young man who will 
take with him wherever he goes the 
best wishes of his Thief River Falls 
friends. He is the eldest son of Mrs.- 
W. B. Fuller of this city. [ 

Able to crack a Brazil nut between 
his still strong teeth, Mr. Lamb, of 
Ash, Surrey, England, is 103 years of 
age. ^ 

JOHNSTON ENTERTAINS '.-'„ 
h. R. Johnston was host Tuesday 
evening at a "stag" party, about, fif- 
teen guests partaking of his hopital- 
ity. At midnight Mrs. Johnston, as- 
sisted by MrJ. Fred Johnston, served 
a delicious luncheon. The men pass- 
ed the evening at progressive whist 
and preparing alibi for home con- 
sumption. It is said that Abe Sapero 
was high man in the alibi contest, with 
Fred' Herrick a close second. The 
occasion was made most enjoyable by 
the host, who received a nuanimous 
vote of approval as the high potentate 
of entertainers. 

NOTICE 

The annual meeting of theJThief 
River Falls Creamery association will 
be held in the Auditorium in the Com- 
mercial club rooms on Saturday, the 
28th of January at 1:30 p. m. 
J. 20-24 P. Engelstad, Se'c'y. 



W.CTJU. Meeting 
IsWell Attended 



Rev. Clinton Cook Speaks 

of Wonderful Progress 

Made by Temperance 



"Shall Law Be Sovereign" 

Subject of Address by 

Mrs. J. M. Bishop 



their trips have • they been accorded 
the friendly and cordial and fair treat- 
ment that they have had on their trip 
to Crookston and Thief River Falls. 
I believe that the advertising that the 
boys have done for you all here has 
been at least as valuable as tnat done 
for Two Harbors by the boys making 
the trip. We would like to see a team 
from your section play here this year 
or next year so that we could recip- 
rocate. , 
"Sincerely yours, 

"Frank A. Rose." 



About sevehty-five interested citi- 
zens attended the meeting of the W. 
C. T- U. at the home of Mrs. Christ 
Storholm on Tuesday afternoon. The 
second anniversary of the National 
Constitutional: Prohibition victory was 
fittingly observed by splendid talks 
and papers by the members. 

Rev. Clinton Cook in his talk spoke 
of the -wonderful progress made in 
temperance work since the time of the 
international convention which he at- 
tended in Portland many years ago 
at which time Miss Lillian Stevens 
was the world president. 

Mrs. J. M. Bishop's address on the 
subject "Shall Law Be Sovereign in 
the United States" was listened to in- 
tently, comment among those present 
indicating that she had struck the 
keynote of the whole matter. The 
speaker made; it clear that unless in- 
dividuals themselves took a public 
stand- for what is right and for law 
enforcement that little could be ac- 
complished. The entire subject was 
handled in a: masterful manner and 
showed that th e speaker had gone in- 
to the matter! thoroughly. 

Too much cannot be said of the un- 
tiring efforts put forth by the presi- 
dent, Mrs. James O. Sether in making 
the local organization the success that 
it is today. In the course of Mrs. 
Sether's remarks on Tuesday she 
quoted the following words," Wher- 
ever Old Glory flows, where the 
liquor traffic lives, if it lives at all, 
lives as an outlaw, a thing to be 
hunted, cursed-and hounded." 



ROYAL NEIGHBORS HAVE 

INSTALLATION SESSION 



PIANOS TUNED. 
Card. Phone 24. 



Call A. L. 
91-3t< 



APPRECIATE TREATMENT HERE. 



Two Harbors Basket Ball Supporters 
Strong for Thief River Falls. 

That the Two Harbors basket ball 
team and their supporters are appreci- 
ative of the cordial and fair treatment 
extended the basketeers on their recent 
appearance here, is indicated by the 
following letter received by The Tri- 
bune from the lake town boys who 
went home all blowed up oveJ the abil- 
ity of the Thief River Falls quint and it 
is said that they consider the rub giv- 
en them by the local athletes about the 
closest they ever received from any 
team in the country. Hence there 
has been a demand in Two Harbors 
for copies of. The Tribune containing 
reports of the recent game here. The 
letter from ; Mr. Rose is appended: 
"Editor of Tribune, 

"Thief River Falls, Minn. 
"Dear Sir: : 

"Since the return of the local basket 
ball team from your section of the 
country therej have been numbers of 
inquiries for copies of papers with ac- 
counts of the games they played. 
Would it be possible for you to mail 
me about five copies of each issue 
of The Tribune in which appear ac- 
counts of the games or comments in 
which local people would be interest- 
ed? You may bill m e for same and 
I'll mail you a check. 

"For your information, I'll say that 
the boys have stated that never in 



TRINITY ANNUAL MEETING 



Officers Elected and Financial State- 
ment Adopted 

The members of the Trinity church 
held their annual- business meeting 
Tuesday at the church and elected of- 
ficers for next year as follows: 

President-fT. E. Sweger. 

Vice-president — Olof Ramstad. 

Secretary — Lars Backe. • 

Treasurer — Carl B. Larson. 
, Trustees — M. B. Evenson, H. S. 
DahlenJ Jorgen Eide. 
j Deacons — John J. Aga, E. A. Mos- 
tue, John J. Weeks, Andrew J. Loft- 
nessj Jorgen Adsero. 

Supt. Sunday school— Gynther Tes- 
sum. . 

The church gained 72 members dur- 
ing the current year. The total re- 
ceipts 'were $5,504.69, the disburse- 
ments $4,972.88. 

The Trinity is entirely free from 
debt and a summary of the financial 
statement shows the following excel- 
lent condition of the church and its 
auxiliaries: 
Cash and inventory $24,831.81 



Ladies' Aid 

Young People's League _... 

Boys Club ._ .'. 

Sunday School „... 

Dorcas Society ._.. 



4,892.68 

72L52 

97.46 

93.83 

546.17 



Total 



_47.._. $31,183, 



Soft foods, especially puddings, are 
blamed by an eminent physician for 
jthe great number of adenoid cases in 
the United States. ( , 



Dewey Camp, No. 1025 of the Royal 
Neighbor Lodge held their installation 
of officers Wednesday evening at the 
Masonic hall and approximately one 
hundred and fifty were present to wit- 
ness the beautiful cermonies which 
were conducted by installing officer, 
Hattie Manther, ceremonial marshal, 
Laura Barden and Mrs. Ira G. Lane 
presiding at the piano. The follow- 
ing officers were installed for the en- 
suing year; Oracle, Bessie Robinson; 
past oracle, Ethel McClelland; vice- 
oracle, Clara Gullingsrud; chancellor, 
Bessie Knight; recorder, Orra Bich- 
ardson; receiver, Abbie Wassgren; 'in- 
ner sentinel; Emma Davidson; outer 
sentinel, Vera Carlson; manager, Fan- 
nie Protz; marshal, Blanche Protz; 
associate marshal, Lorena Gentz. 
Graces — Faith, Irene Smith; Endur- 
ance, Alice Erickson; Courage, Marie 
Carlson; Modesty, Hattie Holmstrom; 
Unselfishness, Marie Talland. 

A social hour of dancing followed 
and at midnight delicious refresh- 
ments were served. 



COAL — Order your hard 
and soft coal from the Chris- 
tenson & Voelz Hardware 
Co. Phone 23. tf 



LOCAL MARKETS 

Hansen A Barton. 

Wheat, No. 1 northern, per bu $1.1- 

Wbent, No. 2 northern, per bu 1.0b 

Wheat, No. 3 northern, per bu 1.00 

Durum wheat, No.l, per bu 76 

Durum wheat, No. 2, per bu 74 

Durum wheat, No. 3, per bu 60 

OatB, per bu -» .23 

Itye, per bu s.' 02 

Barley, per bu \ 34 

Plax, No. 1, per bu 1.88 

Flax, No. -2, per bij, 1.83 

Bran, per cwt J- 1.20 

SaortB, per cwt ,.. 1.20 

Thief Biver Frodnce Co, 

Spring chickens, per lb J5 

Old RooBters, per lb .10 

Hens, light, per lb .10 

Hens, heavy, per lb. ' .15 

Geese, per lb 10 

Ducks, per lb 12 

Cow HideB, per lb 04 

Milk, per quart 00 

Cream, per quart 35 

Butter, per lb 37 

Eggs, per dozen .30 

Cream, per quart 35 

Butter, per lb *» 34 

Eggs, per dozen .25 



CLASSIFIED COLUMN 



WANTED— INSURANCE AGENTS -AND 
salesmen. We believe we have the low- 
est priced restricted health and accident 
insurance on' the market. Liberal com- 
missions to part and full Unie men.-=County . 
agents wanted. " Trauo- Anderson Co., 120 
South Third St., Minneapolis, Minn. 



POUND— A SHEEP LINED OVERCOAT 

on streets of city. . Owner may hare the 

same by calling at the office of the chief of 

police and paying for this ad. 92-tf 



WANTED— COMPETENT MAID, LIGHT 

housework; good home; small family, 

410 Duluth Ave. N. 02-lt 



FOR RENT— ROOMS, ALL MODERN AND 

nicely furnished. 110 St. Paul Ave. S. 

Phone 332-J. 92-lt 



FOR RENT— FULLY MODERN, 

well furnished rooms. Phone 280, 

237 Knight Ave. N. 13-20-27 



ROOM— MODERN ROOM FOR RENT AT 
002 Main ave. Mrs. O. H. Olson. BOtf 



HEMSTITCHING — SELMA AND IDA 
JohnBon. 318 Horace ave. 90-97p 



FOR RENT— MODERN ^ROOM APART- 
ment, kitchenette and bath; may be had 
after Feb. 15. Please phone for appoint- 
ment Mrs. A. W. Swedenbnrg. 89tf- 



FOR SALE, TRADE OR RENT— CITY 

property and farms. See Andrew Ness 

and make a deal. Fl-22 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM FURNISHED 
house on Conley ave. Immediate pos- 
session. Lawrence Mtg. Co. 79-tf 



FOR RENT— A MODERN TURNISHED 
rooms. 801 Main ave. N. Phone 399. 83tf 



4 



FARM WANTED— WANTED TO HBAK 
from owner of a farm or good land for 
sale, price reasonable. L. Jones, Box 551, 
Olney, 111. 



COAL — Order your hard and soft 
coal from the Christenson & Voelz 
Hardware O. Phone 2S. tf 



CARLOAD OF 

Corn 



flWill have a carload of 
corn in Thief River Falls 
about the middle o f 
next week. 

Get Your Order In Now! 

Prices Will Be 



Right 

■ ^INQUIHE- 

Red Lake Falls Milling 

Company 
12S South LaBree 



S 




f"1 ■wW'&z'- 

' ' W-sJ-.s.p.r--*'*-"" 

1 ',1 i^ttt r ' eowei. 

V! :fe*!i 



^ 



L' ti •"Si/.iv" 1 "L* tAtice 



CHIROPRACTIC 

WILL GIVE VOL! HEALTH 



Jennie M. 

EASTMAN 

Pioneer Chiropractic 

Hours 10-12 a. m., 2-5 p. m. 

Evenings by appointment. 

Phones/ 213-1. Res.' 213-2. 

Offices' over First and Peoples' 
Bank Bldg. 



FREE 

Coffee and Cake 

We wish to announce that we have moved our stock of groceries, fruits etc. 
next door to our old location, 301 Main Avenue North, and on Saturday, by 
way of introducing our new and more spacious quarters to all our old custo- 
mers, we will serve free coffee and cake all day Saturday. ; 

Come In the Morning and Come In The Afternoon 
and Make Yourself at Home. 

We have recently added td our line a new and fresh assortment of the best- 
known brands of groceries and when you want the best you will make your 
purchases here. 

WE DELIVER 

BREDESON & GO. 

THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINN. 









£" 






_*a.. 



K 



Vol. 21 



Down-State 

-. Men Win 
iFrom 



iti i inii ii 



"•islorlcnl Society 



No. 94 








THIEF RIVER FALLS, MINNESOTA, JANUARY 24, 1922 



Cambridge Takes 
Two-Game Series 



Basket Bal 
Both Contests 
Local Men. 



Norton, AI -American High 

•Star, Puts Up Classv 

Performance 



LOUDEN to FINISH HERE 



♦ 
♦ 

♦ In responsi to a telegram sent ♦ 

♦ him by Dr. Penny, Louden late ♦ 

♦ today wired his, acceptance of the ♦ 

♦ terms submitted, and will appear ♦ 

♦ in a Thief Hi rer Falls uniform in 4 

♦ all future ganes. ♦ 

♦ . ♦ 
Ht lll H Il I i n M M M t t M 



The double-hiader basket ball bill 
at the Auditorium between the Cam- 1 
bridge five and the Thief River Falls 
aggregation played on Friday and 
Saturday night, resulted in Cambridge 
winning both co itests. The first by a 1 
score of 17 to 30 and the second by! 
the exceedingly close margin of 17 to 
18, the last gaAie perhaps being one 1 
of the most clostiy played and exciting 1 
games played ii Thief River Falls so 1 
far this year, ii which th e local five 
took the lead fram the start' and held 1 
it up until about ten minutes before! 
the .close of the half when Cam-! 
bridge, by a spurt of speed and a! 
like amount of good luck crawled up] 
and passed the local stars, but only 
done so after th ; local quint had their 
lineup seriously impaired by the loss 1 
of two of the outstanding players. ' 

Cambridge bought 'with them a! 
Thief River Fa: Is Norton, all-Ameri- 
can high school .performer, and Lou-; 
den, who is well-known to basket ball 
followers in Thisf River Falls, as well 
as other basket ball centers 6f the 
northwest. Bot i of these star per-: 
formers played leading roles Friday 
and Saturday night, particularly the 
first-mentioned foung star, who lived 
up to his reputation by speedy work 
on the floor anc also in flinging bas- 
ket after- basket for his team from 
deep positions, ;.nd his accuracy in 
this connection was the marvel, of the 
large crowd present at both contests. 

The loss of th? second game Satur- 
day evening ma;- again be safely laid 
to the incapacitation of "Swede" Carl- 
son, star forward of the local team, 
who no doubt ha> a regiment of jinxes 
following him a lout, determined that 
no game of his will be played with- 
out his taking liis share of punish- 
ment. In the ga ne with Two Harbors 
a couple of wesks ago he received 
a painful and '; erious sprain to his 
right ankle, and he entered the con- 
test Saturday n ght with two braces 
to protect the i ijured member. They 
provided him s<ant protection, how- 
ever, for during the spirited play the 
other, night he turned it again and 
was compelled tc retire from the line- 
up. 

Thief River Falls led the Cambridge 
team up to withii i less than 10 seconds 
of the close and the latter flinging 
two baskets at t lis stage of the fray 
resulted in defeat. The local boys 
deserved to win by 
averages known to 



contest Saturday night and it is un- 
derstood that they will not in future 
appear in the lineup. Local followers 
of these two basket ball men regret 
that they have dropped from the! role, 
but It is understood by The Tribune 
that the men/have left the team as far 
as any future appearances are; con- 
cerned. ■ ! j ' : 



$2 a Year in Advance 



OSTBY IS WINNER IN I 

PHONOGRAPH CONTEST 



The prize! contest conducted by the 
Thief River j Music company came to 
a close Saturday when a good-sized 
crowd gathered at the store to witness 
the drawing! of the lucky numbers. A 
Brunswick phonograph, first prize, 
was won by Orrin Otsby of Thief 
River Falls,; 4480 being the winning 
number. Second prize, a violin, ^ent 
to W. E. Smith, farmer, living jwest 
choice iv 



$500 or More to 
Each of These 



Secretary Engelstad Gives 

Tribune List of Patrons 

Who Made Record 



Sfate Does Big 
Business In 1921 



Sixty-Seven Collected More 

Than $500 for Cream 

Year Just Passed 



Secretary Engelstad has furnished 
the Tribune with the following list of 
patrons of the local creamery whose 
checks for the year exceeded $500 and 



of this city; Third prize, * uno. =«,. ^ be noticed ^ t collected 

of 10 phonograph records went to L. \. rf ?1 „„„ 

I. Hermanson, who also farms inear!~ 
Thief River iFalls. 



The contest, which included the is- 
suing of tickets with each dollar's 
worth of merchandise purchased at 
the store during the existence of the 
contest, was considered, highly | suc- 
cessful from] the standpoint of j the 
music company. 



GIRLS' COMMUNITT CLUB 

HOLD REGULAR MEETING 



A regular: meeting of the Girls 1 
Community club was held last I eve- 
ning at the ; : Commercial club rooms. 
The usual business session was! held 
and a committee composed of Ruth 
Soule, Velma Webster, Miss Chamber- 
lain and Esther Gjertson were ap- 
pointed to investigate plays, the! club 
having decided that they put on a 
home talent jproduction some time in 
the near future. ' j 

The speaker of the evening was At- 
torney Theoi Quale, who had been 
asked to discuss the child labor ques- 
tion, as the last meeting in January 
had been designated to be devoted to 
this question; ; 



Will E.-. Smith 
F; M. Kline .... 
Knut Finstad .. 
Hans Sande .... 
L. O. Steriseth 
H. C. Woolsen .. 
The religious meetings that havejQ L gkonovd 



WILL DISCONTINUE MEETINGS 
DURING PRESENT COLD SPELL 



Hans Anton ?2854.73 

P. Engelstad _... 2798.97 

Jens Kierk _ _ 2448.83' 

Waldie Christensen _ 1442.65 

Henry Koop 1415 68 

Paul Engelstad - 1208.43 

R. M. Johnson 1269.01 

S. Wiberg 1183.68 

S. E. Hunt „ 1074.41 

Fred Copp . 1034.40 

August Koglin — 989.20 

Mrs. J. J. Berg ...: 922.12 

Christ Nelson : 888.06 

A. C. Simonson 860.24 



Henry Pope 

M. T. McFarland . 
E. Edman 



J. A. Funnesdahl .... 

N. A. Nelson 

H. T. Waale 

Knut Solheim _ 

C. M. Hoverstad 812.51 

O. S. Breiland 774.29 

C. H. Swanson 762.60 



856.62: 
842.53 
840.44 
839.15 
83L25 
827.75 
821.74 



H. A. Matthees 
A. K. Haggy .... 
Gust Wilkin — 



been held at the Swedish Baptist 'jj' rs jjogjjeck 

church in this city the past week; the « Linden — - 

last of which was held Sunday jeve- ; j^ tie Meyer"!!™.—..- 

ning, will not be continued during the ^ m jj onner ""'" 

present cold weather, The Tribune has! j ^ Hardesty & Son '... 

been informed by A. A. Ohm and L. O. ' gilas' Tergerson : - 657.48 

Williams, who have been in charge of , . , jj overs t a d — " 

the meetings jhere. I ' R Oen 

Mr. and' Mrs. Rav Burris.of Mah- ' G , ust „ E , d ™f\ 



fought hard and 
all the law of 
basket ball.- 

The work of Norton was decidedly 
hard to overcome. His long and sue. 
cessful shots th: it dealt such telling 
blows to the def mse put up by Thief 



^.™l*'f£™— ^ 



the two defeats. 



game. 

once again and 

trouble for the v 



no mean ability, 
man in the lineuj 
ong for Carlson, 
Kiland, who has 



.^C ance, and fought 
Louden, formei 



7i58.il 
751.32 
725.31 
702.90 
698.38 
692.88 
687.57 
678.99 
677.77 
677.63 
675.28 
672.09 
666.16 
666.11 
663:94 



653.61 
646.27 
633.84 

W. P. Willadson .V 632.44 

C. Weiner - 61 4 - 08 

,S. Sovenson ._ _ 587.32 

, 'Fuller & Co - 585.81 

Miss Eileen Herron left Monday af- P. Voldness 
ternoon for ! Crookston to spenil a Joe Oski 



nomen arrived here Friday evening 
and will spend a brief period visiting 
friends and attending to business. 



Transactions in Past Twelve 

'Months Total Over One 

Hundred Million 



Sale Motor Licenses Turns 
"i in More Than $5,000, 
000 to Treasury 



BRING YOUR BASKETS 



short time with friends and 'also 1 at- 1 C. Odegaard . 
tend the Bemidji-Crookston basket; ball [Mrs. B. Saugen 

game. She returned home this morn- 'Jacob Klurigness 549.38 

i ng . ' iPeder Hedeen 548.99 

— ; i F. B. Conklin 



Bank of Nations 
Plan of Senatbr 



Hitchcock 1 Would have Unit- 
ed States Hold Bulk of 
Stock in Institution j 



Knut Ystesund 544.03 

O. B. Gunderson _..». 537.42 

Joljn Sjolsvold ...1 529.56 

Aug. Johnson 528.76 

P. Hornseth - 528.10 

C. Beiswenger - - 524.69 

P. Solom ._.. - •••- 523.63 

.Albert Hanson 517.81 

j Carl E. Erick'son 5X1-.6C 



iWould Have Capital of $2,- 
400,000,000, With Headj- 
quarters in N. Y. I 



A bank of nations, with the United 
States as a majority stockholder! an 



Aug. Carlson 

C. E. Oien -.. 

John Kellberg ... 
E. A. Yonke 



DR. W. L. BOYD HEADS 

STATE VETERINARIANS 



Dr. W. L. Boyd, professor of veter- 
inary medicine at the University of 
Minnesota was elected president of 
the Minnesota's State Veterinary Med- 



. Minnesota did the largest business 
in its history during the year just 
closed. . 

For the twelve; calendar months 
ending, December 31, 1921, according 
to figures compiled by the state audit- 
or,' transactions involving a total of 
$102,387,474.20 were entered in the 
books of the department. 

Of this amount j $50,997,726.94 rep- 
resented . receipts ■ while the expend- 
itures totaled $51,389,747.26. The 
legal bookkeeping period for the state 
is from July to July, hence the ex- 
cess of expenditures. 

From- taxes of various kinds the 
state treasury was enriched to the 
extent of- $22,744,590.39. Department- 
al fees, and other earnings contribut- 
ed the ^balance, $28,253,236.55. The 
largest '.source of revenue was from 
,state taxes amounting to $11,271,650, 
08 andi the" second largest, the rail- 
road gross earnings tax. From this 
source more than $8,000,000 was real- 
ized. Another large revenue producer 
was the. sale of motor licenses which 
is the principal basis of the good roads 
program inaugurated to pull Minne- 
sota out-bf the mud. More than $5,- 
000,000, was received from the sale of 
auto tags, 

WMle direct taxation is the chief 
source of revenue of every common- 
wealth :there are other lines or rev- 
enue and thes e are found in depart- 
mental fees and earnings of various 
kinds. Minnesota fared well in this 
respect last year and to the credit of 
those in charge it must be said that 
the receipts in the majority of cases 
were in excess of the expenditures. 
Thei state insurance department gave 
its check for over $125,000. The dairy 
and "' food department was credited 
with earnings of" over $175,000 am; 
the state game and fish commission 
with a sum slightly under $400,000. 
Large earning factors were those of 
hotel inspection with receipts of over 
$41,000. Oil inspection with receipts 
of more than $173,000, and the sec- 
retary of state with fees from the 
filing of articles of incorporation to- 
taling $107,705. Royalties from iron 
ore mined on state land exceeded 
550.08; $1,000,000. Interest on state, loans 
aidecLjnaterially, likewise the interest 
due on the sale of state lands. The 
two were responsible for a contribu- 
tion of more than $3,000,000. 

Although receipts are a necessity 
and their increase^ with the years 
cause for rejoicing and an indication 
of the state's prosperity, it is the ex- 
penditures that interest the average 
taxpayer. Some large items in dis- 
bursements were listed last year but 
they were mostly in aid of some state 
activity such as agriculture, good 
roads and education. Over $10,000,- 
000 was expended for the latter. Next 
come special aid to veterans of the 
World- war and in turn the construc- 
tion of good roads. Minnesota's finan- 
cial story, however, is best told in the 
tables covering the principal items of 
receipts and expenditures for the year 
just closed. 



558.68 
556.09 
554.'' 



546.18 



Sons of Norway to Hold Basket Social 
Thursday 

The social event of the week will.be 
the basket social of the Sons of Nor- 
way to be held Thursday evening of 
this week. It was announced today, 
that an interesting program had been 
arranged, including several musical 
numbers, and following the sale of 
baskets, there will be a social session 
which includes card's and dancing. 

The lodge officials extend a cor- 
dial invitation to the public to attend 
the social and dance, and the ladies 
are particularly invited to bring. bas- 
kets. 



GILBERT FIVE TO APPEAR. 



Champions of Iron Range Play Here 
Friday and Saturday. ' 

The Gilbert basket ball team, which 
is rated to be the champion five of the 
iron range country of Minnesota, will 
appear in Thief River Falls on Friday 
and Saturday evenings of this week 
to take on the local quint. The Gil- 
bert team has a noteworthy aggrega- 
tion this year, it is understood, and 
come here determined to add to their 
laurels. They are scheduled to take 
on the fast Two Harbors five early in 
March, as well as several other cham- 
pion teams of Minnesota. The games 
are to be played at the Auditorium 
and the usual prices of admission will 
be charged. 

FARM CROPS DECREASE 



Unprecedented Drop of 59 Per Cent 
an Aire in Value of Grain 

There is no parallel in the records 
of the bureau of markets and crops 
etsimates, to the fall of $2i.22, 29 
per cent, in the average value per 
acre, of ten crops, constituting nine- 
tenths of all the crops produced, which 
occurred in the two years from 1919 
to 1921. It was announced today by 
the department of agriculture. The 
decline was found by the department 
to have been from $35.74 in 1919 to 
$14.52 in 1921. 

The general trend of the average 
was downward, the department's fig- 
ures show, from about $14 per acre in 
the years immediately following the 
civil war, to hardly S8 in 1896, the 
lowest point in the industrial depres- 
sion of that .time, it was said. 

The average per acre_advanced to 
$16.49 in 1913, and reached the "peak" 
of $35.74 in 1919, 

The fall in the average, the depart- 
ment said, after 1919. was "more rap- 
id than the ascent at the beginning 
of the war- 



New Mayor Takes 

Office Saturday- 
Wiiiis Nason, Patrol Leader,- 
to Assume High Office 
for One Day Only 



Mayor Bratrud Will take 

Much Needed Rest and 

Vacation Over Sunday 



Next Saturday it will be Mayor 
Nason. Willis Nason, 15, patrol lead- 
er of the boy scouts, has been select- 
ed to fill the office of mayor for a 
day to see what the boys would do 
when invested with full- authority. 
Mayor Bratrud has given his consent, 
and on Saturday morning will turn his 
regalia over to his successor for the 
day. Gee, boys, what kind of a man 
is this new mayor? Is he strong for 
the rights of the down trodden young 
person, now amenable to the curfew 
ordinances and other obnoxious juv- 
enile barriers to late nights, or is he 
a stern visaged young man with a 
civic mission? 

We understand the new mayor will 
hold a special council meeting late 
Saturday and will ask some embar- 
rasing questions of movie proprietors 
and others who are in the habit of 
sending the boys home at the stroke 
of 9:00 bells. He may also fire the 
police department unless they agree to 
wink the other eye when small boys 
are caught out after dark in the sum- 
mer time. He may have other reforms 
in view, but as we understand it, most 
of the changes are in the direction of 
making life more bearable for the 
young man who desires freedom from 
all restraint. 

•The experiment will be watched 
with interest and the Tribune will 
endeavor to give next week the im- 
pressions received by the young man 
and his friends of the city, its vices 
and its virtues, as seen from the may- 
or's office. 



WOMAN'S CLUB MEETS AT | 
COMMERCIAL CLUB MONDAY 



505.77 
499.72 
497.10 
495.49 



He was in excellent 



form Friday night, but the "little fel- 
low in red" didn't get off half so well 
in his second appearance Saturday 
. evening. His" f -equent attempts at 
long shots, although nearly always 
perilously close t) the cage, shots that 
were well-timed md prettily executed, 
somehow or other did not go through 
the rim for coun ;s. ' He did, however, 
make one brilliant shot in Saturday's 
contest by an ov^r-head attempt that 
went through : he cage without a 
murmur. 

Hadrath was i i a new position for 
Thief River Fa: Is at guard and it 
must be said th it he played a good 
He seem: id to . be his old self 
he caused plenty of 
isitors. Brown, too, 
done well, and tenney demonstrated 
that he is a basket ball performer of 
Larson was a .new 
Saturday, substitut 
previously injured. 
ilso suffered injuries 



stitute for gold, and conduct of world g t _ paul Jan 12 and 13. Other of- 
business on a; credit instead of a cash jjj c ' ers elected were: A. J. O'Hara, 
basis, were [advocated by United Northfield, first vice-president; B. L, 
States Senator Hitchcock of Nebraska, j Cook, Farmington, second vice-presi- 
in an address today before the Am-jdent; and Dr. C. P. Fitch, head of the 
erican Manufacturers Export associa- veterinary medicine division at Uni- 
tion in New York last week. i J versify farm, secretary -treasurer. 

Senator Hitchcock discussed a] bill With an attendance of 225 veterinar- 
which he has] introduced in the sehateiians, the 1922 meeting was one of the 
oroviding, for -establishing such a bank! most successful in history, 
if nationsSftth $2,400,000,000 capital. | "The veterinary profession is much 
The United States, he said, would hold interested m the control and eradica- 
51,30O,OOO,OOO : of the stock and bank-. Hon o* bovine tuberculosis," Dr. Boyd 
;rs, importers and exporters of ;this ; says: "I* is a big problem and re- 
:oiintry another $200,000,000, leaving quires much work especially of a co- 
;he remaining $900,000,000 to be pur- ! operative nature.' The new president, 
:hased by other leading nations. I |who has been at University farm for 

The United^ States, by virtue of its; 10 years, is a native of Lake City and 
tockholders, would choose thirteen received his education in Missouri. 
)f the bank's twenty-four directors. I The association was invited to come 
Headquarters j would be at New York.! to Red Wing, Glenwood and Waconia 



in former contests, put in an appear- 



hard for a. win 
performer here, this 
time brought ale ng his big . brother, 
but the latter did not in .any- depart- 
ment come up t> . the _class of ..his. 
brother. He frequently fouled and 



failed to connect 
the basket. 

"Red" Plummet 
did not appear m the floor in the 



any too .often, with 
and Holtzknecht 



The directors {would have power to is ; 
sue currency |to be known as the! in- 
srnational dollar, which would elimi- 
late the continual shipment of gold 
Detween countries, according to Seii- 
itor Hitchcock's plan. 

Asserting that "credit represents 
iie difference between the vast busir 
less enterprises of civilized man and 
Jje insignificant operations of primi- 
;jve .man," Senator Hitchcock, told 
: ;he , association that, the practical 
<:ollapse..of international commerce, is 



for its summer meeting but no definite 
place was named. Summer meetings 
are usually held some place out side 
of the Twin Cities, in order to help 
the rural districts with their problems. 

Harold Provencher arrived here on 
Saturday evening from Fargo, N. D., 
and will spend an indefinite period 
with his family. 



Myron- Pluihmer, who has been a 

member ofthe local basket ball team 

left Sunday evening for. Bemidji where 

due to the-fact that nations are. ..try* kaphas, accepted a position, and also 

ng to do business for cash." j go on a tour with the Bemidji team. 



Railroad Rates 



FIRST GRADE CHILDREN 



School authorities make the request 
that parents who have children ready 
for the first grade,: please see to it 
that they enroll at ; once. An effort 
will be made to accommodate, all chil- 
dren becoming six before March 27, 
but it is imperative: that they enroll 
at once. Children becoming five be- 
fore March 27 will be admitted to 
the kindergarten departments. 



"42 BELOW" WEATHER. 



Cold Wave Commencing Saturday Is 
Continuing Unabated. 

The cold wave, 8* old-fashioned 
blizzard, that visited i this section of 
the country Saturday, has left in its 
wake the coldest weather so far ex- 
perienced this year. The thermometer, 
which registered 25 below zero Satur- 
day night, has crept steadily until Sun- 
day morning thermometers in various 
sections of the city stood at from 38 
to 42 degrees .below zero. 

Snow was blowing furiously Satur- 
day afternoon, but abated during the 
night. Sunday morning, bright and 
clear, brought with it the bitter cold 
that is continuing at the time The 
Tribune goes to press. 

Weather reports :do' not indicate 
that there will be any appreciable let- 
up in the cold spell, and it is thought 
that it will continue for several days. 

The present cold wave is by far the 
coldest .weather of the winter. 



The Woman's club held their reg- 
ular meeting .yesterday afternoon at 
the Commercial club rooms. ,Mis. j. 
M. Bishop, county chairman of the 
Child Welfare board, gave a very in- 
teresting address on "Child Labor," as 
.-en more rapid than the| Januarv 23 had been designated" as 
assent when this country became a|- the dav . for ! the soIution of this b L 
belligerent. If the average value .per: ]em _ The rest of the m waa 

acre went up like a rocket, it eame: in ch of JIrs _ A N _ H n who 

do™ hke-a stick." : read a paper on .. Mo(lern Photo . 

1-. ■-. tt * i - 1 sraphy. Current Events with Mrs. W. 

r arm Bureaus Hit : H - Akre as leader was assisted b ? 

"jMrs. B. W. Briggs. 

Mrs. H. W. Froehlich-as chairman of 
the comforter committee of the club 
for making a comforter for state 
president, Mrs. Rounds, reported that 
the quilt had been completed and was 
on exhibit Monday at Loken's store. 

The next meeting of the club will 
be February 6, and will be in the 
nature of a social affair and valentine 
party to be m charge of Mrs. T. L. 
Melgard and committee. Refreshments 
\vlir be served and the following com- 
mittee was appointed to serve; Chair- 
man, Mrs. Ruppre'cht, assisted by Mrs. 
Jung, Mrs. C. T. Christenson and Mrs. 
H. O. Loken. 

Owing to the fact that the piano 
is in such bad condition, the various 
organizations using the club rooms 
have been unable to havf? any music 
at their programs. 

The Social Welfare section of the 
club will meet Monday afternoon, Jan- 
uary 30. Lunch -will be served by 
Mrs. E. J. Richards. and Mrs. A. S. 
Sapero. at the Commercial club rooms 
and sewing will be done in the work 
room up-stairs. A large attendance 
is desired as the call for clothing is 
becoming so great. 



Federation Defends Farm- 
ers' and Consumers' In- 
terests in Hearings 



Attorney Says Present .In-. 

quiry Involves- Millions. 

in Rate Reductions 



The American Farm Bureau feder- 
ation, backed up by the state feder- 
ations, is making another vigorous 
attack on railroad freight rates, ac- 
cording to information received at the 
county farm bureau office. 

Transportation experts and attor- 
neys employed by the federation are 
appearing every day before . the In- 
terstate Commerce commission to de- 
fend the interests of the farmers and 
the consuming public in a general rate 
investigation is- to last until late in 
February. 

"The American Farm Bureau fed- 
eration already has saved every Am- 
erican farmer an average of $30 in 
lower freight rates for i-922," James 
R. Howard, president of the federa- 
tion, said in announcing-plans for the 
farmers' new fight before the federal 
commission. ; J 

The present inquiry involves rate 
reductions that will mean millions, of 
dollars to the general public, the 
farm bureau attorneys say. They are 
devoting particular attention to the 
hearings on lumber rates, Jan. 26, and 
27; on fertilizers, Jan. 28; on the 
farmers, shippers' and consumers' -at- 
titude toward freight rates, Jan.' 30 
to Feb. 4; vegetable oil, Feb: 8; grain, 
and agricultural products, Feb.:9; 
livestock, Feb. 10; canned goods and 
wholesale groceries, Feb. 15; fruits 
and vegetables, Feb. 16 and 17; and 
milk, cream and dairy products ; on 
Feb. 18. | ■ 

The farm bureau; is represented! by 
Clifford Thorne, .general .'counsel, and 
C. B. Hutchings, its traffic manager. 



Hope makes hopeless fools of some 
people. • • -'■''. 



$100,000 FIRE AT ORTONVIELE. 



Two Newspapers There Are Among 
Sufferers From Blaze 

Fanned by a heayy west wind a fire 
Thursday afternoon destroyed proper- 
tp of an estimated value of $100,000 
in -the- business center here. 

The M. Schoen three-story brick 
building was destroyed, caupsing a.- 
loss of $31,000. The stock of the M. 
M. Johnson furniture store, locatei- 
in the building, was bumed with a. 
loss of $24,000. 

Other firms suffering losses are the 
Alva Matthews Implement store; Or- 
tonville State Bank; Ortonville Jour- 
nal; Ortonville Star and Tollitz Mer- 
cantile company. 

Firemen were hampered, by a light 
water pressure and asked Milbank for 
aid, but this call- was cancelled, as 
•the fire -burneiiitself out.;in half an 
hour. -"I' -:■ ''' ■■':■- ' ' •■::■ 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Johnson re- 
turned^, home Monday 'morning from 
Minneapolis and Northwflod, la, where 
they -have spent the past two weeks 
visiting relatives. 



V 





Annual Financial Statement 

(Ciiiittniied from Page Five) 



W H. Wilde, dragging rond .. 

.J *F. Keil, drugging road 

G. B. Tve t, dragging road .... 
"Wicks Pniie & Lamb, interest on 

■warrant* 
Ole MathBt n 

ing crew ..........•••••• 

E H. Stephens, hauling gravel .. 
Gerald Stephens, hauling gravel 



n," supplies for gravel- 



Total 



To Whom! Issued— 

For What Purpose. 
To Whom Issued— 

For What Purpose. 
11 McGini, insp«tjng road ... 

,T S. Koy inspecting road 

Gust Nap in, inBpecttng road .. 
r W. HinBon, Inspecting road 
Ed Grout dhouae, dragging road 
B McGin i, interest on .warrants 
Gilbert Peterson, work on Burvey 



Lyle Culi 
Total 



To Whon 
For 



ert Co., culverts 



John Mal^sneBB, dragging., 
Total 



O. Se ivey, patrolman., 



F|in I 



tad, patrolman 
_ Fin itad, patrolman 
M. O. Sea -ey, patrolman 
Bert W " " " 



mland, work on read... 

ey, work on road 

stad, work on road.... 
d, partial estininte ex- 



. li 

M. O. Sea 

H. I. Fin 
P. Lu 
cavatioi: ■%-.-- 

First & Peoples State Bank, 
teres t 01 warrants 

Lyle Conugated Culvert Co.. cul- 
verts . 

H. I. Fins tad, dragging road. 

M. O. Seavey, dragging road. 

""" "" Fifistad, dragging road. 



H. 

G. 
H. I. 



W. LcBree, work on road. 



, Fin 
Li 

H. P. L 
road w 



H. I." Fi 
Oliver 



Floyd Ba 
John Vni , 
Roy Kic 
Arnt Wo 
J. O. Stei 



Orlie Ho 
Harry H 
Swan Sv 
Swan Sw 



Em II Za; 



Bennie 
K. Kiihi 
R. Kubii: 



Herman 
O. Urdu 
E. L. K 
Ed. Vat I 
M. M. A 
R. T. 
3ulill! 
Illgvold 
51. 0. " 



Olaus 
Henry 



John M. 



Jerry P 
Ben Ra< 
Justice 
Arnt Jo 
Oliver I 



State Road No; 5. 



State Boad No. 6 



Issued — 
"What Purpose. 




THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 24, 1922 



12 on 

30 00 
12 00 



50 70 
12 00 
10 30 



$32618 34 



Amount. 

$3 &. 

" 4 60 

6 80 

300 

237 40 

45 87 

S 75 

110 30 

$419 98 



Amount. 
$19 00 



State Boad No. 1 



$19 00 



$34 50 

25 00 
' 22 00 

26 00 
30 00 
30 50 
25 90 



tad, dragging road 

nd, road work 

ind, final payment on 
>rk 



Bert W. IJmland, work on survey 



t.stnd, dragging 

.. !Ban, dragging 

W. H luson, inspecting road.. 
S. Kay, inspecting road. . . 
Nai lln, inspecting road.. 
51. O. Seavey. hauling gravel 
H. I. Finiitud, dragging road 
Henry Ivirsoii, hauling gravel 
~~" ~iird, hauling gravel 

, hauling gravel 
. . hauling gravel 
oideel, hauling .gravel 
i nes, t hauling gravel.. 
Halvor Olson, hauling gravel. 
Bennie Jt hnson, hauling gravel. 
Ed Vatni:, haulin£?gri]vel. 
Buden G^indersonVhauling grav 
el .... 

Larnk, hauling gravel, 
Eddie Halvorson, hauling gravel 
Chas. Stdin. hauling gravel 
odal, hauling gravel 
3. eland, hauling gravel 
vaiiHon, hauling gravel 
Vinson, hauling gravel, 



Henry Hyland, hauling gravel. 



atal, hauling gravel.. 



Hubert Jwova, hauling gravel... 



iving, hauling gravel., 
lack, hauling gravel., 
ack, hauling gravel. 



Arue Markerson, hauling gravel. 
Gust BetkiiPBB. ha^iling^gravel... 
B. B. Wivgnesa, hauling gravel. 
Gunder JVestnlnte^hauling gravel 
" Jessio T^nner.^-haultng gravel.. 
Ole T. teviug', hauling gravel... 
Eddie Giving, hauling gravel... 
Ing. Geiing, hauling gravel ... 
Selnier Erickson, hauling gravel 
-llenrv Irickson, liauling gravel 
John* Er efeson. hauling gravel. 



.1. Pakri. hauling gravel 

hauling gravel 

itchy, work on pit 

hauling gravel 

idcrsim, liauling gravel 

son. hauling gravel... 

phciiHou, loading gravel 
Geving, hauling gravel 
St'.ivey, liauling gravel — 
M. EerdenaiiBon, hauling 
„ ravel, 
Henry I 'yinnd. hauling gravel 
S: n. hauling gravel ... 
ollefson. hauling gravel 



J. S.* Mfjilur, hauling gravel., 



Juhnson, hauling gravel 



Kiiut Siirlcy. hauling gravel.. 



Race, hauliiig gravel. 

c. hauling gravel 

lanson. liauling gravel, 
innon, hauling gravel... 
esan, hauling gravel. 



Oliver I esan, dragging road. 



G 69 

95 42 
24 00 
^ TJ 0U 
10 50 
12 00 
*12 50 
3,440 99 

1,055 97 
15 00 
12 00 
111.00 



pen Mercantile, Company, sup- 

A. W. I ' Hanson, commissioners 

mileage :,'""." 

John Mostrom, partial estimate 
H. Wi Lazier, work repairing 

E. F. IBerganV'work repairing 
trucks ; • : * 

Aaseby & Burstad, work repairing 
trucks ,..,...•■■••■■ •»•■ ••• 

O O IHofdal, work on roads.. 

Hans'* Prestby, wort on roads.. 

Lyle Corrugated Culvert Com- 
^any. grader blades • ••••' 

Lyle .Corrugated Culvert Com- 
pany road signs .. :;!•;•• 

Ed G; Pearson, hauling gravel.. 

Wood -Hydralyze Hoist Company, 
supplies and repalrB .....!.... 

Nash Sales Company repairs, lor 

Thlet Blver iron Worka, shafting' 

Lyle Corrugated Culvert Com- 
pany, repairs v;* 

J S. :Koy, interest on warrant; 

The Prlchard Company, road 
drag ''"'.; 

The i Prlchard Company, road 
planer j," ' ' 

Lyle Corrugated Culvert Com- 
pany, grader blades ....>... . 

NortMleld Iron Works,. culverts 

Aaseby & Burstad, Interest on 
warrants !■•••• 

State iBank o£ Wylle, Interest on 
warrants ■'•••• 5S2 5S 

J. B. i McEnelly, partial estimate «5 48 

First {National Bank, Interest on 

First i and Peoples State Bank, 

interest on warrants . .... 

B F.' 1 Umlnnd. englneera expense 
B F„ Umland, engineers expense 
The I Prlchard . Company, road 

drag ■ ■•• 

Minneapolis Bridge Company, In- 
stalling culverts i.... 

Russell Grader Company, grader 

blades . . .'• :> • • •• 

Russell Grader Company, grader 

blades • ;. . . . 

Northfield Iron Works, culyertB 
First (National Bank, interest on 

warrants r .......... 

3. I. Flnstnd, appropriation town 

of Highlanding : 250 00 

Frank McGinity, livery for, en- 
gineer 9 00 

The Priehard Company, lath 12 45 

John IT. Coan, placing culvertBf. 20 00 
Lyle : Corrugated Culvert Com- 
pany, grader ....... f.... J87 00 



interest on war- 



55 

• 4 (10 
200 00 

84 50 

IB 50 

27 2.1 
36 75 
40 00 

59 40 

158 40 
4 00 

796 

77 50 
10 10 

15 60 



40 00 
35 00 



102 00 
25 73 



14 25 



Hans Jnsperson 
rant 

First & Peoples State Bnnk. in- 
terest and principal on ditch 
bonds ,• ^SS 



SO CO 



27 



H. P. Lund, leveling road 

Bj. Bjoruavaa, refundment on 

taxeB •••■ 

Oscar J. Peterson, committee 

work 

Oscar J. Peterson, committee 

work •••• 

Oscar J. Petereon, committee 

work 

Julius PeterBon, hauling 

Martin Helgeson, hauling 

John O. JohnBon, material for 

bridges 13800 

Ole MathBon, supplies 4 *> 

J. F. Kiel, hauling bridge mate- 

rul l 45 00 

Bert F. Umland, engineer's fees / 86 M 
The Prlchard Co., bridges... .... WO J7 

Gilbert Peterson, axeman 

Minneapolis Bridge Co., bridges.. 
Cttliens State Bank, Interest on 

bonds «J™ 

J. A. Doffy, refundment on taxes °^ OK 
T. P. Anderson, auditor's fees.. 
John Mostrom, lumber for bridge 
Basel Mercantile Co., material 

and supplies 

Ole Neiland, building bridges... 
Oscar Nesland, building bridges 
Minneapolis Bridge Co., draft 

l bolts , • • • • 

Oscar J. Peterson, committee 

work -•• 



408 78 

48 60 
110 00 
07 90 

84 00 

150 88 

915 

21 90 
68 50 

23 00 



34 52 

12 40 

5 00 

11 00 
9 00 
9 00 



10 50 
314 35 



2T25 
15 00 
70 08 

9 70 
384 40 
221 00 

14 00 

. 35 20 



First National Bnnk, St. Paul, 
Interest ditch bonds 

State Bank ot Warren, engineer's 
work by QuiBt 

R. E. Stromberg, assisting engi- 
neer • 

Hilmer Erickson. rodmnn 

Aimer Swnndby, chalnmnn 

Hilmer Erickson, rodmnn .- 

Total ?2,343 72 



02 57 

08 65 
40 50 
27 50 
5 50 



Judicial Dtleh. No. 41. 

To Whom Issued— • 

For What Pnrpose. 
First National Bank, Interest on 

ditch bonds ■ 

First National Bank, St. Paul, 

Interest on ditch bonds 



(94. So 
92 60 



Total »187 3« 



Amount. 
$7 80 
40 

5 20 
60 

6 60 

12 50 
40 45 



' Judicial Dllch No. 48. 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. 
Flrat National Bank, Interest on 

ditch bondB 

T. P. Anderson, auditor's fees.. 
Flrat National Bank, St. Paul, 

Interest on' ditch' bondB 



171 88 
13 20 



71 88 



Total I »1M0(! 



Total •••• W^ 15 



I Judicial Dltoh No. 2. 

To Whom Issued — 

For What PurpoBe. 
J. A. Duffy, refund on ditch : tax 
Northwestern TruBt Co., intereBt 

on ditch bonds 

John Nostrom, oak planks for 

bridges :,v,"i ?? in 

T P. Anderson, auditor's fees.. 1J 4n 
Northwestern Trust Co., St. Paul, 

interest on ditch bondB 



Amount. 
$5 25 



375 00 



14 40 
1 875 00 



Oliver 1 esan, hauling svnrel 

II ilvorson, hauling gravel. . 
James IveiiBon. dragging road... 
Hnlvor ' 31son, hauling gravel.... 
Oscar T aorvaldson, hauling grav- 
el •,•-; 

[verson. hauling gravel. J 
Iverson, hauling grnvel.,' 
S envick, hauling gravel...' 
: rohnson, hauling gravel. J 
Erickson, hnuling grnvel 
Erickson. hauling gravel 

t ecth. hauling gravel i 

'•undersoil, hauling gravel 

Kately, work on pit. J 

Tomnierdahl, hauling 



Casper 
Casper 
Oscar S 
Bennie 
Selnier 
John A. 
Carl Et 
Ruben 
E. L .li 
Oliver 

grave 1 

Theo. Ilylninl. hauling grnvel. 
W. Wryne, hauling gravel. 
Sig Myroui, supplies for gravelr 

ing C 



Grygla 



dynanite 
Thep. 



John > nrkenson. 



mack, hauling gravel.. 



R. 

U. Kuslinack. hauling gravel. 

John Husuiack, hauling gravel.. 



To Whom IsBiied— 



?' 



H. r. 

Ing 
G. B. 
Oscar 

road 
J. S. 

GllBt 

G. B 



... What Purpose. i 

Lund, final .estimnte grad- 



Tveidt. dragging road.... 
PeterBon. Inspecting 



[toy. inspecting road....L. 
^aplin. Inspecting road. 1 .. 
Tveidt, work on road..'.. 
Lyle Corrugated Culvert Co., cul- 
verts !• • 

H. PJ Lund, Interest on war- 
rant i • :- • 



Totil I- *1,044 36 



Bert 
■ Bert 



Engineer's Salary and Expense; 

WhomlsBUed — • ; 

?or What Purpose. Amount. 

W. Umland, salary ....'.. J2I00 00 

W*. Cmland, expenses . J . . 718 42 



Totil ■■■ *2818 42 



WellB- 



T. T. 

of 
Lyle 



Co.Operative Store Co. 1 , 



hauling grnvel 
hauling gravel 



11 80 
97 Si 

2 10 
72 00 
43 70 
51 00 

2 50 
10 00 

7 50 
156 50 
129 20 

37 50 

46 13 
30 00 
63 20 

8 00 

12 Ti 
61 50 
49 00 

6 00 

42 00 

51 80. 

' 50,40 

^54 40 

- 46- 50 

55 00 

48 00 
60 83 

44 S3 

49 50 
37 50 

100 80 
30 38 
87 35 

45 S3 
32 75 
20 50 
44 00 
■ 7 23 

170 40 
30 50 
86 00 
4 SO 
71 10 

37 50 
117 00 

90 SO 
2 50 

36 50 
250 73 
113 38 
100 43 

02 25 

69 93 
50 00 

120 00 
40 50 
110 30 

38 00 
67 40 
45 00 

4 55 
53 50 

04 00 

70 80 
30 50 

133 04 
57 00 
01, 
00 
12 45 
7 08 
3 67 

100 40 
80 89 

5 00 

55 70 

20 55 
20 00 

12 50 

13 13 
7 50 
9 00 



Paul Borgee, gravel pit ......... 225 00 

Gust ; Naplin, committee .work.. 80 

Lyle i Corrugated Culvert Com- 
pany, culverts - • . . • 

A. C. Swandby, clerk Marshall 
county,, Pennington county In- 
clusive, highway ; 105 47 

H. W. Lazier, work on county 
roads '. 

Northfield Iron Works, jroad 
planer ' 

Lyle | Corrugated Culvert Com- 
pany, culverts : . 

O. M: Mandt, appropriation town 
of Deer Park •: 

J. A; McEnelly, work on roads. 

J. A. : McEnelly, work on roads.. 

Halvor Holen, work on roadB.: 

Rambeck Sc Stone Company, re- 
pairs * ^ 

J. V. Hoffman, appropriation 
town of Star J 

H. T. Hanson, appropriation 
town of Hickory :..l 

Lyle> Corrugated Culvert |Com- 
pany, repairs C J 

Ward Hydraulic^ Company re- 
pairs ......< j 

Citizens State Bank, interest on 
warrants ^ L . . . . 

GuBt^NapHn, inspection of , roads 

_Guy#Peer8on, work on trucks . . 

AutayService Company, repairs 
onT trucks i 

First National Bank, interest, qn 
warrants • 

C. GuBtafson & Son. repairs .. 

Thief River Iron Works, repair, 
ing truekB, road graders 

J. 3i Aga, repairs 



Total 



54 68 



35 00 

35 00 

158 87 

350 00 
200 78 
90 30 
50 50 

8 90 

250 00 

250 00 



88 75 

10 00 
10 20 
52 80 

8 35 

174 84 
10 40 

110 25 
7 50 



Amount. 
$380 82 



1,440 00 



Total < v 1 ' 425 ? 

Judicial Ditch No. 13. 

To Whom Issued— 

For What PurpoBe. 

Oleander Uglum building bridges 

Farmers & Merchants State Bank, 
Interest on ditch bonds 1,451/5 

NorthweBtern Trust Co., intereBt 
on ditch bonds .............. 

Northwestern Nat. Bank, interest^ 
on ditch bonds 

A. E. Stromberg, aBBlstant en- 
gineer 

Elmer B. Swanby, rodman 

Warren State Bank, engineering 
by FulBt- 

R. McGinn, attending board meet- 

J. a. Boyj attending board meet- 
ing " ■ • • • • : 

Gust Naplin, attending board 
meeting — ■."•*: 

R. W. Hanson, attending board 
meeting- • 

r. w. Hanson, committee wort 

T* P. Anderson, auditors' fees.. 

Oscar J. PeterBon, attending 
bearing 

Elev Aakre, refundment on taxes 

Even Oae, partial estimate 138 ou 

Oscar J. Peterson, letting con- 
tract 

T. P. Anderson, auditors fees.. 

'R. E. Stromberg, assistant engi- 



19 50 
5 50 



5 20 



17 60 



7 30 
9 60 
5 00 



15 60 
3 



7 SO 
20 00 



56 00 


300 00 


57 00 


15 00 


23 50 


83 48 


51 or 


19 80 


12 5C 


57 OC 


10 4( 


8 8t 


5 0' 


n a 


5 00 


9 60 


5 0C 


5 0( 


5 00 



ST 70 

18 60 
10 50 
9 60 



$6271 64 



KECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF 
THE INCIDENTAL FUND. 

f Receipts. | " 
Transferred from county revenue 
fund | ?1502 20 



Total L $1502 26 



Disbursements, 



Warrants Issued $1502 20 



Total 



•?1502 26 



Postage .Stamps, Express and Incidentals, 



6 GO 
16 50 
15 56 



500 00 

15 60 

26 20 
5 50 
5 50 

600 00 



j $11,948 31 



State Road No. S 



Amount. 



8 25 
47 12 



•159 40 
22 82 



130 30 



SI 55 
14,00 



76 25 
2150 



816 
7 81 



$1,334 89 
31 00 

5 40 
7 50 
9 50 
00 00 



To :Whom Issued— 

; For What; Purpose. 

Northwestern Telephone, {"Com- 
pany, telephone rent^-i $595 69 

Ira ; C. Richardson,' postage, etc. ' ° °" 

W, ;J. LaBree,, postage arid ex? 
press . .'. • • • ! 

T. P. Anderson, postage express 
and freight J 

John Gullingsrud, postage .... 

Geo! M. Gunderson, postage and 
express ■■ . 1 

Adolf Eklund, postage and ex- 
press ' 

Wm. Arnold, wood 

A. ;H. Akre, city clerk, | water 
and lights 

R. \h. Polk, directories .|...>< 

N. J. Anderson, postage arni ex- 
press v-* < y 

Red Lake Ice Co.-ice ...'. 

City Dray and^-Fuel Company, 
draylng .„.*<T J 

Nor thern^Wood work Co. repair- 
ing ,,-iV : 

New Sanitary Supply Company, 
supplies ■ 

Lars Backe, postage L 

B. F. Umland, postage ..J 

Leonard Du Champ, auto] livery 
Simonson's Grocery, supplies -. 

C. ;M. EvenBon, repairing! trucks 

Hall Bros., supplies I - 

Martin Bothun. flowers .;....'... 

Frank McGinity, livery i 

James King, brooms ....j 

Geo. Leimers, expense ..1 

Seott Laird, supplies ...I 

Mrs. L. G. Larson, postage ... 
A. i K.- Dicken, unloading! wood. 

John Koall, wood I 

H.! A. Pratt, freight on ;wood.. 

Eniil Thune. wood L 

S. L. Sorenaon, wood '. 

Thorn Lien, wood '. 

Henry Snetting, wood 

Fred Staberg, wood 

Alvin Dahl, wood 

F.[ Burns, repairs , 

J. |W. Anderson, wood ... ! 

G.l C. Gustafson, wood : 

Total .■ 



neer :**;*" 

Irving. B. Qulst, engineer a fees 
Hilmer F. Erickson, rodman.... 
R. M. Hanson, letting contract.. 

Gust Naplin, letting contract 

J. S. Roy, letting contract 

Aimer Swanby, chairman 

Irwing E. QuiBt, engineer 

Continental & Commercial Na- 
tional Bank, principal and In- 

terest ditch bonds 5 510 2o 

Elof Aakre, partial estimate ex- 
amination ■ • • ■ ■ 

Warren Machine Works, engi- 

gineer's work by Quist 

A. E. Stromberg, assisting engi- 
neer . . . • 

Hilmer F. Erickson, rodman 

Aimer Swandby, chainmau 

Elev : Aakre, partial estimate ex- 
cavation - 

H. Halen, partial estimate ex- 
cavation 200 00 

Even Oae, partial estimate ex- 
cavation 

Even Ose, partial" estimate exca- 
vation 

Even Ose„ partial estimate exea 

vation 2 9550 

Halvor Holan, partial estimate 

excavation 

NorthweBtern Trust Co., St. 

Paul, Interest ditch bonds 

First National Bank, St. Paul, 

Interest ditch bonds 

Even Ose, final estimate excava- 

tion »« 2H 

Halvor Holen, partial estimate.. inA ftn 
Halvor Holen, final estimate.... 
Selraer Erickson, work on ditch.. 
vElev Aaker, partial estimate ex 

' cavatlop «JS 

Alfred Olson, placing culverts.. 1,IU1 
T. E. Stromberg, assisting engi- 
neer 

Aimer Swandby, chalnman .... 
Oleander Uglem, building bridge 
Elev Aaker, final estimate exca- 
vation ■ 

Elex Aaker, estimate final exca- 

Tatlon - • • • 

Oscar J. Peterson, committee 

work •••• 

A. M. Hanson, committee work.. 
T P. Anderson, auditor's fees.. 
K. J. Taralseth Co., engineer's 

work by Quist ••■ 

R. E. Stromberg, assisting engi- 



JidlcUI Ditch No. 44. 

To Whom issued— 

For What/ Purpose. Amount 

Adolf Eklund. clerk's fees $158 30 

J, M, Schei, i Interest on warrant 

Oscar J. Peterson, letting con- 
tract i • 

Adolf Eklund, /attending sale of 
job .-..,' 

T. P. Anderson, attending sale 
of Job ii....- 

Maurice Frank, assistant engi- 
neer office work 

W. J. Brown, attorney's fees... 

T. P. Anderson, auditor's feeB.. 

N. J. Anderson, recording lien.. 

Adolf Eklund, clerk's fees 

Geo. S. Znervold, assistant engi- 
neer .J,.[ 

Forrest ' Qilmore, rodman 

T. P. Anderson, auditor's fees.. 

Daniel Shaw, premium on bonds 

T. P. Anderson, auditor's fees.. 

R. McGinn, attending hearing... 

Gust Naplin, attending bond sale 

Gust Naplin, committee work... 

J. S. Roy( attending bond sale.. 

J. S. Roy) committee work 

R. W. Hanson, attending bond 
sale ... .1 '• 

R. W. Happon, committee work 

T. P. Anderson, auditor's fees.. 

T. P. Anderson, .sale of bonds 

Lewis P. (Nelson, partial esti- 
mate ...y 

F. and M. \State Bank, Interest 
on warrants 

State Bank \of Warren, interest 
on warrants 

Adolf Eklunq, Interest on war- 
rants . 

O. A. Napllt^ interest on war- 
rants ...... 

Goodridge State Bank, interest 
on warrants \ 

Axel RiBberg, epteridgj bonds 

Lewis A, Nelson, partial esti- 
mate ... 1 ... A. . L 

Lewis A. Nelson, partial esti- 
mate .v [. 

H. F. WadBwortq, rodman 

J. H. Bough, engineer 

Warren State Bank, Interest on 
.warrants v-m 

Daniel Shaw, Interest on war- 
rant [•••'. 

Louis F. NelBon, partial estimate 
excavation J,....; 

Summit Bank, Interest on war- 
rants ...-1 \.' 

J. H. Baugh. engineers fees.... 

Herbert F. I Wadswortb, rodman 

T. P. Anderson, attending meet- 
ing sale ;of job ...,\ 

Louis A. Nelson, partial estimate 
excavntion \......... 

First and PeopIeB State Bank, 

interest on ditch bonds 

Oscar J. Peterson, fees aVid mile- 
age attending sale of Job 

Adolf Eklund, fees attending sale 

of job \ ., 

Louis A. Nelson, partial estimate 

excavation .\ 

Louis A. Nelson, partinl estimate 

excavation 

Louis A. Nelson, final estimate 



5 00 
1 48 
5 50 
11 50 
8 80 


8 80 

9 60 
60 


8 48 
100 00 



County Ditch No. 35. 

To Whom Issued— 

For What Purpose. 
Oscar J. Peterson, attending sale 

of job 

Oscar J. Peterson, committee 

work . . . . ; 

R. McGinn, attending Bale of job 
R. McGinn, attending hearing.. 
J. S. Roy, committee work.... 
J. S. Roy, committee work.... 
A. A. Naplin, premium on 

bondB ' 

Carl Beiswlnger, interest on war- 
rants 

T. P. Anderson, attending sale of 

job 

H. A. Rogers, bine prints 

Elmer Llndstrand, chalnman. . . . 

Aimer Swandby, chalnman 

Gust Naplin, committee work .. 
Guit Naplin, attending .letting of 

bonds i 

A. W. Hamon, attending hearing 
A. W. Hanson, committee work 
State Bank of Warren, interest 

on warrant - 

Krist Larson, lumber for bridge 
Carl Beiswlnger, partial estimate 

excavation 

Oscar J. Peterson, committee 

work 

First National Bank, interest on 

bonds 

A. W. Hanson, inspecting bridge 
A. B. Stromberg, assistant en- 
gineer '....t.r. 

Aimer Swanby, rodman 

Warren Stat* Bank, engineering 
by Quist 

Hilmer F. Erickson, rodman — 

Warren State Bank, interest on 
warrants 

Oscar J. Peterson, committee 
work 

A. E. Stromberg, assistant en- 
gineer .............. ...i.. . 1 1\ 

Irwing H. Qulst, engineer 

Aimer Swanby, rodman 

Hilmer F. Erickson, chaiunian.. 

Aimer Swandby, chalnman...... 

A. E. Stromberg, assistant en- 
gineer - 

The Priehard Company, placing 
and material for bridge 3213 37 

Russell Grader Manufacturing 
Cq., bridge material 276 30 

Carl Beiswlnger, partial estimate 
excavation 1500 00 

The Prlchard Company, ' lum- 

Henry' HendrickBon, work on 
I _. b . r ^^?.? 



COUNTY DITCH FUND. 

County DHch No. 39. 

To Whom Issued— 

For What Purpose. 
A.- W. Hanson, attending letting 

of contract 

T. P. Anderson, auditors fees. 



9 60 
GO 00 



Total! $2316 44 



1000 00 
6 50 

285 00 

10 00 

B BO 
5 50 

11 40 
11 00 

4 18 

5 00 

86 
9 00 
5 50 
5 50 
11 00 

11 30 



110 81 



GENERAL DITCH FUND. 
Connty Ditch No. 41. 

To- Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

Citizens State' Bank, principal 

and Interest on. bonds 1024 00 

Merchants Loan & Trust Com- ' 

pany, interest on ditch bonds. 220 47 

Total 51244 47 

County Diteh No. 42. » 0j ^ 

To Whom Issued— 

"• For What Pnrpose. Amount. 

Northwestern Trust Company, 

Interest on ditch bonds ?2o5 00 

J. A. Duffy, refundment of ditch 

tax 3822 

Northwestern .Trust Company, _ 

interest on ditch bonds 225 00 

Total $528 22 



Connty Ditch No. 43. 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. j 

J. A. Duffy, refundment of ditch 

tax 

Citizens State Bank, principal 

aTtd Interest on bonds 

O, K SJiomedal, refundment of 
aitch tax ....- , 

John MoBtrom, piling 

A. W. Hanson, committee work 

N. P. Larson, building bridge.. 

R. McGinn, committee work .. 

J. S. Roy, committee work .... 

Gnst Naplin, committee work .. 

A. W. Hanson, inspecting bridge 

J. S. Roy, committee work.... 

Merchants Loan and Trust Com- 
pany, IntereBt on ditch bonds 

J. A. Duffy, refundment of ditch 
tax 



'70 
5 00 



680 20 
33 00 
111 00 



11 50 
33 92 
11 00 



69 25 
45 00 



Elling Kjoness, work on bridge 

F. . E. McGinn, interest on war- 
rants {. ■ 

O. O. Hofdal, building bridge ... 

Curl BeiBWinger, final estimate 
excavation .' 

Jog Hilan, part payment, for 
clearing •• . • j ....... ' 

Erling Prestby, work on bridge 

Oscar J. Peterson, inspecting 
ditch : • 

A. W. Hanson, inspecting ditelr 

T. P. Anderson, auditors fees... 

T. P. Anderson, mailing notices 
of hearing 

A. E. Stromberg, assisting en- 
gineer *.... 

Hilmer F. Erickson, rodman ... 

R. McGinn, Inspecting ditch .... 

J. S. Roy. committee work 

Gust Naplin, inspecting ditch ... 

The Prlchard. Company lumber 
for bridge 

Norman Stenberg, work on ditch 

JameB Conely, work on ditch... 

First National Bank St. Paul, 
interest on ditch bonds 

A. E. Stromberg, assistant en- 
gineer .....' ■ 

A. V. Jacobson, work on ditch 

Christ Kruse, work on ditch ... 

Gust LIndberg, work on bridge. 

Total ; $7013 10 



15 47 
147 00 



255 00 
69 00 

15 00 
14 60 
5 00 

22 50 

31 78 

5 50 

10 20 

11 60 
13 80 

32 03 
47 6b 
73 69 

285 00 

12 50 
40 25 

6 50 
1 50 



Connty Ditch No. 36. 

To Whom Issued— 

For What Purpose. 

J. A. Duffy, refund on ditch taxes 

T. P. Anderson, auditors fees.. 

N. J. Anderson, recording lien 

statement 

Total .- 



Amount, 
$8 44 
40 00 



300 00 
26 50 



130 00 
412 50 



042 15 



100 00 
368 30 
25 00 



32 00 

14 70 
5 50 
91 00 

233 10 

43 40 

19 80 

40 45 
5 00 

43 20 



\ 



500 00 
2552 91 



Total :.... $9095 40 

• ' \ 

Judicial Ditch No. £0. 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. 
T. P. Anderson, auditors fee at- 
tending sale of job .... 



«Bl 



978 00 

7 23 
135 00 

6 60 
133 00 

5 40 

6 RO 

5 00 

6 60 
S 20 

210 59 

7 52 



V 



Total 51K5 19 



Connty Ditch No. 44. 



1 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

Farmers and Merchants State 
Bank, principal and Interest on 
bonds $1210 00 

Merchants Loan and Trust Com- 
pany, interest on ditch bonds 260 56 

- Total : . * * * ?1470 56 



/ 



Connty Ditch No. 45. 



^»» 



To Whom Issued— 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

Farmers, and Merchants State 
Bank, principal and interest on 
ditch bonds ?1SG 00 

Merchants Loan and Trust Com- 
pany, interest on ditch bonds.'"* 40 00 



Total 



$226 00 



County Ditch No. 48. 



To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

Elmer Anderson, refundment on 

taxes * 51237 

Chas. E. Reed, refundment- on 

taxes ;-... 2752 

J. S. Roy, committee work .... lo 20 

L. E. Miller, repairing bridge.. 42 00 



Total 



$97 09 



County Ditch No. 47. 



To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. 

Farmers and Merchants State 
Bank, principal and Interest on 
ditch bonds .-. 

Citizens State Bank, interest on 
warrants ; 



41 10 
22 00 



81 10 



. 1 13 


8 in, 


2 00 


1 00 


2 28 


',--• 1 10 


2 71 


2 50 


3 00 


1 23 


1 S5 


2 30 


1 25 


13 00 


26 00 


22 51 


6 50 


19 00 


13 00 


24 00 


6 00 


6 00 


1 55 


12 00 


S 00 



neer 

Hilmer F.^Erlckson, rodman 

R. McGinn, inspecting ditch 

Selmef Erickson, building bridge 

Frank Race, building bridge 

J. S. Roy, committee work 

■Gust Naplin, committee work... 
The Prlchard Co., lumber for 

brhige 299 40 

H. W. Lasler, work on ditch... " M 

T. P. AnderBon, auditor's fees... 



26 81 
50 00 
13 00 
15 00 



6 00 
140 00 



Repair Ditch No. 1. 

To Whom Issued — 

For What PurpoBe. 

Bert W. Umland, chalnman 

Gorden, W. LaBree, rodman 

W. E. Wood, receivers feeB .. 

A. P. Sandberg, receivers vfees 
P. O. Soriom, receivers fees ... 
T. P. AnderBon, mailing notices 
W. J. LaBree, livery posting 

notices 

Oscar J. Peterson, attending sale 
of job «... 

J. S. Roy, attending final hear- 
ing • • 

Gnat Naplin, attending final 
hearing 

B. F. Umland, engineers feeB .. 
T. P. Anderson, auditors fees.. 
T. P. Anderson, auditors fees.. 
R. McGinn, attending final hear- 
ing 

T. P. Anderson attending sale of 
job ••• 

W. E. Wood, viewer attending 
hearing ..•••. 

W. E. Wood, partial estimate . 

A. P. Sandberg, viewers fees .. 

P. O. Sorium, -viewers fees 

A. W. HanBon, attending final 
hearing y .**"** 



Tetal • $I5\943 24 



Amount. 
$12 00 

18 00 
41 00 
37 20 
36 00 
13 25 

6 00 

780 

13 20 

17 60 
44 22 
35 00 
D 00 

10 40 

5 00 

6 00 
212 50 

8 20 
6 40 

19 20 



County Ditch No. : 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. 
J. A. Duffy, refund on ditch tax 
J. S. Roy. attending hearing.. 
O. A. Naplin, premium on bonds 
T. P. Anderson, auditors fees 
Gust Naplin, attending hearing.. 
W. Hanson, attending hearing 
Moses R. Landes, refund on. tax 
Oscar . J. Peterson, attending 

hearing 

R. McGinn, attending hearing.. 
Einar Aakre, livery for engineer 
W. O. Braggans, stenographic 

work 

Tollefson & Olson, livery for en- 
gineer 

Hilmer F. Erickson, rodman .. 

A. Swandby, chalnman 

A. E. Stromberg, assisting en- 
gineer 

A. E. Stromberg, assisting en- 
gineer 

Warren State Bank, engineering 

by $uist 

Warrent State Bank, Interest on 

warrants 

Oscar J. Peterson, committee 

work 

A. W. HanBon, committee- work 
T. P. Anderson auditors fees.. 
R. McGinn, attending hearing .. 
J. S. Roy, attending hearing .. 
Gust Naplin, attending | hesiring. 
Merchants Loan & Trust Co., 
semi annual Interest and princ- 
ipal bondB ;.: 2742 50 

Warren State Bank, interest on 

warrants 73 

A. E. Stromberg, assisting; en- 
gineer ..-.' 1 12 74 

St. Hllaire ^Lumber Company, 

engineering by Quist .' 31 20 

Hilmer F. Erickson, rodman .. 5 50 

Aimer Swandby, chairman 5 50 

A. W. Hanson, committee work- 9 70 

J. A. Duffy,' refundment ditch 
tax ...; 5 14 



Totnl 516S7 50 



Judicial Ditch No. 14. ^ 

To Whom Issued— i . 

For "What Purpose. Amount. 

F. and M. State Bank, principal 

and IntereBt ditch bonds $1,412 50 

First National Bank, interest on 

ditch bonds °* ™ 

F. and M. State Bank, interest on ' 

ditch bondB 385 00 

First National Bank, St. Paul, 

IntereBt on ditch bonds 210 00 



Total $562 97 

Sunders and Black River Ditch No. 1. 

To Whom Issued — 

For;. What Purpose. Amount. 

Fred Kosp, cutting brush $50 00 



Total $50 00 



Amount, 
$6 SS 

6 60 
32 50 
43 75 

8 80 

9- (50 

' G 50 

7 80 
5 20 
G 00 

5 70 

6 00 

38 81 
20 81 

39 00 
34 81 
18 00 
10 $4 

7 80 
9 60 
5 00 
5 20 
G 60 

8 80 



Connty Ditch No 



40. 



To Whom Issued— 

For What i "Purpose. 

First National Bank. Interest and 
principal on bonds 

Merchants Loan and Trust Com- 
pany, interest on ditch bonds 

Total ". $1244 47 



220 47 



County Ditch No. 61. 

To Whom Issued— 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

Farmers and Merchants State 
Bank, principal and interest on, 
ditch bonds $150 00 

CItitens State Bank, Interest on 
ditch bonds 150 00 

Total .*, J3O0 00 



County Ditch No. 53. 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Pnrpose. Amount. 

Farmers and Merchants State 
Bank, principal and Interest on 
ditch bonds $1240 00 

Citizens State Bank,! Interest on 
ditch bonds 210 GO 



Total ?1450 00 



Total J $3132 67 



Total $2,072 11 



Highlanding Bridge. 

To Whom Issued— . ! 

For What Purpose. ! 

„.j»rB and Merchants' State 

Bank, IntereBt on bonds 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
I THE GENERAL DITCH FUND. 

■ Receipts. 

Received from current and delin- 
quent tax collections : $52059 78 

Received from miscellaneous 
'ditch tax collections 1950 65 

Received from sale of drainage 
'ditch bonds L 100074 18 

Received from townships on ac- 
count of road benefits jaasessed 
against townships on county 
'ditches ; '. 8784 97 

Transfered from county road and 
i bridge fund ; 8000 00 

Debit balance December 31st, 

"1921 7974 42 



Dickey Co., semi-annual 



inttrest on bonds 



$900 00 



Miscellaneous. 



Amount. 
$127 00 



To Vhom Issued — 

For What Purpose. 
„ ... Lazier, work on roads 
Bottem Hardware Company, eup 

Nash] Sales" Company, repair jf or 1M „ 

trucks .". •' •.;-- , ;'u«' 

Kvale, appropriation town 

flnknrv \- ■ • ^" W 

Culvert Com- 



Judlclal Ditch No. 18. 

To Whom Issued— 

For What'Purpose. 

First & Peoples State Bank, prin 
elpal and Interest on bonds... $4,470 00 

Northwestern Trust Co., Interest 

on ditch bonds v - 1,412 BO 

Northwestern National Bank, In- 
terest on warrants ; 

Merchants Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, Interest on ditch bonds 

First & Peoples State Bank, in- 
terest on ditch bonds 

NorthweBtern Trust Co., St. 
Paul, interest on ditch bonds.. 

NorthweBtern TruBt Co., St. 
Paul, interest on ditch bonds.. 



I Total' J $173844 00 



Amount. 



1135 



96114 
96114 



385 00 
328 15 



Repair Ditch Ne. 16, 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

First National Bank, interest on 

bonds •••-,• * X72 °° 

First National Bank St Paul, 

interest on bonds 172 oo 



Total 



$845 00 



Total • $7,896 29 



| Disbursements. 

Warrants issued ; $163805 30 

Transferred to county road and 

'bridge fund '■ 8200 00 

Distribution of refundments . 14 32 
Debit balance January 1st, 1921 1764 38 



Total -1 $173844 00 



iickory 
Corporation 



paiy, interest on warrants 



63 71 



GENERAL DITCH FUND. 

I Judicial Ditch No. 1. 

To Whom TBsued— j 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

J. A. Duffy, refund on ditch tax $2 84 

J. A. Duffy, refund on ditch tax 4 94 



Judicial Ditch {No. 85. 

To Whom Issued— 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

First National Bank, ditch bond 

and interest ..-$4,210 00 

Farmers & Merchants State Bank, ^ 

ditch bond and interest 1,127' 50 



COTJNTT FUND 

County Repair DH«h No. : 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. 

W. E. Wood, (interest on war- 
rants L 

W. E. Wood, 'interest on war- 
rants > ■••*■ 

Farmers State- Bank, Interest on 
warrant . . . . i • • ■ • y 

First National Bank St. Paul, 
Interest on bonds .- ■• *w J** 

C. E. Oien, leveling ditch grade 

W. E. Wood, interest on war- 
rants • • * • V 

First National Bank St. Paul, 
interest on bonds ....:...-..■ 

First National Bank St. Paul, 
interest on' bondB 207 00 



$2 15 



2 00 



50 00 
638 



207 00 



Total ••••- $5.337 50 



Judicial Ditch No.. 40. 

To Whom Issued — . 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

F, and M. State Bank, principal 
and interest on ditch bonds.. $1,550 00 



Total - W 8918 

GENERAL DITCH FUND. 

Connty Ditch No. 82. 

J. A. Duffy, refund on ditch tax $2 04 
Cltisens State Bank, principal. 

and interest on ditch bonds .. 1583 
W. H. Sherwood, refund on ditch 

tax •-••- o 

Merchants Loan and Trust Com- 

pany,' interest on ditch bonds 341 71 



Total $1,93185 



gC^^-^^'-j-*.' 



County Ditch No. 30. 

To Whom IsBued — | 

For What Purpose. j 

Farmers and Merchants' State 
Bank, interest on ditch bondB 

Hilroer F. Erickson, rodman .. - 

A. E. Stromberg, assisting en- 
gineer I 

Warren Auto Company, 1 livery for 
engineer J 

A. E. Stromberg, assisting en- 
gineer : . 

St. Hllaire Lumber Company, en- 
gineer by Qulst I 

Hilmer F. Erickson, rodman.... 

Warren State Bank, Interest on 
warrants J 

Gust' Naplin, interest 1 on war- 
rants [ 

T. P. Anderson, mailing notices 

W. 3. LaBree, posting notices.. 

Emit Larson, viewer .'. 

EmlL Larson, livery for viewers 

A. p! Sandberg, viewer! 

Swan Wlberg, viewer L 

Erwing E. Quist, engineer 

Oscar J. Peterson, attending 
hearing \ 

A. W. Hanson, attending hsaring 
J. S. Roy, attending! hearing.. 
R. McGinn, attending; hearing.. 
Gust Naplin, attending hearing 
T. P. Anderson, auditors fees.. 
Aimer Swandby, chalnman 

B. M. Stanton, attorney's fees.. 
A. E. Stromberg, assisting en- 
gineer | 

A. P. Sandberg, viewers fees. . 

Emll Larson, viewers! fees ..... 

Swan Wlberg, viewers fees .... 

Lyle Corrugated Culvert Com- 
pany, culverts '........... 

Cont. and Commercial National 
Bank, principal and interest on- 
ditch bonds 

OBcar J. Peterson, attending sale 
of Job 

J. S. Roy, attending final hear- 
ing 

Gust Naplin, attending hearing 

A. E. Swandby, asBlstjing engin- 
eer 

Hilmer F. Erickson, 

Aimer Swandby, chai 



To Whom Issued— 

For What Purpowe. 1 

Farmers and Merchants State 

Bank", intereBt on ditch bonds 
First National Bank, interest on. 

ditch bonds 

Citizens State Bank, Interest on 

ditch bonds 

J. A. Duffy, refundment of 

ditch taxes 

J. A. Duffy, refundment of ditch 

taxes 

First National Bank St. Paul, 

Interest on ditch bonds 



Total $969 45 



rodman 



$336 25 
11 00 



43 85 
22 00 

80 

9 63 
28 00 
10 50 
25 00 
10 00 
25 00 
25 00 
24 60 

7 80 
9 60 
6 60 
520 
880 
50 00 
22 00 
35 00 

28 32 

17 20 

18 40 
16 50 

32 30 



26 04 
16 50 
16 50 



County Ditch No. 67. 

To Whom Issued— 

For What Purpose. 
Farmers and Merchants State 

Bank, Interest on ditch bonds 
State Bank Gully, interest . on 

warrants 

N. P. Larson, building bridge.. 
First National Bank Sti Paul, 

interest on ditch bonds 



$330 00 



1 00 
90 00 



330 00 



Total $751 00 



County Ditch No. 08. 

To Whom Issued — 

. For What Purpose. Amount. 

Northwestern Trust Company, 

Interest on ditch bonds $225 00 

Northwestern TruBt Company, 

interest on ditch bonds 225 00 



Total .- $45( 



County Ditch No. 59. 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

Northwestern Trust Company, 

Interest on ditch bonds $150 00 

Northwestern Trust Company, 

interest on ditch bondB 150 00 



Total 






COUNTY DITCH FUND. 

County Ditch No. 60. 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. 
Farmers and Merchants State 

Bank, Interest on ditch bonds 
First . National Bank St. Paul, 

interest on ditch bonds 



1 



$90 25 



Total $102 50 

(Continued on Page " Seven) 




\I 



Annual FifMti&l Statement 

rOoYftftrtrtn' from r.ise Six) | 



^NER 

'Count 



,lL DITCH FUND. 
Ditch No. 61. 



farmers aud 

Bank, interest 
First National 

interest on ditich bonds 



Total 



County Ditch No. 68. 



To Whom Issui 
For What 
First National 

semi annual 1 
First National 

semi annual 



ed— 



Purpose. 
Bank St. Paul, 
terest on bonds 
Bank St. Paul, 
interest on bonds 



Total 



Countjr Ditch No, 63. 



To Whom Issue 
For What 
First National 
ditch bonds 



I— i 

Purpose. Amount. 

Bank, interest on 

$76 To- 



Total 



County Ditch No. 64. 

To Whom 

For What Furpuse. Amount. 

W. P. Willardson, interest 

warrants '■■■■] ?9 18 

First National Bank, interest on 

bonds \ 70 75 



Total 



Counts- Ditch No. I 



Trt Whom Is: 

For What 
Warren State 
warrant ... 



Total 



Count 



o. ; 



jadojf EiittMT. si 

I. P: -InHerson. 
Jv. P* Anderson, 
A*i P. Anderson 

tract 
W. O. Braggads, 

work . . , 

American Drai iage 



.„ gineWihp by C uist 
i\ Pi Anderson 



Adolf Eklund. 



TBTE TBBsP RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



Merchants State 
Itii ditrh bonds 
Bank. St. Paul," 



5434 53 



Purpose. 

nk. interest 



$85 03 



Amount. 
$10 05 



;r Ditch No. I 



To Whom Issued— 

Purpose. 

;mium on bonds . 
attending sale 



stenographic 



For What 
. Naplin. 
Anderson 
of job- 
W. 0. Braggaijs 

work 
Adolf Eklund, attending sale of-: 

job 
Warren State 13 

by Quist 
W. O., Braggatjs, 

work 
Oscar J. Peterson. 

work _ 

American Drainage Coftjpany, 

partial estimat; excavation .... 

Gust Naplin. cocimittee work.... 

A. E. Stromberg, assisting engln- 

.&§? :;■;■■ "i" '" ::;: : :r:;-.T 

fe|litm£jjr.i Jh-lGtaoh. rodman... 

jgning contract.. 

signing contract 

recording' lien.. 

recording con- 



Amount. 
S12 50 



ank, engineering 
stenographic 
committee 



stenographic 



1004 90 
3 80 

. 45 56 
40 5Q 
5 00 
5 00 
40 do 

. 00 



Company, 



partial estimate excavation. 
American Drai lage Company, 

partial eatimste excavatien . 
Warren State lank, engineering 

by Qtilat 

George & ftttitt 
.Fuftl w .^... 
Peopres xiadinf 



engineering by 
Company, en- 



auditors fees. 



warrants . . 
lerchants" State 



fcattners and X erchants' State 

Bank, interesi 
Farmers and l\ 

Bank, expense cash advanced 

excavation boi ds 
State Bank of Warren, interest 

on warrant 
First National fcanfe. interest on 



50 31 
102 00 

I 



tttendinjr letting 

ntract hriddes 

signing hondB.. 

letting contract 

stenographic 



T. ,P. Anderson. 
T. P. Anderson 
Ituth Mathew 

work 
Citizens State ^lank. interest on 

warrants 
Minneapolis B 

material for 
T. O. Mogen, 
Jolxa Jarangou, 

«er 

A. W. Hansoi 

ling bonds 
A. E. 3trotabe 'g, assisting en 

jriueer 

■Aimer H. Swftnby, rodman . 
warren State llank, engineering 

, by Quts't . 

gil'mer F. Eritjksi 



ridge Company, 
ulverts 

damages allowed 
livery for engln- 



nttending sel- 



ion, rodman 



interest on war- 



3.1 nk, interest on 



R-. McGinn, attending meeting.. 
T . S. . Roy, attending meeting. . 
Vust Napli'&. (ttendlng meeting 
A. W. Hanson, attending meeting 
Oscar J-. Pete'i son, letting con- 
tract j........ 

'Oscar. J. Petf'rson, committee 

( . work. - . . 

yscar, J. Peterson, 'signing 'con- 

. ..tract .... 

W. F. Powell, 

. rants 

Warren State 
.. warrants . . 
W. O. Bragg^ns. 
,. warrants 
Thief River 
■ l pany,. part 
Oscar. .T. Pet 
. work. 
'Oscar J. Pet(irsoi 

hearing 
'Oscar J. Peterson. 

, work 

-Albert Kolp, 
^Albert Kolp. 
,W. E. Wood 
.0. O. Hoidal. 
P. O. .Snrloni, 
O. A. Naplin. 
A. ■ E, Stromh 

g.inti 
Pfoples Tradihg" .Company, 

ginc-ering ii_ ~ 
.Aimer. Swandb 
.Helmar F. 
It. McGinn 



Interest oh 

hnstruction Corri- 
itimate on steel, . 
rson. committee 



ork on ditch 

.eyeling banks' ... 
iewer. .' 

viewer 

Viewer ...'... 

attorneys- fees ... 

rj--. assisting en- 

en- 



Uuist 

■ , i.-hainman 

ckson. rodman... _. 

•ommittee. work.'. 

American .. Primage Company. 

partial estir. late excavation . . 

McGinn. < ommittee work.. . 

J. S. Uoy. corimittee work 

American Diainage Company, 
partial estimate excavation . 
placing culverts... 
Bridge Company, 



-Knut Bjorge. 
Minneapolis 

' -culverts . 
..T. S. Koy, coVnmtttee work 



)y. chainman. 
>rg assisting en- 



Almer Swnnt h_ 

Winton Nich )ls 

pany, lumb >: 



', 00 
5 00 
5 (HI 



1S01 00 
310 00 



7(1,62 
27|50 

49 120 
4&f50 

7JS0 





130 



committee 



Mrs. Mfcttfo Mosbeck, refundment 
dltjA \ax *. 

Thief River; Construction Com- 
pany, partial estimate bridge's 

American [Drainage Cottipa'ny, 
partial estimate excavation . . 

Thief River Construction. Com- 
pany, partial estimate bridges 

American iDrahrage Company, 
pnrtial estimate excavation . . 

A. E. SttomDerg, assisting en- 
gineer .1 , 

Hilmer F. [ErickBon. rodman .* 

JulittB J. Olson, engineers work 
bv Quist i 

Aimer Swandby, chainman 

Oscar J: Peterson, inspecting 
ditch .:.l 

A. W. Hanson, inspecting ditch. 

■Oscar Carlson, work on bridges 

Gunnard Lindquist. work on 
bridges . ; 

A. V. Jncobson. work on bridges 

T. P. Anderson, clerk at board 
meeting ; * 

Warren Stnte Bank, engineers 
work by On 1st -' 

A. E. Stromberg, asBtBting en- 
gineer . . ; 

Hilmer F. Erickson. rodman . . 

R. , McGinn. i Inspecting work .,. 

Russel Anderson, chainman 

J. S. Roy. i committee work . . . 

Gust Naplin, inspecting work... 

St. Hilairei Lumber Company, 
lumher . ; * 

Trief River Construction Com- 
pany, steel for bridges 

Minneapolis: Bridge Company, 
culverts j 

Elmer Hanson, work on ditch . 

Henrv Hanson, work on ditch ... 

Thief River Construction Com-, 
pany. nnrt estimate on bridges' 

Thief River Construction Com- 
pany, steel for bridges 

Hilmer F. Erickson. rodman 

A. E. Stromberg. 4 asBiBting en- 
gineer .. . .; 

Nels Newman, installing culvert . 

Ben Brevick. work on bridge ... 

Aimer Swandby. chainman 

G. W. Hooper, moving telephone 
poles . . . ; -• 

Lyle Culvert and Road Equip- 
ment Company, culverts 



S 

500 

G719 

1 1325 

'2345 

156 
12X 

151 
143 

13 

9 







100 
40 
12 
20 



100 
160 



006 
6 
8 



Lyle Corrugated Culvert Co., cul-- 

verts --,■■-■- ___ 

James Conely, partial estimate, 

excavation, 

L. D. Mo. Adams, final estimate, 

culverts ; '■ 

Thief River Construction Co., 

steel for bridges 

Thief River Construction Co., 

retaining wall ( 



R. McGinn, expenses, trip to St. 
Paul 



James Conely, partial estimate,' 

excavation. ~— — — ±- 

James Conely,- partial estimate, 

excavation ™ : 

P. "W. Roark, work on ditch . — - 
Lyle Corrugated Culvert Co., 

culverts „____™_™_— ™ 

V. C. Noper, right of way' — : 

First National Bank, St. Paul, 

Interest on ditch bonds 

James Conely, partial estimate, 

excavation 

G. Howard Smith, assignee, same 
W. E. Wood, Interest on warrant 
Oscar J. Peterson, committee 



i Geo. \V. Smith, engineer work by 

j. Qulst __„ . 

■ A. E. Stromberg, assisting en- 
gineer „ 

James Conely, partial estimate, 
excavation 



Total . . - : $52101 12 



GENERAL DITCH FUND' 
County Ditch No. 70 I 
Warren State Bank, engineering 

by Quist | . ™ 5 

H. A. Rodgers, blue prints : 

O. A. Naplin, premium on bonds j 
Adolf Eklund, attending sale of 

job j. ; 

W. O. Braggans, stenographic ; 

work ! , ~_ ■ 

A. E.\ Stromberg, assisting en- 
gineer L. 

H. F, Erickson, rodman 

E. M. Stactpp, attorney's tees — 

E. M. Stanton, same __^ 

\Y. E, Wo#4, witness appeal case 
W. o, Brasgaod, stenographic 

work __' -ir — -~~ — 

T. P. Anderson, attending sale of 

job ; -^ 

A, E. Stromber, aaslsting' engin- 



56.80 
3.03 
12.50 



Warren State Bahkv englnflorlna 

by Quist j — — . l ^is..^_x^», u ..».™ r 
H. F. Erickson, rodman ,™™..™. 
Aimer Swanby, rodm&ll ^.~ ™ « « . 
Chas. Boughton, expense, appeal j 
Os^ar J. . Peterson, committee j 

work i i^ii . . ......... I 

Oscar J. Peterson, attending ap- | 

peal case: .■*. - — ^. j 

Ruth Mathews, stenoffraphie ; 

work * _. ~ .-...--,--■■. -■■■-■-.-.■.-.-■■■r.r- | 

N. J. Anderson, recording Ht^i ! 

statement! -^ z -u ~- z^» z ;rxx :z. ] 

T. P. Anderson, auditor's fries _ j 
James Conely, partial *3Ctmate_ i 
Axel Rishenr, clerfc' iftBrng bonds ; 
W. O. Braggans, Stenographic | 

work -..--.-.-.•^ •.",..:•:-:..:. ; 

P. O. SoTioro-, ^witness fee i 

Gilbar HaJav^, Vltness fee . . I 

S. C. Steje,: cleaning ditch j 

Warmi 0tate Bank, engineering 

by 'Quist i* — ! 

Hilmer F. Erickson. rodman — I 
James Conely, partial estimate^ — i 
E. M. Stanton, interest on war- ; 

rant ^ . rr- \ 

Farmers Sd % ilerchants StaTe f 

Bank, same , , — , j 

State Bank I of Warren, same __ ! 
O. Green, damages allowed _ ! 
L. F. Douglas, same . 



Axel Rlsberg, entering bonds — >. 
American Drainage Co., partial i 

estimate, Jexcavation ! 

A. E. Stromberg, assisting engin- : 

eer . 



Hilmer F. Erickson, rodman . 
Leslie M. Conner, damages 
lowed 



al- 



Chas. Boughton, inerest on war- 
rant . i •.,.■■■,., .„ 

"WaiTen State Bank, engineering 

by Quist J — 

T. P. Anderson, signing bonds 

T. P. Anderson, auditor's fees 

Minneapolis Bridge Co., meal 
culverts ' 



James 'Conely, 'partial estimated 

American -Drainage Co., partial 

estimate, i -excavation 

€>sca-r J, ;-peterson, committee 

work 



Same, atfetiding sale of bonds 

■James 'Cortely, partial estimate^ 

G. 'K. -Haavl, damages alloweo] r 

W. -F. -Powers, interest on war-i 
rants '_. 



D.'McAdams, parlal estimate, 

-culverts -,—. 

L. D. McAdams, same 

TiVomas Kinsela, damages al- 
allowed 



Theo. Thompson, part payment 

damages j J , 

. W. Hanson, committee work 

. P. Anderson, auditor's fee 

Anderson, same . 



Lyle Cor. Culvert Co., culverts— 
A. E. Stromberg, assisting engin- 
gineer 



rodman ... 
Bank, engineering 



.Aimer Swand 

A. E. Stromb 
gineer 

Hilmer F. Er ckson 

Warren State 
by Quist 

Minneapolis 

installing colverts 

American Dpainage Company, 

- partial esti: nate excavation 

P. O. Sorlum,. intercBt on war- 
rants 

LaCoe & Fotntain. hauling cul- 



B ridge Company, 



on. auditors fees. . 
D. McAdams. part estimate 
bridges 

P. W. Roark work on ditch 

Lyle Corruga:ed Culvert Com- 
pany. ClllVf 

Corrug ited 
.pany'. culv 
First Nation^! 
interest on 



Culvert Com- 



Paol, 



7j SO 

7: 50 

m : 05 

123 00 
10|40 
10 40 
10 40 

150 00 

127 60 



3300 no 
S 50 
3 40 



203 00 
5 20 
33 00 

08 30 
66 00 



12 SO 
20 00 



800 00 

ISO 00 



S93 30 



Aimer B. Swanby, rodman 

Hilmer F. [Erickson. rodman 

Tiieo. Thompson, moving dirt 

R. McGinn, attending committee 

meeting I J 

J. S. Roy, '■ same 



Gust Naplin, same = ! 

Warren State Bank, engineering] 

by Quist: ■ ! 

Theo. Thompson, moving dirt ' 

American iDrainage Co., parial! 

estimate,! excavation ! 

James Conely, partial estimate,! 

excavation 



L. D. McAdams, partial estimate,! 
culverts ' 



American Drainage Co., work on 
ditch L ! 

American Drainage Co., partial 
estimate,) excavation 



Theo. Thompson, moving-dirt . 
Theo. Thompson, same 



V. C. Noper, removing dirt 
James Conely, partial estimate, 

excavation l* 

'. P. Anderson, clerk, attending 

board meeting :: , ,1 . 

Theo. Thompson, moving dirt _ ! 
Park Ridge Telephone Co., re-j 

pairing telephone line I 

A. E. Stromberg, asst. engineer 
"Warren Auto Co., engineering by 

Quist \ ! 

Aimer Swanby, chainman ! 

R. McGinn, committee work I 

R. McGinn, same . '. L 

J. S. Roy; same 



American Drainage Co., leveling 

roads L- l 

L. D. McAdams, part estimate] 

culverts i I 

Oscar J. ! Peterson, committee 

work i_ L 

Helmer F/ Erickson, rodman i. 

James Conely, partial estimate^ 

excavation 



: 1 Bank St. 
ditch bonds 
American D rainage Company, 
nartinl csti nate .excavation 

Construction [ Com 
estimate culverts 

and bridged 34G0 00 

W. E. Wooq, interest on war- 
rants 
Warren Building and Loan As 
f ngineers fees by 



2670 00 

i 
4731 00 



il 60 



socintion. 
, Quist . . . 

Stromperg, assisting en- 
gineer 
■Hilmer F. Ejrickson, rodman 

chainman 

Lumber Com- 



122 00 
I 

133 32 
88 00 
90 00 



3.20 

12.50 
24.06 
100.00 
50.00 
2.20 

6.40 

5.0Q 

48.46 

10.23 
20.90 
24.46 
40.03 

10,80 

i6.oo 

20.00 

57.75 

565.00 

5.00 

20.16 
3.28 
2.50 

13.50 

66.69 
33.00 
202.00 

3.22 

4.17 

8.08 

50.00 

100.00 

5.00 

2737.30 

74.64 
44.00 

40.00 

.50 

03.85 
5.00 
8.00 

1049.00 
202.00 

2734.70 

18.00 

7.80 

323.00 

40.00 

8.55 

1500.00 
900.00 

100.00 

25.00 
U.60 
5.00 
15.00 
17.85 

95.64 
66.00 
66.00 
25.00 

19.00 
6.60 
8.S0 

117.42 
100.00 

3410.00 

258.00 

S59.10 

50.00 

131S.00 
75:00 
50.00 
40.50 

260.00 

15.00 
245.50 

42.00 
104.B8 

152.40 

60.50 
7.00 

19.50 
8.60 

360.00 

1506.98 

8.0tf 
60.50 



John P. Swanson, damages al- 
lowed 

James Conely, final estimate, ex- 
cavation 



American Drainage Co., leveling 

road 

Thief River Construction Co., 

partial estimate? bridges 

John Bratrud. damages allowed 
A. E. . Stromberg, assisting en- 
gineer ' ,,• 

Helmar F. Erickson, rodman 

James Conely, leveling road 

James Conely, clearing 

J. S. Roy, committee" work_ 



M artin Rustebakke, leveling road 

G. K. Haavi, placing culverts 

Thief River Construction Co.. 

estimate on bridges 

Minneapolis Bridge Co., culverts 479.fi 



67.44 
500.00 
600.00 
286.80 
214.00 

43.00 

557.95 

82.05 
360.00 

50.59 
125.00 

720.00 

342.00 
58.00 
1.87 

8.60 

99.60 

27.06 

200.00 

50.00 

868.95 

362.50 

1117.20 
140.00 

10.58 
5.50 
37.50 
35.05 
7.00 
22.0G 
50.00 

200.00 



receipts. and; disbursements of 
mortgage registry tax fund 

Receipts. 

Credit balance Jan. L 1921 51,378 53 

Received from registration tax 
collected 1 710 *>n 



Disbursements 

Distribution on tax 



Disbursements. 

Warrants issued ■ 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OP 
THE COUNTY SANITORIUM FUND 



Receipts. 

Credit balance Jon. 1, 1921 -§1,231.32 

Received from tax distributions™ 6,935.60 
Received from Red Lake county 

(refundment) „ . 58.17 







Disbursements. 


$7,656.89 


Distribution of refundments 
Credit balance Dec. 31, 1921 


paid 

54.42 
513.87 








Doklond Park Sanitorium, main- 
tenance . $4,281.80 
Oakland Park Sanitorium, con- 









RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF 
THE COUNTY BOND AND IN- 
TEREST FUND 

— - ■ Receipt*. 

EKTdlt balance Jan. 1, 1021 . „S2,009.77 

■Received from tax distributions^ 2,769.61 

Transferred from sinking fund 800.00 



Total 



_$5.579.33 



Disbursements. 

Warrants Issued 



-.$4,657.15 



Distribution of refundments paid 

out of County Revenue fund 27.63 

Credit balance Dec. 3L 1923 S94.55 



_$5,579.38 



Henry Rines, state treasurer, 
principal and Interest on state 
loan $4,052.00 

First & Peoples State Bank, in- . 
terest on warrants 5.15 



_$4.657.15 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF 

THE STATE REVENUE AND 

SCHOOL FUND 



Receipts. 

Received from current and delin- 
quent tax distrubutions $30,701.55 



Disbursements . 

Warrants issued _430,3S8.43 

Distribution of refundments paid 
out of County Revenue funii 313.12 



Henry-Rines, state treasurer, 
share of tax distribution 30,388.43 



-$30,388.43 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF 
THE COUNTY SINKING FUND 



Receipts. 

Credit balance Jan. 1, 1921 , 
'Tax collections 



Disbursements. 
Transferred to County Bond and 

Interest Fund - ™ $ 800.00 

Distribution of refundments paid 

out of County Revenue Fund 33.04 

Credit balance Dec. 3L 1921 . . 3,636.93 



RECEIPTS AND-DISBURSEMENTS OF 

COUNTY ATTORNEY'S CONTIN» 

GENT FUND 



Receipts. 

Transferred from the 
Revenue Fund „ 



County 



-? 300.00 



Transferred to County' 
Fund ; 



258.35 
4L65 



Total $ 300.00 

Theo. Quale, expense, court cases* 258.35 



Page Seven 



Total 



-$3,088.73 



Credit balance Dec. 31, 1921 
Total ' „ 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF 
INHERITANCE TAX FUND 

Receipts. 

Received from Inheritance tax 
collected . $ 2U.50 



Total 



_$ 211.50 

_$ 211.50 



Total 



_? 211.50 



.. P. Chase, state auditor, inher- 
itance tax, estate of Fred Roth $ 164.50 

O. A. Naplin. refund Interest, es- 
tate of Fred Roth , ' ,, , 3.00 

R. P. Chase, inheritance tax, es- 
tate of Dan Patterson 44.00 



Total 



_$ 211.50 



ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF PEN- 
NINGTON COUNTY, MINNESOTA 

Assets. 

Taxes for the year 1920 and 
prior years (unpaid balance) $ 63,049.84 

Balance in the county treasury 
to the credit of the following 
funds : 

County Revenue Fund 2,610.93 

County Road and Bridge Fund 3,817.10 



County Bond and Interest Func 
County Sinking Fund 



Countyt Sanitorium Fund 

Moneys advanced from "County 

Revenue Fund to repair Ditch 

No. 1 



Moneys advanced from County 
Revenue Fund to repair Ditch 

No. 32 „ 



894.55 

3.G36.U0 

513.87 



Total 



_S 70,560.81 



Inventory of County Property:; 

West Fifty (50) feet Lots Fif-^ 

teen (15) and Sixteen (16) of: 

Block Sixty-three (63). Orig-: 

inal Townsite of Thief River i 

- Falls ___ __$ 

Lots One (1) and Two (2),! 
Block Fifty-six (56), Original 
Townsite of Thief River Falls : 

Personal property (including 
furniure and fixtures) 

Road machinery and road 
equipment 

Eight (8) gravel pits 

Highlanding bridge (across Red 
Lake river) „ 15,000.00 

Kratka. bridge (across Red Lake 

river) , 30,000.00 

County roads and highways 285.000.00 

Total „__ __$353.300JW 



5,800.00 
800.00 



Liabilities. 

Bonded debt Pennington Coun- 
ty, 4 per cent Countv Bonds-..;: 

Red Lake County Bonds, Pen- 
nington County share (bal- 
ance unpaid) 



ABSTRACT OF TAX LIST OF PEN- 
NINGTON COUNTY, MINNESOTA, 
FOR THE YEAR 1021. 



Assessed valuation real estate 

(unplatted) — $3,UG0,O99.0O 

Assessed valuation real estate 

(lots and platted property..) 1,427,004 00 
Assessed valuation personal 

property — 727,582.00 

Assessed valuation moneys 

and credits ■_ 1,002,817.00 

Total valuation taxable prop- 
erty ,_ —S6.S27.102.0O 

Assessed valuation of exempt 

real estate (as listed) 20",49S 00 



Tax Levy. 

For State Revenue purposes^ $ 

For State School purposes 

For Teachers' Insurance and 

Retirement 

For Principal and Interest on 

State Loans ; ; 

For County Purposes 

For Drainage Ditch Purposes™' 1 

For Township Purposes ■ 

For City and Village Purposes- ! 
For School District Purposes .„ li 



7.740.15 
7,163.83 

291.27 

1,020.15 

2.328.98 

it.6S3.lS 

4.752.02 

5,186.15 * 

7.S44.04 

Total Taxes Levied $486,009.77 



Drainage Ditch' Bonds issued by 
Pennington County (balance) 622,400.00 

State Rural Highway Bonds is- k 

sued by Pennington County 
(balance) 16,000.00 

Highlanding Bridge Bonds Is- 
sued by Pennington County 
(balance) _, 15,000.00 



The foregoing statement, prepared by 
the County Auditor in and for the Coun- 
ty of Pennington, State of Minnesota, is 
hereby approved and respectfully sub- 
mitted to the taxpayers of said County 
ofi Pennington, State of Minnesota. 
j OSCAR J. PETERSON, 

I Chairman. 

GUST NAPLTN. 
A. W. HANSON, 
J. S. ROY. 

R. McGinn. 

Board of County Commissioners. 

Pennington Countv, Minnesota. 
Attest: 

T. P. ANDERSON, Countv Auditor. 
(Seal) 



Receipts and Disbursements of City, Town 
and Village Funds 






Bray — 

Black River 
Clover Leaf . 

Deer Park 

Goodridee — 
Highlanding 
Hickory - 
Kratka _ 
Mayneld . 
North _ 
Norden _ 
Numedal 
Polk Center . 
Rocksbury _ 
River Falls 
Reiner — • — 
Smiley — _ 
Sanders — 

Silverton 

Star 



Wyandotte 

St. Hllalre vU. _ 
Goodiidge vil. __ 
T. R. .Falls city 



; 1.257.06 
1.327.57 
1.594. UO 
1.255.72 
1,027.90 
2,401.16 
1,024.44 
2.086.34 

920.42 
3.416.09 
1.649.82 
1.259.13 
1,033.47 
3.404.90 
1.601.39 
1,500.40 
1.368.89 
2.114.06 
3,040.40 

896.00 

1.S21.S3 

2,983.70 

2.076.08 

64.707.38 



I 1,257.00 
1.327.97 
1,594.60 
1,255.72 
1,027.96 
2,401.16 
1.130.24 
2.088.34 

920.42 
3.416.09 
1.649.82 
1,259.15 
1.033.47 
3.404.90 
1.601.39 
1,500.40 
' 1.368.89 
2.114.06 
3,263.54 

S36.00 
1.S21.83 
2.983.76 
2.076.03 
65,109.16 



1.181. 
1.747. 
1,165. 
1,051. 

649. 
1.994. 

908. 
1.774.; 

S37. 
3.363. 
1,307. 
1,101. 

992. 
3.325. 
1.434. 
1,183. 
1,185, 
2.087. 
2,846. 

759. 

1,622.5 

2.955.S 

1.925.2 

57,927.5 



93.92 
1.35 



7.17 
6.30 
S.3U 



27.80 
147.82 
872.81 



463!) 


R<14? 






2R4 IV) 


4ai 04 1 
150.36/^./ 71.71 
311 7S 


ss an < 


'.« r,a 




157 67 


33 33 


73 17 


15S44 


317 an 


173 95 


?.t\?R 


142.78 274.23 
133 !17 




.10 >i_ 

3 04 / 



JReceipts and Disbursements of School District Funds 






104.04 
S3L4S 
81.26 
• 63.03 
86.92 
S1.49 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS tt* 

TEACHERS' INSURANCE ANB 

RETIREMENT FUND 



Reetifrte, _ 

Credit balance Jan. 1, 1821 % 55.28 

Received from teachers' pensions 862 50 



James Conely, partial estimate, 
excavation L 

Minneapolis Bridge Co., culverts 

American (Drainage Co., final est- 
imate .J _1 

James Conely, partial estimate^ 
excavation ' 

Oscar J.j Peterson, committee 
work „: _^ L 

A. "\V. Hanson, inspecting ditch J. 

J. S. Royj committee work i. 

R. McGinn, same 




Gust Naplin, attending hearing-! 
Axel Rlsberg, clerk, attending 

hearing) ; 

L. D. McAdams, back filling __1 

Aimer Swanby, chainman „ ^ 

A. E. Stromberg, asst. engineer 
"Warren State Bank, engineering 

by Quiat I 

Mpls., St., 1 P. & S. St. Marie Rail<> 

way Co., excavating . l. 

T. P. Anderson, auditor's fees J^ 
Minneapolis Bridge Co., install- 
ing culverts L- 



S2.05 
1814.00 

950.00 

200.00 

1S.50 
5.00 
16.10 
13.10 
12.90 

5.00 
209.25 
'33.00 
35.70 

07.24 

12.00 
2S.25 



-4 917.78 



DlatoormttKnt*. 

Warrants issued „ 

Credit balance Dec. 31, 1921 

Total 



-* 812.78 
_ 105.00 



_$ 917.78 



Henry Rines, state treasurer, 
teachers Insurance and retire- 
ment fund collections y 812.78 
collections _j 812.78 



Total . 



_? 812.78 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF 
THE STATE LAND AND iNTER-- 

EST FUND 



t w "Receipts. 

Credit balance Jan. L 1921 j ; 

Received from collections of prin- 
cipal and Interest on state 
lands 



88.59 













Total 






D'ia 

issue* 




n'ts. 




"Warrants 
Total 


bnrsetm 


?°,?55.70 




nes,. 
and 




tfea 
'on 




Henry. Ri 
■ principal 


state 
interest 


Burer, 
state . 












'Total 


S?,?Ji5.ft 



17 

1 IS' 



29 
30 
31 
33 



3S 
39 
41 



48 
50 
51 



50 
57 
5S 



04 
05 
06 
67 
63 



94 
99 
102 
106 
103 
124 
125 
127 
133 
135 
147 
148 
149 
154 
105 
166 
178 
180 
194 



5,530.71 
94.57 
99.74 
S3.71 
23.77 
130.2S 
90.05 



62.20 
348.82 
54.53 
8.22 
87.51 
30.18 

32.74 
S9.87 
5.98 
131.47 
73.70 



78.01 
173.20 
51.21 



92.09 
37.39 
12.87 



111:32 
114.78 



•228 
Unorg. 



351.78 

702.51 

301.03 : 

812.87 

049.90 

898.57 

428.79 

IS. 103.43 

725.02 

820.96 

1.082.90 

12.200.03 

121.09 

08.40 

900.49 

S6.09 

127.S4 . 

95.041.77 

778.04 

1,017.10 

935.30 

770.07 

7S3.63 

SS1.5S 

128.68 

388.50 

897.25 

S49.2S 

S43.15 

S03.25 

S79.24 

941.53 

173.75 

117.48 

638.39 

594.68 

705.30 

924.83 

'698.03 

6*0.33 

1.271.35 

850.38 

1.088.94 

850.38 

992.30 

100.03 

1,026.94 

204.98 

879.35 : 

734.52 

B37.02 

445.97 

684.53 

■962.86 

336.82 

2,175.36 

1.070.81 

606.22 

17.601.69 

661.01 

330.47 

31.03 

1.077.80 

1.007.07 

433.30 

760.84 

'865.67 

212.'01 

804.23 

797.75 

969.38 

'741.69 

1,281.15 

670.45 

813.38 

475.94 

1.106.42 

198.78 

414.57 

1.092.67 



$ 351.7S 

702.51 

301.63 

S12.S7 

049.90 

S98.57 

532.S3 

1S.044.91 

806.28 

889.99 

1.109.88 

1,301.52 

121.69 

98.40 

900.49 

S6.09 

127.84 

100,572.48 

S73.21 

' 1.116.90 

1,010.07 

704.44 

013.91 

971.63 

128.08 

388.50 

959.45 

1.198.10 

S97.68 

S97.0S 

900.73 

S77.71 

173.75 

150.22 

728.26 

600.60 

"S36.72 . 

998.62' 

098.03 

040.33 

. 1,307.19 

850.38 

! 1,166.95 

1,023.58 

1.043.57 

160.03 

1.070.98 

264.98 

972.04 

771.91 

550.79 

404.91 

684.53 

962.86 

024.39 

2,338.93 

1.070.81 

717.54 

17.710.47 

601.01 

330.47 

31.03 

1.201.06 

1.007.07 

433.30 

.760:84 

865.07 

212.91 

804.23 

797.75 

969.38 

741. 69 

1,281.15 

672.86 

813.38 

.475.94 

1.132.32 

1S8.78 

414.57 

1,092.67 



5 351.7S 
702.51 
301.03 
S12.S7 
600.30 
898.57 
330.68 

13.520.19 
658.2S' 
629.99 
953.03 
1.0S1.74 
121.69 
• 98.40 
900.49 
S2.10 
127.S4 

S7.5S3.51 
712.32 
1,017.16 
935.36 
744.83 
717.74 
S05.77 
128.68 
388.56 
76S.47 
844.98 
S42.00 
797.20 
803.14 
930.04 
173.75 
108.77 
541.50 
550.10 
625.95 
850.02 
698.03 
040.33 
1.007.13 
S44.37 
S99.80 
007.02 
730.08 
160.63 
810.98 
204.08 
808.43 
642.90 

348!55 

084.53 

962.86 

234.66 

2,078.07 

1.070.81 

513.87 

17.345.50 

601.01 

330.47 

31.03 

1.O77.S0 

1,007.07 . . 

433.30 '■ 

700.84 

865.67 

212.91 ■ 

804.23 ; 

797.75 

959.68 

741.69 

1.281.15 

631.88 

813.38 

475.94 

789.55 

198.78 

165.83 

1,092.67 



40.00 



132.00 
■ 1,940.00 
14SVHJ 
200.00 
104.00 
120.00 



10.12 
7S4.77 



r, 120.00 
124.00 



24.00 
144.00 
120100 



12S.00 
24.00 



11.20 . 
104.00 



14.00 
112.00 

48.00 
132.00 
148.00 



136.00 
272.00 
00.00 



0.01 
3.90 



260.00 

"iioToo 

116.00 
24.00 
96.00 



208.00 
160.00 



■ 132.00 
200.00 



5.73 
74.10 



4.718.07 
30. S9 
90.74 



02.08 
329.12 
54.53 ' 

3.07 
59.61 
3S.34 



27.45 
'2S.26 



127.25 
138.34 
253.49 



53.61 
13:01 
9.57 



59.94 
98.87 



h 



Page Pour 



Annual Fkancial Statement 

(Continued from Page Three). ' 



Peter KaUestranJd 
George HnnBon, 
Theodore Bergh, 
Geor;re Hanson; 
P. II. Loesch, 
F. L. GnMbcck, 
Carl • Brating, 
Henry- KlockluaT) 
Hugh Host, 
Gerhard Hanson 
Ole Peterson, 
C Rustad, wolf 
K. Skaaren, 
Peder Mossestnd 
Jessie Tanner, 
Vraa Haastvedt, 
Julius Mossestac 
Eltner B. Daln, 

Total 



;1, ,'ivolf bounty./ 
vrolt '.Up'uhty^,'.';'" 
wolf. bounty :.'. 
w61f. bounty.... ', 
olf. bounty.. ;V.'"'' 
wolf -'bounty..:.' 
rolf bbunty.... 
, \vou bounty.. 

bqUhty.. ...... 

woft'.bounty... 
olf bounty 

bounty 

•' : b6uhty..;.:.. 
.wolf bounty... . 
ivolf bounty... . 
wolf bounty.... 
, wolf bounty., 
wolf bounty.... • 



olf 



County 

To Whom Issuei 

For what 
Oscar J. Peterpoi 

tnvrs books 
T. I'. Anderson 

ur.Ts books 
Adoli' Kk hi lid. 

era books ! v . . 



Total 



Bourd of Anddt. 



InB rnlty' Cases. 



To Whom Issuei 

For what 
A. \V. Swedenbe 

of Thos. Han 
H. *W. Fruohlii 

of Thos. ilai! 
W. iT. LaBree. e: 

Oen 

C. M. Adklns, 

Edw. Oen ... 
O. F. Mellby, 

Eihv. Oen ... 
Hi W. Froehileh 

A. Wood 
A. W. Swedenb 

of A. Wood . 
C. M. Adklna, 

John Doe . 
W. J. Labree, e; 

tars Johnson 
A. W. Swedenb 

of Lars Johni 
P. L. Vistiuinet 

Olive Johnson 
W. J. LaBree, e 

Olive Johnson 
A. W. Swedenb 

of Olive Johi 
W. J. LaBree, 

John Thomas 
H. W-. Froehlicb 

A. O. Alkin 
L. F. Fisher, e 

O. Alkin .... 
Paul Medderigh, 

John Safford 
H.- w; Froeblict 

John Safford 
O. F. Mellby, 

John .Safford 
F. J. McGInty, 

Mrs. Halseth 
0. F. Mellby, ex 

Halseth 

H. W. Froehllct 

Mrs. Halseth 
O. F. Mellby, 

Mary Tildahl 
H. W. Froehlict 

Mary Tildahl 
O. F. Mellby, 

Mrs. .Bolberg r 
Jacob Belderman 

Mrs. Solberg 
O. F. Mellby, 

Nellie Regoq 
Jacob Beiderma 

Nellie Itegor 
L. F. Fisher, 

Minnie Just . 
Jacob Beiderma 

Minnie Just . 

Total 



ulministrator 

son 

'onveying Edw. 



of 
'of 



^urpose. Amount. 

g, edmlnislrator \ 

?5 30 

5 30 

I 
43.75 

5 30 

I 

30 

5 30 

I 
5 30 

I 
5 15 

04 30 

5 15 

I 
5 15 

77 35 

5 15 

45 03 

5 30 

. i 
5 30 



examination 

examination 

examination of 

irg, examination " 

examination of 

pense conveying 
to Fergus Falls 
trg, examination 

311 

examination of 

pense conveying 

Tg, examination 

son 

expense conveying 

" to Faribault ... 

, examination of 

amlnation of- A. 

expense case of 

, examination of 

examination of 

eicpense conveying 

mlnatlon of Mrs. 

examination of 

examination of 

, examination of 

examination of 

examination of 

examination of 

, examination of . 

examination of 

, examination of 



Salary and 

To Whom Issue 
For what 
J. J, McCniin, 
J. J. McCann, e: 

Total , 



Expense County Agent. 



Expenm 

To Whom lssufi 

For what 

Geo. M. GiTTi 

visiting schoi 



Total 



Sahiry. Kxpen 

Peter C. Wold 
and expense 

C. (JliristiiiiiHon 
and expense 

John Itadnicke 
and expense 1 



!)Total 



Refan 



iBSU'ld 



ref ii 



linens 



rcfu: 



hfrg, 



To Whom 

- For what 
James Gllkerti 

taxes 

Jay Payne, 
Ole- A. Shu. re 
O. : H. Nelson 

tares 

Mrs'. J. J. Ami 
.- ,-taxea 
C. T. C.hristeiiB 

taxes 

Mrs. Geo. G. 

inent oji tas 
Ole Eggrud, re 
C. It. Gustafai 

taxes 

Rosa O. Wee* 

taxes 

G. II. Falli 

taxes 

G. II. Frlssell 

taxes ...... 

' .Julia Anderso 

taxes 

A. B. Mandt, 
Theo. Fude, 
John W. Aik 

on taxes 
E. T. Dale, re 
Mrs. A. Sten' 

taxes 

Henry Goothe 

taxes 
H. F. Booren 

taxes 

Mrs. Ray Spei 

taxes 

O. E. Jenson 

taxes 

. Lou 1b Ferogei 

taxes 

A. R. Johnar 

taxes 

H. Mathews, r 
G. J. Olson, ri 
John O. Uonuji: 

taxes 
Carl Strombe 

taxes 

E. F. DeVu 

taxes 

Mrs. S. Hoff. 

Arne Vik, re 

Arne Vik, re 

Clurg Ellaso 

tuxes . . . . . 

Yellow Med. 

uient on ta: 

Farmers' Stat 

on taxes . 

Henry . E..H 

taxes 

John Norma 

. taxes 

Oscar Liden, 
Hall Brothers 

taxes 
Fred Soderbe 

taxes .. 

Martin Be; 

taxes ... 

Li. ken Bros; r 

Thief Rive; 

ment on tc 
X-arson -Furni 

ment on 

McFarland A 

on taxes 



tax 28 



7 50 
21 00 
7 50 
7 50 
7 50 
7 50 
7 50 
7 50 
7 50 
7 50 
7 50 
7 5l> 
7 50 
15 00 
7 50 
7 50 
7 50 
7 50 



?510 00 



'urpose. . Amount. 

, auditing treas- | 

?05 20 

auditing treas- | 

54 00 

auditing treasur- | 

...: 54 00 



?173 20 



5 30 
5 30 
42 32 

5 30 

i 
5 30 

5 30 

5 30 

5 30 

5 30 

5 30 

.5 30 

5 30 

5 30 



Ole Revdahl, refundment on taxes 
W. G. Hartal, refundment ou 

t£xea .....' 

Anna Eckstr'om, refundment on 

taxes ....J 

A. Saterberg, refundment on 

taxeB ....: 

Louisa Stark, refundment on 

taxes ....;..... -. 

John Egge, refundment on taxes 
F. P. Hornseth, refundment on 

■ taxes . . . . i 

Job" M. JohbBon, refundment on 

taxea . . . . i 

Oen Mercantile Co., refundment 

on taxes J 

Adolf Amundsen, refundment on 

, taxes .... J 

J, W. Erlandson, refundment on 

taxeB . . . . i 

John Gunan, xefundment on taxes 
Joe Ceruonclk, refundment on 

taxes • ■• • . I 

Ivar Aaseby, (refundment on taxes 
Ole Revdahl, refundment on 

taxes 

T. S. Ivefaon, refundment on 

taxes ....• 

K: O.- Glgstad, ' refundment on 

taxes ....'. 

J. S. Roy, refundment on taxeB 
Rothwell & | McDonald, refund- 
ment on taxes 

Stephen Singer, refundment on 

taxes . . . . i 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE 



TUESDAY, JANUARY 24, 1922 



5 38 
07 00 
20 00 

7 00 

I 55 
! 12 48 

| 17 10 

| 50 38 

iase so 



30 
42 42 



7 33 
6 00 



6 00 
5 60 



1 00 
24 10 



81 30 
74 



Total 



$4075 38 



County Board of EquaUratlon. 

Amount. 



To Whom Issued — 

For what purpose. 

Oscar J. Peterson, two days ser- 
vice and mileage 

A. W. HanBon, two days ser- 
vice and mileage ....'. 

J. S. Roy, two days service and 
mileage ..' 

H. McKivin, two days service and 
mileage .: .- 

Gust Nuydir, two days service 
and mileage ^j... 



¥8 80 
10 00 

6 00 
, « 40 

80 



County. Commissioners Mileage. 



To Whom Issued — 

For what purpose. Amount. 

R. McGIvin,; mileage, attending 
regular aud special meetings.. 

A. ; W. Hanson, attending reg- 
ular and special meetings .... 

Gust Naplin, attending regular 
and special meetings 

J.. S. Roy, attending regular and 
special meetings 

Oscar J. Peterson, attending reg- 
ular and special meetings .... 

Oscar J. Peterson, mileage sign- 
ing warrants as chairman .... 



Total 



?5 SO 



10 00 



11 20 
11 20 



Ed. NesB, petit .Juror June 1021 

term court ' 

Eleo Aakre, petit juror June 1021 

term court* x 

E. H. Stephens, petit juror June 

1021 term court 

Oscar GlgBtad, petit juror June 

1021 term court 

Peter" Lovely, petit Juror June 

1021 term court 

Ole Handriim, petit juror June 

1021 term court 

Thor. Skomedal, petit juror June 

1921 term court ;.; 

William Vaughan, petit juror 

June 1021 term court • •'. 

Swan Wlberg, petit juror June 

1021 term court ' 

Louis Demmen, petit juror June 

1921- term court 

Adolph Satterberg, petit juror 

June 1921 term court . 

C. E. Oien, petit Juror June 1921 

term court 

Albert Arveaon, jietit juror June" 

1021 term court .....".. 

Fred Hollander, petit juror June 

1921 term court 

Total ..., '.. 



16 20 
21 00 
19.00 

19 00 

20 20 
24 60 

24; 00. 

20 40 
w 17.' 50 

17 60 
14 00 
13 00' 

- 2'4 00 
13 00 



George Britprlcher, grand Juror 

June 1021 term court ;•■>• 

Halvor Lokeu. grand juror Juner>.. 

1021 term court '.... ' 

Gilbert H. Sandum, grand Jurors 

June 1021 term court 

Elo Sanders, grand : Juror June ' 

1021 term court 

Olof RamBtad, grand juror- June 

1021 term court 

C. A. Nason, grand juror June 

li'Jt term court i. 

A. ; M. Langseth,. grand juror 

June 1921 term court »......'... 

C. A. NelBon, grand juror June 

1021 term court 

David Gustafson, grand juror 

June 1921 term court 

V. C. Naper, grand juror June 

1021 term court 

James Cosprove, grand juror 

June 1921 term court 

Total 



Grnnd Jurors 



Witness' Fees and Mileage, District Court 
Cases. 



¥23 36 
11 84 



nirpose. 
salary . 
pense . . 



5483 32 
330 Oil 



Supt. of Schools. 

d— 

purpose. A 

ilerson, expense 



ie, etc.. Weed Inspectors; 
salary, mileage 
salary, mileage . 
salary, mileage 



¥241 90 
.47 36 
380 00 



?070 



imonts on Taxes 



purpose. Amount, 

n, refundment on 



ndment on taxes 
idment on tuxes 
refundment ~on 



$31 
30 
18 



le, refundment on 1 

m, refundment on 

Johuson, refund- 

ea 

7 undment on taxes 
refundment on 



To Whom Issued— \ 

For what purpose. Amouni, 

Salomon Blue, case of State' vs. 

Carlson . ;. ' 

Edward Sand, before grand jury 
C. R. Whiting, case of State vs. 

John Doe J ■ 112 

Hans Rustad, case of Stale vs. 

Anderson ; 2 12 

Joe Jetland; case of . State vs. 

Carlson- i "2 12 

H. Matthew, case of Sta-te vs. ' 

Reeves .- 1 : ....". '. 112 

Dr. H. W. Froehlicbi case of - 

State vs. Klrby ' 1 12. 

Leo Fahey, case of Srnte vs. John ■ 

Doe : • ! 112 

Bernice Thompaon, case of State 

vs. ReeveB "! 1 12 

Bert Ostvolden. case of State vs. 

John Doe! M 112 

Bert Brating, cose of State vs. 

Reeves ..; ■ 112 

J. E. BIoomqulBt, catte of State 

vs. John Doe 1 12 

Gilbert Durhelm, case of State vs. 

ReeveB y. /.....; 1 12 

B. G. Rounds, case of Sta'tc vs. 

..UeeVfiSo". . ! - | 2 24 

Ella Waldorf, case of State vs. 

Brendlcke : 3 30 

Nicholas Waldorf, case o£ State 

vs. Brendlcke \ 3 36 

Roy Miller, ; case of State vs. i 

Ailderson ■ , 1 li 

Louis C. Esky, case of State vs. * 

Figenschaw 1 12 

Mrs. R. F. * Malmstrom, case of | 

State vs, Reeves : 5 50 

H. F. 5[almstroiii, case of State ; " 

. vs. Reeves , 3 50 

Abe SaperoJ ease of State vs. 

Char. Concau. et al 112 

Salomon' Blue, case of State vs. i 

Carlson j 23 80 

Joe Jatland, case of State 

Carlson . ; 1 12 

N. B. Waldorf, case of State vs. 

vs. Brindicke' 2 24 

Mrs. N. B. Waldorf, case of State 

h. Brindicke 2 24 

Ole Olson Ijoel, case of State vb. ' 

Carlson .;.., :..... j . 1 24 

. .1. Keating, case of State vs. 

Brindicke I ! 2 24 

Sarah Johnson, Feebleminded j 

case ....; j ■ 1 ii 

John Bratrud; case of State vs. j 
vs. Clarkman .-.'.. "■ 1 i^ 



To Whom Issued— 

For what purpose. Amount. 

,F. F. Satre, grand juror, Jan. 

1921 term court 

Aug. JohnBo'n, grand juror Jan. 

1921 term .court 

S. C. Coumbe, grand juror Jan. 

1921 term court 

J. \W Anderson, grand Juror 

Jan. 1021 term court 

Willis- Akre, grand Juror Jan. 

1921 term court 

Anton Peterson, grand juror 

Jan. 1921 term- court 

Ed. Evenson, grand juror Jan. 

1021 term court 

S. E. Hunt, grand Juror Jan. 1921 

term court 

C. T. Thompson, grand juror 

Jan. 1921 terra court 

Fred Soderberg, grand Juror 

Jan. 1921 term court ..;....,.. 
P. J. Keating, grand juror Jan. 

1921 term court 

Thos. Florence, grand juror Jan. 

1021 terra court 

23 00 Emil Sigerud. grand juror Jan. 

1021 term court 

Oliver Fommerdahl, grand juror 

Jan. 1921 term court 

Gilbert Bokke, grand Juror Jan. 

1021 term court 

John Funk, grand juror Jan. 

1921 term court 

Forrest Hedrick, grand juror 

Jan. 1021 term court 

Hans Anton, grand juror Jnn; 

1021 term court 

Peter C. Wold, grand juror Jan. 

1921 term court 

J. -P. Johnson, grand juror Jan. 

. 1921 term court .."....■; .% . 

O. Brlcland, grand juror Jan. 

1921 term court 

Peter Heden, grand juror June 

1921 term court 

C. J. Ekwall, grand juror June 

1021 term court '..: 

Albert Geske, grand juror June 

1021 term court 

A. E. Anderson, - grand Juror 

June 1921 term - court 

O. M. Petersen, grand juror June 

1921 term court ..-....,..'' 

J. M. Sollce, grand Juror June 

' 1921 term court ,..':....' 

S. M. Pbston, .grand Jur.or June 7 

1921 term court ..;..,.. v 

N. P. Larson, grand' Juror 'June 

. 1921 .term court ; 

Martin' BJerke; grand juror June 
■■1921 term court .;..;..,'..'.■'.'... 
Henry Olson, grand Juror June 

ll*2l term court .....'.: 

N. H. Anderson, grand" juror . 

.Tunc 1921 term court .......... 

Olai Larson, grand juror June 

1921 term court 



; 579 80 



$0 80 

10 20 
20 

11 40 
9 20 

11 60 

12 20 
9 SO 

12 40 
10 80 

9 20 
10 00 

14 40 

15 60 

10 20 
14 

11 GO 
10 20 

14 00 

13 & 

15 40 
7 Ou 

id 00 

5 

5€0 

6 •& 

it? 

"10 ;60 

,5<S0 

:J -io 



.7 

4 20 
4 20 
8 40 
4 20 
1 20 
4 20 
6 80 
4 20 
4 20 
4 20 



Talesman Jurors 

To Whom Issued— 

For Whnt Purpose. Amount. 

Ole Flatum, taleBman juror $4 00 

W. E. Wood, talesman juror .. 4 00 

R. R. Calloway, talesman Juror 4 00 

Wm. K. Hoefer, taleBman Juror. . 8 00 

A. M. Shafer, talesman juror ... 3 00 

Pat J. Keating, talesman juror.. 3 00 

George Streeter, talesman Juror . 3 00 

Wm. Knight, talesman juror .. 3 00 

James Cosgrove, talesman juror 3 00 

Olaf Finberg, talesman Juror .. 3 00 



Total 



¥38 00 



Court Expense, 



To Whom Issued— 

For Whnt Purpose. Amount. 

Walter E. Smith, drawing jurors ¥5 60 

W. E. Wood, drawing jurors.. 6 40 
Glen C. Anderson, deputy clerk 

of court 96 00 

Frank McGinty, court bailiff .... 45 00 

Paul Medderlgh, court bailiff ... 90 00 

Pat Keating, court bailiff 12 00 

W. O. Braggans, expense ' court 

reporter 110 12 

W. J. LaBree, meals for jurors 37 15 

W. J. LaBree, sherifE expense.. 34 02 
Derby R. Anderson, deputy clerk 

of court 6 00 

O. A. Naplin, atorney's fees case 

of State vs. Carlson 10 00 

H. O. Chommie, attorney's fees 

case of State vs. Andrews, et al 10 00 

Total 



W. J. LaBree, livery case of State 

vs. Boat ":.. 

W. J. LaBree, posting school 
notices 

Hans C. Hanson, boarding pris- 
oners .....'...; 

Hans C. Hanson, boarding pris- 
oners 

W. J. LaBree, livery expense.. 

HanB C. Hanson, boarding prls- 

- oners ....". ;.....-. -..,, .... . 

W. J. LaBree, ■ posting school 
notices ...:. ,.i., 

W. J. LaBree, livery caBe of 
State vb. Althoft ::■+ 

W. J. LaBree, livery expense 
collecting delinquent personal 
property taxeB ; 

W. J. LaBree,' llveuy drawing 
Jury 

W. J. LaBree, expense conveying 
Albert Wood to Faribault .... 

W. J. LaBree, meals for pris- 
oners ( 

W. J. LaBree, livery drawing 
Jury 

W. J, LaBree, .livery case of 
State vs. Rowning 

W. J. LaBree livery case of State 
vs. John Doe 

W. J, LaBree, livery case of State 
vs. Malske T . 

W. J. LaBree, expense case of 
State vs. Boat 

W. J. LaBree, livery case of State 
vs. Carlson 

W. J. LaBree, livery case of 

State vs. John Doe 

. F. Hall, drawing jury .... 

Hans C. Hanson, boarding pris- 
oners 

W. J. LaBree, expense case of 
State vs. Lonson •. . 

W.^ j. LaBree, expense case of 
State vs. Thompson 



Sheriff's Expenses. 

To Whom IsBued — 

For What Purpose. 
W. J. LaBree, case of State vs. 

ReeveB 

W. J. LaBree, caBe of State vs. 

Westphal , 

\y. J. LaBree, case of State vs. 

Thoa. Hanson 

W. J. LaBree, livery case of State 
.vs. John Doe *.... 



¥462 29 



Amount. 
¥500 
8 00 
49 23 
10 66 



Wood 

Dry Poplar Cdrdwbod, Sawed 
and Delivered; '$6,60 Per'^Cord. 
Dry Pole. Wood, ?4 Pervtoad, 
Delivered. ■; ' 

PHONE 8-F-218 

NESS BROS. 



Total 



¥1030 OS 



Petit Jn 



refundment on 
; refundment on 
refundment on 
refundment ' on 



All Home-Made 

Candies 

Now On Sale For Two Weeks 

WHOLESALE PRICES 

JANUARY 2 5th to FEBRUARY 8th 



ndment on taxes 

ndment on taxes 

erHon, refundment 

Tundment on taxes 
if, refundment on. 



refundment on . 

refundment on 

r, refundment on 

refundment on 

refundment on 

id, refundment on 

tfundiuent on taxes 

refundment on taxes 

ng, refundment on 

refundment on 

refundment on 

efundment on taxes 
undment on taxes 
undment on taxes 
i, refundment on 

Co. Bank, refund- 

es 

; Bank, refundment 

It, refundment ou 

refundment on 

i efundment iof taxes 
Co., , ref undmentjQU 

refundment an! 

refundment on; 

ifundhioiVt-on taxes''; 
tliiBic Co., refund-! 

xes ."......- 

ure Co., refund-; 



At to Co., refundment: 



To Whom Issued — ' 

For. what purpose. Amount. 

O. J. Valsvek, petit Juror Jan. i 

1021 terms court j $10 40 

Sever Anderson, petit juror Jan. i 

1021 term court . .-. ' 15 60' 

:WTO3i Mulry, petit Juror Jan, 

1921 term court : 24 20 

Fred, : Du Champ, petit Juror Jan. 

1921 term court 27 40 

Selnier N. Olson, petit juror Jan. • 

1021 term court ■; 27 20 

Gust Bergoen, petit Juror Jan. i 

1921 term court 24 80 

Henry S. Boletnd, petit juror ; 

Jan. 1921 term court '•■ 20 00 

Hans Wilson, petit juror Jun. . 

1021 terra court , . . . i 4 8b 

Tom Lfan,; petit juror Jan. 1921 ; 

term court 25 80 

Geo. Eastman, petit juror Jan, ! 

1021 term court \. i 4 00 

Frank I'rotz, petit juror Jan.' j 

8 92 1921 term court ."....'! 24 20 

G18 4G.C. A - Anderson, petit juror Jan. , 

02 1921 tqrm court j. 27 CO 

Joseph Kiel, petit juror Jan. 1921 [ 

term court ■ 27-40 

Soren Sorenson, petit juror Jan. j 

1921 term ' court ; ., 25 00 

Edwin Hanson, petit juror Jan. 

1921 term court 7 go 

P. 51. Carlson, petit juror Jan. 

1921 terni court -. . 24 20 

Carl EdBetb. petit juror Jan. 1921 '.. 

term court .' ; ' 2? 

Victor Johnson, petit juror Jan. . 

1921 term court \27 20 

James Cosgrove, petit Juror Jan. 

1921 term court 4 00 

Axel Crown, petit juror Jan. 1921 

term court - t 40 

John SJogyold, petit juror Jan, 

1921 term court 25 00 

Ordean Olson, petit Juror Jan. 

1921 term court- 4 80 

C. -M. Wilson, petit Juror Jan. 

1921 term court 24 20 

J. N. Huddleson. petit juror Jan. 

1921 term court i 26 80 

George Hanson, petit Juror Jan, 

1921 term court 25-20 

Lew^s Aaseby, petit juror Jan, 
1921 term court ............... 26 00 

H. A. Olson, petit juror Jan. 

1921 term court 4 so 

W. A. Bishop, petit juror Jan. 

1921 term court 24-20 

Iver Solheim, petit Juror June 

1921 term court 19 00 

BJergo Newton, petit juror June 

1921 term court 17 40 

Ole . Iavanson, petit juror June 

lO^l term court 10 40 

Ivar B. Hbwiek, petit Juror June 

1921 terin court 20 60 

Ed. Singer,, petit juror June 1021 

term court . .' 17 °0 

AndySmith, petit juror June*1921 

term court '....- 12 20 

Benuie Rdstad, petit juror June " 

1021-term court •- 2140 

H. P. Sunde, petit juror June 1921 

terjoi court 12 60 

kugejje. Tanner, petit juror . June 

1921' term, court 17 40 

Carl Anderson, petit juror June 
1921 'term court 21 60 



92 

f 

8 92 



8 02 

I 



3 So 
8 92 

■• I 
8 92. 

■ I 
8 92 

I 
23 83 
.1 
8 9i 

I 
892 

! 

3 92 
I 

8 92 
8 92 

■ 8 92 
I 

. 8 00 

1 ■ 

2 11 
I 

1J-10 
11 48 
28 79 
11 50 

4 19 
I 

22 90 

I 

159 as 

6 92 
I 
20 31 
> 81 

19*31 

50. 75 

.158 33 
' 013 10 

0) 28 

644 91 

31120 



SALE STARTS WEDNESDAY 

Salted peanuts two lbs. __._ _. 

.Cocoanut candy, now on at per lb 

Peanut Candy now on at per lb ;_„.. 

Peanut butter, now on at per lb. 

Sugar peanuts, now on at per lb— .._:_.._ 

Dry candy, now on at per lb .>. 



-15c 



Cocoanut squares, now on at per lb._ — _. 
Plain chocolate squares, now on at per lb... 
Chocolate nut squares now on at per lb — 1_ 
Mixed candy now on at per lb — _-; 



,_20c 
__25c 
_....15c 
.._..20c 
„..15c 
.....20c 
___20c 
25c 



10 00 

U 50 

20.4Q 

74 Ab 
5 33 

38 40 

8 50 

2 00 

7 50 

2 00 
90 37 

7 80 

8 00 
7 00 

3 00 
2 00 
7 50 

10 50 

2 00 
4 

28 80 

10 00 

6 00 



W. J. LaBree, posting Behool 

notices : 

W. J. LaBree, livery caBe or 

State vs. Gellette' •- 

W. J. LaBree, livery . case of 

State vs. Solberg' .'.; 

W". J. LaBree, livery caae of 

State vs. Moratocl ;-... 

W. J. LaBree, meals' for prisoners 
^Y. J.. LaBree, expense case of 

State vs. Morstad 

W, J. LaBree, expense case oft 

State vs.. Larson '....,.. 

John Java'nson, livery for sheriff 
\V. J. LaBree, sheriff expenses.. 
W. J. LaBree, livery case of 

State vs. Bjerkiie 

W. J. LaBree, livery case of 

t .State vs. Anderson .'. 

W. J. LaBree, livery case of 

State vs. Lovwaik 

W. J. LaBree, livery caBe of 

State vb. Kelly 

W. J. LaBree, expense case of 

State vs. Pigenshaw 

W. J. LaBree, livery case of 

State vs. Phlllon 

W. J. LaBree, expense case of 

I State vs. Stanley et al ." 

w. J. LaBree" livery case of 

State vs. Tildahl 

HanB C, Hanson, boarding pris- 
oners 

W. J. ■ LaBree, livery case of 

State vb. Voldness .......'. 

W.' J. LaBree, livery case of 

State vs. John Doe .'. . 

W. J. LaBree, livery caBe of 

State vs. Voldness 

W. J. LaBree, livery case of 

State vs. Abe Bost .3 

W. J. LaBree, livery case of 
State vs. Ole Mnttson 



11 50 
1 0» 

1 00 

2 00 

3 00- 

51 25 

30 90 
13 Ou 

2 Ou 

18 00 
7 00 
9 00 

18 20 
22 05 
15 0O 

19 0O 
2.00> 
7 20. 

3 00- 
9 00- 
3 0V 

10 00' 
5 00. 




Chocolate cream caramels now on at per lb- 
Hard French creams 'now>~on at per lb — :...-. 
Sing Sing chocolates now on at per lb.™___.^ 



..30c 
_4Qc 
_30c 
_35c 

Peppermints and wintergreens, now on at per lb-20c 

Fancy mixed chocolates now on at per lb — ! 40c 

OUR CANDIES AT WHOLESALE PRICES 

And all one lb. boxes 6f assorted chocolates at...._75c 
All one-half lb. assorted chocolates -at._ — ; 35c 

Guaranteed All l>ure or Your Money Back 
We Make Candy Fresh Every Day 



MINNESOTA CANDY 



THIEF RIVER .FALLS, MINNESOTA _J' v . 



Overblouse 

9868— 35c ,. 

Skirt 0873— 3Pc 



Costume 
9862— 35c 

^,.... B , dcontinu«'tormphasize 

the low walat-line. These smart frocks above and some of the new maldiirK capes 
and dresses, you will find Illustrated in , 

THE SPRING FASHION BOOK F *»"'-"-" 



STREET frocks for Spring show many versions of the tunic, a 



bru»ry Pattern 
Now On Salt- 



We Have a Large Line of 

Piece Goods 

Both in Cotton and 
Wool I Fabric^ 

which are going at a- very 
low *. price during this |ale. 
We are also maintaining 
the sale prices in all other 
| departments during Mar- 
ket Days. 

Do not let this opportunity pass 
to supply yourself with all the 
necessary wearing apparel at these 
^rock bottom prices. 

Remember Wednesday, Jan. 25 
is the Last Day 



OEN 

ERC, GO. 






'■ it 



S 







I- i 



% 



"\, 



1/ 




TUES DAY, JANUARY 24) 



Annual 



\4T 



T^ 



Financial Statement 

nued from Page Four) ■ 



W. .T. LaBr 
State vs. 



Bcbool not 



J. 

State vs. 
W. J. LaBre 

Cathelenean 
W. J. LaBrt 

State 
"\V. J. LaBrc 

State vs, 



Total 



1922 



Oif 



»e, \ivery case 

] ^red Martin . . .' 

W. J. LaBree, coat paid for re- 
pairing sb tea foe prisoners ••• ■' 
" ~~ laBree, livery, ease .. of 
Joheiipa .'..-,.. *.!.;-. ,, 
meals for DrlBon-, ' 



vr. J. 

State vs. 

W. J. LaBree, 
era 

W. J. LaBree, meals for prison- 
ers 

W. J. LaBrte, meals for prlson- 

W. J. LaBree, livery case of 

State vb. Vpk . 
\V. J. LaB ee, livery posting 



,0 6Q ; 



ces 



of 



W. J. LaBree, livery case 
State vs. Ited Lake Ice Co. 
LaBr ±e, livery case 

esselqulst et al .... 
livery of State vs. 



of 



expense 
C^din Aalby 

expense 
iiolby 



case of 



$050 12 



Reporting Births and Deaths. 

To Whom Issued — 

For What Purpose. Amount. 

H. A. Dahlen, town of Star. ?4 50 

Felix' Anderson, .town of Black 

Hiver ,-..\ l 25 

Harry Hawldnson, town of Bray 3 25 

town of Clover L«af 2 75 

town of Cliiver 



J. D. Gavin, 
C. M. Talle 

Leaf 

O. T. Lundui, town of Deer Park 
W. A. Swanson, town of Deer 

Park J 

Palmer Twelt, village of Good- 

r'dge .' 

Mcoly Urdajil, 

ridge 
Bj Bjornarai, 
H. I. Finsti 

ing ..... 

}l, M. Johnson, 

M. 0. Leary 

. John Tunnls 

Thoa. H. Bj 



town of Hickory 
town of Highland- 
town of Kratka 
town of Mayfleld.. 
s Jail, town of Norden 
._ _j;rke, town of -North 
John O. Ron ling, town of Nuihe- 

dal \.y. 

Naplln town of Polk Cent- 



er 
Frank Ilace, 
T. Morken, 
(Just Erlcks 

Falls 
P. Engelstad 
Mike Fricke 

la Ire 
O. O. Malan 
Albert .Lind; 



J. 31. Thelge, 

J. R. Larson 

Jacob Beide:man, 
River Falls 



' Total 



To Whom It sued— 



For \\ 
J. AL Scheie, 
E. H, "■ 
M. O. 



town of Good- 



town of Reiner 
town of Reiner .. 
ri, town of River 

town of Kocksburg 
, village of St. Hf- 

I, town of Sanders 
, town of Sanders' . . 
Thos. McCorjnlek, town of- Silver- 
ton .. 

town of Smiley ... 

town of Wyandotte 

city of Thief 



Assessor) 'Per Diem and Mileage, 



hat Purpose. - 

, Mileage- 

Besa isoii, mileage 
Seav< -y t mileage . . . 



C. O. Tange n, mileage 
Sever Nelson, mileage .... 
P. O. Peter jon, mileage 

Joe Kllan, mileage 

G. J. Nordl agen, mileage 
G. K. Haavi, mileage ..... 
M. .O'Leary, TriileagQ- ..;..'. 

Lewis Stens >th, mileage 

Harold Holipes, mileage 

Carl Johnson, mileage '. 
Emil Larson'; .mileagey.'. 
J. Ed. Johnsou, mileage 
Oscar Peterdon, mileage-. 
Ellas Peterson, mileage 
J. W. Denhart, mileage 
Enik Anderson, mileage 
F. T. Satre," mileage ... 
Ed. Kustan, aiileage .... 



Julius Olsoi 
Lars Backe, 



:enge 
mileage < . 



Ole Tharold ion, mileage 
Total ~1 . . 



's Feed, and Expenses. 

To Whom- I: isued — 

For What Purpose. Ai 

H. W. Froefclfch, .viewing body of 

Mrs. W. A. Seversou 

H. W. Froe illeh, viewing bodies 

of Hansui und Haatvet 

H. W. Froeljiich, viewing budy of 

George Rutz 

H. W. Fro italich viewing body 

of John A. Robert 

H. W. Frouhlieh, viewing body 

of -,Gulbra idaon 

H. W. Frojihllch, viewing body 



of Boyers oil 



of B. Carson 



ihlich, viewing body 



To Whom EBHueiP=: 



Fo: 



Hint Purpose-. 



John Naplim gopher bounty 
John Sohal d, gopher*' bounty,, , 
Edward- Mo :en, gvpher hounty . 
Ole Larson. . gopher- bounty. . . . 
Ole S. Bret laud, gopher bounty 
John Kapluv gopher -Jjonnty .... 
Charley Jonnson.^gopher bounty 

Ole Lafsonjl grfjjhrfr bounty 

Ole S. -Siet loii<i$.Agnpher bounty 
Inar Newnu a; goober bounty '... 
John Napll i, gopher bounty ... 
Ole S. Breeland,_ gophec bounty 



T, J. Skaa 
Ole Larson 



V" gopher hounty 
gopher bonnty 



Ole S. Breeland, gopher bounty 
C. It, Melin, i gopher bounty .... 
Clms. Johttt on, gopher- bounty .. 
Mike Frick :r. gopher bounty .. 
T. J. Skuni, .gopher- bounty .... 
Ole S. Bree and, gopher- bounty . 
J. G. Nnrdliiigeu, gopher: bounty . 



Ole Larson 
Ole S. Bre 



Charley Jo; inaon.- gopher bounty 



olm Schol 
Ole Lamm 
C. R. Na pi 
Oie Lar«oi' 
John Sjusv 



opher bonnty. 
gupher bounty ... 
. gopher bounty... 
gopher bounty ... 
ild, gopher bounty 



Total 



Expense b$- Member of Child Wei faro 
Board. 



Total 



Susaa Ka: 
Slim Bakli 
Anastnsla 

sion .. 
Tilda Tor*; 

sion . 
lianiiuh 

sion . 
Burt ha .M|nnt, 
Bertha U 



THE THIEF RIVER FALLS TRIBUNE' 



Page Five. 



50 
2 25 



4 50 

3 25 

3 25 
1 75 
4.75 

4 00 

1 00 

2 50 
1 50 
1 25 



3 25 

4 50 
1 50 



$120 75 



Amount. 
$5 30 
Q 50 
6 00 

6 70 
GO 

4 05 

5 85 
4 U0 

4 25 
00 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 50 
5 80 
5 00 
5 50 
5 50 
5 30 
4 50 
00 

13 00- 
4 00 

7 50 



¥5 85 



Mlnnriesdtu School for Deaf, care 
of Frank Herrlck et al !. 

Model' Steam Laundry,-, laundry 
work '. . . . i !• 

A. W. Brink, inspecting boiler. 1 . 
Farmers! and Merchants'' State 

Bank, (premium on bonds . .[. 

B. O. Sather, car load wood.... 

John Hanson, wood ' !■ 

Farmers! and Merchants' State 

Bauk, 'premium on bonds .-..[. 

N.- J. Anderson, recording bondB 

O.' H. Zeland, Appt. Red River 
ValleylDevelopment association 

Peter C.iWold, expense sb mem- 
ber Child Welfare board i.... 1 . 

S. T. JohnBon, postage • court 
commissioner • 

N. J. Ariderson, recording board 
deputy; clerk of court I 

N. J. Anderson, recording ,der 
crees ; * \ 

Edd Leej repairs on boiler ...L 

John E. Dahl, carpenter work . ; 

Winton-Nicbols Lbr. Co., door fo: 
court house • 

First National Bank; premium oi 
Insurance policy ...4 

Minnesota Highway Improvement 
association, Akyer operation. 

Adolf Eblund, preparing delin- 
quent tax list t 

N. J. Ariderson, recording bonds 

Hans Riistad, work on Jail ...L 

Einelia Olson, county aid I 

L. C. ii Neilson, appropriation 
memorial committee '. 

State Game and FiBh commis- 
sioner.jtrappers license .......L 

Ed. Lee, 1 plumbing and repairing 

Pennington County Agricultural 
association, appropriation for 
countyj fair I 

N. S. Anderson, recording bonds 

Minnesota School for Deaf, exi- 
pensecare of Rodman children 

A. Anderson & Son, repairing 
sidewalk .....i 

City of .Thief River Falls, cem- 
etery lot , ....'. 

L. A. Lampert, premium on ln|-. 
surance • 

Dr. P. L. ViBtaunet, medical aid 
Mrti. Jblmson L 

Elliot-Fisher Co., repair book 
niar-hinc * L 

Minnesota School for Feeble 
Minded' care of John Thorn..!. 

City Dray and Fuel Co., coal for 
courthouse use |. 

T. P. Anderson, hunters licenses 

L. D.'McAdams, repair work. .'J. 

Town of Norden, part expense 
contagious disease cases • • • • 

T